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M A G A Z I N Transforming Lives through ChristE Summer 2013

Healing Research Biochemistry Professor Luyai Seeks Cure for Schistosomiasis


contentsSummer2013

Photos by Alan Storey

Cover Photo by Alan Storey

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Biochemistry professor Dr. Anthony Luyai conducts research on Schistosomiasis and has purified two epitopes that help the body fight the disease. He discusses his research and his faith in God in this issue’s cover story.

inthespotlight The Incomparable Kennedy Sisters

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Michael Tothe (’95) serves as director of the Crowne Plaza Invitational Tournament, one of the PGA’s top tournaments.

Contributed Photo

Contributed Photo

Texans Kristina and Kaitlin Kennedy have taken Shorter’s music and theatre scene by storm.

Guardian of Tradition

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Departments 4 president’smessage 5 hillhappenings

• Purchase to Add Founder’s Home to Shorter Campus • Shorter Students ‘Stand for Freedom’ • Spotlight: Criminal Justice Program at Shorter • Emily Messer Tapped to Lead Enrollment Division • Ladies Society Leads Prayer Walk at Residence Hall • Cool Missions Experience: Iditarod Dog Sled Race

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• Brainy Hawks: Academic Honor Roll Results • At Last: Women’s Track Claims NCCAA Title • Our Time: OT Win Makes Hawks National Champs

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• Heritage on the Hill Photos • Class Notes & Obituaries

President | Dr. Donald V. Dowless Editor | Dr. Dawn Tolbert Contributing Writer | Dr. Courtney Cash Athletic News Writer | Matt Green Class Notes Writer | Wanda Taylor Contributing Photographers | Jenny Pilgrim (’14), Alan Storey, Dana Thompson, Loni J. Watkins (’11)

More than 540 members of the Class of 2013 were welcomed as Shorter University’s newest alumni during spring commencement. The ceremony was held Friday, May 3, at State Mutual Stadium. The featured speaker was Dr. Don Hattaway, senior pastor of Tabernacle Baptist Church in Cartersville and vice chairman of the Shorter University Board of Trustees.

Shorter University Magazine is produced by the Office of University Communications, Campus Box 27, 315 Shorter Ave., Rome, GA 30165. Alumni news or address changes may be sent to Alumni News, Office of University Advancement, Shorter University, 408 Shorter Ave., Rome, GA 30165; e-mailed to alumni@shorter.edu; or faxed to 706-291-5344. Comments or suggestions may be sent to the editor at dtolbert@shorter.edu or 706-291-5348. Shorter University Magazine is published twice annually.

Graduate Shares Message of Hope

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Dr. Jamie Roberts (’86), Carol Williams Kirby (’68), and Paul Bowley (’07) are the 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award winners.

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Jenny Pilgrim (’14) Photo from the 1948 Argo

Ieshea Hartwell offers hope for a better future through her work at the Agapé Christian Counseling Center she founded.

Distinguished Alumni


Photos by Dana Thompson

from the President

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n this issue of Shorter University Magazine, you will read the personal stories of those who help make Shorter the special place it is. Academic achievement, athletic prowess, and community service demonstrate ways in which lives have been transformed through Christ. I wish each of you could have been with us to celebrate the pinning service for our nursing seniors, which took place the day before our spring graduation. The photos on this page capture just a small taste of the pride and enthusiasm of that day. That spirit will continue this fall, as our Nursing School will have 93 students, a record number! The University is excited about its acquisition of the Thornwood property, a nine acre campus adjacent to the main campus. Thornwood was the home of Col. Alfred Shorter, the University’s namesake. The property contains several buildings and 20 classrooms, and this property will be used to continue our mission of providing quality, Christ-centered education. We are also happy to share with you the news that our athletic program produced another banner year. Men’s Basketball and Women’s Indoor Track both won National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA) national championships this spring, and Softball finished second nationally. In addition, Chad Warner was named Georgia Basketball Coaches Association Division II Coach of the Year –­ what a year! In conjunction with this success, we continue the process of becoming full members of the NCAA Division II, and our coaches and athletic staff continue to push for athletic as well as academic excellence for our students, many of whom were on the Gulf South Conference Academic Honor Roll. The NCCAA, of which Shorter is also a member, recently announced it would bring its football championship to Rome as well as its national track championships. We value the opportunity to partner with and showcase the Rome community. As we look toward a bright future, we bring a great heritage as a Christ-centered institution committed to biblical truth. Our mission challenges us each day to do our best for our students, which is evident in our commitment to small class sizes (15:1 student-to-faculty ratio) where qualified and dedicated faculty enjoy a mentoring relationship with their students. Thank you for your interest in and support of Shorter University and our students. With your support and prayers, the Lord will continue to accomplish great things on the Hill.

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RuthAnne Anderson, Darlington School

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Purchase to Add Founder’s Home to Shorter Campus

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n February, Shorter University announced that it had reached an agreement with Darlington School to purchase Thornwood, the historic home of Shorter’s benefactor Col. Alfred Shorter, and the adjacent nine acres. The property, which is located on the corner of Shorter Avenue and Horseleg Creek Road, has served as the Darlington Lower School campus. Completed in 1847, Thornwood was the home of Alfred and Martha Shorter and served as a private residence until 1958, when it became home to the Thornwood School for Girls. The Thornwood School was consolidated with Darlington School in 1973, and Darlington had owned the campus since that time. “We are excited about adding Col. and Mrs. Shorter’s home and the adjacent property to our campus,” said Shorter University President Dr. Don Dowless. “In the 1870s, the Shorters’ support was so crucial to the success of the college that the institution was renamed in their honor. We are proud that their legacy will live on in a new, tangible way and that our students, faculty, and staff will benefit from it. “The addition of the Thornwood property, which is adjacent to our main campus, will provide additional academic and athletic space that will enhance our campus community,” Dr. Dowless said. “This addition also increases our footprint along Shorter Avenue and gives us even more of a presence within the Rome community.” Shorter University Magazine

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Photos by Jenny Pilgrim (’14)

Shorter Students ‘Stand for Freedom’

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preading the word about modern-day slavery is a cause for which Shorter students are willing to stand. This spring, Shorter’s chapter of the International Justice Mission (IJM) organized an event that invited students to do just that. Students gathered in the Front Circle for a 27-hour Stand for Freedom event. Each hour represented one million individuals around the world who are living in slavery. (That’s nearly the population of the states of Georgia and Florida combined.) Stand for Freedom was part of a national initiative involving college students. Ana Martin, a member of Shorter’s IJM chapter said, “IJM is dedicated to bringing justice to the suffering and oppressed around the world, looking to Christ and His mercy as the ultimate cause and example for biblical justice.” Shorter’s Office of International Programs and Baptist Collegiate Ministries sponsored a companion event, “Stand for Freedom...The Day After,” which included a study on God’s Passion for Justice. Guest speakers were FBI Agent Adam Rowland, a human trafficking specialist, and Shorter alumnus Paul Bowley (’07), who serves as director of donor relations for Wellspring Living in Atlanta. Mr. Bowley’s presentation focused on what happens after victims are rescued and highlighted Wellspring’s work with victims of childhood trauma and sexual exploitation.

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Photos by Alan Storey

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Spotlight: Criminal Justice Program at Shorter “

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he first time I stepped into the women’s unit and the door closed behind me, I knew I was home.” That recollection is not about a summer camp or a girls’ school, but instead reflects on the experience Dr. Beverley Spitler had during her first day of work at a women’s prison, and it’s a passion she shares with students in the Criminal Justice program she now leads at Shorter. “Working in the Criminal Justice field in any of the three areas of police, courts, and corrections requires compassion and empathy,” Dr. Spitler said. “We are all created in the image of God, whether we like what we see or not. You have to have a calling to work with people. “The Criminal Justice Program at Shorter University strongly believes in Micah 6:8, which says ‘And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God,” Dr. Spitler added. “As Christians we have obligations to orphans, widows and the oppressed, but also to the incarcerated.” Dr. Spitler encourages her students to embrace the concept of restorative justice. “A lot of the individuals we work with have never had good role models, and they don’t have one right now. I’m not a push-over, and I don’t show sympathy, but I ask them – ‘what did you do?’ Until you come to terms with that, there is no way you can get

past this. Once these individuals begin to take responsibility for themselves, they can forgive themselves, then they can begin to be able to ask forgiveness from their families and victims.” Dr. Spitler leads Shorter’s Criminal Justice faculty, which consists of scholar-practitioners who teach from both an academic perspective and personal experience in the field. The Criminal Justice major is designed to open many opportunities for jobs on the federal, state, county and city levels and will give graduates a well-rounded, comprehensive study of the three areas of Criminal Justice – police, courts, and corrections – as well as supporting agencies. “While you do not have to have a four-year degree to be a police officer except at the federal level, many agencies are looking to promote individuals who do have four-year degrees,” said Dr. Spitler. “Some certification agencies are also giving preference to candidates who have or are pursuing a degree.” Shorter has offered a major in Criminal Justice through its traditional program since 2011 and will continue that program. Online degree programs were added this spring, making the major more accessible for adults returning to school. “Placing our Criminal Justice degree online provides an additional option to our existing traditional classroom

