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A Publication of The Times

Franciscan Omni Health and Fitness Personal Trainer Manager Jane Bogordos with personal trainers Keith Johnson, Mandy Moore and Dina Berry.

Why everyone needs a trainer

Don’t Do It Yourself ALSO

Beating Addiction Coping with Loss Bariatric Attitude Adjustment March/April 2014

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march/april 2014

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MIND AND BODY HEALTH

As the weather gets warmer, there’s never been a better time to get out and start on weight loss goals. And after a brutal winter, our minds are ready for some spring cleaning just as much as our homes. Learn how doctors can help with these goals and other improvements to help you become your best self.

HEALTHY PRODUCTS DOVE ADVANCED CARE DEODORANT New Dove Advanced Care Deodorant is the only deodorant formulated with NutriumMoisture, offering the brand’s best care ever, while also providing 48-hour odor and wetness protection. NutriumMoisture is a proprietary Dove formula comprised of ingredients that are known to moisturize the skin. Using this new line of deodorants provides women with softer, smoother armpit skin in just three days. New Dove Advanced Care comes in 11 signature Dove scents and two different formulations to address individual skincare needs. The full line of products is available for $4.99.

the body shop

HOSPITAL NAMES NEW EXECUTIVE Dr. Daniel McCormick will take over as vice president of medical affairs for Franciscan St. Anthony Health hospital in Crown Point starting March 1. McCormick previously served two years as president of Franciscan Physician Network in Illinois, which is affiliated with Franciscan St. James Health hospitals in Chicago Heights and Olympia Fields. McCormick, a nephrology specialist, has been in practice since 1991. Among his duties will be overall responsibility for the medical staff and serving as a liaison between physicians and senior management; implementing programs that will benefit medical staff, the hospital and patients; coordinating patient care review and monitoring physician performance. He also will work with executive staff members to develop hospital goals and participate in community service groups.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY COURSE A medical terminology course designed for beginners will be offered for nine consecutive Tuesdays, beginning March 18. The course will be offered in the Marian Education Center, Suite D, on the campus of Franciscan St. Anthony Health hospital, 1201 S. Main St. Classes, which will meet from 5 to 7 p.m., will teach the basics of medical terminology and how to easily remember, pronounce and apply the meanings of all prefixes, roots and suffixes that combine to form more than 11,000 medical terms. Cost, which includes a textbook, is $80 for Franciscan Alliance employees and $130 for non-employees. For more information and to register, call (219) 757-6368.

NATURE VALLEY PROTEIN GRANOLA IN CRANBERRY ALMOND Nature Valley Protein Granola makes it easier to enjoy the taste of Nature Valley anytime, anywhere, in a loose, bagged granola with energy from whole grain to keep you going. It is now available in three flavors, including a new variety—Cranberry Almond. Made with wholesome ingredients, including real almonds and sweetened cranberry pieces, each serving contains 10 grams of protein and at least 22 grams of whole grain (48 grams of whole grain recommended daily). Nature Valley Protein Granola is delicious and versatile: it can be sprinkled on yogurt, eaten with milk or enjoyed as an afternoon snack to satisfy mid-day cravings. The product can be found in the granola aisle at retailers nationwide for an SRP of $4.49 for an 11 ounce bag. Nature Valley Protein Granola is also available in two additional varieties—Oats ‘n Honey and Oats ‘n Dark Chocolate. CHICK-FIL-A ANTIBIOTIC-FREE CHICKEN Chick-fil-A, Inc. announced today the company’s plan to serve chicken raised without antibiotics in all Chick-fil-A restaurants nationwide within five years. This move marks the first time a quick service restaurant has committed to a 100 percent “raised without antibiotics” standard for poultry. The company is partnering with its national and regional poultry suppliers to build the necessary supply of chickens raised without antibiotics to match the chain’s sales volume. The company is asking suppliers to work with the USDA to verify that no antibiotics are administered at any point. JOHN J. WATKINS, THE TIMES

Overcoming

T

Alcoholism THERE COMES A POINT IN AN ALCOHOLIC’S LIFE WHEN DRINKING TAKES OVER. WHEN OPPORTUNITIES TO SELF-MEDICATE OUTWEIGH EVERYTHING ELSE. For 60-year-old south suburban Stella, a nightly dose of alcohol helped dull the pain of her husband’s passing. Several days a week, she bought a pint and nursed it in front of the TV. Then she passed out. For five years, this was Stella’s pattern. She drank alone, and when she ran out, she had a network of 20 liquor stores she bought from. “I didn’t want them to know I had a drinking problem,” she says. “So I’d switch things up and go to different stores. As if someone who buys a pint of vodka at a time doesn’t have a problem!” Like many alcoholics, Stella was a private drinker. On rare occasions when she ventured out with friends, she kept her addiction under control. And unlike the stereotypes often associated with an alcoholic, Stella wasn’t a destitute drinker. On the contrary, she is a doctor’s wife. “I just wasn’t dealing with life as it was coming at me, and I knew it,” she says. Eventually nighttime drinking became daytime drinking too.

Participants in a Barre Fitness class in Chesterton create lean muscle definition with their workout.

barre fitness

A BALLET-INSPIRED WORKOUT Dr. Joseph Beck counsels a patient about addictions

Stella made appointments to see her doctor; she even attended Alcoholics Anonymous meetings. But it wasn’t until she got a DUI that Stella made the

PROVIDED

decision to get sober for good. “It was the worst day of my life,” she says of her DUI arrest. “I had never felt so humiliated. Yet it was the best day of

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on your mind

If you’ve ever coveted the long, lean physique of a dancer, barre workouts are designed to help achieve just that. • Based on traditional ballet movements, barre classes have been popular with celebrities for some time and barre studios began opening up in big cities throughout the country in the past decade. Now, thanks to a new studio opening in Chesterton called M.O.M.s Method, Northwest Indiana women can give this new craze a try.

Apps and technology for

mental health maintenance

he studio has been offering classes since mid-January and teaches what owner Orlee Glazer calls “Mind Over Matter Studio Method,” or M.O.M.s Method, a method she designed to benefit women of all

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ant to set your home’s alarm system? There’s an app for that. Want to track your movements fitness goals? There’s

an app for that too. Want to know what song is playing right now, wherever you are? There’s even an app for that. But mental health maintenance? Can there be an app for that? As it turns out, there is. In addition to professional apps, independent consumer apps such as Lift, Unstuck, Superbetter, Optimism and others are designed with mental health goals in mind. Some of these apps, such as Unstuck, helps the user get to the root of their problem or negative mental state, and then allows the user to set a goal to move past it. Smaller goals, like making a habit of flossing every night, are covered within the Lift app, where users can track the number of days they accomplish their one small goal. Other apps, such as Superbetter, use a gamelike interface to present healthy challenges and allow the user to overcome mental health “bad guys,” such as laziness or negative self-talk. Some healthcare groups are even creating custom apps for their patients, says Joseph G. Fanelli, Medical Director for Community Healthcare System Centers for Mental Wellness, whose organization is currently developing several tech tools, including apps. “These apps are focused on assessing signs and symptoms of illness, on assessing response to treatment, and on enhancing mental wellness,” Fanelli says. But how effective are independent apps for mental health maintenance?

stages in their lives. Glazer explains, “M.O.M.s Method is a technique that I’ve formulated that combines the best from ballet, Pilates and barre with stretching and conditioning.” Professionally trained in ballet, Glazer became interested in barre fitness after she took a class in New York City with a friend. She ultimately earned her certification to teach barre classes. When Glazer, a Maryland native, moved to Northwest Indiana, she discovered the closest barre classes were offered in Chicago and decided to open her own studio in Chesterton. Set to up-beat music, the studio’s hourlong class focuses on isometric or small movements, isolating one muscle at a time, followed by stretching to lengthen the muscle. The workout focuses on all parts of the body, with an emphasis on core strength, and participants keep moving the entire time. “This is the type of class that energizes you for the day,” Glazer says. In addition to the muscular benefits, “you are getting some cardiovascular benefits because your heart rate will go up and down as you go through the movements.” Glazer says she not only sees the benefits of the lengthening, strengthening and tightening of the body from barre workouts, but added that clients often tell her how energizing, invigorating and motivating the workout is as well. Client Amy Morgan shared on the studio’s Facebook page, “Thank you ladies for the

