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A PublicAtion of the times

NEW HOPE FOR

CANCER PATIENTS Innovative Therapies & Solutions in Northwest Indiana

ALSO

PATRICIA ROSS of Crown Point is beating lung cancer. A non-smoker, she was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2005. The American Cancer Society expects that 10 to 15 percent of lung cancers diagnosed this year will occur in non-smokers. 1 | PRODUCT

Benefits of saffron Year-round skin protection SPECIAL SPINE CARE SECTION: Better health, shorter recovery NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012 NWI.COM/GETHEALTHY


your life. better.

Imagine a patient-centered hospital. You can stop imagining now. The new Porter Regional Hospital is now open and you can give yourself a pat on the back, because you played a key role in its design. From the start, we envisioned it from a patient’s perspective and built it around the things that are most important to you. • • • • • • •

Respect for your privacy, with private registration areas, all private patient rooms, and private recovery rooms for surgery patients An innovative design that streamlines lifesaving and complex care Quick connection with your nurse and the nurses’ station Advanced medical and communications technology Spacious, comfortable waiting rooms An E.R. designed for faster attention Free valet parking

To find out more about the hospital built just for you, visit www.PorterHealth.com/MyNewHospital today.

85 East U.S. Highway 6, Valparaiso, IN

Porter Regional Hospital is directly or indirectly owned by a partnership that proudly includes physician owners, including certain members of the hospital’s medical staff.


I Chose Methodist At Methodist Hospitals, I use the latest weight-loss surgery advancements to deliver long-term weight management solutions that improve the quality of my patients’ lives. James Siatras, DO Bariatric Surgeon

Weight Loss Surgery Can Change Your Life Obesity is more than just being overweight. For many, it is a threat to physical and psycho-social health, increasing the risk of diabetes, high blood pressure and sleep apnea. But you can have the life you want. At the Northwest Indiana Center for Bariatric Surgery, we can help our patients change their lives through minimally invasive weight-loss surgery. In fact, Methodist Hospitals has helped more than 1,000 people achieve a healthier life through bariatric surgery - more than any other Northwest Indiana hospital. Our comprehensive program is designed for success, and our dedicated staff, led by Dr. James Siatras, is with you every step of the way.

Is Weight Loss Surgery Right For You?

Attend a FREE informational Seminar to learn how weight loss surgery can help you reclaim your life and restore your life. Northwest Indiana Center for Bariatric Surgery Methodist Hospitals • Southlake Campus • Pavilion A 101 E. 87th Ave., Suite 430, Merrillville SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 10:00 a.m. ThURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 6:00 p.m. Make your reservation today. Seating is limited.

1-888-909-DOCS (3627). NORTHLAKE CAMPUS

MIDLAKE CAMPUS

SOUTHLAKE CAMPUS november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 1


november/december 2012

14

NEW HOPE FOR CANCER PATIENTS

The healing power of sound and an ancient compound from the turmeric root are only two new therapies available for treating the modern malady.

20

SPINE CARE SOLUTIONS

The latest in spine care includes ounces of prevention and shorter recovery on those pounds of cure. survivor spotlight

on your mind

the body shop

food & fitness

senior scope

aging parents:

family

Are your aging parents taking care of themselves? Here’s a guide to gauging when your elderly parents need help:

By Vanessa Renderman

HEALTHY PRODUCTS SALTY DRINK DUBBED ‘IV IN A BOTTLE’ Described as “an IV in a bottle,” a drink called BANa helps prevent dehydration and severely reduce nausea. Created by Charleston-based emergency room physician Dr. Benjamin Yoo, BANa provides four times the amount of salt as other sports drinks, but with no calories or sugar. BANa was developed with the idea that a beverage drink similar to an IV bag would produce the maximum rehydration property needed for optimal revitalization. BANa is available for children and adults in packs of four (for $9.96) or 12 (for $27) plus shipping and handling and can be purchased online at banadrink.com.

St. Clare Health Clinic is seeking donations for its food pantry. Needed are nonperishable food items, paper goods including toilet paper, laundry detergent, and personal care products such as deodorant, shampoo and soap. The clinic, which is under the auspices of Franciscan St. Anthony Health in Crown Point, provides free primary health care for residents of Northwest Indiana who fall within established income guidelines, are uninsured and are not eligible for government assistance. Donations may be brought to the clinic, 1121 South Indiana Avenue, between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Franciscan St. Anthony Health’s Prenatal Assistance Program, which is at St. Clare, is in need of diapers, formula, baby items and new or gently used clothing, sizes newborn through 3T. The program provides free assistance to needy residents.

Handmade blankets distributed locally

More than a dozen people met at Hartsfield Village to create 30 fleece blankets for the Franciscan St. Margaret Health St. Monica Home in Dyer, Franciscan St. Clare Prenatal Assistance Program in Crown Point, and the Nazareth Home of East Chicago. Ten blankets went to each of the three charities. St. Monica Home is a mission work of Franciscan St. Margaret Health Dyer and is committed to providing a healthy environment for teen mothers during pregnancy. The agency also assists in educational programs, counseling sessions and prenatal services. The St. Clare Prenatal Assistance Program, part of Franciscan St. Anthony Health in Crown Point, also received 10 blankets that will be given as a gift to new mothers. The clinic provides outreach services to expectant mothers in Lake, Porter, Jasper and Newton counties. The final 10 blankets were given to the Nazareth Home, founded by the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ to provide protective and nurturing services for infants and toddlers who come from distressed homes.

New program targets substance abuse

Campagna Academy has added an Intensive Substance Abuse Treatment Program to its residential and community youth services. The program, individualized for each client, includes up to 24 substance abuse treatment sessions, relapse prevention treatment sessions for 12 weeks and aftercare sessions for 12 weeks. “Our mission is to provide comprehensive substance abuse recovery and behavioral health services to help individuals and families achieve and maintain a healthy and productive lifestyle,” says Campagna Academy CEO Elena Dwyre. “The goal of ISATP is to achieve abstinence, strengthen the family system, and provide both the parents and adolescent with the tools for successful recovery.” Sessions for boys and girls 12 to 17 are facilitated by a licensed therapist and trained staff. Campagna partnered with Porter Starke Services.

BATTERY PACKAGING DISCOURAGES CHILDREN Energizer, in a step to promote child safety, has announced a new child-resistant coin lithium packaging designed to reduce the occurrence of battery ingestion and the associated medical complications. The company also teamed with Safe Kids last year to establish “The Battery Controlled” to help raise awareness of the issue. The CDC issued a report showing the number of children injured from swallowing coin lithium batteries is on the rise. The new package is made from more durable and flexible materials, making it difficult for a young child to open. It also features new icons to remind adults of the danger of ingesting a coin cell PHOTOS PROVIDED battery and how to get help if one is swallowed. A sticker on the back of the battery itself serves as another reminder. Energizer is transitioning this packaging to retail stores nationwide. Coin lithium batteries power many everyday devices, including some remote controls and toys, bathroom scales, medical devices, garage door openers, key fobs, flameless candles and musical greeting cards. WINDI TAKES AWAY THE PRESSURE FOR BABIES Parents who want to relieve their baby’s colic, constipation and gas-related problems have a non-medicinal option. The Windi, by FridaBaby, features a soft, pliable, hollow tube with a rounded tip that is long enough to reach past the muscle that prevents the release of gas and has a stopper to prevent it from being inserted too far. The tube is inserted the same way as a rectal thermometer. A five-pack of the disposable product costs $15 and is available online at fridababy.com.

8 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

vision

Sundowner’s Syndrome

LOSS

treatment WITH A NEW DRUG THERAPY

TONY V. MARTIN, THE TIMES

Dr. Christopher

Charlotte Moorehead had no idea she even had a problem until she went for a routine eye checkup. The 87-year-old thought her vision was near perfect, so it came as a surprise when her doctor diagnosed her with macular degeneration. “I had no pain—no signs that I would have macular degeneration,” Moorehead says. “I was completely shocked.” Dr. Christopher Kardasis, Moorehead’s ophthalmologist, explains that it’s possible—and even common—for patients not to realize they have a problem in one eye. “Patients often come to me with no complaints because often the other eye compensates for the bad eye,” he says. “My mother-in-law is the perfect example. She didn’t realize her eye was going bad until she got soap in her good eye and couldn’t see out of her bad eye.” In Moorehead’s case, her right eye had such excellent vision, it compensated for her left eye. “My right eye was so good, I could see everything and I didn’t realize my left eye was doing what it was doing,” the Olympia Fields, Ill., resident says. Macular degeneration affects more than 1.75 million Americans—more than glaucoma and cataracts combined—and is the number one cause of irreversible vision loss among the country’s growing senior population. “It’s the number one cause of vision loss among those over 65,” Kardasis says. While macular degeneration isn’t life threatening, it is debilitating.

It can not only prevent someone from getting a driver’s license or reading a book, it also can prevent someone from distinguishing between family members’ faces. “I take care of my husband and I spend a lot of my free time reading, so my eyesight is very important to me,” Moorehead says. There are two types of macular degeneration—dry and wet. Dry is more common and less severe, and causes vision loss in the center of a person’s field of vision. It occurs when the macula, which is in the center of the retina, deteriorates. Wet macular degeneration, Moorehead’s diagnosis, includes swelling caused by leaking blood vessels that affect the macula. “The vast majority have the dry, which is not progressive,” Kardasis says. “It’s very slow, and every other part of the retina is essentially normal. The other 10 percent of Americans have the more aggressive form, the wet form. There is leakage and bleeding, and there’s rapid change in one’s vision.” Kardasis explains both wet and dry can cause increased blurriness, decreased brightness of colors, and in severe cases, hallucinations of geometric shapes, animal or people. Up until recently, treatment for wet macular degeneration consisted of patients frequently undergoing prescribed drug therapies and injections. However, Kardasis, who is on staff at Advocate South Suburban Hospital, is one of few physicians in the Chicago and Northwest Indiana areas who are offering their patients a new medication that reduces

Elastic

Dementia amplifies end-of-day experience as memories fade

Kardasis gives the number of times Charlotte Moorehead patients have to a check-up with an receive treatment. Ocular Coherence Patients receiving Typography scanner. Eylea treatment can go almost twice as long—up to eight weeks—between injections in their physician’s office, when compared to older prescribed drug therapies, Kardasis says. Decreased visits mean more convenience and less discomfort, as well as possible cost savings, he says. Although there is no cure for either type of macular degeneration, Eylea therapy helps block abnormal blood vessel growth that leads to vision loss in wet macular degeneration. “I could tell the positive difference in my vision after the first shot,” Moorehead says. “I was so happy that I did a jig in the exam room.” Eylea is injected into the eye’s vitreous portion—the clear jelly-like substance that fills the eye from the lens back to the retina. The injections are given on an outpatient basis with anesthesia to minimize discomfort. Moorehead recently finished her last scheduled treatment and shortly after went to see her ophthalmologist for a checkup. “I could read several lines further down,” she says. “The treatment really worked for me.” Anyone exhibiting signs or symptoms of macular degeneration should see an ophthalmologist, Kardasis says. —Christine Bryant