format and helps to meet the growing demand for such a program,” said Dr. Donald L. Martin, Jr., executive vice president and provost at Shorter. “Our highly qualified faculty have expertise and experience in a variety of areas within the field of Criminal Justice and view their work as a calling, not just a profession.” Individuals already working in the areas of police, courts, or corrections may qualify for academic credit based on professional experience. Peace officers who are certified by a state or Department of Corrections will receive 14 to 16 hours credit. “Coursework is closely related to the peace officers’ professional experience – allowing them to take the lessons learned back to their agency and improve their service,” Dr. Spitler added. The online programs in Criminal Justice are also ideal for active and former military personnel. Shorter offers a convenient, military-friendly education for military personnel who have spent or who are actively spending their lives serving and protecting our country. Shorter’s Online Programs also honor our troops by providing special benefits to each branch of the military, reservists, veterans, military spouses, and Department of Defense employees. For additional information on the Criminal Justice programs, contact Dr. Spitler at bspitler@shorter.edu or visit online.shorter.edu. Shorter University Magazine

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hillhappenings Emily Messer Tapped to Lead Enrollment Division

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mily Messer, who had served as Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Director of Student Life at Shorter since 2007, has been named Vice President for Enrollment Management at Shorter University. She serves as the senior administrator in Shorter’s Enrollment Management division and as a member of the President’s Council. In this role, Mrs. Messer leads the overall enrollment activities for the university. She manages the admissions staff and serves as the leader for implementing effective recruiting strategies and developing the university’s enrollment plans for all areas. “We are excited to have Mrs. Messer head our Enrollment Management team,” said Shorter University President Dr. Don Dowless. “Through her work in Student Affairs, she was responsible for planning and implementing our new student orientation – a crucial part of both our recruitment and retention efforts. She loves working with students

and has demonstrated a passion for Christian higher education and for Shorter’s mission of Transforming Lives through Christ.” Mrs. Messer earned the Bachelor of Arts in English with a minor in Spanish, magna cum laude, in 2005 and

the Master of Public Administration in education in 2007 from Jacksonville State University. She currently serves on the executive board of the Georgia College Personnel Association and received the Outstanding New Professional Award from that organization in 2009. She also serves as the State Coordinator for Georgia in the National Orientation Directors Association. Among many awards she has received, Mrs. Messer was presented with the Most Outstanding Intern Award by the National Orientation Directors Association. As an undergraduate, she was on the Executive Council of the Zeta Tau Alpha sorority, was SGA President, JSU Ambassador and orientation staff leader. Mrs. Messer is pursuing a doctorate in higher education administration at the University of Alabama. She was recently named 2012 Jacksonville State University Young Alumna of the Year. She and her husband, Chris, have a daughter, and they reside in Rome.

Grand Opening Held at Cobb Campus

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horter University held a grand opening for its Cobb Campus on Thursday, May 9. The new campus is located at 1090 Northchase Parkway in Marietta, in a corporate complex off of Delk Road and Powers Ferry Place near I-75. The Cobb Campus is home to the administrative offices for the College of Adult and Professional Programs as well as classes for students who previously attended the North Atlanta campus.

Photos by Mack Photography

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Photos by Loni J. Watkins (’11) and Dawn Tolbert

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Ladies Society Leads Prayer Walk at New Residence Hall

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he Shorter Ladies Society made its debut this summer by hosting a time of prayer and dedication at the new residence hall on May 20. More than two dozen faculty and staff members joined the Ladies Society’s leadership team for a prayer walk and, in keeping with Deuteronomy 6:9, wrote scripture verses on the walls, floors and door frames of the building. The Shorter Ladies Society is a Women’s Auxiliary Group that will be forming in the fall. The organization’s leadership team includes Mrs. Teresa Dowless (pictured above, second from left), wife of Shorter President Dr. Don Dowless; Mrs. Julie Martin, (pictured above, left) wife of Executive Vice President and Provost Dr. Donald “Skip” Martin, Jr.; Mrs. Hannah Epting, (pictured above, second from right) wife of Vice President for University Advancement Mr. Bert Epting; and Mrs. Becky Humphries, (pictured above, right) wife of Vice President of Student Affairs Mr. Corey Humphries.

“Write [the Lord’s commandments] on the doorframes of your houses and on your gates.” – Deuteronomy 6:9

Senior Susanna Polley Receives Prestigious Scholarship from Alpha Chi

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usanna Polley, a senior biology and piano performance major, was one of 10 students nationwide selected to receive the Alfred H. Nolle National Scholarship from Alpha Chi. A prestigious national academic honor society, Alpha Chi is open to the top 10 percent of juniors and seniors academically. A native of Lindale, Polley served as vice president of Shorter’s Alpha Chi chapter during the 2011-2012 academic year and as the organization’s secretary during 20122013. Shorter’s Alpha Chi National Honor Society Chapter was also recognized as a Star Chapter for

the third consecutive year in recognition of its academic and service accomplishments during 2011-2012. The award was presented at the 2013 Alpha Chi National Convention in Nashville. To earn the elite “Star” designation, chapters must send at least one sponsor and one student to the annual convention and at least one student must present during the event. In addition, chapters must host at least one scholarly program on campus during the academic year. This year, the officers chose to co-sponsor a poet’s visit and to offer a resume and interview workshop to graduating seniors. Shorter University Magazine

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One Cool Missions Experience: Iditarod Dog Sled Race 2013 Spring Break 2013 meant a lot of snow and an amazing adventure for a group of Shorter students who took part in a unique missions experience – working the Alaskan Iditarod Dog Sled Race. The trip was coordinated by Shorter’s Christian Studies Department and Baptist Collegiate Ministries group in partnership with GraceWorks Ministries. Dr. Alan Hix (’82), associate professor of Christian Studies, said the Shorter group (pictured at right) assisted with race set up, trail guarding and volunteer support during the Iditarod, all while making new friends in the name of Christ. In addition, the students volunteered at a homeless ministry in Anchorage and worked with children at a local Boys and Girls Club and senior adults at the Pioneer Senior Center.

Pianist Diane Turner Continues to Receive Accolades, Scholarships

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iane Turner, a piano performance and pedagogy major from McDonough was named “Outstanding Performer/Convention Recitalist” in the piano competition at the 2013 Georgia Music Teachers’ Association Auditions. “Known for her technical ability and deep musicianship, Diane is one of our finest piano students,” said Dr. Jerico Vasquez, artist in residence and assistant professor of music. “Being chosen as an outstanding performer and a recitalist for the Georgia Music Teachers’ convention is a great honor for her and for Shorter University’s Music Department.” Just weeks after earning the GMTA honor, Diane was named recipient of the Floride Dean Piano Scholarship from the Georgia Federation of Music Clubs, adding to the accolades she has won while attending Shorter University. As a

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freshman, she won the collegiate division of the Rome Symphony Orchestra’s (RSO) inaugural concerto competition. The RSO featured her in a 2011 performance in which she played the first movement of Mozart’s Piano Concerto in D minor. She was also the recipient of the Music Lovers Club of Rome Scholarship and was presented in a recital in February. In the fall of 2012, Turner won a Collegiate Scholarship presented by the Atlanta Steinway Society. She received the society’s 2012 Henry Mancini Trophy in honor of Kiki Van Meter. She was one of the performers featured in a recital at Peachtree Presbyterian Church, where she performed the second and third movements of Beethoven’s Sonata in C Major, Opus 53 “Waldstein,” Liszt’s Waldesrauschen, and Fantasia by Benjamin Lees.


hillhappenings Transition to NCAA Membership Continuing on Schedule

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he light at the end of the NCAA transition tunnel is truly getting brighter. That’s the optimistic feeling at Shorter University after the institution hosted the required twoday site visit by NCAA officials that will help determine if Shorter is on track to begin its third and final year toward becoming a full Division II member. “Based on the initial feedback, we are where we’re supposed to be,” Shorter Director of Athletics Bill Peterson said about the recent visit by the NCAA’s three-member delegation that evaluated if Shorter is integrating the policies, procedures and philosophies of Division II legislation into the institution. Shorter was tasked with the completion of an annual report and an update to the Institutional Self-Study Guide that was submitted before June 1. The NCAA Membership Committee is expected to meet in July to review all of the documents that Shorter submits and the results of the site visit to determine if Shorter is ready to begin its third and final year of the process as a provisional member.