“For people not dealing with any serious issues in their life and just looking to improve themselves, indeed, ‘there’s an app for that’— many good ones, too!” Says Jean Lubeckis, EAP Therapist with Franciscan Alliance. “Apps such as Optimism, Inspirational Quotes, Hope Book or Atease, can help someone practice mindfulness, meditation, improve attitude, sleep, or reduce stress,” Lubeckis says. For those looking for a better quality of life, these apps can be very helpful. However, Lubeckis cautions others to be careful. “Just because there is Joseph Fanelli, MD an app, doesn’t mean it is good or reliable,” Lubeckis says. For those with more serious mental health goals, Lubeckis suggests using higherlevel apps along with other treatment. Jean Lubeckis, “Anyone seeking Licensed Mental information, guidance Health Counselor or help regarding mental health issues like anxiety, depression or issues negatively impacting their life, would be wise to seek information from professional apps,” she says. “For instance, there are apps by Web MD, Psych Central, state and federal mental health groups and even the DSM-V. Some apps have been designed by professionals and some are designed to accompany self-help books. “There are apps focusing on Depression and Anxiety. One has a screening tool called the

ISTOCKPHOTO

TREATMENT FOR ATHLETES WITH ADDICTIONS

consequences

Athletes, with their need for a competitive edge, enhanced speed and being able to play through pain, are at a greater risk of becoming addicted to drugs in general but prescription drugs specifically because of injuries and the rising pressure to keep playing even when injured says Peter Bradley, a therapist at Illinois Institute for Addiction Recovery, which has a unit at Ingalls Hospital.

B

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COMPETITIVE radley is certified in working with dual diagnoses involving substance abuse and mental health. Professional sports figures are often afraid if they don’t play because of an injury, someone else will take their place. High school and college athletes worry about losing scholarships and prestige. “And there’s the fan level,” says Bradley. “You want to please them and that feeling just adds to the pressure.” At times, that’s apparent even to those watching the game. An athlete withers in pain on the floor, is helped back to the bench, he or she is talked to sternly and then suddenly they’re back on the floor. “Some of the medications they prescribe for injuries can be doozies,” says Bradley. “The opioids used in pain killers are very strong, very potent and they’re meant for short term use because they are highly addictive. Therein lies the problem; a lot of people get addicted who wouldn’t normally have the profile of someone who would become addict.” “Sports figures are high arousal people,” says Larry Brewerton, a psychology professor at Indiana University Northwest. By using the term high arousal, Brewerton is referring to the need for extreme physical and emotional stimulation. “They’re used to high arousal when they’re playing with a lot of adrenaline going on and

they really thrive on that,” he says. “When they’re not off, they still need it. They thrive on it and so many use amphetamines, cocaine, things that keep up that arousal. It makes them feel very good as well as omnipotent.” Bradley believes painkillers are the number one misused prescription drug. “If you use them too many days you develop tolerance and withdrawal symptoms where you try to stop and these are symptoms of drug addictions,” he says. “Pain patients’ withdrawal from opiate use is like having the flu a hundred times over and addicts know in order to stop these dramatically painful withdrawals is to take the drug. I’m a firm believer that certain people need prescription medicines for certain things, but the potential for misuse is pretty amazing” Brewerton, who used biofeedback when working with sports stars in order to train them to relax, says that there are many people who are addicted who are not aware of it mainly because of self medicating. “They look at medicine that is prescribed as being okay compared to drugs on the street,” he says. “Unfortunately general practitioners write a lot of prescription and don’t send patients to specialists to figure out why they’re anxious, can’t sleep and instead of just writing prescriptions…many people out there self medicating.” Treatment can make a difference but Brewerton offers some caveats. “Many times treatment programs for alcohol and substance abuse ask someone to give

ask the expert

senior scope

JANE BOGORDOS, OMNI HEALTH & FITNESS

maintaining a

HEALTHY

weight

You’re a senior who expects to maintain a healthy weight, but the scale numbers are creeping up. What’s going on?

A something up but you also have to replace it with something to give the patient a way to put themselves in a place that’s very awarding but satisfying and healthy as well,” says Brewerton. Both Bradley and Brewerton agree that the best chance for recovery is when a patient is committed. If not, when confronted by loved ones, the addict withdraws from them and becomes angry as denial is part of the addiction process. “That’s an important part of recovery,” says Brewerton. — Jane Ammeson

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ny number of changes occur as you age—and they can contribute to sabotaging your ideal weight, says Dr. Omar Shamsi, on staff at Healthy 4 Life Centers at Community Hospital in Munster and St. Mary Medical Center in Hobart. First, as you age, “Metabolism slows down. You may not be able to move around as well; a hip might be hurting,” says Shamsi. “A spouse may have passed away and you Dr. Omar Shamsi don’t want to cook for yourself, so you go out and eat. A husband alone may not know how to cook. And the elderly love to buy treats for grandkids; then they end up eating some chocolates themselves.” Jan Dowell, a registered dietitian at Ingalls Wellness Center at Ingalls Family Care Center, says many seniors are less active with every increasing year. “With time on their hands, the

elderly may do things like watching TV, knitting, bingo, book clubs—all wonderful things. But you may be taking in more calories than you’re burning.” And up go the numbers on that scale. How can seniors stop the trend and stay at a healthy weight? Motivation and monitoring “The key is to stay active, to keep your metabolic rate up,” says Jill Kilhefner, registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Porter Regional Hospital in Valparaiso. “If you’re carrying too much weight, it puts you at risk for all kinds of disease—high blood pressure, diabetes, and more. You set yourself up for more pain if you become less mobile,” says Kilhefner, who also works with the hospital’s weight loss surgery patients. Time for a change. “Motivation is the biggest step towards a healthier lifestyle—and it’s the hardest step. People just need someone to push them a little bit,” says Shamsi, who is fellowship trained in Nutrition Support/Obesity Medicine. Seniors’ doctors may have told them to lose weight, but many physicians don’t know how to explain eating healthy or exercise, says Shamsi. Still, seniors realize weight may be causing problems like arthritis. “These seniors want to ambulate better, be able to put on their shoes; they know their sweets and stuff are not helping. Patients at Healthy 4 Life want to get healthy. They want to be there for their grandkids.” Dowell’s tips for staying at a healthy weight:

P R O V ID E D

Jan Dowell, registered dietitian

Pay attention to portion size and actual hunger: Do you really need a cookie? Would half that potato be enough? If you’re cutting portions, cut out things that don’t provide nutrition, like pie, regular soda, the extra glass of wine. Weigh yourself once a month so you can catch weight gain before it gets out of control. Shamsi cautions, “Don’t skip breakfast, otherwise your metabolism slows down.” And get enough shut-eye: Without enough sleep, certain hormones aren’t released—and that leads to stubborn weight loss. Think it’s too late to start exercising? Not so, says Shamsi. “It’s never too late to exercise. It decreases diabetes and cancers, builds strength in bones, and improves balance, reducing the risk of falling.” And it helps maintain proper weight. Dowell recommends the healthy eating budget from the Environmental Working Group at ewg. org. It tells how much of every $25 to spend on different food groups. Says Kilhefner, “All of us should be eating with an emphasis on plant foods; whole grains; lean, low-fat protein sources in small portions; low-fat or fat-free dairy; and a good variety of foods to get all the nutrition we need.” Food for thought: “I don’t know of anyone who’s overweight because they’re eating too many vegetables,” says Dowell. —Julie Dean Kessler

Personal training tailored for you

Jane Bogordos has been an exercise physiologist for 21 years. She has been an exercise physiologist and fitness supervisor at Omni Health & Fitness since 2010. Previously, she spent 15 years working in outpatient physical therapy helping athletes, stroke patients, people suffering from industrial injuries and people recovering from surgery.

Q: How did you get started personal

Q: Who needs a trainer? Everyone would

training? I have always been active, played sports in high school and college, and loved helping people either get started on exercise programs or challenge them to higher levels with their current workouts. Working first in physical therapy and now back in fitness has allowed me to help so many people improve their strength, function, and overall health.

benefit from having a trainer. Anyone who is new to exercise would benefit from the expertise and education of a trainer to make sure they are learning proper form and technique. A person who has been exercising independently for a long time, but who is not getting the desired results of all their hard work, also would benefit from a trainer to change up their exercise routines and take their training to a higher level.