End-of-day anxiety and the search for comfort is a lifelong experience that can increase with aging, particularly for those with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. • Sundowner’s Syndrome is a facet of the diseases that magnifies a feeling of being at “loose ends” when the day is wrapped up and there is anticipation for tomorrow, says Barbara Dzikowski, director of Alzheimer’s & Dementia Services of Northern Indiana Inc. “Sundowner’s can include increased agitation, anxiety, some kind of confusion and sudden mood shifts,” Dzikowski says. “Not everyone with dementia has Sundowner’s, but it’s so prevalent that it is very much identified with dementia.” Individuals with dementia struggle with obtaining that sense of comfort found in family and a home environment as their realities have changed due to the disease. “You systematically regress backward into your life, erasing layers of memory in reverse with short-term memory being the first area to be affected. That’s why we see, at some point, people don’t recognize their husband or children, as they are back into time

ten, fifteen years, or more,” Dzikowski says. She believes Sundowner’s is the most difficult behavioral issue for caregivers who strive to provide a calming atmosphere for their loved ones who no longer recognize their homes. “You have to go with the person’s reality, not your own. We had a gentleman end up in Canada looking for his old hometown. Wandering is a very bad byproduct of Sundowning,” she says. As director of the 30-year-old organization since 1998, Dzikowski has seen both the distressing and inspiring sides of the diseases. She feels spirituality is heightened and a different side of the individual comes to the surface and emerges. Over the years, she has heard stories of individuals talking to deceased loved ones or angels and having beautiful visions. “As the human brain dims, the soul rises to the surface. The soul isn’t impaired, the mind is. Caregivers can have an amazing connection in an emotional way: soul to soul,” she says. Dzikowski spotlights one story where a woman saw her own birth through her mother’s eyes. “The daughter had a conversation with her mother about how she had the most beautiful girl in the world and how she was the most wonderful gift in her life. The daughter saw how much her mom loved her and was with her on the day she was born. It’s stunning,” Dzikowski says. As with the diseases, caregivers and family members have to find ways to manage Sundowner’s as there is no cure or exact known cause. Dzikowski’s organization offers support groups, education and one-on-one counseling. “Because of the ongoing

THERAPY

stress, we are seeing the effects on caregivers’ lives. We try to help them understand the disease process. There is hope and we can help them look at other ways to deal with the issue and manage it,” she says. “Tap into our network of knowledge and know you are not alone.” For more information on the organization and area support groups, visit alz-nic.org. —Lesly Bailey

10 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

KINESIO TAPE SUPPORTS HEALING

If

you watched the summer Olympics, you probably noticed colorful tape and intricate patterns adorning some of the athletes’ bodies. These designs weren’t for aesthetic reasons; rather, it’s an elastic therapeutic tape called Kinesio tape. The tape was created over 30 years ago for sumo wrestlers by a Japanese chiropractor and acupuncturist called Dr. Kenzo Kase as an alternative to rigid taping. According to Kinesio Global, “the tape has a texture and elasticity very close to living human skin. It treats a number of conditions: orthopedic, neuromuscular, neurological and medical. It alleviates pain and facilitates lymphatic drainage by microscopically lifting the skin, allowing pain and swelling to reduce.” The practitioner can either customize the tape to the patient’s needs or they can choose a precut pattern and put it right on the area. Athletes like the tape because it doesn’t restrict movement. Tracy Campbell, PT, MPT, a physical

november/december nov ovemb ov ve em emb mber//dec mb d emb ber er 2012 201 012 | GET 01 GE GE ET T HEALTHY HE EALT TH HY Y | 11 1

therapist at Dynamic Rehabilitation Services in Valparaiso, has been using the tape on her patients for eight years. Campbell first encountered the tape when seeking a treatment for ankle injuries. “It really helps the ankle sprains,” she says. “I also use it for tendinitis conditions, such as with the Achilles tendon, the knee or the shoulder. It helps rest the tendon, which is what a lot of bracing does, but that can be cumbersome. I like to use it for women who have diastasis rectus abdominis, which means the abdominal muscles have separated. Some women can’t tolerate bracing during pregnancy and the tape is very non-invasive and helps them get the support that they need to encourage the fascia and muscles to return to their normal resting position.” There is some controversy with the tape because there isn’t much independent research on it. “In the grand scheme, if it’s not doing any harm then it doesn’t hurt to wear it,” Campbell says. “If the patient is getting benefit from the tape, even if it’s placebo, then it’s worth using.” People of all walks of life can benefit from the tape, but because it’s a taping method, it’s important to find a trained practitioner who understands Kinesio taping. For more information, please visit kinesiotaping.com/ global/association. —Sharon Biggs Waller

12 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

Short on time?

matters

TRY HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING

D

on’t have time to fit a long workout into your busy schedule? A fifteen- or twenty-minute workout is a great alternative to none at all, says Jane Bogordos, fitness supervisor and exercise physiologist at Franciscan Omni Health and Fitness in Schererville. In order to make the most of a short amount of time, Bogordos recommends high-intensity interval workouts. These workouts combine short bursts of high-intensity exercise with lower-intensity recovery periods, typically one minute of high-intensity exercise, such as jumping jacks, followed by one minute of recovery time, such as light jogging. Not only are these workouts more effective than steady, moderate HOW TO REFUEL intensity exercise, YOUR BODY AFTER Bogordos says, but you A WORKOUT burn more calories. “You have a good three After high-intensity exercise, to four hours afterward your body needs to refuel. Bogordos recommends where you’re burning eating “the right amount of way more calories [than protein and complex carbs” after a lower-intensity thirty to sixty minutes after your workout.Try one workout],” Bogordos these nutritious snacks: says, but only if your level of intensity is high Turkey enough. Cheese sticks Bogordos suggests Hard-boiled eggs using the Rated Perceived Hummus with celery Exertion (RPE) scale Protein bar or shake to measure the level A piece of fruit of intensity of your Peanut butter workout. The scale runs smoothie or sandwich from 0 to 10, with 0

representing an activity you find easy and 10 the most difficult. “High-intensity spurts should get close to 7 to 9 on that scale,” Bogordos says. “When you’re recovered, you should be closer to 3 or 4.” At Franciscan Omni Health and Fitness, Bogordos offers thirtyminute “lunchtime workouts.” For cardio-only circuits, Bogordos does one-minute spurts of sprinting, jumping jacks, mountain climbers, steps, squat jumps, or speed skating, mixed with one-minute recovery periods of walking or jogging. Cardio/strength circuits consist of one minute of cardio exercise, followed by a minute of recovery, then a minute of a strength move and another minute of recovery. Strength options include walking lunges, push-ups, tricep dips, planks, etc. “What I love to do is on the combination moves, like a shoulder press with lunge,” Bogordos adds. Those new to high-intensity workouts may need to begin with ten- or fifteen-minute circuits or take two minutes of recovery time. “You have to figure out what your fitness level is,” Bogordos says. “At the end of your recovery time, you should be ready to go again.” As with all workouts, be sure to warm up for at least five minutes and allow ample time for cool down and stretching. —Ashley Boyer

7 WARNING SIGNS OF HEALTH PROBLEMS

What to look for when determining the needs of our elderly parents

CONTACT Franciscan Omni Health and Fitness Schererville Campus 221 US Hwy 41, Ste A Schererville, Ind. 219.865.6969. franciscanalliance.org/omni

24 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

We were lucky when my mom, then 94, decided all on her own not to drive anymore because her eyesight was so poor. But it was more difficult a year later when I looked in her pill box where she organized her medicine by day and discovered mistakes. “Let me take care of that,” she said somewhat snappishly as she took it out of my hands—unusual for someone always very sweet. Gaffes, forgetfulness and disorganization aren’t uncommon for any of us. “It can be difficult for adult children to determine the differences between normal forgetfulness and dementia,” says Melissa Bohacek, communications manager and executive assistant for the Northwest Indiana Community Action Area One Agency on Aging and Community Action Agency (NWICA) in Crown Point. “There are good resources out there to help. AARP has an older driving quiz which is available online. We have a Creative Caregiving Resource Guide; it is a checklist for evaluating loved one’s homes—another consideration when planning to care for a parent or older adult. We recommend contacting your physician or the family’s medical provider when you start noticing changes in the older adult.” People with questions can also call NWICA’s 211 number. On their website, the Mayo Clinic describes seven warning signs indicative of whether our parents can take care of themselves, including how well they get around, if they’re losing too much weight and if they’re in good spirits. The latter is very important, according to Lawrence Brewerton, a clinical psychologist and an adjunct professor of psychology at Indiana University Northwest who also works with the elderly in residential care settings. “The most common problem we have with older adults is depression,” says Brewerton, who teaches a

course on adulthood and aging. “Depression is very underrated in older adults. The things to look for are insomnia—always a clue in depression—changes in appetite, fatigue, do they talk about feeling down, have there been stressful life events like losing friends, or lack of social support.” Forgetfulness is not necessarily a sign of dementia. “I misplace my keys all the time,” Brewerton says. “But when I find them, I know what to do with them.” There is also a difference between depression and dementia. “Depression is 24 hours a day and is more generalized,” Brewerton says. “Dementia is much more intense in the evening. Whenever anyone sees anything with an older adult, get them checked medically.” When working with aging adults, Brewerton recommends looking at options like adult day care to help provide a social component to their lives and, for caregivers, get respite care when feeling overwhelmed. “Try to involve them when any decisions need to be made,” Brewerton says. “State things in a way that makes it seem like it’s also their decision as well. When I work with patients, I establish contracts where they agree to try things like an activity. Contracts are good, because they feel an obligation then to exercise twice a week or join a group. Giving verbal praise is important. We all love to reminisce, so talk to them about their lives and what they’ve done.” Forget the stereotype. Getting Alzheimer’s and dementia is not a normal progression of aging, Brewerton says. But it is more pervasive and getting more so. “Unfortunately, many of my patients are getting younger and younger,” Brewerton says. “We have two generations who are not active and we need to start taking better care of ourselves.” —Jane Ammeson

1.

Pay attention to your parents’ appearance. Are their clothes clean? Do they appear to be taking good care of themselves?

2.

Are your aging parents experiencing memory loss?

3.

Are your aging parents safe in their home?

4.

Are your aging parents safe on the road?

5.

Are your aging parents able to get around?

6.

Have your aging parents lost weight?

7.

Are your aging parents in good spirits?