Peterson said that the entire Shorter community has been a part of helping the university implement as much of the Division II legislation as possible over the past year. “From the President’s office on down, it has encompassed the entire institution,” he said about the process in which Shorter President Dr. Donald Dowless and every department has demonstrated involvement and commitment. Playing a huge role in making sure Shorter is on track, Peterson pointed out, have been three members of the Department of Athletics – Matt Green (Senior Associate Athletic Director for Compliance and Media Relations) and

Dr. Richard Cowan (Senior Associate Athletic Director for Compliance), who are tasked with making sure the university is in compliance with the NCAA guidelines, and Rachel Rogers, Shorter’s Senior Woman Administrator. “They took us through dress rehearsals and helped us to do what we needed to do to be ready for the visit,” Peterson said. “This was an opportunity to show that we were doing the things expected of an NCAA institution. From my perspective, I think we did a really good job.” Shorter, which began playing a full Gulf South Conference and Division II schedule in every sport during 2012-13, expects to begin the provisional period in the membership process after approval by the NCAA Membership Committee this summer. It will then be required to operate in full compliance with NCAA Division II legislation during the 2013-14 year. After the provisional year, the NCAA Membership Committee will again evaluate Shorter. If successful, Shorter would then been invited to become an active Division II member beginning Sept. 1, 2014.

Automax makes donation

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utomax Rent-A-Car of Rome has donated a Toyota Avalon to Shorter University for use by University President Dr. Don Dowless. “We at Shorter are grateful for the generous support of Automax,” Dr. Dowless said. “Automax, a family-owned operation, is proud of its status as a Christian-based company, and we appreciate their support of our mission to transform lives through Christ in the work we do with students. Their gift helps us do that.” Established in 1980 by R. Sherold Salmon Sr., Automax Rent-A-Car began with a fleet of five vehicles. Today, the company employs more than 20 people in three locations with a fleet of 200-plus cars, vans and buses.

Shorter University President Don Dowless (right) with Automax Vice President Corey Rhodes.

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Your support will help transform their lives. Shorter University has been offering a transformational experience for our students since 1873. The opportunities we provide are made possible through the generosity of our donors. As we strive to provide an engaging, Christ-centered learning environment, opportunities to support Shorter include:

• Serve as an ambassador for the University S hare your Shorter experience with prospective students and news from the Hill with our Shorter Family

• Financially support our Colleges & Schools Provides funding for scholarships and professorships College of Adult & Professional Programs College of Arts & Sciences Robert H. Ledbetter College of Business School of Education School of Fine & Performing Arts School of Nursing

• Financially support the Shorter Fund  rovides funding for student scholarships, operating dollars P for the University, and student engagement outside of the classroom

• Financially support Athletics J oin Hawk Nation or give to your favorite team

Thank you for your support of the Shorter Student Experience. Your impact on our students is very evident, and we are excited about what the Lord has in store for Shorter in the future. Please contact the Office of University Advancement (706-291-5343 or cjones@shorter.edu) if you would like to learn more about how to support Shorter University.

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athleticsnews

Brainy Hawks Shorter Leads Way in GSC Fall Academic Honor Roll

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horter University student-athletes accounted for 73 of the 515 members on the Gulf South Conference Fall 2012 Academic Honor Roll, which was released by the league offices during the spring semester. Shorter, in its first year as a member of the GSC, represented the largest number of Academic Honor Roll honorees among any school in the conference. In order to qualify for GSC Academic Honor Roll honors, a student-athlete must have played during the fall sports season and maintained at least a 3.00 cumulative grade point average. Shorter’s Football Hawks placed 25 student-athletes on the list, while women’s soccer saw 16 of its 23 players named to the honor roll. Volleyball also had more than 70 percent of its roster earn Academic Honor Roll accolades, with 13 of its 18 team members capturing honors. The men’s and women’s cross country programs combined to tally 13 honorees, and men’s soccer had six players named to the squad. Shorter added 10 more Academic Honor Roll honorees in April, when the men’s and women’s basketball teams combined to put 10 student-athletes on the league’s academic roster. The 83 total honorees representing Shorter had the highest number of honorees among all Gulf South Conference institutions heading into the spring season.

Shorter’s top 15 fall student-athletes, sorted by GPA, are as follows: Student-Athlete

GPA

Sport

Christopher Beno

4.00

Football

Katelyn Mullenix

4.00

Soccer

Hannah Turner

4.00 Cross Country

Taylor Wilkerson

4.00

Volleyball

Leslie Welch

3.97

Volleyball

Jessica Wright

3.97

Soccer

Megan Pepe

3.93

Volleyball

Loren Olive

3.90

Volleyball

Kelli Davis

3.89

Soccer

Kendall Dials

3.82

Football

Anna Graham

3.80

Volleyball

Kelsey Kirk

3.80

Volleyball

Sarah Jude

3.79

Cross Country

Katherine Stachula

3.77

Soccer

Mary Kate Lollar

3.76

Soccer

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At Last!

Women’s Track races to NCCAA National Title By Matt Green

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fter years of close calls, the Shorter University women’s track and field program finally has its national championship. The Lady Hawks’ national championship moment couldn’t have come in a more dramatic fashion. Sophomore Ayana Walker was part of four national championship performances, junior Lakeisha Spikes had a hand in three, and junior Shea Spicher posted a clutch national championship performance in the 3,000 meters as Shorter captured the 2013 NCCAA Women’s Indoor Track and Field National Championship in February. Shorter edged defending NAIA Indoor champ Azusa Pacific by 4.5 points to claim the title. The Lady Hawks scored 149 points when all was said and done, with Azusa mounting 144.5 for its runner-up finish. “It’s what they needed to get over the hump,” said Scott Byrd, Shorter’s director of track and field, who is also a three-time National Coach of the Year. “The women beat the same Azusa Pacific team that beat them last year. The girls were shocked. It reminded me of the

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first time the men won [the national championship]. We won that by four points as well and needed some clutch performances at the end to finish it out.” The title is the first for Shorter’s women, but the fourth overall national championship for Shorter’s track and field program within the last three years: Shorter’s men captured both the NAIA Indoor and Outdoor national crowns in 2011 before repeating as NAIA Outdoor champions last year. Now, after watching their male counterparts collect hardware regularly over the past couple seasons, Shorter’s women have taken center stage, and rightfully so after what amounted to a dominating performance in Marion. “You could see that something clicked with the girls when they realized that they could do it,” Byrd said. “They beat some quality D-II teams to win this championship.” The championship effort came on the shoulders of six individual national title performances and some monster individual acts by Walker, Spikes and Spicher.


athleticsnews Walker and Spikes began their national weekend by serving as members of Shorter’s 4x200 meter relay team, which won the team’s first individual title on Friday by winning the final in an NCCAA record 1:40.7. Walker, Spikes, Alexis Smith and Ashley Ballard won the event by more than two seconds and smashed the previous NCCAA record by more than seven seconds. Spikes set the tone for the Lady Hawks on Saturday by winning the 60 meter dash in a time of 7.73. Walker then stepped into the spotlight, putting together one of the most impressive 90 minutes in program history. Less than 30 minutes after finishing fifth in the 60 meter final, Walker stepped into the blocks for the 400 meter final and cruised to an individual national championship in NCCAA record time of 57.05. Less than an hour later, Walker toed the line for the 200 meter dash final and proceeded to win another championship, setting yet another NCCAA mark by winning the event in 25.22 seconds.

“I’ve never had an athlete do what Ayana did,” said Byrd. “I don’t know how she did it. We sat down and asked her if she really wanted to do this, and she told us that she would do whatever it took to help us win. It’s incredible and says so much about the type of athlete and person Ayana is. “Lakeisha has filled the role of captain beautifully and leads by example,” Byrd said of Spikes. “She has incredible range and to be able to lead off the 4x200, come back and win the 60, and then extend herself in the 4x400 is unbelievable. That is a tough triple to complete, much less win.” With the Lady Hawks toe-to-toe with Azusa Pacific after the 200 final, it was Spicher’s turn to get into the act. Spicher put Shorter in the driver’s seat for a team title by crossing the finish line in an NCCAA record time of 10:10.10, narrowly beating the event’s runner-up by .08 seconds to put the Lady Hawks up by 2.5 points over Azusa Pacific with one event remaining. “We were hoping that Shea could come in third, but we had no idea that she would [set a personal record] by nearly 20 seconds,” Byrd said. “It was a dagger. Azusa saw right there that it was over. Shea has come so far in just one year, and she is the best distance runner we’ve had since [five-time national champion] Justyna Mudy.” Shorter next needed to finish no more than one place behind Azusa in the 4x400 to become the national champions. Again, anchored by Walker and Spikes, Shorter’s relay team answered the call. This time, Walker, Spikes and Ballard teamed up with Daisy Helm to torch the final field by eight seconds and cross the tape in 3:50.15 – another NCCAA national record. The relay victory clinched the team title for the Lady Hawks, and while a celebration was in order, most of the women’s team could barely move after putting forth the physical exertion necessary to accomplish what seemed to be a long shot at the outset of the meet. “Shea’s performance really gave the 4x400 team the extra boost they needed to find the energy to compete,” Byrd said. “This was the first 4x400 team we’ve had win a national championship and that group had run an incredible amount of races. It wasn’t their best time, but it was by far their best performance.” In addition to Shorter’s national championship efforts, Ballard made a statement in the preliminary round of the 60 meter dash, where the Newnan native qualified for the United States National Team trials with a time of 7.68. Byrd added, “We have a great group of women and men, and we are blessed to have such a wonderful group of kids representing Shorter University. I am extremely proud of them.”