Q: What is a personal trainer? Do trainers specialize in different things? A personal trainer is a certified health professional who is there to help motivate, educate, support, and provide accountability to their clients. Many of the trainers at Omni have different areas that they specialize in. A few of the specialties include functional training, body building, power lifting, Pilates reformer training, youth sports performance, body fat reduction, and endurance training. Omni offers not only one-on-one training, but also semi-private, small group training, and youth training as well.

Q: How do you choose a trainer who is

right for you? Choosing a trainer that is the right fit for you is very important. We assess everything from the clients goals, preference for female/male trainer, the desire for one-on-one vs. group training and the time/date availability of the client. Q: What should I expect in my first session

with a trainer? First, if the session is a private training session, the trainer and client will discuss goals, previous exercise experience, preference for specific exercises, medical history, and training schedule, followed by your first training session.

TONY V. MARTIN

survivor spotlight

Compiled by Times Staff

Health care officials recently hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony to mark the opening of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago at Franciscan Alliance comprehensive outpatient therapy clinic at Franciscan Physician Network-St. John Health Center, 10860 Maple Lane. The clinic will focus on the treatment of functional impairments related to neurological deficits caused by such diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, brain injuries or the aftereffects of a stroke. It also will treat amputees and patients having other impairments, due to workrelated injuries that require multiple therapies, such as physical, outpatient and speech therapy.

PHOTOS PROVIDED

what’s new Local Health News OFFICIALS MARK CLINIC OPENING

If you are participating in small group training, you will first complete an introductory session to learn the basic fundamental training exercises and then continue onto the small group training sessions that are available throughout the week. Q: What are the benefits of working with

a trainer? The greatest benefits of working with a trainer are motivation, accountability, and results! If you have a specific goal of reducing body fat and building upper body strength for instance, often it is very hard to do it on your own. We are creatures of habit and get stuck in a rut doing the same exercises week after week, not making any strides to reach our goals. Trainers are able to use their education, knowledge and experience to provide you with tips and tricks to help you develop a healthier lifestyle and make it easier for you to reach your goals. — Carrie Rodovich

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Contact Franciscan Omni Health and Fitness at franciscanalliance.org/omni‎.

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what’s new

survivor spotlight

the body shop

on your mind

food & fitness

senior scope

ask the expert

Moisturizing deodorant, protein-filled granola and antibiotic-free chicken.

An addictions survivor takes us on her journey to recovery.

Barre fitness creates dancerstyle lean muscles in a convenient class.

Mental health apps can help you achieve your goals along with professional treatment.

Losing weight the natural way is healthier than any fad diet.

How to maintain a healthy weight as a senior while continuing an active lifestyle.

Personal trainer Jane Bogordos creates a tailored fitness experience.

4 letter from the editor 2 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

|

6 get healthy executive partners


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letter from the editor volume 9 | issue 2

I

A NEW ERA OF COMMUNICATION

f you’re anything like me, and you have a smartphone, chances are it’s less than 12 inches from your hand right now. Most of us are constantly checking emails, checking social media, and managing our calendars from these hand-held devices. Even on vacation, I can’t go a solid hour without checking for an email or a text (a habit that drives my husband nuts). Even when there’s no work to be done, our phones play our music, stream favorite videos and keep track of our high scores on Flappy Bird. And I know I’m not alone on this. It’s even difficult for me to leave my phone outside the bathroom when I go to take a shower—which explains why waterproof cases are so popular. The point is, through our phones, we are constantly connected. Why not use these phones to connect with our goals and our healthcare? The iTunes store is flooded with health apps, from simple calorie counters to fancier models that sync up with wristbands. It’s easier to achieve weight loss goals when you can see your progress as a handy graph week-to-week. But even beyond weight loss, apps can help smartphone users achieve all kinds of goals: Mental health goals, house cleaning goals,

money-saving goals—you name it, there’s an app for it. I have used several apps to work on my personal mental health and self-care goals, including SuperBetter, which uses a game-like design to make overcoming obstacles seem like fun. Or Unstuck, which helps users get to the bottom of a problem, whether it’s an emotion or another mental roadblock. And I know that in the last month, I’ve flossed my teeth more regularly than I ever have in my life thanks to Lift. Doctors and health organizations are helping patients take things to the next level with custom-designed apps and communication tools to bring patients and doctors closer together. It seems like an obvious development, if you think about it. Our phones are always in our hands. Why not use them to take a more active and participatory approach to our health and wellness? Smartphones and related devices are definitely here to stay, as everyone knows. And just as they have merged office tasks with communication, they will continue to be excellent tools for staying healthy too. KATHLEEN DORSEY MANAGING EDITOR

Publisher — CHRISTOPHER T. WHITE Associate Publisher/Editor — PAT COLANDER Managing Editor — KATHLEEN DORSEY Associate Content Producer — TARA MCELMURRY Design Director — BEN CUNNINGHAM Designer — APRIL BURFORD Contributing Editors JANE AMMESON, LESLY BAILEY, ASHLEY BOYER, CHRISTINE BRYANT, TRISH MALEY, TARA MCELMURRY, JENNIFER PALLAY, PHILIP POTEMPA, CARRIE RODOVICH, ELOISE VALADEZ, SHARON BIGGS WALLER NICHE PUBLICATION SALES Account Executives MIKE CANE, ANDREA WALCZAK VP of Sales JOHN TUCKER Advertising Managers ERIC HORON, CRAIG CHISM, DEE DEE WHITE Production Manager TOM KACIUS

Published by Lee Enterprises The Times of Northwest Indiana Niche Productions Division 601 W 45th Ave, Munster, Indiana 46321 219.933.3200 2080 N Main St Crown Point, Indiana 46307 219.662.5300 1111 Glendale Blvd Valparaiso, Indiana 46383 219.548.4300 Copyright, Reprints and Permissions: You must have permission before reproducing material from Get Healthy magazine.

CHECK OUT NWI.COM/GETHEALTHY, WHERE YOU’LL FIND: Our comprehensive calendar of Well-Being Events • Fresh new articles and information every day Health advice from local and national experts • The place to sign up for our weekly email newsletter with and ideas on nutrition, fitness, mental health and health care

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Get Healthy magazine is published six times each year by Lee Enterprises, The Times of Northwest Indiana, Niche Division, 601 W 45th Ave, Munster, IN 46321.


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HEALTH ISSUES, WHO PAYS WHAT AND LIFE ITSELF The bottom line for the industry is a long and healthy outcome

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hen has the economic impact of healthcare not been front page news lately? Insurance companies, provider systems and state and federal governments, which have been working for years to towards becoming more efficient as well as compliant, are now seeing fruits of that labor. On the other side, the individual customer is embarking on a new world, where research and decision-making will be an obvious and defining factor in the family budget. Just anecdotally, many people I know are making choices that will change their wellness plan for this year anyway, as part of a large social experiment with an unknown (and unknow-able) result. And while it is difficult to be 100 percent comfortable with trying to predict how healthy we will be in the year to come—especially when the weather has been an extremely volatile factor in everyday living and working—there are items that everyone is relieved to have off the table, like pre-existing conditions, or the million dollar insurance caps that have been gone so long that they are almost forgotten. By the way, I don’t mind giving up the old routine of filling out a new set of forms for every doctor visit. Remembering the dates of any past surgeries, illnesses, prescription drugs—generic vs. trademark names, dosage, duration, are you kidding me?—had gotten to be way more than a minor annoyance. Kind of like taking a standardized test before every office appointment; I won’t miss that. I like that a specialist I haven’t seen for 13 years knows exactly what took place that long ago and will gladly show me the report, because I sure don’t remember the details. Last week I went to the wake of a high school friend’s mother who died at the age of 91, leaving a very sad, but very large group of people including spouse, children, grandchildren, spouses of children and grandchildren, and many great grandchildren, even a few with spouses of their own. While it was obviously very painful for family to lose someone so close and so beloved, it was plain to see what a joy every day of her life had been for all concerned. Living longer and having an improved quality of life is the big benefit of efficient and affordable healthcare, that’s the benefit we sometimes forget about as we study fees-perpaycheck and coverage subsidies. Communicating, informing and educating readers about what’s going on with healthcare in Northwest Indiana are our mission. The economics that go with supporting healthy life plans are certainly an important part of our work, but we should never forget the point of staying alive. Our common goal of living longer, happier and healthier lives is the reason these things matter so much and commerce, in spite of all the attention it gets, is just a side note. Next issue we will look at innovative treatments, aching bones and our tired, cold feet.