FOR YOUR INFORMATION agingcare.com/Articles/ worried-about-elderlyparent-driving-133862.htm Northwest Indiana Community Action Area One Agency on Aging and Community Action Agency: 800.826.7871 or nwi-ca.com

26 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

ask the expert

PROVIDED

what’s new Local Health News Food pantry donations sought

DR. MITCHELL BRESSACK

Discusses skin cancer basics, including protection and early detection The ABCs of healthy skin lie in knowing when to see a dermatologist, staying protected from the sun’s rays and catching cancers early. Dr. Mitchell Bressack of Dermatology Center of Northwest Indiana has spent 30 years helping patients monitor the body’s largest organ.

Q: When should individuals begin skin checkups? The time to start checkups is when you have something you are not sure about. Keep an eye on yourself and have your spouse help check your back. When you go in for a routine physical, your primary doctor should also look at your skin as part of the standard exam and advise you when to see a dermatologist. Around 50 years old, it is worth it to have a baseline exam and then every three to five years if nothing pops up. Q: What concerns should prompt a visit to the doctor? The American Academy of Dermatology ABCDE guidelines include watching for differences in asymmetry, border and color within a mole and the diameter as well. E (evolving) was added five years ago and basically involves changes. The problem is everything changes as we get older—it’s like gaining and losing weight. Over the course of six months on a day-to-day basis you don’t see the change, but six months later you are 15 pounds heavier. You don’t see the change because it happens gradually. Photos will help with this. Keep skin close-ups around as a basis for comparison. This is something you can do yourself. Q: What are the different types of skin cancers and treatments? Skin cancers are divided into melanoma and

non-melanoma types, which have a very small chance of spreading. Basal cell carcinoma, which is the most common, is found in the deepest layers of skin. Squamous cell carcinoma is found in the skin’s surface. Both can be treated with creams, burned or frozen off, surgically removed or there is Mohs surgery for larger tumors. This method combines removal with review under a microscope to ensure all of it is eliminated and as much healthy tissue as possible is preserved. Finding these at an early stage saves the amount of surgery needed. There is also keratosis actinic, which can turn into squamous cell carcinoma if left untreated. Melanoma can spread if it is left alone. The chances of it spreading are related to how thick it is, which also indicates how long it has been there. The problem with melanoma is there is no good therapy. The goal is to catch it as early as possible. The lesion is taken off plus additional tissue depending upon the thickness—it is not a minor procedure. Lymph nodes are also tested to see if it has spread. The difference between big and small in non-melanoma is a big and small scar. The difference between big and small in melanoma could be life and death. Q: Is skin cancer more prevalent? My first year of practice I saw one case of melanoma. Now I see two or three a month on average. Is it because there really are more cases or are we more aware? I don’t think there is any way to prove an

answer. There have been changes in society. With more money and free time, more people are going on spring break vacations and over the years, we started wearing less at the beach. Then tanning beds were created and that has added to it. Q: What is key for sun protection? Common sense: use sunscreen and wear long sleeves and big hats—you have to protect the scalp. If you can see light through the fabric, it is not going to protect you from the sun. The tighter the weave the better, and the darker the color the fewer ultraviolet rays get through as they are absorbed by the material. You can still do what you love. If you golf, you can golf, if you garden, you can garden— just try not to do it between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. In winter months, there are not as many ultraviolet rays, but you should still make it part of your daily routine to wear sunscreen and be covered. Q: What can we pass along to our children to curb skin cancer cases in the future? Kids do what they are taught when they are young. If they are taught to put on sunscreen, it will be part of their natural routine like brushing their teeth. —Lesly Bailey FOR YOUR INFORMATION

For more information about Dr. Bressack’s practice, visit dermatologynwi.com.

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what’s new

survivor spotlight

on your mind

body shop

food & fitness

senior scope

ask the expert

Food pantry and handmade blankets for the needy, and new products include relief for baby gas

A new treatment for vision loss related to macular degeneration

Sundowner’s syndrome, a look at late-day dementia

Kinesio tape therapy and archery revival

High-intensity interval training and saffron to curb your appetite

Determining the needs of elderly parents

Dr. Mitchell Bressack on skin care, disease prevention and detection

4 letter from the editor 2 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

|

6 health care advisory council


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Just In Time for the Flu Season… St. Catherine Hospital’s Hessville Family Care Center’s Immediate Care has expanded its hours to Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Walk-in patients welcome! While getting sick is never convenient, there is a simple solution. Medical attention for illnesses that are not life-threatening is available through St. Catherine Hospital’s outpatient center located in Hessville. For immediate needs, lab work to x-rays, patients seeking help and answers can often get what they need in just one visit. No appointment is necessary Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. and most insurance plans are accepted. Conditions We Treat & Services Provided: • Cold/Flu • Bronchitis • Ear infections • Minor lacerations/burns

• Sprains/Strains • Urinary tract infections • Sports physicals • Lab Testing

Hessville Family Care Center 3432 169th St. • Hammond, IN 46323 (219) 844-9060 www.comhs.org november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 3


letter from the editor volume 7 | issue 6

These days, it seems like every essay, news article, or magazine (including this one) that focuses on cancer begins the same way: “Cancer touches everyone.” It’s tempting to shrug off this statement as being trite, overly dramatic or morbid, but the fact is, cancer really does touch everyone.

T

his truism became all too clear to me when a good friend of mine was suddenly diagnosed with breast cancer earlier this year. Not only was she young (early thirties) and healthy (she had recently lost a great deal of weight, and was in the best shape of her life), but she was a wife, a daughter, a sister, a mother to two young children—and the sunny nucleus of my circle of friends. Yes, her cancer touched many, many people. But it wasn’t always in a negative way. The conversational topics of our “Girls’ Night Out” gatherings changed in tone from “complaining” to “compassionate”; we communicated more frequently—with greater candor—and supported each other unconditionally; and every milestone she achieved (recovering from surgery, finishing chemo, getting her hair back) became a cause for celebration. On the eve of her surgery, our group of friends shared a joyful, decadent meal (“Bring us ALL of the appetizers!”) and we all wore pink caps in solidarity with our strongest link. I still cherish that cap, because it reminds me of the hopes and prayers that bound us together that night—and it also reminds me to be grateful that she came through the ordeal with the best possible outcome: cancer-free. Not everyone beats cancer, but more people are every day, and as we go to press with this issue during Breast Cancer Awareness Month I

see pink ribbons everywhere—even pink socks on the high school football teams!—proclaiming that we’re here to fight this disease. Accordingly, we’re pleased to bring you a special oncology supplement, starting on page 14, that outlines some of the groundbreaking treatments that are available in our area, from supplements and innovative techniques, to cancer trials and a very promising vaccine technology. Be inspired by our conversation on page 15 with Crown Point’s Patricia Ross, a non-smoker who was baffled when she was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2005. A grateful survivor, Ross feels that she owes her life to the persistence of her diligent physician, Sharon Harig . . . and we have to agree. In addition, “we’ve got your back” in our special Spine Care feature on page 20, showcasing tips, exercises and procedures for keeping that most essential body part straight, supple and strong. We’re also happy to introduce a new department in this edition of Get Healthy, “Senior Scope,” which will spotlight ideas and advice for staying fit and active into older adulthood. As always, this issue is packed with eye-openers (like our article outlining the complexities of macular degeneration on page 10) and new ways to get moving (archery, anyone?), so get started . . . and get healthy! KATHRYN MACNEIL MANAGING EDITOR

CHECK OUT NWI.COM/GETHEALTHY, WHERE YOU’LL FIND: Our comprehensive calendar of Well-Being Events • Fresh new articles and information every day • Health advice from local and national experts • The place to sign up for our weekly email newsletter to receive advice and ideas on nutrition, fitness, mental health and health care

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Publisher — BILL MASTERSON, JR. Associate Publisher/Editor — PAT COLANDER Managing Editor — KATHRYN MACNEIL Design Director — BEN CUNNINGHAM Designer — APRIL BURFORD Niche Assistant — LAVETA HUGHES Contributing Editors JANE AMMESON, HEATHER AUGUSTYN, LESLY BAILEY, TRICIA DESPRES, LU ANN FRANKLIN, TERRI GORDON, JULIE DEAN KESSLER, BONNIE MCGRATH, KIM RANEGAR, VANESSA RENDERMAN, SHARON BIGGS WALLER NICHE PUBLICATION SALES Account Executives MIKE CANE, ANDREA WALCZAK Advertising Operations Managers ERIC HORON Advertising Managers DEB ANSELM, LISA DAUGHERTY, CRAIG CHISM Production Manager TOM KACIUS Creative Services Manager AMI REESE

Published by Lee Enterprises The Times of Northwest Indiana Niche Productions Division 601 W 45th Ave, Munster, Indiana 46321 219.933.3200 2080 N Main St Crown Point, Indiana 46307 219.662.5300 1111 Glendale Blvd Valparaiso, Indiana 46383 219.462.5151 Copyright, Reprints and Permissions: You must have permission before reproducing material from Get Healthy magazine. Get Healthy magazine is published six times each year by Lee Enterprises, The Times of Northwest Indiana, Niche Division, 601 W 45th Ave, Munster, IN 46321.


november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 5


REGIONAL INITIATIVE TO COMBAT LACK OF DATA AND PANDEMIC THREAT ASSESSMENT AND TROUBLING STATEWIDE STATISTICS ON QUALITY OF LIFE DATA

L

ate September was a busy time for the One Region team with the annual meeting at the Radisson featuring keynote speaker Governor Mitch Daniels as well as U.S. Congressman Peter J. Visclosky on the dais before 650 attendees at the event. Times and Get Healthy Publisher Bill Masterson mentioned the competitivecollaborative mission of the health care providers here in the Northwest Indiana Region, while the governor lauded the expansion of the Indiana University medical school at Indiana University Northwest. Chancellor William Lowe also spoke to this giant step toward strengthening the level of care and attracting major talent in medicine to this corner of the state. And the new executive director of the One Region initiative, Calumet College Chancellor Emeritus Dennis Rittenmeyer, spoke of the health care council as one of the key ongoing, driving forces for change and cooperation in the progressive work of the strategic vision of One Region. Both with the Times Board of Economists and the new 2012 Indicators Report, the second week in October proved just what a dynamic segment the health care industry is in terms of economic development as well as the quality of life here. The downside, as Dennis Rittenmeyer has reported, is the lack of quality data regarding health care issues at the regional level. As though to offer proof of the importance of the health care council, on October 4th Dr. Virginia Caine, director of the Marion County Public Health Department and associate professor of medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine Infectious Disease Division, called on public and private networks to join together to address the state’s looming public health issues through preventative care. Even though there have been numerous strong educational efforts in the state, some of the statistics are alarming. Dr. Caine cited the 21.2 percent of residents who smoke, the number of children who live in poverty (25.2 percent) and the 30.2 percent of our population who are obese. Dr. Caine added that state numbers show continued high levels of air pollution and cancer deaths on a state level. She also has concerns about Indiana’s ranking of 48th state in the nation when it comes to public health funding at a rate of only $42 per person annually. Dr. Caine concurred with Rittenmeyer’s point that a data baseline needs to be established as demographics shift and health disparities between population groups persist. In Indiana, 37 percent of blacks are obese, compared with 28.8 percent of whites and 28.4 percent of Hispanics. And data from 2007 show that, in Lake County, the infant mortality rate for whites is 8 deaths per 1,000 births, and for blacks, it is 14 deaths per 1,000 births. And the certainty of a pandemic at some point in the state is a constant worry for not only health care providers, but emergency first-responders. Not knowing where a contagious illness could start or how it could spread could cost millions of lives in a short period of time. The Times Media Company provides continuous coverage of these issues and collaborative efforts on a 24/7 basis.