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Hawks use OT to become NCCAA National Champs By Matt Green

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alter Hill has made plenty of big shots during his career. The All-American has been one of several crucial pieces in the rise of Shorter’s men’s basketball program over the last three years. Arguably the biggest shot of Hill’s career helped propel the Hawks to the pinnacle of college basketball. Hill scored 13 points, including a three-pointer as time expired to send the game to overtime, and Shorter University captured its first men’s basketball national title with a 90-87 overtime victory over Oklahoma Christian in the final game of the NCCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championship. The Hawks (21-11) emerged from the tournament’s No. 5 seed to claim the title and capture that elusive national championship that Shorter came so close to winning just a season ago. “I am so happy for our team, for Shorter, and for Rome,” said Hawks’ head coach Chad Warner. “This group is so special. We prayed that we would give an effort that would glorify God, win or lose, and I hope we did that. This is just a great moment for Shorter Athletics.” Anthony Banks and Dedric Ware each scored 26 points for the Hawks, who trailed by as much as nine in the second half and had to overcome a six-point deficit with just 1:45 remaining to force overtime. Shorter trailed 77-74 with 13.7 seconds left when Hill missed a three-pointer from the top of the key and Ware misfired on a second attempt from long range after an offensive rebound. Kenny Leverette soared high to control Ware’s miss and tipped the ball out to Hill, who drilled his second chance from the wing as the buzzer sounded to send the game to an extra session. “What an incredible play,” Warner said of the final seconds. “Kenny got two offensive rebounds to give us the opportunity and Walt made an incredible shot. We were fortunate.”

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Photo by Loni J. Watkins (’11)

athleticsnews

In overtime, Shorter built a six-point lead on the shoulders of Banks, who had 11 of Shorter’s 13 points in OT. Oklahoma Christian (19-12) surged back in the final moments to trim Shorter’s lead to 90-87 on an Eric Randall three-pointer with 51.7 seconds left, and, after the Hawks missed two shots from in close on their ensuing possession, Hill made another game saving play, pinning Kendre Talley’s layup against the glass to preserve a three-point lead with eight seconds to play. Shorter missed a pair from the line that could have iced the game. As time expired, Oklahoma Christian’s Devan White saw his 30-foot heave bounce off the front of the rim, giving Shorter the win. This game was nothing like Shorter’s first two rounds of the tournament, when the Hawks surpassed 100 points. While Shorter’s first two opponents featured high scoring guards, Oklahoma Christian featured 6-foot, 10-inch All-American center Will Reinke, who came into the game averaging 19 points and 10 rebounds. Reinke finished with 20 points and nine boards on 8 of 11 shooting, but fouled out with 1:45 to go. Banks went to work on the Eagles after Reinke’s departure, scoring 14 points in the final 6:45 of the game, including overtime. “I will be lucky if I ever coach a player like Anthony Banks again,” said Warner. “He is the most consistent

competitor I have ever coached, and he is the best post player I have ever coached.” Leverette finished with 10 points, nine rebounds and seven assists for Shorter, which overcame a 16-for28 performance from the foul line. Hill made just 5 of 17 shots and only 2 of 10 from beyond the arc, but his second make of the game proved to be the biggest shot of his career and set up the Hawks’ victory in overtime. The Hawks never led in the first half as Oklahoma Christian built a 31-24 lead with 3:31 left until halftime behind a 7-2 run capped by a Reinke dunk. The Eagles led by eight at the 2:06 mark, but Shorter closed the half on a 5-0 run sparked by Banks’ steal and dunk to go into the locker room down 33-30. Shorter made just 2 of 7 from the foul line in the first period. Shorter took its first lead of the game, 34-33, on two Banks’ free throws 1:42 into the second half. “We always talk about having to overcome adversity,” said Warner. “I think this team epitomized it this year. I sure hope we can always build on the lessons we can learn from basketball that carry over to our lives.” Hill and Ware, who had seven rebounds and four steals, were named to the NCCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championship All-Tournament Team while Banks was named an NCCAA All-American and the Tournament Most Valuable Player.

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Healing Research Shorter Biochemistry Professor Dr. Anthony Luyai reflects on faith, science, & the greatness of God By Courtney Cash

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Photo by Alan Storey

r. Anthony Luyai has improved the lives of millions of people through scientific research. “I’m a Shisto guy,” he says with a confident tone and confirming smile – almost as if he was expressing affinity for a favorite sport or type of music. However, his casual admittance in no way belies the seriousness or significance of his chosen adversary. Schistosomiasis is a disease caused by parasitic worms. It affects more than 200 million people worldwide. Its highest prevalence and severity is in school-aged children in third world countries. The perpetrator of the disease is called a schistosome, and infection occurs when skin comes in contact with contaminated water and parasites invade the human body. The body reacts with fever, chills, cough and muscle aches. The symptoms can continue for years. Schistosomiasis has been very difficult for scientists to treat as the schistosomes are naturally protected by a layer of carbohydrates that antibodies have difficulty penetrating. Dr. Luyai has studied this problem for many years and in his research, has purified two specific epitopes. These antigens are recognized by the body and help instruct the immune system to create the correct antibody to fight Schistosomiasis. Dr. Luyai’s research helps to improve the lives of millions

of people and further medical advancements to eliminate this awful disease. Although these epitopes were known to exist, scientists had not previously known their potential benefits in diagnosing and treating parasitic diseases. It is this wealth of experience and knowledge that Dr. Luyai brings to the Shorter classroom. He joyfully shares all of it with his students: his science, his research, and his testimony.


coverstory Dr. Luyai has studied Schistosomiasis for many years and, in his research, has purified two specific epitopes which are recognized by the body and help instruct the immune system to create the correct antibody to fight the disease. His research helps improve the lives of millions of people and further medical advancements to eliminate this awful disease. It is this wealth of experience and knowledge that Dr. Luyai brings to the Shorter classroom.

Dr. Luyai is very clear about the distinct intersection of his faith and his profession. He emphatically states, “I see God in science; I see God in education.” Each semester Dr. Luyai challenges his Shorter students with his passionate faith. He implores them to examine any doubts they might have because of claims by secular sources that good science disproves the existence of a great God. Dr. Luyai speaks as a scientist. He is one of less than 2,000 glycobiologists in the world with extensive training in biochemistry, immunology, and the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. When he speaks of science and faith, he can discuss both with great knowledge and experience. He tells his students, “At this level (of science) I should be very corrupted. Yet, I am still believing. The more education I receive the more humbled I am - the more I see God. So for you, at your level, why are you worried about what you are learning about evolution or biology? Why do you doubt? If I can be a believer at this high level, then you can also be a believer at your level.” Dr. Luyai has the credentials to support this heartfelt challenge to his students. His scientific work in immunology and his discovery of improved diagnostic techniques with specific carbohydrate antigens has garnered attention from major pharmaceutical firms and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he currently serves as a Research Fellow. However, when referring to the levels he has achieved in the scientific community, he said, “I don’t gloat over it. It is God who made it possible. From the time I was a small boy barefoot in a Kenyan village to my time here as a professor at Shorter, God has been in it. “As I tell my students, God lives. He will order your steps. There are many times you may have to wait to hear His voice, but He will surely speak to you, as He has spoken to me so many times. I tell them they can be anything they want to be. Their only limitation is themselves. ”