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______________

Carol Schuster, RN, MBA Franciscan Alliance Thomas J. Gryzbek Franciscan St. Margaret Health Jim Lipinski Franciscan Alliance James T. Callaghan III, MD, MBA Franciscan St. Anthony Health Michigan City Trish Weber, RN, MBA Franciscan St. Anthony Health Michigan City Jonathan Nalli Porter Hospital Michael Davenport, MD Methodist Hospitals Denise Dillard Methodist Hospitals Haroon Naz Pinnacle Hospital Barbara H. Greene Franciscan Physicians Hospital Beverly DeLao Franciscan Hammond Clinic Rob Jensen Franciscan Hammond Clinic

MARKETING AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS Mylinda Cane Community Healthcare System Angela Moore St. Catherine Hospital Kelly Credit Porter Hospital Karen Keltner Porter Hospital Mary Fetsch St. Mary Medical Center Marie Forszt Community Hospital Joe Dejanovic Franciscan Alliance Ellen Sharpe Franciscan Alliance Sister M. Aline Shultz, OSF Franciscan Alliance Maria E. Ramos Franciscan Alliance

Dr. Nancy Trimboli Trimboli Chiropractic

Neil Mangus, MHA IU Health LaPorte Hospital

John T. King, MD Franciscan St. Anthony Crown Point

Colleen Zubeck Franciscan Medical Specialists Centers of Indiana

Anton Thompkins, MD Lakeshore Bone & Joint Institute

Michael Shepherd St. James Hospital and Health Centers

Willis Glaros Employer Benefits Systems

Linda Hadley Methodist Hospitals

Adrianne May Hospice of the Calumet Area

Evelyn Morrison Methodist Hospitals

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Calumet City Harvey Tinley Park

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Cardiovascular Testing Services: 64-Slice CT Scan • EKG EchoCardiogram • Heart Monitoring Echo and Thallium Stress Tests

Hearts in the right place. Ingalls outpatient cardiovascular testing. Great healthcare is even better when it’s local. At Ingalls, we have a heart to improve our community’s cardiovascular health and to enrich and extend each person’s life. So now we provide local diagnostic services to make it easy for you and your doctor to learn more about your heart.

www.Ingalls.org

The most sophisticated diagnostic testing services for your heart are just around the corner at an Ingalls Family Care Center or at our main campus. It’s comfortable, more convenient for you and your physician, and easier to schedule and follow up.

If you need help choosing a primary care doctor or specialist, an operator is available 24/7 to help you schedule your first appointment. Just call 708.915.2273. To schedule a test, call Outpatient Services Scheduling at 708.915.3333.

Wholehearted Cardiovascular Care.

SM

march/april 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 7


what’s new Compiled by Times Staff

Local Health News

HEALTHY PRODUCTS

OFFICIALS MARK CLINIC OPENING

DOVE ADVANCED CARE DEODORANT New Dove Advanced Care Deodorant is the only deodorant formulated with NutriumMoisture, offering the brand’s best care ever, while also providing 48-hour odor and wetness protection. NutriumMoisture is a proprietary Dove formula comprised of ingredients that are known to moisturize the skin. Using this new line of deodorants provides women with softer, smoother armpit skin in just three days. New Dove Advanced Care comes in 11 signature Dove scents and two different formulations to address individual skincare needs. The full line of products is available for $4.99.

Health care officials recently hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony to mark the opening of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago at Franciscan Alliance comprehensive outpatient therapy clinic at Franciscan Physician Network-St. John Health Center, 10860 Maple Lane. The clinic will focus on the treatment of functional impairments related to neurological deficits caused by such diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, brain injuries or the aftereffects of a stroke. It also will treat amputees and patients having other impairments, due to workrelated injuries that require multiple therapies, such as physical, outpatient and speech therapy.

HOSPITAL NAMES NEW EXECUTIVE Dr. Daniel McCormick will take over as vice president of medical affairs for Franciscan St. Anthony Health hospital in Crown Point starting March 1. McCormick previously served two years as president of Franciscan Physician Network in Illinois, which is affiliated with Franciscan St. James Health hospitals in Chicago Heights and Olympia Fields. McCormick, a nephrology specialist, has been in practice since 1991. Among his duties will be overall responsibility for the medical staff and serving as a liaison between physicians and senior management; implementing programs that will benefit medical staff, the hospital and patients; coordinating patient care review and monitoring physician performance. He also will work with executive staff members to develop hospital goals and participate in community service groups.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY COURSE A medical terminology course designed for beginners will be offered for nine consecutive Tuesdays, beginning March 18. The course will be offered in the Marian Education Center, Suite D, on the campus of Franciscan St. Anthony Health hospital, 1201 S. Main St. Classes, which will meet from 5 to 7 p.m., will teach the basics of medical terminology and how to easily remember, pronounce and apply the meanings of all prefixes, roots and suffixes that combine to form more than 11,000 medical terms. Cost, which includes a textbook, is $80 for Franciscan Alliance employees and $130 for non-employees. For more information and to register, call (219) 757-6368.

8 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

NATURE VALLEY PROTEIN GRANOLA IN CRANBERRY ALMOND Nature Valley Protein Granola makes it easier to enjoy the taste of Nature Valley anytime, anywhere, in a loose, bagged granola with energy from whole grain to keep you going. It is now available in three flavors, including a new variety—Cranberry Almond. Made with wholesome ingredients, including real almonds and sweetened cranberry pieces, each serving contains 10 grams of protein and at least 22 grams of whole grain (48 grams of whole grain recommended daily). Nature Valley Protein Granola is delicious and versatile: it can be sprinkled on yogurt, eaten with milk or enjoyed as an afternoon snack to satisfy mid-day cravings. The product can be found in the granola aisle at retailers nationwide for an SRP of $4.49 for an 11 ounce bag. Nature Valley Protein Granola is also available in two additional varieties—Oats ‘n Honey and Oats ‘n Dark Chocolate. CHICK-FIL-A ANTIBIOTIC-FREE CHICKEN Chick-fil-A, Inc. announced today the company’s plan to serve chicken raised without antibiotics in all Chick-fil-A restaurants nationwide within five years. This move marks the first time a quick service restaurant has committed to a 100 percent “raised without antibiotics” standard for poultry. The company is partnering with its national and regional poultry suppliers to build the necessary supply of chickens raised without antibiotics to match the chain’s sales volume. The company is asking suppliers to work with the USDA to verify that no antibiotics are administered at any point. JOHN J. WATKINS, THE TIMES


Should I have my wisdom teeth removed? When should I have them removed? These are a few questions that are commonly asked in our office. We would like to have the opportunity to see you for a consultation to determine if you will benefit from wisdom tooth removal. Consultations are always complimentary for wisdom teeth and dental implant patients. Dr. Platt has been serving Northwest Indiana for over 20 years with quality oral surgery care in Wisdom Teeth Removal, Dental Implants, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Extractions, General and IV Sedations. Patient financing available

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We welcome new patients Monday -Thursday: 8am - 5pm Friday: 7am - 2pm We are currently scheduling Spring break appointments. Please consider scheduling your wisdom tooth consultation early for the most convenient appointment times.

Dr. Jay Platt and his staff work closely with you and your dentist to ensure your treatment exceeds your expectations. Choosing an oral surgeon is an important decision. Our team is composed of experienced professionals who are dedicated to your care. We are looking forward to fulfilling your dental needs.

www.jplattdds.com march/april 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 9


survivor spotlight

Overcoming

Alcoholism THERE COMES A POINT IN AN ALCOHOLIC’S LIFE WHEN DRINKING TAKES OVER. WHEN OPPORTUNITIES TO SELF-MEDICATE OUTWEIGH EVERYTHING ELSE. For 60-year-old south suburban Stella, a nightly dose of alcohol helped dull the pain of her husband’s passing. Several days a week, she bought a pint and nursed it in front of the TV. Then she passed out. For five years, this was Stella’s pattern. She drank alone, and when she ran out, she had a network of 20 liquor stores she bought from. “I didn’t want them to know I had a drinking problem,” she says. “So I’d switch things up and go to different stores. As if someone who buys a pint of vodka at a time doesn’t have a problem!” Like many alcoholics, Stella was a private drinker. On rare occasions when she ventured out with friends, she kept her addiction under control. And unlike the stereotypes often associated with an alcoholic, Stella wasn’t a destitute drinker. On the contrary, she is a doctor’s wife. “I just wasn’t dealing with life as it was coming at me, and I knew it,” she says. Eventually nighttime drinking became daytime drinking too.