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219-374-5555 www.comhs.org november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 7


what’s new By Vanessa Renderman

Local Health News

HEALTHY PRODUCTS

Food pantry donations sought

SALTY DRINK DUBBED ‘IV IN A BOTTLE’ Described as “an IV in a bottle,” a drink called BANa helps prevent dehydration and severely reduce nausea. Created by Charleston-based emergency room physician Dr. Benjamin Yoo, BANa provides four times the amount of salt as other sports drinks, but with no calories or sugar. BANa was developed with the idea that a beverage drink similar to an IV bag would produce the maximum rehydration property needed for optimal revitalization. BANa is available for children and adults in packs of four (for $9.96) or 12 (for $27) plus shipping and handling and can be purchased online at banadrink.com.

St. Clare Health Clinic is seeking donations for its food pantry. Needed are nonperishable food items, paper goods including toilet paper, laundry detergent, and personal care products such as deodorant, shampoo and soap. The clinic, which is under the auspices of Franciscan St. Anthony Health in Crown Point, provides free primary health care for residents of Northwest Indiana who fall within established income guidelines, are uninsured and are not eligible for government assistance. Donations may be brought to the clinic, 1121 South Indiana Avenue, between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Franciscan St. Anthony Health’s Prenatal Assistance Program, which is at St. Clare, is in need of diapers, formula, baby items and new or gently used clothing, sizes newborn through 3T. The program provides free assistance to needy residents.

Handmade blankets distributed locally

More than a dozen people met at Hartsfield Village to create 30 fleece blankets for the Franciscan St. Margaret Health St. Monica Home in Dyer, Franciscan St. Clare Prenatal Assistance Program in Crown Point, and the Nazareth Home of East Chicago. Ten blankets went to each of the three charities. St. Monica Home is a mission work of Franciscan St. Margaret Health Dyer and is committed to providing a healthy environment for teen mothers during pregnancy. The agency also assists in educational programs, counseling sessions and prenatal services. The St. Clare Prenatal Assistance Program, part of Franciscan St. Anthony Health in Crown Point, also received 10 blankets that will be given as a gift to new mothers. The clinic provides outreach services to expectant mothers in Lake, Porter, Jasper and Newton counties. The final 10 blankets were given to the Nazareth Home, founded by the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ to provide protective and nurturing services for infants and toddlers who come from distressed homes.

New program targets substance abuse

Campagna Academy has added an Intensive Substance Abuse Treatment Program to its residential and community youth services. The program, individualized for each client, includes up to 24 substance abuse treatment sessions, relapse prevention treatment sessions for 12 weeks and aftercare sessions for 12 weeks. “Our mission is to provide comprehensive substance abuse recovery and behavioral health services to help individuals and families achieve and maintain a healthy and productive lifestyle,” says Campagna Academy CEO Elena Dwyre. “The goal of ISATP is to achieve abstinence, strengthen the family system, and provide both the parents and adolescent with the tools for successful recovery.” Sessions for boys and girls 12 to 17 are facilitated by a licensed therapist and trained staff. Campagna partnered with Porter Starke Services.

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BATTERY PACKAGING DISCOURAGES CHILDREN Energizer, in a step to promote child safety, has announced a new child-resistant coin lithium packaging designed to reduce the occurrence of battery ingestion and the associated medical complications. The company also teamed with Safe Kids last year to establish “The Battery Controlled” to help raise awareness of the issue. The CDC issued a report showing the number of children injured from swallowing coin lithium batteries is on the rise. The new package is made from more durable and flexible materials, making it difficult for a young child to open. It also features new icons to remind adults of the danger of ingesting a coin cell PHOTOS PR OVIDED battery and how to get help if one is swallowed. A sticker on the back of the battery itself serves as another reminder. Energizer is transitioning this packaging to retail stores nationwide. Coin lithium batteries power many everyday devices, including some remote controls and toys, bathroom scales, medical devices, garage door openers, key fobs, flameless candles and musical greeting cards. WINDI TAKES AWAY THE PRESSURE FOR BABIES Parents who want to relieve their baby’s colic, constipation and gas-related problems have a non-medicinal option. The Windi, by FridaBaby, features a soft, pliable, hollow tube with a rounded tip that is long enough to reach past the muscle that prevents the release of gas and has a stopper to prevent it from being inserted too far. The tube is inserted the same way as a rectal thermometer. A five-pack of the disposable product costs $15 and is available online at fridababy.com.


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www.jplattdds.com november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 9


survivor spotlight

vision LOSS

treatment WITH A NEW DRUG THERAPY

TONY V. MARTIN, THE TIMES

Dr. Christopher

Charlotte Moorehead had no idea she even had a problem until she went for a routine eye checkup. The 87-year-old thought her vision was near perfect, so it came as a surprise when her doctor diagnosed her with macular degeneration. “I had no pain—no signs that I would have macular degeneration,” Moorehead says. “I was completely shocked.” Dr. Christopher Kardasis, Moorehead’s ophthalmologist, explains that it’s possible—and even common—for patients not to realize they have a problem in one eye. “Patients often come to me with no complaints because often the other eye compensates for the bad eye,” he says. “My mother-in-law is the perfect example. She didn’t realize her eye was going bad until she got soap in her good eye and couldn’t see out of her bad eye.” In Moorehead’s case, her right eye had such excellent vision, it compensated for her left eye. “My right eye was so good, I could see everything and I didn’t realize my left eye was doing what it was doing,” the Olympia Fields, Ill., resident says. Macular degeneration affects more than 1.75 million Americans—more than glaucoma and cataracts combined—and is the number one cause of irreversible vision loss among the country’s growing senior population. “It’s the number one cause of vision loss among those over 65,” Kardasis says. While macular degeneration isn’t life threatening, it is debilitating.

10 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

It can not only prevent someone from getting a driver’s license or reading a book, it also can prevent someone from distinguishing between family members’ faces. “I take care of my husband and I spend a lot of my free time reading, so my eyesight is very important to me,” Moorehead says. There are two types of macular degeneration—dry and wet. Dry is more common and less severe, and causes vision loss in the center of a person’s field of vision. It occurs when the macula, which is in the center of the retina, deteriorates. Wet macular degeneration, Moorehead’s diagnosis, includes swelling caused by leaking blood vessels that affect the macula. “The vast majority have the dry, which is not progressive,” Kardasis says. “It’s very slow, and every other part of the retina is essentially normal. The other 10 percent of Americans have the more aggressive form, the wet form. There is leakage and bleeding, and there’s rapid change in one’s vision.” Kardasis explains both wet and dry can cause increased blurriness, decreased brightness of colors, and in severe cases, hallucinations of geometric shapes, animal or people. Up until recently, treatment for wet macular degeneration consisted of patients frequently undergoing prescribed drug therapies and injections. However, Kardasis, who is on staff at Advocate South Suburban Hospital, is one of few physicians in the Chicago and Northwest Indiana areas who are offering their patients a new medication that reduces

Kardasis gives the number of times Charlotte Moorehead patients have to a check-up with an receive treatment. Ocular Coherence Patients receiving Typography scanner. Eylea treatment can go almost twice as long—up to eight weeks—between injections in their physician’s office, when compared to older prescribed drug therapies, Kardasis says. Decreased visits mean more convenience and less discomfort, as well as possible cost savings, he says. Although there is no cure for either type of macular degeneration, Eylea therapy helps block abnormal blood vessel growth that leads to vision loss in wet macular degeneration. “I could tell the positive difference in my vision after the first shot,” Moorehead says. “I was so happy that I did a jig in the exam room.” Eylea is injected into the eye’s vitreous portion—the clear jelly-like substance that fills the eye from the lens back to the retina. The injections are given on an outpatient basis with anesthesia to minimize discomfort. Moorehead recently finished her last scheduled treatment and shortly after went to see her ophthalmologist for a checkup. “I could read several lines further down,” she says. “The treatment really worked for me.” Anyone exhibiting signs or symptoms of macular degeneration should see an ophthalmologist, Kardasis says. —Christine Bryant


on your mind

Sundowner’s Syndrome Dementia amplifies end-of-day experience as memories fade

End-of-day anxiety and the search for comfort is a lifelong experience that can increase with aging, particularly for those with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. • Sundowner’s Syndrome is a facet of the diseases that magnifies a feeling of being at “loose ends” when the day is wrapped up and there is anticipation for tomorrow, says Barbara Dzikowski, director of Alzheimer’s & Dementia Services of Northern Indiana Inc. “Sundowner’s can include increased agitation, anxiety, some kind of confusion and sudden mood shifts,” Dzikowski says. “Not everyone with dementia has Sundowner’s, but it’s so prevalent that it is very much identified with dementia.” Individuals with dementia struggle with obtaining that sense of comfort found in family and a home environment as their realities have changed due to the disease. “You systematically regress backward into your life, erasing layers of memory in reverse with short-term memory being the first area to be affected. That’s why we see, at some point, people don’t recognize their husband or children, as they are back into time

ten, fifteen years, or more,” Dzikowski says. She believes Sundowner’s is the most difficult behavioral issue for caregivers who strive to provide a calming atmosphere for their loved ones who no longer recognize their homes. “You have to go with the person’s reality, not your own. We had a gentleman end up in Canada looking for his old hometown. Wandering is a very bad byproduct of Sundowning,” she says. As director of the 30-year-old organization since 1998, Dzikowski has seen both the distressing and inspiring sides of the diseases. She feels spirituality is heightened and a different side of the individual comes to the surface and emerges. Over the years, she has heard stories of individuals talking to deceased loved ones or angels and having beautiful visions. “As the human brain dims, the soul rises to the surface. The soul isn’t impaired, the mind is. Caregivers can have an amazing connection in an emotional way: soul to soul,” she says. Dzikowski spotlights one story where a woman saw her own birth through her mother’s eyes. “The daughter had a conversation with her mother about how she had the most beautiful girl in the world and how she was the most wonderful gift in her life. The daughter saw how much her mom loved her and was with her on the day she was born. It’s stunning,” Dzikowski says. As with the diseases, caregivers and family members have to find ways to manage Sundowner’s as there is no cure or exact known cause. Dzikowski’s organization offers support groups, education and one-on-one counseling. “Because of the ongoing

stress, we are seeing the effects on caregivers’ lives. We try to help them understand the disease process. There is hope and we can help them look at other ways to deal with the issue and manage it,” she says. “Tap into our network of knowledge and know you are not alone.” For more information on the organization and area support groups, visit alz-nic.org. —Lesly Bailey

november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 11


the body shop

Elastic

THERAPY KINESIO TAPE SUPPORTS HEALING

If

you watched the summer Olympics, you probably noticed colorful tape and intricate patterns adorning some of the athletes’ bodies. These designs weren’t for aesthetic reasons; rather, it’s an elastic therapeutic tape called Kinesio tape. The tape was created over 30 years ago for sumo wrestlers by a Japanese chiropractor and acupuncturist called Dr. Kenzo Kase as an alternative to rigid taping. According to Kinesio Global, “the tape has a texture and elasticity very close to living human skin. It treats a number of conditions: orthopedic, neuromuscular, neurological and medical. It alleviates pain and facilitates lymphatic drainage by microscopically lifting the skin, allowing pain and swelling to reduce.” The practitioner can either customize the tape to the patient’s needs or they can choose a precut pattern and put it right on the area. Athletes like the tape because it doesn’t restrict movement. Tracy Campbell, PT, MPT, a physical