It’s a claim that is difficult for any student to argue with when they consider the source and see the passion of Dr. Luyai as he proclaims the truth of personal experience. He explains, “I was born into a poor family in the small village of Lumakanda, Kenya. We were very poor. My father was a drunkard we did not see, and my mother cared for us and sent us to school.” “These (Shorter) students have shoes. They have books. Unlike where I came from, where there were so many limitations,” he says. Lumakanda is a small town just to the west of the Rift Valley. It is a hilly and rocky area where house plots are spread in the fields around the small town center. Families reside in mud brick huts with thatch roofs. A row of green leafy vegetables and for some families a cow, provide the sustenance necessary to feed children, extended family or local orphans. Poverty is common in the area, and there are few resources available to assist needy families. “Believe me, my brother, we used to share one textbook between seven students. We each got one day in the week to study. My first time to wear shoes was in high school, and it was also the first time I had my own bed. When I would go to sleep, I would grab my blanket tight and think ‘This is mine alone, no one else’s.’ “At that school they would ring a bell at meal time. Breakfast is ready. Dinner is ready. I thought to myself, they have given me everything, how could I not study!” The high school he attended was Alliance Boys High School in Nairobi. It was a prestigious school that young boys were invited to when they excelled in their studies and exams. With aspirations of becoming a veterinarian, Dr. Luyai worked hard, graduated and gained acceptance to Kenyatta University, where he would become interested in biochemistry. After university, Dr. Luyai taught at Nyeri Baptist High School and became a technician at the Kenyan International Livestock Research Institute. “It was at ILRI that I was Shorter University Magazine

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Dr. Anthony Luyai is an assistant professor of biochemistry at Shorter University and a research fellow for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He and his wife Susan live in Gwinnett with their three daughters and one son. Dr. Luyai’s faith and passion are infectious and spread to anyone he meets. In addition to his efforts to assist others through his research, he and his wife also provide scholarships for young Kenyan students so that they may receive a quality education and experience the same opportunities afforded him. Among these students is his niece, who is attending college to become a nurse.

introduced to microbiology, immunology and parasites,” he says. He also admits, “It was also at ILRI where I began to believe I could be more than a technician. Every day at lunch I would search the web looking for schools around the world where I could be accepted for a master’s degree.” He found one: Oklahoma State University. And, over the next few years, guided by God’s hands and ordained relationships, Dr. Luyai completed his master’s degree. He then followed his professor to Emory University and earned his Ph.D. in biochemistry. All the time, he was gaining more knowledge and experience about the diagnosis and prevention of one of the most prevalent and neglected parasitic diseases in the world. The opportunity to teach and invest above and beyond the subject matter was a big part of the reason Dr. Luyai was attracted to the opportunity to be on faculty at Shorter. “When I was looking for jobs and praying about the next step, I remembered my time at Nyeri Baptist High School and how I not only taught, but also ministered to the students. I wanted that opportunity. I saw that in Shorter,” he says. “I look at the students,” he says. “They are my reward. Their growth and learning. When they learn, I see a result.

They are transformed. Not in a big way, but in a small way. I believe I have planted a small seed that can one day grow to become a big tree.” He explains, “I tell them, ‘I started at a very low level. There is no way this man could have made it here without God. With the things that have happened in his life, and with all the things he has done, he is now your professor. If he is successful, you can be successful. If he is a believer, you can be a believer.’” Dr. Luyai’s desire to transform lives reaches far beyond the Shorter campus. “I want to give back to my people in Kenya. My goal is collaboration with African colleges and professors. We have the expertise here. They have the subjects and samples there. We can make structures here and test them in Africa, then bring African students here to meet our students and be exposed to our learning environments.” These are big dreams for a barefoot boy from a poor African village, but they are not too big for God. As Dr. Luyai said, “God lives. I can see Him everywhere. It is in the way He gave us all of the antibodies we needed before we ever had a disease. Please do not tell me that can just happen by chance. No way! The good God lives.”

For more information on Schistosomiasis and its effects on world health, visit http://whqlibdoc.who.int/trs/WHO_TRS_912.pdf

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The Incomparable

Kennedy By Courtney Cash

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t only takes a moment with Kaitlin and Kristina Kennedy to realize these sisters need no stage to entertain and enthrall you with their love for the arts and their passion for Jesus Christ. Kristina and Kaitlin are transplanted Texans with fiery red hair who have taken the Shorter theater and music scene by storm. They are dynamic personalities with exceptional talent and a quirky sense of humor they share. Kristina graduated in May with a degree in Musical Theatre; she was the first to make the leap from Houston to the Hill. “I was first introduced to Shorter at a college fair in Texas,” she says. “The Shorter booth was next to other arts schools like Julliard and Belmont. I liked that it was small and that it was a Christian school with an emphasis on the arts. “I made two visits to campus. On my second visit, I knew this was where God wanted me to be. Shorter is such a warm place, and they have always been so accommodating to out-of-state students.” Kaitlin, a rising junior Musical Theatre major, was a little more reluctant to make the move. “I started not wanting to come here because Kristina was here. I had gone through middle school and high school as ‘Kristina’s little sister.’ But, I applied anyway,” she says. Kristina chimes in, “I was praying hard that she would come.” It all changed quickly for Kaitlin. “There was just a day when I thought – I love Shorter,” she says.

inthespotlight

Sisters

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Kaitlin

The Kennedys

Kristina

Kristina Kennedy (pictured at right rehearsing for her senior recital) graduated in May and is embarking on a promising career in theater and the arts. She wowed audiences in such productions as Seussical the Musical and Pride and Prejudice. She is an astronomy enthusiast, who loves her “Jesus” walks and Reeses Peanut Butter Cups. Kaitlin Kennedy (pictured at left performing in The Ruby Sunrise) is preparing for her junior year at Shorter - her first on campus without her older sister. She has established her own very strong artistic reputation in Pride and Prejudice and as the lead in Ruby Sunrise. Happiness for her is Lindor Truffles and ‘daffy British period movies.’

When asked what it was like going to college together Kristina says, “Oh, it’s awesome! Growing up we fought a lot, but once we started doing theater together we became best friends. “Kaitlin actually got me into theater and dance,” she says. “I went with her to an audition as moral support. They looked at me and said they were doing another play and needed me for it. From there, I fell in love with it. Since then, we’ve been best friends.” Kaitlin agrees, “It means so much to be here with my sister. When I first got here, we were cast as sisters in Pride and Prejudice. It was so much fun – especially, since I was cast as Lydia, the sister who gets married first,” she says with a smile and nudge of her older sister. “We have this special chemistry on stage,” Kristina explains. “It’s very special. We work well together. We understand each other, and we get each other’s sense of humor. We even have our own 10-minute secret handshake we’ve been adding to since I was 12.” Kaitlin clarifies the claim, “Well, maybe not 10 minutes. It’s more like five, or maybe two.” When asked to demonstrate, the pair declined. After all, it is a secret handshake. As much as they enjoy the fun and the laughter, Kristina and Kaitlin also recognize the significance of this time. 22

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According to Kristina, reflecting on her four years at Shorter, “I know this is going to sound really cliché, but it is so true. I’ve grown so much musically, theatrically, and in my confidence. But also, I have grown spiritually. I’ve changed so much since my freshman year. Just the atmosphere at Shorter has caused me to draw closer to God. And, the closer to God I am, the better actor I become. It’s all connected.” Kaitlin echoes the thought. “Yes, I’ve grown a lot musically and in acting. But, what I love is being in an environment where there are others I can go to. I can go to my teachers as spiritual leaders, like our dance teacher Mrs. Shell Benjamin. We pray before we dance. I love that. The arts can be an environment without a lot of Christian influence. It is a blessing to be in a place we can talk about dance as worship. Working on our art and our faith together, that’s what I love.” “The environment here is so important,” says Kristina. “I would have been a totally different person and artist if I had not had the spiritual foundation of knowing who I am in Christ.” When asked for a specific example, she responded, “I would say it was when I had the opportunity to play the Cat in the Hat in Seussical the Musical. I’ve never gotten to play a role like

that because I’m normally cast as a romantic interest. I was so terrified, but going through rehearsals was really exciting.” “I remember opening night. I’ll never forget the feeling of not only getting the lines and technical things right, but I was also having fun on stage. It was the first time I just really ‘let go and let God.’ We are taught here to let everything be a prayer. And, I think that’s what Seussical was for me. It was a pure expression of joy.” With a nod of affirmation, Kaitlin expressed complete agreement with her sister. “In acting class, we talk about a character’s super objective: something they want for the entire play. One day in class we asked the question, ‘What is your life’s super objective?’ “I remember thinking I have no idea. Then, I realized my life’s super objective is to love God with all my heart, all my soul, and all my mind. I want to find a way to do that through art.” With the timing of a best friend and sister, Kristina continued, “You want to do something meaningful that moves people to action. I want to stand before God one day and hear him say I’ve done a good job. I’ve always said that I wanted to be as close to God as humanly possible without dying. And, I know art will flow out of that.”