10 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

Dr. Joseph Beck counsels a patient about addictions

Stella made appointments to see her doctor; she even attended Alcoholics Anonymous meetings. But it wasn’t until she got a DUI that Stella made the

PROVIDED

decision to get sober for good. “It was the worst day of my life,” she says of her DUI arrest. “I had never felt so humiliated. Yet it was the best day of


my life too. It forced me to do something about my problem. Thankfully, I didn’t hurt anyone else. I had such a sense of grace. Someone was looking out for me, and I wasn’t going to blow it.” Urged by her doctor, psychiatrist and addictions specialist Joseph Beck, M.D., she voluntarily admitted herself to the four-week program at the Illinois Institute for Addictions Recovery at Ingalls (IIAR). The IIAR is a 16-bed adult addiction treatment facility providing care for a wide range of addictions, including alcohol and drugs; gambling; the internet; video-gaming; sex; spending/ shopping; DR. food; and chronic pain with addiction. Since her treatment four years ago, she’s never touched a drop of alcohol again. “The first Saturday night that I was in treatment, a group of us were eating popcorn and watching a movie about addictions,” she recalls. “I was surrounded by people dealing with similar issues, some worse than mine, and it suddenly hit me that this was the best Saturday night I’d had in five years.” Though she had to conquer the addiction herself, Stella says the IIAR counselors gave her the tools she needed to be successful. “And for that,” she adds, “I’m forever grateful.” “What many people don’t realize is that coming to treatment is the first step in a lifelong journey

of recovery,” Dr. Beck explains. “Your life (the people, places, and things you’re associated with) has to dramatically change after treatment. That’s really where the rubber meets the road for so many of our clients.” After her discharge, Stella reconnected with old friends and began volunteering in

What many people don’t realize is that coming to treatment is the first step in a lifelong journey of recovery. JOSEPH BECK

the community. She repaired fractured family relationships and rediscovered her love of traveling. She even hired a personal trainer and lost 83 pounds in the process. With the help of the IIAR, Stella emerged from the darkness of her addiction and rebuilt a life that now brings her joy. To others facing the uncomfortable truth of addiction, Stella advises, “The most important thing is to be honest with yourself. Are you the person you want to be? If the answer is no, you don’t have to do it alone. Help is closer than you think.” If you or someone you love is ready to reach out for help, call 708.915.4090, available 24 hours a day.

march/april 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 11


PHOTOS PROVIDED

the body shop

T Participants in a Barre Fitness class in Chesterton create lean muscle definition with their workout.

barre fitness

A BALLET-INSPIRED WORKOUT

If you’ve ever coveted the long, lean physique of a dancer, barre workouts are designed to help achieve just that. • Based on traditional ballet movements, barre classes have been popular with celebrities for some time and barre studios began opening up in big cities throughout the country in the past decade. Now, thanks to a new studio opening in Chesterton called M.O.M.s Method, Northwest Indiana women can give this new craze a try. 12 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

he studio has been offering classes since mid-January and teaches what owner Orlee Glazer calls “Mind Over Matter Studio Method,” or M.O.M.s Method, a method she designed to benefit women of all

stages in their lives. Glazer explains, “M.O.M.s Method is a technique that I’ve formulated that combines the best from ballet, Pilates and barre with stretching and conditioning.” Professionally trained in ballet, Glazer became interested in barre fitness after she took a class in New York City with a friend. She ultimately earned her certification to teach barre classes. When Glazer, a Maryland native, moved to Northwest Indiana, she discovered the closest barre classes were offered in Chicago and decided to open her own studio in Chesterton. Set to up-beat music, the studio’s hourlong class focuses on isometric or small movements, isolating one muscle at a time, followed by stretching to lengthen the muscle. The workout focuses on all parts of the body, with an emphasis on core strength, and participants keep moving the entire time. “This is the type of class that energizes you for the day,” Glazer says. In addition to the muscular benefits, “you are getting some cardiovascular benefits because your heart rate will go up and down as you go through the movements.” Glazer says she not only sees the benefits of the lengthening, strengthening and tightening of the body from barre workouts, but added that clients often tell her how energizing, invigorating and motivating the workout is as well. Client Amy Morgan shared on the studio’s Facebook page, “Thank you ladies for the


Looking younger, more toned after weight loss surgery

wonderful class today. Even 8 months pregnant and the burn was energizing.” Master Instructor at M.O.M.s Method in Chesterton, Elizabeth Mazepa, agrees, “After each class, your entire body will feel truly worked. You’ll feel stretched, lengthened and invigorated. It truly will give you a ‘barre high.’” Women of all fitness levels are welcome at Glazer’s studio. Because the studio is the first of its kind in Northwest Indiana, many of the students are new to the workout and workouts can be modified to fit each student’s ability. Students often wear yoga pants and a T-shirt, but nothing too baggy so instructors can help correct form. In addition, socks are required in the studio and a special sock to help with grip when doing movements can be purchased at the studio. All other equipment, including the light weights used during the workout, is provided. With this new studio, Glazer hopes to help women achieve their goals—whether it’s just to get out of the house, develop upper body strength or take time out of the day to take care of themselves, for example. Her motto is to “Be your better self,” whatever that goal may be. “I really wanted to create a class that’s not only beneficial for your body, but also for your mind,”

IF YOU GO:

M.O.M.S METHOD

761 Indian Boundary Rd, Ste 5 Chesterton, Ind. 219.929.1550. momsmethod.com

Glazer said. “I want our studio to inspire women to come out, to work out and to feel good about themselves.” — Ashley Boyer

While weight loss surgery produces a new lease on life, one of the negative after-effects tends to be excessive loose neck and facial skin that gives the person an older, more tired look, says Sreek Cherukuri, M.D., a top boardcertified facial plastic surgeon and Northwest Indiana’s leader in minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures of the face and neck. That occurs because the skin and connective tissues in the face and neck stretch over time to accommodate layers of fat as they accumulate, he explains. “Weight loss surgery makes people feel better and healthier, but they tend to look older. Losing the fat that was underneath the skin leaves the person with jowls as well as loose neck and facial skin,” he says. “Laugh lines and frown lines are more pronounced.” The Weekend Lift provides a solution that returns the client’s face and neck to a more youthful, naturally-toned look and feel without more major surgery. Introduced to the area in 2003 by Dr. Cherukuri, the Weekend Lift is mini-facelift that is an excellent alternative to a full facelift. It provides an overall lift to the neck and lower third of the face, whether clients have had weight loss surgery or would like to “freshen” their looks, he says. “It focuses primarily on trouble spots such as the neck, jowls, mid-face and the lines around the nose and mouth. It is called the Weekend Lift because that is the approximate duration for post-operative recovery,” says Dr. Cherukuri, who performs this and other minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures at Carepointe Facial Plastic Surgery, 801 MacArthur Blvd., Suite 302 in Munster. There are major advantages to the Weekend Lift compared with traditional full facelift surgery, he says. • The procedure is performed with local anesthetic rather than