12 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

therapist at Dynamic Rehabilitation Services in Valparaiso, has been using the tape on her patients for eight years. Campbell first encountered the tape when seeking a treatment for ankle injuries. “It really helps the ankle sprains,” she says. “I also use it for tendinitis conditions, such as with the Achilles tendon, the knee or the shoulder. It helps rest the tendon, which is what a lot of bracing does, but that can be cumbersome. I like to use it for women who have diastasis rectus abdominis, which means the abdominal muscles have separated. Some women can’t tolerate bracing during pregnancy and the tape is very non-invasive and helps them get the support that they need to encourage the fascia and muscles to return to their normal resting position.” There is some controversy with the tape because there isn’t much independent research on it. “In the grand scheme, if it’s not doing any harm then it doesn’t hurt to wear it,” Campbell says. “If the patient is getting benefit from the tape, even if it’s placebo, then it’s worth using.” People of all walks of life can benefit from the tape, but because it’s a taping method, it’s important to find a trained practitioner who understands Kinesio taping. For more information, please visit kinesiotaping.com/ global/association. —Sharon Biggs Waller


Let the Game Begin An ageless sport thrives anew On a warm August afternoon a group of young women are out for a Chicago bachelorette party. Are they clubbing? Taking in some of Chicago’s famous fine dining? Partaking in a lovely river cruise? Nope. They are at Archery Bow Range Chicago, taking turns shooting arrows at targets. It looks a bit odd to see a woman in a white veil shoot an arrow, but the group is having a grand time of things, congratulating bullseyes and playfully ribbing each other when the arrows go wide. So why are the ladies here, of all places? Archery, it seems, is no longer a pastime reserved for hunters, Olympians and Renaissance Faire showmen. Due to popular films like The Hunger Games and The Avengers, which both feature some pretty hardcore, super-cool archers, archery has shaken off any stigma it once had and has become a sport of choice among the young. “With the movies—that’s grabbing a lot of people,” says Bryan Lovely of Valparaiso, president of Deep River Bowmen. “I have more girl students than boys. They really

like the target shooting.” What’s appealing about archery is that it’s a sport that’s open to all. In fact, thanks to the Archery in the Schools Program (which has chapters in Indiana, Illinois and Michigan), more and more children are learning this craft, Lovely says. Classes are popping up everywhere for beginners. The classes generally teach the basics; after that, you’re free to rent time (much like you would at a shooting range) and just practice your skills. For many people this culminates in “league play,” where archers compete in the “game” of archery. Most places have bow rental, but if you get serious about it, you can buy your own bow from local sports shops, like Gander Mountain or Bass Pro Shop. “Archery is an ageless sport,” says Mike Tichenor of Valparaiso, lead secretary for the Deep River Bowmen. “Any age group, any fitness level, can really enjoy the sport. And it doesn’t have to cost you an arm and leg to participate. It’s something the whole family can participate in together and you’re not going to break the budget doing it.” —Christy Bonstell

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Your News | Your Events | Your Community november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 13


discover curcumin

New Hope for

CANCER

PATIENTS In this issue we stalk the cure and applaud the innovations in treatment and care happening here and now. Cancer touches everyone and anyone. But there is hope everywhere too. There are so many new ideas and approaches that the dreaded disease is no longer thought of as automatically incurable. Still, a quick and easy end to the sickness remains elusive. Here you will read about minor miracles, creative approaches and just plain good sense advice about dealing with cancer. The best chance of recovery is a combination of early detection, good luck and a heavy dose of determination. Meet some of us who met the challenge.

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An ancient remedy for cancer prevention and survival

P

atients undergoing cancer treatment often look to augment their health through alternative means. Many integrative medical interventions can make a real difference in cancer prevention, recovery and survival. Supplements are a popular choice, although they can sometimes lead to a buyer-beware situation. The effects of some haven’t been fully studied and the outcome isn’t always beneficial. Curcumin, a compound from the turmeric root, is a supplement that experts are praising for its safety and numerous long-term benefits. It has been used for centuries as a disease treatment in Ayurveda, India’s traditional medicine and arguably the oldest surviving healing system in the world. Cheryl Myers, an integrative health nurse, author, and expert on natural medicine, is the head of Scientific Affairs and Education for EuroPharma, Inc. She refers to curcumin as the “anti-cancer herb,” because of its success in stopping cancer formation, replication and spread. Curcumin increases the activity of certain cancer drugs while protecting normal organs such as liver, kidney, oral mucosa, and heart from chemotherapy and radiation therapy induced toxicity. Because of this, some integrative oncologists are using curcumin in conjunction with these therapies. It has also been proven to reduce systemic inflammation and help with oxidative stress. “Epigenetic studies have shown that curcumin is the most potent natural compound for waking up sleeping genes by reawakening our body’s own tumor

suppressing gene,” Myers says. “James Duke, PhD, author of The Green Pharmacy, and the man who established the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) ethnobotanical and phytochemical database, has said that of the thousands of botanical medicines in the world, if he had cancer and could select only one herb to have the greatest impact, that herb would be curcumin.” While curcumin has been proven to be helpful for cancer patients, Myers says that anyone who wishes to begin a healthy supplement regimen to increase their health will benefit from its antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties by taking one supplement a day. Curcumin can also help those suffering from arthritis, eczema and inflammatory bowel disease. All curcumin products are not alike. “When looking, keep absorption in mind,” Myers says. “Because curcumin isn’t absorbed easily, you should look for enhanced formulas with micronized curcumin and turmeric essential oils. Be sure to buy curcumin and not just turmeric. Turmeric is a healthy food, but the natural medicine comes from the curcumin, which only makes up about 2 to 5 percent of turmeric.” Myers suggests that patients undergoing cancer therapy take 500 mg of curcumin 3 times daily. With all of this in mind, it is important to know that there are two types of chemotherapy, Adriamycin and the cyclophosphamide group, for which curcumin may not be helpful. Further research must be done on these therapies, so it is always best to work with an integrative oncologist when combining supplements with chemotherapy. Myers says it’s always important to proceed with caution when considering supplements touting cancer cures. “The FDA is vigilant against unsubstantiated claims for cancer cures and those making very bold cancer claims,” she says. When looking for natural therapy, be highly suspicious of products that claim “cure” and secret formulas that do not reveal their ingredients. —Sharon Biggs Waller


fire, but no smoke Non-smoking Crown Point woman survives lung cancer

N

o one could have been more surprised than Patricia Ross when she was diagnosed with lung cancer. “Lung cancer!” Ross says. “I never touched a cigarette in my life. I was shocked. Everyone was.” Overall, 10 to 15 percent of the about 226,000 new cases of lung cancers expected to be diagnosed this year will occur in nonsmokers, with another 50 percent occurring in former smokers, according to the American Cancer Society. Two-thirds of the non-smokers who get lung cancer are women, and 20 percent of lung cancers in women occur in individuals who have never smoked, the ACS states. Although the cause of Ross’ cancer is unknown, the 75-year-old Crown Point resident had been exposed to second-hand smoke, one known cause of lung cancer. Her parents smoked, and both her first and current husbands smoked, although Ross said they “didn’t smoke a lot.” “When I was young, everyone in my generation smoked,” she says. “My mom asked me if I wanted her to teach me how. I said ‘no.’ I didn’t wanted to smoke because of how cigarettes smelled.” Ross learned she had lung cancer in 2005 after three years of testing. “I had gone to my doctor in 2002 because I had a pain in my chest that wouldn’t go away,” she says. “I had a CAT [spiral computed tomography] scan but nothing showed. Then I had a PET [positron emission tomography] and the doctor saw a little pinhead spot on my lung.” The doctor, Sharon Harig, MD, told Ross the spot could be from a previous bout of pneumonia, but advised her to have a CAT scan with contrast every six months. Ross complied.