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Guardian of Tradition By Courtney Cash

Michael Tothe

understands tradition. As the director of Crowne Plaza Invitational Tournament at Colonial Country Club, every day is a history lesson. From the Wall of Champions guarding the first tee to the statue of Ben Hogan keeping watch over the 18th green, Colonial is steeped in a grand golfing tradition. The Crowne Plaza Invitational Tournament at Colonial has been the site of majestic moments in golf. Legends such as Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, and Lee Trevino all won here. The great Ben Hogan called the course home and won the championship five times. In great respect to tradition and the game itself, the winner of the tournament is still awarded a Scottish Royal Tartan plaid jacket. In contrast to the historic links of Colonial, Michael is the fiery young phenom. Recently named by the Fort Worth Business Press as one of their “40 under 40,� Michael Tothe is a rising personality in the world of golf. After serving for four years as the Director of Sales for the famed Fort Worth tournament, Michael was named its director in 2011. Suddenly, the new guy was given charge of 64 years of history and one of the top tournaments on the PGA tour. Not too bad for a small-framed hockey player turned golfer from Limehouse, Ontario, Canada. Not too bad for a proud Shorter University graduate.

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inthespotlight

Michael Tothe (right), a 1995 graduate of Shorter, serves as director of the Crowne Plaza Invitational Tournament at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, one of the top tournaments on the PGA tour. Michael is pictured with two-time Crowne Plaza winner Zach Johnson, who claimed the Tartan jacket in both 2010 and 2012.

Before his rise through the ranks of the American Junior Golf Association, Michael was a high school golfer in Canada simply looking for a college home. “All my high school friends were talking about party schools in Canada,” he says. “I thought why not see if there is a place to play in the United States.’ I wrote to several hundred small universities and took it upon myself to send them my resume and golf accomplishments. “Then, my mom and I hopped in a car and set out to visit a few of them. We made it to Rome. We got to Shorter and drove up on the hill. You know, it was unique. You don’t see anything like that in Canada. I think I just knew the decision to go to Shorter was right. It was the right decision for me,” he says. Michael fondly remembers what it was like to make the move to a small school in a small southern town. “I think I was the only Canadian on campus,” he states proudly. “It seemed like everyone wanted to know about Canada. It was easy for me to make friends — many I still keep in touch with today. “Georgians and people in the south can be very warm and friendly. They really made me feel welcome. It was the warmth of the people and the charming confines of the campus. It was all very new. However, as I remember the people at Shorter, the professors, and my teammates, it was all pretty special.” As an aspiring student athlete at Shorter, Michael found the open doors to a tremendous career. After playing in a few tournaments with the American Junior Golf

Association, Michael was offered a summer internship. Then, before the end of his senior year, he was offered a full-time position. He would be working 80-90 hours a week for very little pay. However, as he recalls his reaction, “It was December. I had not even graduated, and I had a full-time job. It was amazing!” The world may look a little bit different in the lights of the big city and big-time PGA golf, but the journey is no less amazing to Michael who has great appreciation for his beginnings at Shorter and the many blessings he has experienced in the sport he loves. As a PGA tournament director, Michael describes the uniqueness of his position, “I guess there are only 45 of me – tournament directors. It’s a privilege to be in this role, and I don’t take it lightly. Every day is different. We deal with 132 players, 200-300 sponsors, and 1,500 different volunteers. I’m passionate about golf, and I love being around the game. But, if I could peg it, it’s really about the people.” There are many people in Michael’s life. Some of them are the wealthiest in the country, and others are some of the most famous athletes in the world. It should be difficult for him to keep perspective. However, Michael has learned to appreciate the relationship opportunities and take it all in stride. “Somehow when you link dollar signs with people you treat them differently. Look how much he is worth or he just won a million dollars. At the end of the day, they are still people – experts in their craft,” he explains. Make no mistake, money does have its place for

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A Sp e c i a l

In vi t a ti o n

Happy Anniversary to the following classes who will be celebrating a milestone reunion during

Homecoming 2013 on September 27-29 Michael. As much as he loves watching the leader walk the eighteenth fairway on the way to winning the championship trophy, there are many moments before and after the tournament that bring him an even greater sense of pride. Under Michael’s leadership, the Colonial has become one of the top five most charitable tournaments on the tour. Last year alone, the Crowne Plaza Invitational was responsible for more than $7 million in charitable donations. “We raise money for more than 70 local Tarrant County children’s charities,” he says. “Last year as a part of our efforts, we were able to present the Cook County Children’s Hospital with a check for two and a half million dollars. It was a very rewarding experience. It’s all been a rewarding experience.” It’s a long way from the manicured fairways of the Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas, to the Hill at Shorter University, but Michael does not allow distance to disconnect him from his college home. He is quick to share stories of professors who invested in him and mentors who guided him along the way. He stays in touch with friends from his time in Rome including Shorter Men’s Baseball Coach Matt Larry. In the same way he is now a part of the great Colonial tradition, he is also becoming a significant part of the grand Shorter tradition of business and athletic success. Michael Tothe and his wife Holly currently live in Fort Worth, Texas, with their 2-year-old daughter Remy. The Tothes are expecting their second child in October. In his second year as a PGA tournament director, Michael enjoys continuously learning from the game of golf and the people he encounters in the business. He also appreciates the opportunities he has to invest as a mentor in the many college interns and high school seniors associated annually with the Crowne Plaza Invitational.

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1938, 1943, 1948, 1953, 1958, 1963, 1968, 1973, 1978, 1983, 1988, 1993, 1998, 2003, 2008 If you are a member of a reunion class, please join us for Homecoming 2013. If you are interested in volunteering to organize your class event, please contact the Alumni Office by phone (706) 291-5339 or email alumni@shorter.edu.

Sa v e th e

Da t e


Graduate Shares Message of Hope through Christian Counseling Center

By Dawn Tolbert

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od has our best interests at heart. He has complete control, and we need to put our complete trust in Him.”

Those are the words that define Ieshea Hartwell’s approach to life; they also form the basis of the counseling she offers through her ministry, Agapé Christian Counseling Center in Austell. The purpose of the center, founded by Ieshea in 2012, is to “bring the pages of the Holy Bible to life by teaching others how to love themselves, how to restore faith in God, and how to hope for a better future.” Ieshea felt her call to Christian counseling as she was completing her Associate’s degree in Shorter’s College of Adult and Professional Programs. Her Shorter degree prepared her to succeed in pursuing her Bachelor’s degree in Human Resources Management and certification as a Christian Conquering Life’s Counselor. She is currently working toward a Master’s degree in Challenges with Love Clinical Christian Counseling. “Shorter helped to build the foundation for me,” Ieshea said. “I use the principles that I learned in the cohort model every day as I work. The team makes it work, and my experience at Shorter prepared me to do well in that environment.” Ieshea’s path has been an interesting one, often filled with challenges. The New Orleans native moved to Atlanta after having served in the United States Army and being stationed in Germany for three years. Now happily married to fellow Shorter graduate Earnest Hartwell III and the mother of four children, Ieshea says her background includes being the victim of domestic violence. Her difficult past and her longing for a normal life led her to God, and she now uses her Christian faith to help others overcome their obstacles. “Working with people is causing me to realize that everybody has their own problems,” Ieshea said. “We encourage them to seek answers not merely in themselves but in God who created and loves us.” Ieshea is quick to give God credit for the Agapé Center’s success. “When the initial idea for the center was revealed to me, I would write down ideas that seemed huge. I would think ‘I don’t know how to do that,’ but I would write it down anyway. As I look back, I see God did it. God is putting people around me who can help take the organization to the next level.” Shorter University Magazine

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2012 Distinguished Alumni Award Recipients

President Dr. Don Dowless congratulates the 2012 Distiguished Alumni Award winners. Dr. Jamison “Jamie” Roberts (’86) Distinguished Alumnus of the Year

Carol Williams Kirby (’68) Distinguished Service Award

Paul Bowley (’07) Distinguished Young Alumnus Award

Dr. Jamie Roberts received the Distinguished Alumnus of the Year Award., recognizing demonstrated outstanding professional achievement, public service, or accomplishment in service to the global community. Dr. Roberts has been a leader in the field of Pediatric Medicine in Newnan, Ga., and around the world through his volunteering to serve through the International Mission Board. Jamie has set the example of a Baptist leader in the field of Medicine. He is a minister to all his patients and their families. He always credits his success in medicine and ministry to the foundation that was formed during his four years at Shorter. The Augusta native graduated from Curtis Baptist High School and earned a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Shorter. He attended the Medical College of Georgia and completed a pediatric residency at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He served one year as chief resident in pediatrics at Vanderbilt. In 1994, he moved to Newnan, where he continues to practice pediatrics with Piedmont Physicians Pediatrics at Thomas Crossroads. He has two sons, Trevor (14) and Thomas (12), and is an active member of Crossroads Church.