TONY V. MARTIN/TIMES

Sreek Cherukuri, M.D. under general anesthetic. • It takes about one hour instead of the usual two to six hours for a traditional facelift. • There are no major risks and minimal incisions. Incisions start at the hairline and go around the ears. There are no drains or big face bandages and no risk of nerve damage. • Unlike a full facelift, the Weekend Lift has minimal bruising or swelling. • Downtime from work or other activities is one to three days, instead of a month or more with traditional facelifts. • The cost is about one-third of a full facelift. The natural results of the Weekend Lift also make it a popular alternative to the “wind tunnel” look many celebrities such as Joan Rivers, Bruce Jenner and Kenny Rogers have from major facelifts, he says. “One of my goals in facial plastic surgery is to produce results that appear as if the person were born with it”, explains Dr. Cherukuri. “In other words, people should not be able to tell if any cosmetic surgery has been performed because the results look so natural.” For more information, call (219) 836-2201 or visit theweekendlift.com.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

march/april 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 13


on your mind

Apps and technology for

mental health maintenance

W

ant to set your home’s alarm system? There’s an app for that. Want to track your movements fitness goals? There’s

an app for that too. Want to know what song is playing right now, wherever you are? There’s even an app for that. But mental health maintenance? Can there be an app for that? As it turns out, there is. In addition to professional apps, independent consumer apps such as Lift, Unstuck, Superbetter, Optimism and others are designed with mental health goals in mind. Some of these apps, such as Unstuck, helps the user get to the root of their problem or negative mental state, and then allows the user to set a goal to move past it. Smaller goals, like making a habit of flossing every night, are covered within the Lift app, where users can track the number of days they accomplish their one small goal. Other apps, such as Superbetter, use a gamelike interface to present healthy challenges and allow the user to overcome mental health “bad guys,” such as laziness or negative self-talk. Some healthcare groups are even creating custom apps for their patients, says Joseph G. Fanelli, Medical Director for Community Healthcare System Centers for Mental Wellness, whose organization is currently developing several tech tools, including apps. “These apps are focused on assessing signs and symptoms of illness, on assessing response to treatment, and on enhancing mental wellness,” Fanelli says. But how effective are independent apps for mental health maintenance?

14 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

“For people not dealing with any serious issues in their life and just looking to improve themselves, indeed, ‘there’s an app for that’— many good ones, too!” Says Jean Lubeckis, EAP Therapist with Franciscan Alliance. “Apps such as Optimism, Inspirational Quotes, Hope Book or Atease, can help someone practice mindfulness, meditation, improve attitude, sleep, or reduce stress,” Lubeckis says. For those looking for a better quality of life, these apps can be very helpful. However, Lubeckis cautions others to be careful. “Just because there is Joseph Fanelli, MD an app, doesn’t mean it is good or reliable,” Lubeckis says. For those with more serious mental health goals, Lubeckis suggests using higherlevel apps along with other treatment. Jean Lubeckis, “Anyone seeking Licensed Mental information, guidance Health Counselor or help regarding mental health issues like anxiety, depression or issues negatively impacting their life, would be wise to seek information from professional apps,” she says. “For instance, there are apps by Web MD, Psych Central, state and federal mental health groups and even the DSM-V. Some apps have been designed by professionals and some are designed to accompany self-help books. “There are apps focusing on Depression and Anxiety. One has a screening tool called the

ISTOCKPHOTO


At the

Heart of Valparaiso

PROVIDED

conveniently situated in central Valparaiso

MCDONALD DR. Glendale Medical center

Excellent cross-referral opportunities

GLENDALE DR.

Laboratory on premises

Porter Hospital Surgery Center

Remodeled office suites Timeshare suites also available

ROOSEVELT RD.

But most importantly, Lubeckis advises those seeking treatment to speak with a qualified health care provider rather than relying on independent apps. “If someone is using smart phone apps for diagnostic or screening purposes, that should be just the first step,” she says. “If the person learns they would benefit from professional assistance, the next step should be to contact a professional.” Fanelli thinks technology brings a host of new opportunities to the mental health field. “Rather than depend on technology, I think we are embracing technology as a means to enhance the quality of care we can provide to our patients,” Fanelli says. “Technology will never replace the person-to-person relationship that is the cornerstone of good health care, but technology can certainly provide better tools to make that relationship ever more productive, and that is a very exciting thing.” — Kathleen Dorsey

updated & beautifully maintained facility

ET AVE .

‘PH-Q 9’ which many professionals use to evaluate depression,” Lubeckis says. “Hopefully that clarity will provide direction to lead them to the help they need.” Doctors are also embracing technology as a method of treatment, says Fanelli. “We also incorporate the Wii gaming system as a part of our treatment programing, combining physical and mental fitness activities in a comprehensive wellness program.” In addition to goal-oriented apps, Fanelli says smartphones have made communication between doctors and patients more accessible. “As a psychiatrist, I have found smartphone technology to have been extremely helpful in communicating more effectively with my patients,” says Fanelli. “I have been able to address their issues much more quickly and efficiently than in the past. Texting alone has enabled me to start new medications and make the kind of crucial changes that can be key to successful treatment.”

Come join us in offering the area’s finest medical services

CAL UM

St. Catherine’s Inpatient Neurobehavioral Medicine staff consists of a multidisciplinary team that includes (standing, from left): Robert Crowe, RN; Willie Morgan, MHW; Ileana Ramos, RN, Sharon Booker, MHW; Michael Brown, RN; Scot West, RN; Willie Hurson, MHW (kneeling, left to right): Maylee Chavarria-Iruegas, MHW; Jaime Rivas, MHW; Melissa Evers, RN; Patricia Brucer, RN and Ameer Elsalaymeh, MHW.

Come Visit Our Distinguished Physicians and Practices Obsterical and Gynecological Associates, Inc. Cheryl Short, M.D. Crystal Strickland, M.D. L. Jennifier Murphy, M.D.

Porter Physician Group Derek Gasper, D.O.

Associated Pediatricians, LLC

Valparaiso Internal Medicine Surya Nallari, M.D.

Midwest Fertility Center Amos Madanes, M.D. Porter Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine Douglas Mazurek, M.D. James Anthony, M.D. Urology Associates of NWI, PC Weil Foot and Ankle Institute

Dynamic Rehabilitation Services Porter Glendale Laboratory

Franciscan Medical Specialists Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Michael Spence, M.D. American Joint Preservation Institute Gregory Markarian, M.D. Psychiatry & Psychology Robert Reff, M.D. , FAPA John Stutesman, PsyD

1101 EAST GLENDALE BLVD. • VALPARAISO, IN

(219) 464-0080

OR EmAIL GLENDALE@BRAESIDEGROuP.cOm march/april 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 15


a DIABETES you Managing

the healthy way

Weight loss and addictions are two problems that plague almost every American, in one form or another. Learn how medical advances have brought new hope for those striving to get well.

16 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

“Whether a person can be managed with or without medication depends on the type of diabetes the individual has,” says Irene Woodruff, MA, RD, CD, a renal dietitian at DSI Duneland—LaPorte and Knox. “Type I DM or diabetes mellitus is the insulin-dependent form and typically affects young people. Type I Diabetes develops as a result of a gradual loss of pancreatic function and insulin production. The person with this type of diabetes is typically dependent on insulin injections to maintain blood sugar control. They will need to balance their carbohydrate intake to the insulin they are taking.”

T

ype II DM, which results mainly from the loss of cell sensitivity to circulating insulin, commonly affects adults and has hereditary and lifestyle causes such as being overweight. And sadly, Type II, previously seen only in adults, is now seen more frequently in children and has been termed MODY—maturity onset diabetes—in the young. It is the type of diabetes that may be managed with healthy lifestyle changes as well. That’s because food and nutrition has a profound impact diabetics because the body digests and absorbs different types of foods at different rates. “Simple, processed carbohydrate foods eaten on their own are broken down rapidly and contribute to rapid rises in blood sugar,” says Woodruff. “The same simple carbohydrate food eaten as part of a meal containing protein, fat, and fiber, is processed less rapidly and contributes to a less dramatic rise in blood sugar.” According to Lori Granich, Registered Dietitian at the Midwest Bariatric Institute at Franciscan St. Margaret Health in Dyer, carbohydrates have the largest impact on our blood sugars. “People with diabetes should not avoid carbohydrates, but they should


HEALTHY HABITS ARE EVEN MORE IMPORTANT FOR THOSE PEOPLE WHO HAVE A HISTORY OF DIABETES IN THEIR FAMILY.