The October 2005 scan indicated the spot had grown. “Dr. Harig said it had to come out,” says Ross, who was then referred to a surgeon. “He said it was malignant,” Ross says. ”Every doctor I saw asked me if I smoke. They assume when you have lung cancer that you smoked. The surgeon did, and when he made the report he put on it that I smoked. I made him change it.” During her surgery at St. Mary Medical Center in Hobart, the doctor removed the upper left lobe of Ross’ lung. She was hospitalized for five days. “I didn’t know if I would live or die,” Ross says. “They had to send away to a pathologist. I sat three days in the hospital and didn’t know which way the door was going to swing. But even the pathologist said I was lucky. It was stage one [cancer], so I didn’t need any follow-up treatments.” To make sure the cancer doesn’t reoccur, Ross had a full-body bone scan annually until 2010. Since then, she receives a special blood test that was developed for the same purpose. Ross, who works as a tax clerk for White Lodging Services, considers herself extremely fortunate to be treated by a doctor who kept urging her to have the six-month CAT scans. “The surgeon told me my doctor was pretty persistent to insist on follow-up testing, because I didn’t look like the typical lung cancer candidate,” Ross says. “I thank her for me being alive. She saved my life. Most doctors would have given up.” —Andrea Holecek TONY V. MARTIN, THE TIMES november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 15


close to home Area hospitals offer clinical cancer trials, providing innovative treatment

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n the past fighting cancer often seemed to take a nuclear bomb approach—high doses of radiation or chemotherapy that killed not only the malignant cells but healthy ones, too. But that is quickly changing, and in Northwest Indiana many local hospitals are collaborating with larger institutions, allowing patients access to state-of-the-art clinical trials. Though the word “trial” may sound like a hit or miss proposition when it comes to cancer care, there are well structured research studies administered to answer specific questions concerning new drug

16 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

therapies, surgical procedures, devices or alternate ways of using known treatments. According to Dr. Mohamad Kassar, a medical oncologist at Community Hospital and the principal investigator for the Gynecology Oncology Group (GOG) trials, clinical trials help in determining whether a test or treatment regimen is equally or more effective than another. In the U.S., medications and devices must go through clinical trials prior to being used in the treatment of patients. Collaborating with Rush Medical Center in Chicago, Community’s cancer team is working to advance early detection and treatment of both uterine and ovarian cancers. “With our participation in the GOG trials, Community Hospital can offer area residents access to state-of-the art national clinical trials,” says Kassar, noting that the treatment of gynecological malignancies, particularly ovarian cancer, is quickly changing and better therapeutic options are becoming available. “There are different cancer research groups in the country,” says B. H. Barai, MD, Medical Director, Oncology Institute at Methodist Hospitals. “We are affiliated with the University of Chicago, which is affiliated with the Alliance for Cancer Research. What that means is whatever protocol that hospitals like Duke University, Mount Sinai and Sloan Memorial have is available in Northwest Indiana. People then don’t have to travel.” Methodist offers the latest clinical trials such as the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) national clinical research trials and is also a regional center for the Dr. Kozloff nationwide SELECT (Selenium and Margaret and Vitamin E Cancer Marriott,The Director of Cancer Prevention Trial). Clinical Trials RN at “Not many cancers are Ingall’s Memorial more aggressive than tripleHospital. negative breast cancer,” Barai YVETTE MARIE DOSTATNI

says. “But there’s positive news; some new chemo drugs for triple-negative are already in clinical trials such as PARP Inhibitors, which are showing a lot of promise.” In his 35 years as an oncologist, Dr. Mark Kozloff, medical director of Ingalls Cancer Care, says he sometimes got a little down. “When you deal with cancer and there aren’t big changes, it’s hard,” he says. “But now I’m more enthused about the future of oncology than I ever have been. The more understanding we have about cancer, the more we can treat it rationally rather than irrationally treating everything.” Partnering with the National Cancer Institute and Chicago’s major university hospitals as well as the nation’s leading cancer treatment centers, Ingalls works with them in the design and implementation of a myriad of clinical trials for nearly every cancer site in the body. “These studies are very exciting,” Kozloff says. “There’s an experimental drug we’re looking at in treating BCL-2,” he says. “BCL-2 typically doesn’t allow lymphoma cells to die, but this drug allows the cancer to die naturally.” According to Kozloff, other clinical studies suggest that certain types of drugs bind with c-Met inhibitors, allowing chemo to be more effective, while another indicates that an antibody appears to attach to c-Met inhibitors and prevents cancer cells from developing. “Oncology today and in the future is going to be personalized care based on the genetics of the cancer and the genetics of the patient,” says Kozloff, noting that it’s no longer onesize-fits-all in cancer treatments but rather tailored to the individual. “It’s going to change how we treat cancer. Sometimes it allows us to give less treatments, sometimes more, but that’s less toxic. It may not always be curative but will hopefully make life better and longer.” —Jane Ammeson


sound healing Relaxation for the mind and body

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ired, hurting, stressed, worn out, scared for themselves and loved ones. These are just a few of the emotions cancer patients may be experiencing, says David Cowan, RN, HNC, CNMT, CLT. A specialist in hands-on healing for chronic pain and former Home Health and Hospice Care nurse, Cowan recently held a Sound Healing session at the Cancer Resource Centre in Munster to help participants manage the stress and pain associated with a cancer diagnosis. During the program, participants lay on their backs with their heads towards the center of the room. Meanwhile, Cowan, a local musician in the area for more than twenty years, played a variety of instruments—including a singing bowl, an overtone flute, a large frame drum, a gong and even a conch shell. The soothing concert of instruments, along with the vibration of the sounds moving through the body, are meant to help the mind and body relax, and eliminate anxiety and stress. Monica Hoffman, a six-year breast cancer survivor and Cancer Resource Specialist at the Cancer Resource Centre, admits she and several other participants were so relaxed and refreshed after the program that they felt as if they had taken a nap or fallen asleep during the session. “The sounds and the vibration wash over your body and give you a renewed feeling of comfort and relaxation,” as Hoffman expresses it. “Each sound had a different pitch and feeling, a vibration through the body. It was very interesting to feel your body respond to the sounds that he was creating on these different instruments.” While Cowan makes use of multiple instruments during these sessions—including the voice of his wife Patti Shaffner—the central part of the session is the gong, which provides the most vibration and opportunity for meditation. “The gong is another form of touch because the vibration touches you,” Cowan explains. “The gong vibrating them is kind of like a massage, a sonic massage. It’s not so much

something that you hear in your ears, but you feel it in your bones.” The vibrations assist in eliminating toxins from the body, relaxing the muscles and improving circulation, Cowan says. In addition, the gong helps those who have difficulty meditating. “The benefit of meditating is that you stop your mind, and the gong will do that for you,” Cowan says. “If you do the music right, it’s hypnotic, [and participants can] kind of check out.” Skin cancer survivor Marilyn Winkler, a regular participant and volunteer at the Cancer Resource Centre programs, enjoyed the session. “You could just totally relax, meditate, go to sleep,” she says of the program. “The sound was like a vibration. I personally thought it was soothing, relaxing.” Healing music experiences, such as these, Cowan explains, “are meant to help satisfy your soul and spirit as well as your body.” Those currently fighting or recovering from cancer may feel helpless and isolated. “[The sessions] create a community, even if it’s only for an hour,” Cowan adds. “We’re all here for the same reason and the same purpose, to recognize that everyone here is human and suffering, and we offer something that is healing.” Interested in attending a Sound Healing session? Call the Cancer Resource Centre at 219.836.3349 for more information. Cancer Resource Centre programs are open to cancer patients and their family members or caregivers. —Ashley Boyer

The central part of Cowan’s sessions is the gong, which provides the most vibration and opportunity for meditation.

contact

CANCER RESOURCE CENTRE 926 Ridge Rd, Munster . 219.836.3349 cancerresourcecentre.com PHOTOS PROVIDED

november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 17


your our life. bet bette ter.r.

Porter Regional Hospital Welcomes 3 new Specialists

James P. Anthony, MD Pulmonary/Critical Care 1231 Cumberland Crossing Valparaiso, Indiana 46383 219-464-9054

Masood Ghouse, DO Hematology/Oncology Health & Oncology Services Porter Medical Plaza 85 E. US Highway 6 Valparaiso, Indiana 46383 219-983-6260

Geoffrey M. Schwartz, MD Otolaryngology

Associated ENT Specialists Porter Medical Plaza 85 E. US Highway 6 Valparaiso, Indiana 46383 219-983-6220

The three-story, 60,000-square-foot Porter Medical Plaza housing the Cancer Care Center, Center for Women’s Health and physician offices is now OPEN!

When it comes to finding a doctor, we’ve got you covered. Today, more than 40 physicians in three counties work together to make Porter Physician Group a healthy resource you and your family can trust.

To find a physician to meet your needs, visit porterphysiciangroup.com 18 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy PPG_GetHealthy_Sept_2012_FINAL.indd 1

9/25/2012 3:25:28 PM


cutting edge treatment for prostate cancer New vaccine is created from patient’s own cells

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irst the discouraging news: According to experts, all men—if they live long enough— will ultimately develop prostate cancer. But take heed. There is encouraging news as well, in the form of new ways to combat what can become a deadly form of cancer. One of the newer and most promising treatments for prostate cancer utilizes a “vaccine” that stimulates the body’s own immune system, which in turn rallies to fight prostate cancer that has traveled from the affected gland in the male reproductive system into areas that are life-threatening: the lungs and the bone. According to Dr. Mohamed Farhat, MD, of Michiana Hematology Oncology in Crown Point, the name of the medication is Provenge, and it involves a slow draw of blood from the prostate cancer patient, a processing of the blood that virtually makes the patient’s own blood cells into a vaccine to fight the invading cancer cells—and finally a return of the treated, activated blood back into the patient to do its job. “It’s cutting edge medicine,” says Farhat, who says he is very excited by the whole Dr. Mohamed idea. “The treatment is a personalized way to target the cancer,” he explains. Farhat paints a picture of the male body as not very good at recognizing, detecting and fighting invading cancer cells from the prostate. Provenge makes the male body’s immune system more “aware” and more able to focus on, and attack, the cells. “By taking the blood out and utilizing the same blood when it’s put back in, that’s the beauty: you’re using your very own blood,” Farhat says. “The cancer cell is a ‘smart’ cell. Provenge reactivates the immune system in the patient to fight those ‘smart’ cells.” Farhat says other treatments are inferior for invasive prostate cancer. These include anti-hormone therapy that fights the male hormone testosterone—a hormone

that can stimulate the cancer cells and make them grow and become more aggressive. And of course, there is chemotherapy—which Farhat says he “hates” because it kills so much more inside the body than just the cancer. “The side effects of Provenge are minimal compared to chemotherapy,” he says. Using Provenge involves only six days of treatment over a six-week period. There are three blood draws, one every two weeks, which can take up to a few hours each. The blood has to be drawn “just so” so that it is in a form that allows for optimal processing. Then there are three days needed, also one every two weeks, for the infusion of the treated blood back into the patient. The infusion process can cause flu-like symptoms. The cost is covered by insurance and by Medicare. And it is all approved by the FDA. As far as results, Farhat is quite excited. Studies show Provenge prolongs life by 4.1 months, on average. Which doesn’t sound like much. Farhat, MD But put in other ways, the results garner a more positive perspective. Farhat says using Provenge—which is generally used after hormone therapy but before chemotherapy— reduces the risk of death from prostate cancer by 22 percent. “Also, 37 percent more men are alive after three years,” says Farhat, as a result of using Provenge. This model of removing blood, Farhat explains, treating it and turning it into a medication that can fight cancer is starting to be studied and developed for other types of cancers, as well, such as lung and breast cancer. And that excites him, too. “It’s a matter of fighting cancer using ‘You,’” Farhat says. —Bonnie McGrath

Dr. Mohamed Farhat, MD

By taking the blood out and utilizing the same blood when it’s put back in, that’s the beauty: you’re using your very own blood.