Carol Williams Kirby received the Distinguished Service Award, which recognizes an alumnus or alumna who has given outstanding service to the university in leadership, volunteerism, on-campus service, recruiting efforts or financial support. Ms. Kirby served as director of alumni relations at Shorter for seven years, a portion of which she also served a dual role as senior advancement officer. She left Shorter to become a ministry ambassador at In Touch Ministries, the global broadcast and print ministry of Dr. Charles Stanley. She serves as ministry ambassador to the Mid-Atlantic Territory. Ms. Kirby graduated from Shorter with a Bachelor of Music Education degree, having studied under Elizabeth Buday and Dr. John Ramsaur, and was a charter member of the Shorter Chorale, under the direction of Dr. Jerry Warren. She later earned a Master of Music degree from Georgia State University and began 27 years of service as director of music ministries in Baptist churches in Gwinnett and Walton counties. Carol was married to the late William R. Kirby Jr. and has two grown children, Ross and Meredith, and five grandchildren.

Paul Bowley received the Distinguished Young Alumni Award. This award honors a Shorter graduate from the past 15 years who has shown promise through his or her professional achievement, community service and/ or dedication to the university and who embraces the Shorter University mission. Mr. Bowley and his wife, Lindsay, are very passionate about the work of Wellspring Living, a nonprofit that directly addresses the needs of victims of sexual abuse and exploitation. Mr. Bowley volunteered with Wellspring Living from its inception until 2009, when he left a career in sales to work full time with the organization in marketing and fundraising. His passion for the organization stems from witnessing first-hand powerful life-change in those Wellspring Living serves. Mr. Bowley graduated from Shorter in 2007 with a Bachelor of Music degree. He lives with his wife, Lindsay, in Woodstock. They attend First Baptist Church of Woodstock, where they teach the college Sunday School class.

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familyconnections

alumni news

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The familyconnections section of Shorter University Magazine celebrates the Shorter family by sharing YOUR life stories with the extended Shorter family. Send us information about marriages, births, career accomplishments and family updates. [Our policy is to not print announcements about engagements or babies who are on the way.] Alumni news items are edited for style and content. To add your news to familyconnections in an upcoming issue mail news and photos to: Shorter University, Office of University Advancement, 408 Shorter Ave., Rome, GA 30165 or e-mail it to alumni@shorter.edu.

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1940s Montine Curles Joiner (’50) announces the birth of her greatgrandson, Peyton John Fetchik, on Jan. 3, 2013. He is the son of Montine’s granddaughter and grandson-in-law, Andrea and John Fetchik. Bobbeth Stroop Hawkins (’53) and her husband, John, still travel in a recreational vehicle across the United States working at various Christian ministries. Their group is called S.O.W.E.R.S. (Servants on Wheels Ever Ready). This past Thanksgiving, the entire Hawkins family rented a condominium in Orlando and celebrated Christmas 2012 by taking the three greatgranddaughters to Disney.

Carol Williams Kirby (’68) is pictured above with her grandchildren: first row (left to right) Micah Cordle, Carol Williams Kirby, Averie Kirby, Will Kirby; and second row (left to right): Malachi Cordle, Emma Kirby. Parents are Brandon and Meredith Cordle and Ross and Jennifer Kirby.

Eugenia Meadows Gilbert (’56) and her husband, Brigadier General Wendell Gilbert, have settled in Clarkesville, Tenn., upon his retirement from the U.S. Army.

James Harvey “Jim” Brotherton (’63) retired after 37 years of service with Northwest Airlines. He is organist-choir director for a small church on Sunday mornings and directs a “Singing Seniors” choir of 40 members at his home church, Winter Park First Baptist. He is also a member of the Fab Follies, a senior’s singing and dancing group that perform throughout Central Florida. He also plays the piano on weekends at a private supper club in the area.

Van Jacobs (’67) has retired from Cobb County Schools after 26 years of service. He has been inducted into the North Cobb Sports Hall of Fame as a coach with over 200 basketball wins, tennis and golf state champions and boys’ and girls’ golf and tennis teams which went to state playoffs several times. Benjamin Claxton, son of Nancy Jenkins Claxton (’71), has retired from the NFL and is attending law school at Mississippi State.

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Greetings, Shorter Alumni!

A

s a member of the Shorter University Alumni Association, you are invited to take advantage of the many opportunities to stay involved in the life of Shorter. Here are a few ways to remain an active member of the Shorter Family: • Remember Shorter in your prayers. • Keep us informed about your life changes. Send us your address when it changes, career and personal achievements, and marriages, births, etc. You may send your changes to alumni@shorter.edu. • Recommend Shorter to others. Share the Shorter experience with your friends and other prospective students. • Attend Alumni Association events. Take part in activities planned in your area and take a fellow Hawk with you. Also, be sure to attend Homecoming annually and celebrate being home on the Hill! • Support Shorter financially. Every gift makes a difference. Begin your legacy with an annual gift to Shorter. Use the gift envelope in the magazine to honor a faculty or staff member who was instrumental in your Shorter experience! For additional ways to stay involved in the life of Shorter University, visit www. shorter.edu/advancement/get_involved.html. Your Alumni Governing Board is fully invested in making this a memorable year of engaging opportunities. I am honored to work closely with this group of dedicated alumni. I look forward to meeting you and will continually strive to make your alumni experience transformational through Christ. Blessings,

Sheri H. Ransome Director of Alumni Relations & Annual Giving 30

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Lamar Wright (’74) was recently inducted into the Rome-Floyd Parks and Recreation Authority’s Hall of Fame. Lamar started his baseball career pitching for Pepperell High School and was on the State Championship team in 1970. He pitched one perfect game in regionals and one nohitter in the semi-finals. In college, Lamar was a three-time All-GIAC and District 25 selection in baseball. He holds Shorter’s all-time career win mark with 45 while he lost just eight games during his career. A two-time All-Area 5 pick, he posted 500 career strikeouts to lead all Shorter players and led the NAIA with 172 strikeouts in 1974, when he was named an NAIA All American. His teams won the 1971, 1973, and 1974 conference championships and won the 1974 District 25 title. After Lamar left Shorter to go pro, Coach Hamp Alexander said Shorter was attempting to sign two pitchers, just to replace Lamar. Wright was drafted by the California Angels and ultimately reached the AAA level; in 1975, his total of 43 appearances was third best in the farm system. In 1975, he played Winter League in Mexico and had a 13-3, ERA 1.39 record. In 1976, he was selected to play in the Caribbean World Series. Owner of the Lamar Wright All State Insurance agency, he has been an active businessman in the Rome community. He coached youth baseball for 16 years and, in 2002, became the first baseball player inducted into the Shorter College Athletic Hall of Fame. Lamar is pictured above with Shorter teammates Brenton Perry (’75) and Darrell Black (’75). Rodney Davis (’79) published his first novel, The Revelation Voyage through Authorhouse Publishing in 2010. It is available on Amazon. com. The science fiction book has a faith-based message and was born out of a desire to find literature based on faith in Christ but with a bent to the future and science fiction in general. He has since completed numerous screenplays and is currently working on The Revelation Planet as well as some nonfiction works. The Rev. David Howard (’82) served as Chaplain of the Day on Thursday, March 28, in the Georgia State Senate. The Rome native serves as Minister of Education at First Baptist Bremen. After graduating from Shorter, he earned degrees from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He is a former

Stephen Henning (’88) and his family are pictured skiing in the French Alps. Stephen is employed with BASF, and he and his family are on delegation in the United Kingdom. trustee of Shorter College who served eight years as a missionary to Brazil with the International Mission Board. David and his wife, Sylvia, have one son, John Michael.


familyconnections counseling and guidance for those who have suffered the trauma of childhood sexual abuse. It works to educate through public speaking and collaborates with other groups to raise awareness and expose sexual predators’ methods. Dwahn Turner (’93, MBA ’09) has been assigned as pastor of a church in Jackson, Ga. Roy McArthur Locklear III (’95) has been employed as an electrician with Oglethorpe Power/Rocky Mountain Project in the Rome area. Michael Tothe (’95) has been named tournament director for the PGA Crowne Plaza Invitational Golf Tournament at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas. The Honorable C. Jean Bolin (’77), front row, third from left, was recently appointed to the McIntosh County State Court judgeship by Governor Nathan Deal (front row, center). Also pictured are the Honorable J. David Miller (’77), district attorney for Georgia’s Southern Judicial Circuit (to the governor’s left) and David Spradlin (’77) (to Mr. Miller’s left). Dr. Mark A. Williams (’82) has been named surgeon in chief for Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. Jon Herrin (’88) and his wife, Jeanne, are both working at South Texas College. Jon works with the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment and teaches one course per semester. Jeanne is teaching ESL for the Department of Continuing Education. The family resides in the Rio Grande Valley. Steve Smith (’92) has been named Executive Director of Enrollment for the College of Adult and Professional Programs at Shorter University. He has worked for the CAPP program since January 2012. Steve has more than 20 years’ experience in sales, consulting, business development and product/project management in the tax accounting and professional tax software industry. He and wife, Cheryl Childress Smith (’91), and family reside in Gainesville.