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pick high-fiber carbohydrates and always practice moderation,” she says. “For an overall healthy diet, we should be limiting refined carbohydrates such as candy, soda and high processed snack foods. Instead, we should choose carbohydrates that are higher in fiber because they digest slower, which will prevent a spike in blood sugars. High fiber foods also keep you full and can aid in weight loss. Keeping a food log is a great way for patients to see how certain foods affect their glucose levels. It also gives patients more insight into their eating habits.” When teaching people how to manage their diabetes, Terri Sakelaris, M.S., a registered dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator at the Community Hospital Diabetes Center in Munster, talks about how to use carbohydrate counting to help keep blood glucose levels within a

patient’s target range. “Carb counting helps you to keep track of how much carbohydrate you are eating,” she says, noting that the American Diabetes Association recommends setting a limit for the maximum amount of carbs to eat combined with the right balance of physical activity and medicine. Sakelaris also gives her class a meal plan calculated on their weight and height which lets them know how many grams of carbs they get a day. “Grams are like money,” she says. “It’s a way for people to see what it costs them in terms of what they eat so they can decide what to spend them on.” Reducing blood sugar levels can be simpler than many diabetics realize. “Ten minutes of walking can reduce sugar quite a bit,” says Sakelaris. “Drinking water versus beverages with a lot of carbs is also beneficial. Keeping hydrated is very important because if someone is dehydrated, their blood sugar goes up. And if you’re under a lot of stress, you release adrenaline which tells the body to release sugar.” Julie Mantis, a nurse practitioner and diabetes educator who works with Sakelaris, says that even little things like standing up when a commercial comes on TV and stretching or lifting small weights can help. “If it gets the heart rate going, that’s good,” she says. According to Woodruff, the body digests and absorbs different types of foods at different rates. Simple, processed carbohydrate foods eaten on their own break down rapidly, contributing to rapid rises in blood sugar while

the same simple carbohydrate food eaten as part of a meal containing protein, fat, and fiber, is processed less rapidly and contributes to a less dramatic rise in blood sugar. Fiber intake is also important. “Carbohydrates have the largest impact on our blood sugars,” says Granich. “People with diabetes should not avoid carbohydrates, but they should pick high-fiber carbohydrates and always practice moderation. For an overall healthy diet, we should be limiting refined carbohydrates such as candy, soda and high processed snack foods. Instead, we should choose carbohydrates that are higher in fiber because they digest slower, which will prevent a spike in blood sugars. High fiber foods also keep you full and can aid in weight loss. Keeping a food log is a great way for patients to see how certain foods affect their glucose levels. It also gives patients more insight into their eating habits.”

F

iber is very filling says Sakelaris as it slows down the digestive system and the release of blood sugar. “Orange juice will spike the release of blood sugar,” she says by way of illustration. “An apple, because of its fiber, slows it down.” Recent studies indicate that cinnamon may improves glucose and lipids of people with type 2 diabetes. “Some research has shown that cinnamon reduces blood sugar levels, triglycerides and cholesterol,” says Granich. “Researchers believe that it is decreasing insulin resistance. It is not suggested that people use cinnamon instead of their diabetes medications. Research is still ongoing.” What works best is simple. “If you want to prevent diabetes, it is very important to consume a healthy diet and exercise regularly,” says Granich. “Exercise is important for weight loss and can improve insulin sensitivity. Healthy habits are even more important for those people who have a history of diabetes in their family.” — Jane Ammeson

march/april 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 17


Thyroid

weight management It’s tiny gland, but when our thyroids get out of whack, it’s big trouble. According to the American Thyroid Association, more than 12 percent of the U.S. population will develop a thyroid condition during their lifetime and an estimated 20 million Americans have some form of thyroid disease. Of those, up to 60 percent of those with thyroid disease are unaware of their condition.

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T

hyroid diseases are generally more common in females than in males,” says Akbar Rahmani, M.D., board certified in internal medicine with a subspecialty in endocrinology with an office in Tinley Park who is on staff at Ingalls Health System. “People can have an overactive or underactive thyroid but underactive is more common.” People with an underactive thyroids, also called hypothyroidism, tend to experience abnormal weight gain and difficulty losing weight until hormone levels stabilize, says Kristal Markovich, a registered dietitian at Methodist Hospitals. Symptoms can also include changes in the menstrual cycle for women, constipation, depression, dry hair and hair loss, dry skin, fatigue, greater sensitivity to cold, slow heart rate and swelling of the thyroid gland. “That’s why a healthy diet and exercise plan for long term weight loss and maintenance are essential,” she says, noting that severe calorie restriction may only leave a person more tired. “Choose lean protein, whole grains, fruits/vegetables and low fat dairy products and follow a healthy diet plan.” Fortunately treating underactive thyroids is relatively straightforward, says Rahmani. “Underactive thyroids have many causes,”


he says. “Someone can be born without a thyroid gland, and so it’s underactive from the get go. Sometimes patients have their thyroids surgically removed because of cancer or part of their thyroids were removed because of other types of surgery or use of radiation. The most common reason is people lose their thyroid function as they grow older or you could have been treated. We treat underactive thyroids with medicine—very simple and natural. You just take one pill a day and have your blood levels monitored regularly.” Overactive thyroid symptoms include an inability to maintain proper weight and are less easy to treat. On the surface, that sounds like the way to go. After all, doesn’t it mean you can eat whatever you want? In reality, hyperthyroidism is a serious disease. “Medical management is a must with hyperthyroidism,” says Woodruff, who refers to the Mayo Clinic web site in suggesting that

in cases of patients experiencing severe weight loss or muscle wasting, it may help to add extra protein at least until hyperthyroidism is under control. Symptoms of hyperthyroidism include feeling nervous, moody, weak, or tired, fast heartbeat, shaky hands, difficulty concentrating and frequent bowel movements Treatment is complex and requires consultation with an endocrinologist, a physician specializing in diagnosing and treating conditions that are related to the endocrine system. “There are basically three treatments,” says Rahmani, “each with pros and cons since it’s a chronic disease. There are only a few types of medicine to treat overactive thyroids and they are not simple pills, they can damage the bone marrow and the liver, plus those pills control rather than treat overactive thyroid and temporarily bring patient down to the right range.” Other options are to mechanically destroy

the thyroid by removing it through surgery or radiation, says Rahmani. “There’s medicine to take for a few years to control, a percentage of the thyroid can be surgically removed or there are pills containing radiation iodine that shrink the thyroid,” he says. There are times, says Rahmani, when patients will insist they have an underactive thyroid which is the cause of their weight gain. “If you’re obese from an underactive thyroid your obesity will decrease to a certain degree,” he says. “But if part of the obesity is due to underactivity and overeating, if you are 40 pounds overweight and 10 pounds of that because of your thyroid, then 10 pounds is what you’ll lose. One thing patients don’t always like is that after treatment, when their thyroid is back to normal, they still have the old habit of eating too much. So if the patient doesn’t watch their diet, they will gain weight.” — Jane Ammeson

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ISTOCKPHOTO

Bariatric a total lifestyle change “Ultimately whether a person wants to lost weight with or without bariatric surgery,” says General and Bariatric Surgeon, Dr. Paul Stanish, M.D., F.A.C.S., who is the Medical Director for the Healthy4Life program at Community Hospital in Munster and St. Mary Medical Center in Hobart, “they will need to make lifestyle changes.” 20 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

A

ccording to Stanish, even those who are prime candidates for weight loss surgery still need to be in good shape before proceeding to surgery. That’s why the team approach emphasizing education and lasting lifestyle changes is so important. “Changing eating habits is the most important step,” says Stanish. “We live in an extremely toxic food environment where there’s food everywhere. Much of our fast food is easier to get and cheaper to buy and not good at all for you.” But there’s further bad news. Forget about working it off. “You have to be a highly trained athlete to exercise your way out of a bad diet,” says Stanish. “That’s why education and food journaling where we keep track of what we eat are so important.”