TONY V. MARTIN, THE TIMES

november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 19


SPECIAL FEATURE

Breast Care Excellence By providing the highest quality, safest treatment experience for women in need of breast care, Community Hospital’s Women’s Diagnostic Center has earned the highest certification in breast imaging from the American College of Radiology as a Breast Imaging Center of Excellence. The Women’s Diagnostic Center offers same day breast imaging results to help ease anxiety and utilizes the most advanced technology to help detect breast cancer at its earliest stages. The health care team consists of specially trained technologists, certified breast health navigators, dedicated breast radiologists, and breast surgeons who together offer the highest standards of diagnostic breast care and treatment. Care provided at accredited breast care centers measures up to the nation’s highest quality standards. For patients, it helps foster peace of mind and trust in treatment.

W

omen’s

Diagnostic Center

A Service of Community Healthcare System

10020 Donald S. Powers Drive | Munster, IN 46321

219-934-8869

20 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

SPINE CARE:

GETTING

BACK TO GOOD

You need your backbone, but few of us understand what we should be doing in our everyday routine to keep our spine healthy. There is a whole new area of medicine opening up to support patients with spinal injuries or disease and help the rest of us prevent deterioration and affliction from sidelining us in the first place. Recoveries that used to take months now take weeks, injuries once thought permanent could soon be temporary and quality and length of pain-free life improve every day.


TOP

10

TIPS FOR A HEALTHY SPINE

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ost of us take the health of our spine for granted . . . until something goes wrong. Luckily, there are ways to make sure your spine stays in tip-top condition throughout the years.

comes to maintaining a healthy spine. Fill your diet with leafy vegetables and a variety of fruits to ensure all of your body parts continue to operate properly.

5

QUIT SMOKING

1

STAY MOBILE

A spine must be kept active in order to continue functioning properly. Therefore, stay active! Maintaining good core strength is a priority. “Motion is lotion for the spine,” explains Dr. George Charuk, DO, physiatrist at Ingalls Advanced Orthopedic Institute. “Staying active is going to keep the joints limber, which will make for a healthier spine.”

Studies show that smoking is not only detrimental to your heart and lungs, but also quite harmful to your spine. “The discs of your back receive the crucial blood supply, and nicotine can choke off that blood supply,” explains Dr. Nitin Khanna, partner at Spine Care Specialists in Munster.

2

ADJUST YOUR CHAIR

The sad reality of today’s world is that many of us spend our days hunched in our desk chair typing away. Sitting properly in your chair is going to have long-term benefits for your spine. The chair itself should also have a good lumbar support that will ensure you are sitting up in the correct position throughout the day.

3

MAINTAIN A HEALTHY WEIGHT

For optimal spine health, it’s essential to maintain a healthy weight for your frame. Excess weight causes unneeded stress to the spine, which will eventually result in back pain.

4

EAT YOUR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Proper nutrition is key when it

8

DRINK LOTS OF WATER

An adequate amount of water is vital to good health. In fact, the spine actually requires water to not only function, but repair itself.

9

LISTEN TO THE SIGNALS

There are ways to know when your pain is far more serious than an achy back. “If one experiences shooting pains down one’s back or difficult walking, it might be time to see a specialist,” Dr. Khanna says. “Also, if you have pain that wakes up from sleeping, it’s time to get a professional opinion.”

10

CONSULT A PRO

6

GET A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP

While purchasing a brand new and often expensive mattress may help your back pain, keep in mind that it might not be the culprit of your pain. Consider also the pillows and the positions you sleep in, and the effects they might be having on your spine.

7

INVEST IN PROPER FOOTWEAR

It just might be time to throw the flip-flops away . . . forever. The average person takes over 6,000 steps during the course of a day, and supportive footwear will help ensure the spine is aligned correctly.

We all wake up with our share of aches and pains, but it’s imperative to consult a professional if achiness in your spine lasts for a prolonged period of time. “Don’t just blame it on a ‘bad back,’” Dr. Charuk says. “Only a spine specialist will be able to determine if the pain is a result of a deeper issue, such as strain or an underlying disc problem. If it doesn’t get better, a spine specialist will be able to diagnose either medications or a physical therapy regimen.” —Tricia Despres

november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 21


NEW SPINE PROCEDURE HAS SHORTER RECOVERY Years of back pain for Herb Williams culminated in December of 2011 when he and his supervisor lifted a nearly 300-pound chunk of concrete into a large waste receptacle at work. “I heard a popping noise and that’s what herniated the disk,” the 42-year-old Roselawn man says. Workers’ compensation sent him to physical therapy, which didn’t help. An MRI revealed the herniated disk, and the physical therapist referred Williams to Dr. Dwight Tyndall. Tyndall, of Spine Care Specialists in Munster, prescribed more physical therapy. “He wanted to do everything but surgery,” Williams says. Again, he saw little improvement. “I was hunched over, couldn’t stand up straight,” he says. “It wasn’t working out, so we decided on the surgery.” What he didn’t realize is he was going under the knife for a new approach to a minimally invasive fusion, using a product that Tyndall’s partner Dr. Nitin Khanna helped design. He had the surgery June 19 and walked four or five laps around the nursing station at Community Hospital in Munster just two days after the operation. “The only thing now is stiffness in the back when I bend over,” he says. “I feel like a new guy.” He does not take pain medication. And after some physical therapy, he returned in October to his job as an apartment complex maintenance technician. A decade ago, such a speedy recovery would be unheard of. Surgeries yielded uneven results and long recovery times, Khanna says. As surgeons increasingly specialized their practices, spine doctors started improving on methods and innovating more successful procedures. Khanna was part of a three-member design team for NuVasive’s MAS PLIF procedure, a lumbar fusion that involves inserting small screws and inter-body cages to help reduce back pain. It was

22 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

THE TIMES FILE PHOTO

Doctors Dwight Tyndall, left, and Nitin Khanna are working on minimally invasive methods and innovative procedures to help reduce back pain.

officially released in July, but Khanna and Tyndall have been performing the procedure for two years. Khanna, because of his role on the design team, was tapped to teach other surgeons the procedure. The operation takes about an hour and a half and has less blood loss than the traditional surgery. Surgeons make a one-and-a-half-inch incision and use high-powered microscopes to see the affected area. Most patients go home in a day and are off pain medicine in two weeks. The biggest concern is getting patients to slow down. They often feel well enough to move around before they are finished healing. Khanna, who has a background in biomedical engineering that complements his work in orthopedics, says this is not the end of the line in the evolution of spinal fusions. “Everyone believes in continually making it better,” he says. Tyndall says the procedure has made a big difference in terms of lumbar fusions but there is always room for improvement. “It’s an evolution,” he says. —Vanessa Renderman

THE TIME TO

EXERCISE YOUR SPINE

The solution to your back problem just might not need to be solved via a complicated surgery or a list of over-the-counter medications. Rather, a prescription for pure and healthy living can often be the answer to your spinal woes. Indeed, diet and exercise can go a long way. “In order to achieve a healthy spine, it is truly achieved through a full body, well-rounded workout,” explains Kelly Langan, a physical therapist at ATI Physical Therapy in Valparaiso. “Overall, the key is to be safe when exercising by always utilizing proper body mechanics and performing exercises within your own personal capabilities. Not only are core and abdominal stabilization exercises crucial, such as Swiss ball exercises, but also lower extremity strengthening exercises. The hips, quads, and even ankles should all be strengthened. Upper body activities that focus on the postural musculature are also an important aspect of maintaining a healthy spine.” Need some ideas of types of exercises that will promote your spinal health? SWIMMING — Much has been said about the benefits swimming can have on the entire body. “Just walking back and forth against the resistance of the water in the pool is going to help you strengthen your core,” explains Dr. Nitin Khanna, partner at Spine Care Specialists in Munster. PILATES – A focus on stretching of the core is going to work wonders when it comes to your spine. “Performing Pilates on a firm mat is going to help you stretch and strengthen those core muscles,” Dr. Khanna adds. “It can often take as little as ten to fifteen minutes a day to get those core muscles in optimal shape.” WALKING – Who knew a walk around the block could have so many benefits? Indeed, a brisk walk can provide oxygen to all the areas of your body, including your spinal region. STRETCHES – Take a moment every day and stretch! A simple knee to chest stretch can work wonders. To do so, lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Using both hands, pull up one knee and press it to your chest and hold for 15 to 30 seconds. Return to the starting position and repeat with the opposite leg. Repeat each stretch two to three times—preferably once in the morning and once at night. —Tricia Despres


Don’t let chronic back and leg pain prevent you from being active The NuVasive® MAS PLIF procedure is a minimally disruptive approach to traditional back surgery. MAS PLIF can result in a faster recovery and a reduced hospital stay compared to traditional spine procedures. Learn more about MAS PLIF. Visit www.nuvasive.com.

Dr. Khanna and Dr. Tyndall of Spine Care Specialists perform the MAS PLIF procedure, in addition to other minimally disruptive techniques.

Dwight Tyndall, M.D., FAAOS Orthopaedic Spine Surgeon

Nitin Khanna, M.D., FAAOS Orthopaedic Spine Surgeon

Spine Care Specialists, in Munster, IN, offers the full spectrum of Spine Care solutions for patients suffering from painful conditions of the spine including comprehensive diagnostic services, conservative treatment approaches, and the latest surgical options in the event that surgery is required. All surgeons are Board certified and Fellowship trained, and dedicated solely to the care of the spine. To schedule a consultation, please call 219.924.3300 or visit www.spinecarespecialists.com.

As with any spine surgery, there are potential benefits and possible risks. Discuss these with your doctor to determine if you are a candidate for the MAS PLIF procedure. © 2012. NuVasive, Inc. All rights reserved.

, NuVasive, Speed of Innovation, and MAS are registered trademarks of NuVasive, Inc.