Martha Tudor (’92) is celebrating the birth of a new great-granddaughter, Vada Wren Brooks, on Oct. 30, 2012. Vada is the daughter of Timothy and Kenya Brooks. David Pittman (’93) is the executive director of “Together We Heal,” an organization whose purpose is to provide

Cliff Brooks (’99) published his first anthology, The Draw of Broken Eyes and Whirling Metaphysics, in April 2012. The work was published by John Goslee Books and has sold out of four printings. As noted by Amazon.com, this work was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and Georgia Author of the Year as well as a Pushcart Prize nominee. Selena Campbell (’05) is a medical lab instructor at Dalton State College. Veronica Parker (’05, MBA ’07) announces the birth of her son, Evan, on June 7, 2012.

Classmates from the Class of 1990 met recently to laugh together and reminisce about their time together on the Hill. The group included (left to right): Christi Bass Sims, April Tillman Sellers, Kristi Avery Jones, Lisa Howell Nelson, and LaDonna Rabern Turrentine (’89), who was their Ep Sig president. Not pictured but attending were Lara Payne Welsh (’90) and Julie Kown Morris (’91).

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familyconnections

Heritage on the Hill Generations of Shorter Friendships

Photo

s by J

enny P

ilgrim

(’14)


Guests attending Heritage on the Hill included the Rev. James Sanders (’53), Shorter’s first male graduate. He earned the Master of Divinity from the Candler School of Theology at Emory University and has 58 years of service to the United Methodist Church. James and his wife, Janice, live in Decatur, Ga. He recently shared his reflections on his days at Shorter and lessons for today’s students. What is your fondest memory of your Shorter experience? I was married and serving two churches out from town as a student pastor during my undergraduate years at Shorter so I wasn’t incredibly involved in student activities. My fondest memories are of the classes I attended. My history professor, Dr. Kellogg, taught with such passion that you felt as though you had the historical experiences personally. Dr. Grant, my religion professor, was a big help as I prepared to enter seminary. I am appreciative for the opportunity to grow and learn at Shorter College. What did you enjoy most about being back on the Hill for our spring Alumni Weekend? The growth of Shorter University is just amazing! I enjoyed seeing the new facilities and opportunities provided to the current students. What words of wisdom do you have to share with the current Shorter students? Be aware of the outstanding opportunities you currently have at Shorter and take advantage of them.


familyconnections

Amber Priest Hiatt (’08) and her husband, Christopher, announce the birth of their son, Benjamin Thomas, on Sept. 2, 2012.

Dr. Pamela Floyd (’98) and Rickey Walker were married in Decatur, Ga., on March 31, 2012. The wedding was officiated by Dr. Robert H. Darville III and nuptial music provided by Christopher Blanton (’98). The couple resides in Atlanta, where Pamela is a middle school counselor and Rickey is a mechanical engineer. Kenna Stock (MBA, ’07) has been named executive director of the Harbin Clinic. She joined Harbin Clinic in 1999 as director of the business office and was promoted to chief operating officer in 2001. Debbie Galloway (’08) has been named as a new sales coordinator with the Greater Rome Convention and Visitors Bureau. Timothy A. Sullivan (’08) has retired from Dekalb County Fire and Rescue and has opened a new business, Sullivan Resource Solutions. Services include grant preparation and technical specification development for public safety agencies.

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John Robert Parham (’10) and Heather Susanne Stephens were married on Sept. 15, 2012. Dr. Robert Darville performed the ceremony. John was previously a manager with Chick-Fil-A, but is currently working with the youth staff at Perimeter Church, training to be a youth minister. Heather is employed at Agco Finance as a bilingual sales representative. The couple resides in Duluth. Meosha Smith (’10) was promoted to Superintendent at Macon Transitional Center in Macon.

Andrew Schrampfer (’08, MBA ’10) and Mallory Jones Schrampfer (MBA ’11), announce the birth of their son, Hudson James Schrampfer, on Dec. 26, 2012. Andrew was an inaugural member of the Shorter Hawks football team and went on to coach as a graduate assistant. Mallory was director of special events at Shorter from 2009 to 2011. Andrew is the Southeastern Territory manager for Detroit Forming, Inc., and Mallory works for Harry Norman, Realtors. They reside in Marietta. Blake Terrell (’09) and Stefanie Mattingly were married Dec. 12, 2012, on the Hawaiian island of Kauai. Blake was a member of the Shorter Hawks football team from 2005 to 2008. He works for the United States Army Security Assistance Command on Redstone Arsenal as a Country Program Manager conducting Foreign Military Sales for our nation’s allies across the globe. Stefanie is currently employed by the Department of Defense working at the Defense Contract Managing Agency as a Senior Program Analyst in Finance/ Earned Value Management. She also served in the United States Air Force from 2002 to 2008 as a Command and Control Weapons Director. The couple currently resides in Huntsville, Ala.


With Deepest Sympathy Shorter University extends heartfelt sympathy to the families and friends of the following alumni and friends. Margaret “Bitsy” Simms Copeland (’35) died April 7, 2013. Elizabeth Williams (’37) died Oct. 31, 2012. Patricia Bradley Flynt (’39) died Jan. 15, 2013 Virginia Hutson Redding Schimmel (’43) died April 5, 2013. Meriamme Rhodes “Dustie” Avent (’45) died April 3, 2013. Molly Young Suddeth Tolleson (’45) died Jan. 4, 2013. Virginia Carolyn Ballard Moore (’46) died Nov. 23, 2012. Betty Jane Epps Painter (’46) died Jan. 1, 2013. Ruth Gragg Early (’47) died Jan. 8, 2013. Dorothy “Dot” Perryman (’42) died Dec. 2, 2012. Sara Nell Cooley Reeve (’43) died April 15, 2013. She was the aunt of Anne Reeve Fowler (’78) and the greatgreat-great niece of Alfred E. Shorter. Charlotte Monk Jenkins (’46) died Jan. 2, 2013. Marian Ford Downey (’54) died Dec. 30, 2012. Patricia Weeks Wilchester (’58) died May 2, 2011.

Richard Bowman (’59) died Feb. 22, 2012. Martha Ruth Sanders Fussell (’69) died Sept. 18, 2011. Charles Potts Underwood (’70) died April 17, 2013. Thomas Johnson (’71) died April 26, 2013. Loretta Porter Brown (’71) died April 13, 2013. James Gilbert Purvis, Jr. (’71) died Nov. 28, 2012. Robert E. Turpin (’72) died Jan. 12, 2013. Gregory Williams (’78) died March 8, 2012. Rev. Michael Wayne Baker (’79) died March 12, 2013. Frances Pledger Bowling (’80) died Oct. 31, 2012. Patrick G. Robinson (’98) died March 13, 2013. Richard Vance Dunn (’00) died Jan. 28, 2013. Glenn A. Riley (’01) died April 18, 2013. Andre Adelard Blanchard (MBA ’05) died Jan. 12, 2012. Genet Heery Baron, who served as a Shorter College Trustee from 1993 to 1998, died Feb. 8, 2013.

Shorter University offers sincere condolences to the following alumni and friends on the death of their loved ones. Jane Betts Higgins (’42) on the death of her son, Ernest Whatley “Ernie” Higgins, Jr., on Dec. 25, 2012. Ernie was also the nephew of Anne Betts Coxhead (’43). Rev. Horace Sheffield (’64) on the death of his wife, Bernice, on June 12, 2012. Patricia Whitehead Underwood (’73) on the death of her husband, Charles Potts Underwood (’70). Ken Kizziah (’74) on the death of his mother, Sara Kizziah, on Nov. 23, 2012. Ginger Hicks Alexander (’79) on the death of her mother, Elizabeth Hicks, on March 31, 2013. Mrs. Hicks served as secretary to President Randall Minor. Terry Raine Storey (’80) on the death of her father, Theodore “Ted” Raine, Jr., on Dec. 11, 2012. Julie Woods Byers (’85) on the death of her father, David Lee Woods, on Nov. 21, 2013. Dr. Stephen Ford Worsham (’86) on the death of his mother, Marian Ford Worsham Downey (’54), on Dec. 30, 2012. Janie Faron Blanchard (’07) on the death of her husband, Andre Adelard Blanchard (MBA ’05), on Jan. 12, 2012.

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Transforming Lives through Christ 315 Shorter Ave., Rome, GA 30165

Homecoming 2013 - September 27-28 Make plans now to join the Shorter Family for Homecoming 2013. Highlights include: • An Anniversary Reception honoring reunion classes ending in 3 & 8 • The Festival in the Front Circle • Alumni Association meeting • A ceremony honoring the 2012 & 2013 Distinguished Alumni

• Alumni athletic team reunions • Anniversary class reunion celebrations • The Shorter Family Tailgate • Cheering on the Hawks as they take on West Georgia

Additional details will be posted at www.shorter.edu/advancement under “News and Events.”

Sa v e th e

Da t e

Shorter University Magazine - Summer 2013  
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