12-NUVA-1068

november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 23


food & fitness

Short on time? TRY HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING

D

on’t have time to fit a long workout into your busy schedule? A fifteen- or twenty-minute workout is a great alternative to none at all, says Jane Bogordos, fitness supervisor and exercise physiologist at Franciscan Omni Health and Fitness in Schererville. In order to make the most of a short amount of time, Bogordos recommends high-intensity interval workouts. These workouts combine short bursts of high-intensity exercise with lower-intensity recovery periods, typically one minute of high-intensity exercise, such as jumping jacks, followed by one minute of recovery time, such as light jogging. Not only are these workouts more effective than steady, moderate HOW TO REFUEL intensity exercise, YOUR BODY AFTER Bogordos says, but you A WORKOUT burn more calories. “You have a good three After high-intensity exercise, to four hours afterward your body needs to refuel. Bogordos recommends where you’re burning eating “the right amount of way more calories [than protein and complex carbs” after a lower-intensity thirty to sixty minutes after your workout.Try one workout],” Bogordos these nutritious snacks: says, but only if your level of intensity is high Turkey enough. Cheese sticks Bogordos suggests Hard-boiled eggs using the Rated Perceived Hummus with celery Exertion (RPE) scale Protein bar or shake to measure the level A piece of fruit of intensity of your Peanut butter workout. The scale runs smoothie or sandwich from 0 to 10, with 0

24 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

representing an activity you find easy and 10 the most difficult. “High-intensity spurts should get close to 7 to 9 on that scale,” Bogordos says. “When you’re recovered, you should be closer to 3 or 4.” At Franciscan Omni Health and Fitness, Bogordos offers thirtyminute “lunchtime workouts.” For cardio-only circuits, Bogordos does one-minute spurts of sprinting, jumping jacks, mountain climbers, steps, squat jumps, or speed skating, mixed with one-minute recovery periods of walking or jogging. Cardio/strength circuits consist of one minute of cardio exercise, followed by a minute of recovery, then a minute of a strength move and another minute of recovery. Strength options include walking lunges, push-ups, tricep dips, planks, etc. “What I love to do is on the combination moves, like a shoulder press with lunge,” Bogordos adds. Those new to high-intensity workouts may need to begin with ten- or fifteen-minute circuits or take two minutes of recovery time. “You have to figure out what your fitness level is,” Bogordos says. “At the end of your recovery time, you should be ready to go again.” As with all workouts, be sure to warm up for at least five minutes and allow ample time for cool down and stretching. —Ashley Boyer

CONTACT Franciscan Omni Health and Fitness Schererville Campus 221 US Hwy 41, Ste A Schererville, Ind. 219.865.6969. franciscanalliance.org/omni


SatierealSAFFRON Cravings can derail a well-intended diet plan quicker than anything. Heather Hausenblas, PhD, of the University of Florida College of Health and Human Performance, says that snacking has changed dramatically since the 1970s and may in part explain the increase in overweight and obesity. “Not only are people snacking more frequently, but there is an increased preference for higher calorie snacks,” she says.

Willpower isn’t always enough to keep your hand out of the cookie jar, but there is a new way to fight cravings. Satiereal is a patent-pending, clinically proven satiety ingredient, which is derived from the flowers of saffron crocus. Saffron is best known as a culinary spice and dye, but Dr. Hausenblas says Satiereal is made from special crocus rich in active saffron constituents, which makes it cost-effective. The study performed by Gout et al. [2010] found that mildly overweight women who took Satiereal Saffron for eight weeks reported 100 percent reduction in the desire to snack, 50 percent fewer instances of eating between meals, less hunger, moderate weight loss, and more energy. People who have taken Satiereal Saffron extract say they experienced a greater sense of control over between-meal snacking, and a change in eating behavior, without that “jittery feeling” or other undesirable effects. “When serotonin levels are low, people experience depression and anxiety,” Dr. Hausenblas says. “These feelings

An herb that curbs emotional eating

can lead to compulsive eating and craving.” Saffron, particularly the chemical components of safranal and crocin, elevates serotonin levels. When serotonin levels are high, people feel less stressed and depressed. When people feel better emotionally, they are less likely to overeat. The higher serotonin levels also produce a full feeling. “Satiereal is backed by safety data and will not increase levels of serotonin in the blood,” Hausenblas says. Satiereal is available as Re-Body Hunger Chews and Re-Body Hunger Caps. “You take two a day, preferably before your two main meals of the day or at times during the day that you typically feel like snacking,” Dr. Hausenblas explains, “and your tendency to overeat or snack goes way down.” —Sharon Biggs Waller

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november/december 2012 | GET HEALTHY | 25 62259_PORTE_Perl_9_89x4_95c.indd 1

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senior scope

aging parents:

7 WARNING SIGNS OF HEALTH PROBLEMS

family

matters

What to look for when determining the needs of our elderly parents We were lucky when my mom, then 94, decided all on her own not to drive anymore because her eyesight was so poor. But it was more difficult a year later when I looked in her pill box where she organized her medicine by day and discovered mistakes. “Let me take care of that,” she said somewhat snappishly as she took it out of my hands—unusual for someone always very sweet. Gaffes, forgetfulness and disorganization aren’t uncommon for any of us. “It can be difficult for adult children to determine the differences between normal forgetfulness and dementia,” says Melissa Bohacek, communications manager and executive assistant for the Northwest Indiana Community Action Area One Agency on Aging and Community Action Agency (NWICA) in Crown Point. “There are good resources out there to help. AARP has an older driving quiz which is available online. We have a Creative Caregiving Resource Guide; it is a checklist for evaluating loved one’s homes—another consideration when planning to care for a parent or older adult. We recommend contacting your physician or the family’s medical provider when you start noticing changes in the older adult.” People with questions can also call NWICA’s 211 number. On their website, the Mayo Clinic describes seven warning signs indicative of whether our parents can take care of themselves, including how well they get around, if they’re losing too much weight and if they’re in good spirits. The latter is very important, according to Lawrence Brewerton, a clinical psychologist and an adjunct professor of psychology at Indiana University Northwest who also works with the elderly in residential care settings. “The most common problem we have with older adults is depression,” says Brewerton, who teaches a

26 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

course on adulthood and aging. “Depression is very underrated in older adults. The things to look for are insomnia—always a clue in depression—changes in appetite, fatigue, do they talk about feeling down, have there been stressful life events like losing friends, or lack of social support.” Forgetfulness is not necessarily a sign of dementia. “I misplace my keys all the time,” Brewerton says. “But when I find them, I know what to do with them.” There is also a difference between depression and dementia. “Depression is 24 hours a day and is more generalized,” Brewerton says. “Dementia is much more intense in the evening. Whenever anyone sees anything with an older adult, get them checked medically.” When working with aging adults, Brewerton recommends looking at options like adult day care to help provide a social component to their lives and, for caregivers, get respite care when feeling overwhelmed. “Try to involve them when any decisions need to be made,” Brewerton says. “State things in a way that makes it seem like it’s also their decision as well. When I work with patients, I establish contracts where they agree to try things like an activity. Contracts are good, because they feel an obligation then to exercise twice a week or join a group. Giving verbal praise is important. We all love to reminisce, so talk to them about their lives and what they’ve done.” Forget the stereotype. Getting Alzheimer’s and dementia is not a normal progression of aging, Brewerton says. But it is more pervasive and getting more so. “Unfortunately, many of my patients are getting younger and younger,” Brewerton says. “We have two generations who are not active and we need to start taking better care of ourselves.” —Jane Ammeson

Are your aging parents taking care of themselves? Here’s a guide to gauging when your elderly parents need help:

1.

Pay attention to your parents’ appearance. Are their clothes clean? Do they appear to be taking good care of themselves?

2.

Are your aging parents experiencing memory loss?

3.

Are your aging parents safe in their home?

4.

Are your aging parents safe on the road?

5.

Are your aging parents able to get around?

6.

Have your aging parents lost weight?

7.

Are your aging parents in good spirits?

FOR YOUR INFORMATION agingcare.com/Articles/ worried-about-elderlyparent-driving-133862.htm Northwest Indiana Community Action Area One Agency on Aging and Community Action Agency: 800.826.7871 or nwi-ca.com


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PROVIDED

ask the expert DR. MITCHELL BRESSACK

Discusses skin cancer basics, including protection and early detection The ABCs of healthy skin lie in knowing when to see a dermatologist, staying protected from the sun’s rays and catching cancers early. Dr. Mitchell Bressack of Dermatology Center of Northwest Indiana has spent 30 years helping patients monitor the body’s largest organ.

Q: When should individuals begin skin checkups? The time to start checkups is when you have something you are not sure about. Keep an eye on yourself and have your spouse help check your back. When you go in for a routine physical, your primary doctor should also look at your skin as part of the standard exam and advise you when to see a dermatologist. Around 50 years old, it is worth it to have a baseline exam and then every three to five years if nothing pops up. Q: What concerns should prompt a visit to the doctor? The American Academy of Dermatology ABCDE guidelines include watching for differences in asymmetry, border and color within a mole and the diameter as well. E (evolving) was added five years ago and basically involves changes. The problem is everything changes as we get older—it’s like gaining and losing weight. Over the course of six months on a day-to-day basis you don’t see the change, but six months later you are 15 pounds heavier. You don’t see the change because it happens gradually. Photos will help with this. Keep skin close-ups around as a basis for comparison. This is something you can do yourself. Q: What are the different types of skin cancers and treatments? Skin cancers are divided into melanoma and

28 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

non-melanoma types, which have a very small chance of spreading. Basal cell carcinoma, which is the most common, is found in the deepest layers of skin. Squamous cell carcinoma is found in the skin’s surface. Both can be treated with creams, burned or frozen off, surgically removed or there is Mohs surgery for larger tumors. This method combines removal with review under a microscope to ensure all of it is eliminated and as much healthy tissue as possible is preserved. Finding these at an early stage saves the amount of surgery needed. There is also keratosis actinic, which can turn into squamous cell carcinoma if left untreated. Melanoma can spread if it is left alone. The chances of it spreading are related to how thick it is, which also indicates how long it has been there. The problem with melanoma is there is no good therapy. The goal is to catch it as early as possible. The lesion is taken off plus additional tissue depending upon the thickness—it is not a minor procedure. Lymph nodes are also tested to see if it has spread. The difference between big and small in non-melanoma is a big and small scar. The difference between big and small in melanoma could be life and death. Q: Is skin cancer more prevalent? My first year of practice I saw one case of melanoma. Now I see two or three a month on average. Is it because there really are more cases or are we more aware? I don’t think there is any way to prove an

answer. There have been changes in society. With more money and free time, more people are going on spring break vacations and over the years, we started wearing less at the beach. Then tanning beds were created and that has added to it. Q: What is key for sun protection? Common sense: use sunscreen and wear long sleeves and big hats—you have to protect the scalp. If you can see light through the fabric, it is not going to protect you from the sun. The tighter the weave the better, and the darker the color the fewer ultraviolet rays get through as they are absorbed by the material. You can still do what you love. If you golf, you can golf, if you garden, you can garden— just try not to do it between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. In winter months, there are not as many ultraviolet rays, but you should still make it part of your daily routine to wear sunscreen and be covered. Q: What can we pass along to our children to curb skin cancer cases in the future? Kids do what they are taught when they are young. If they are taught to put on sunscreen, it will be part of their natural routine like brushing their teeth. —Lesly Bailey FOR YOUR INFORMATION

For more information about Dr. Bressack’s practice, visit dermatologynwi.com.


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For the finest in heart care, simply follow your heart. We’ll take care of the rest. Chadrick A. Cross, MD Eias E. Jweied, MD, PhD Hilton M. Hudson II, MD George T. Hodakowski, MD Michael A. Bresticker, MD Paul J. Gordon, MD Not pictured: Pat S. Pappas, MD, Antone J. Tatooles, MD, Mini Sivadasan, MD

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Get Healthy Magazine NovDec 2012