Weight loss surgery is a life-changing procedure requiring many changes before and after surgery says Lori Granich, Registered Dietitian at the Midwest Bariatric Institute at Franciscan St. Margaret Health in Dyer. “Not only will the surgery center that you choose require you to make changes, but your insurance company also has requirements that must be completed before they approve your surgery,” she continues. “With the help of your bariatric team, you will be asked to start making changes before surgery.” Kristal Markovich, a registered dietitian at Methodist Hospitals, suggests that prior to surgery it’s important to start a diet that includes low fat or fat free dairy options, lean cuts of meat, whole grains as well as consuming more fruits and vegetables. “Bariatric support groups allow you to meet people who have had surgery or are preparing to have surgery just like you,” says Markovich. “They are great places to practice your new healthy lifestyle in a positive and supportive environment.” There’s also a psychological component to why we eat. “When we do the surgeries, they’re very measured,” says Stanish, noting that it’s the patients not the surgeries which vary, making it important to get to the underlying food pathology. “Meeting with a psychologist is also a prerequisite for most programs,” says Granich. “The psychologist can evaluate if you are ready to make the changes necessary for weight loss surgery and can also help you deal with other issues you may have related to food, stress or family.” Often patients are asked to keep a food journal. “People think of it as a chore,” says Stanish, “but I want people to think when they’re about to eat and ask themselves, why am I eating? Am I eating because I’m hungry? Depressed?” Bariatric isn’t the end of healthy lifestyle changes. “It is extremely important to continually stay in touch with your bariatric team,” says Granich, “and attend all preoperative and postoperative appointments.” When they recognize the signs of patients who aren’t fully committed, Stanish and his team work with them. “We know what phases they are in and whether they are or are not following the diet and exercising,” he says. I tell them I’m like Santa, I know if they’ve been good or bad.” — Jane Ammeson


Weighting

ITOut

10 contestants competing in three-month Seattle Sutton Slim Down Challenge Editor’s note: In 2010, Columnist Philip Potempa competed in the Seattle Sutton Slim Down Challenge.

M

ichael and Linda Adams believe husband and wife competition can be a healthy motivation for positive change. The Crown Point newlyweds are among the 10 contestants who were selected to shed pounds at the start of 2014 during a three-month contest from Seattle Sutton’s Healthy Eating. This year’s contest targets 10 lucky residents in Northwest Indiana’s Lake and Porter counties. The grand prize winner and will be awarded a trip for two to Riviera Maya, Mexico, valued at $2,500. “This is something we want to do not only for ourselves, but for each other,” says Linda, 46, whose her family’s health history includes heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Husband Michael, 52, will be facing added daily temptation because of his popular and appetizing business. “I run a hot dog stand in Crown Point,” Michael says. The 10 chosen contestants are receiving 21 provided meals per week from Seattle Sutton’s famed kitchens for a total of 315 meals throughout the 15-week challenge. When Seattle Sutton launched her first Slim Down Challenge in 2010, she had a pool of more than 3,000 potential contenders who applied for the inaugural contest. TONY V. MARTIN There are Seattle Contestants for the 2014 Sutton centers throughout Seattle Sutton Slim Down Northwest Indiana, from Challenge were weighed Jan. 13.

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Chesterton and Valparaiso to 2014 Seattle Sutton Highland, Merrillville and St. Slim-Down Challenge John, in addition to others. Contestants To date, Seattle Sutton has • Annette Walker, 57 of Gary, helped the 39 people from aspiring actress with a goal weight the previous four contests of 140. Starting weight: 235, weight shed 1,722 pounds. In 2010, loss after first four weeks: 12 the initial 10 contestants lost • Jessica Mignard, 31, of Valparaiso, a total of 372 pounds in 14 works in doggie daycare and has a goal weight of 160. weeks. In 2012, nine LaSalle Starting weight: 196.6, weight County, Ill. residents lost loss after first four weeks: 20 a total of 510 pounds in 15 • Linda Adams, 46, of Crown Point, weeks. And, in the summer contestant wife with a goal weight of 2012, 10 DuPage County, of 150. Starting weight: 204.8, weight loss after first four weeks: 8 Ill. contestants lost 355 pounds in 15 weeks. Last • Lon Saloman, 45, of Valparaiso, year, 10 Peoria-Tri County a teacher and coach with a goal weight of 200. Starting weight: 269, residents lost a combined weight loss after first four weeks: 26 weight of 485 pounds in 15 • Maureen Anleitner, 60, of weeks. Chesterton, a nurse and teacher “I am so happy to help with a goal weight of 150. these 10 finalists begin Starting weight: 225, weight loss after first four weeks: 12 a new, healthier lifestyle through providing them with • Michael Adams, 52, of Crown Point, hot dog vendor with a goal our freshly prepared, portion weight of 190. Starting weight: 247, and calorie-controlled weight loss after first four weeks: 24 meals,” says Seattle Sutton, • Dr. Michael Perez, 46, of Munster, RN, BSN, and founder of a dentist with a goal weight of Seattle Sutton’s Healthy 160. Starting weight: 256, weight loss after first four weeks: 29 Eating. “Making a positive lifestyle • Rebekah Cowan, 50, of Valparaiso, a counselor with a goal weight of choice, such as changing 130. Starting weight: 181, weight one’s eating habits is an loss after first four weeks: 14 important step in achieving • Sue Kiefer, 52, of Crown improved overall health. Point, works at a middle school Good health is a person’s and has a goal weight of 125. Starting weight: 182, weight greatest asset in life, without loss after first four weeks: 21 it, nothing else matters.” The family owned company • Tim Kreke, 62, of Crown Point, just retired and has a goal weight based in Ottawa, Ill., is of 190. Starting weight: 264, weight headed by the 82-year old loss after first four weeks: 27 registered nurse Sutton, who founded the company in 1985 with her late physician husband, in hopes of helping to improve people’s eating habits and overall health by providing the healthiest meals possible prepared and provided clients coast-to-coast with more than 80 million meals to date. Contestants are also having blood lab work completed, once at the beginning of the contest and once at the end, to measure cholesterol, triglycerides and fasting blood sugar, as well have their blood pressure taken. Lab services are free as part of the contest, provided by IN THE FIELD Health Services. Contestants will be weighed each week at Seattle Sutton’s Lake and Porter counties distributor locations when they pick up their SSHE meals. — Philip Potempa


Best Foot Forward Reprinted from March 9, 2009 - by Steven Longnecker

Jeff Fulton is a simple man. He’s friendly, a dedicated worker. He owns a Christmas tree farm and brings his wife with him on business trips to exotic destinations. He is also a diabetic. His ordeal began simply in February of 2006. A callus on the bottom of his left foot, two inches behind his left toe. A year ago, Fulton wasn’t expecting to see this Christmas. If he did, he was resigned to the fact that it would be his last. Instead, he celebrated Christmas with the doctor who saved his life and his leg from amputation. After noticing the callus in 2006, Fulton mentioned it to his podiatrist, who did a routine callus removal. “I didn’t think anything about it,” says 56-year-old Fulton. “But it caused a hole in my foot.” He gives a tense chuckle. “The hole never healed.” Instead the ulcer worsened—a 1.5-inch wide and 1-inch deep gaping hole. Time-consuming and expensive treatments failed and he saw still more doctors. Then, the infection spread to the bone. “My wife and I both decided that amputation wasn’t an option. With diabetes, it doesn’t have a good five-year history. Usually when they cut off one thing they just have to keep cutting.” Fulton had been a diabetes educator in the 1980s for a well-known medical device supplier until being diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and forced by the company to resign. “I’m familiar enough with diabetes that I updated my will and made a living will,” Fulton relates. “They can only control a bone infection so long.” But Fulton refused to give up. Nine doctors later, his regular diabetes doctor suggested someone who might help. Dr. Ahmad El-Samad, director of the diabetic limb salvage program at St. Mary Medical Center in Hobart, specializes in exactly what Fulton needed. A different approach. “Jeff was a very desperate man, asking me ‘I hope you’re going to do something different,’” ElSamad says. “He tells me he’s been getting this treated for two years and the ulcer was getting bigger. It was draining, it was smelling and you could see the bone poking out of the wound. And this is when I told him we’re going to put a whole team together,” El-Samad remembers. At this time, Fulton was on long-term disability. He had to give up his job at a sewer cleaning manufacturing company due to the care his foot required. He sold equipment, then traveled to the buyer for training. He names a few of the places he traveled to—Iraq, Kuwait, China, South Korea. He was rehired by the same company and returned to work just days before sharing his story with Get Healthy, thanks to his successful treatment. “Dr. El-Samad was able to completely heal my foot. There’s just a little scar at the top,” Fulton says. Focused on addressing the whole picture, El-Samad traced the infection back to the initial cause and decided Fulton needed a foot reconstruction—cutting bones, routing tendons and reshaping the foot in such a way to take off the pressure that caused the original, simple callus. “We addressed the deformity of the foot, the infection was cleaned and the skin loss was substituted with a GraftJacket.” GraftJacket acts as a replacement skin graft and is especially useful to diabetics, since using their own skin could cause another area to become infected. “It’s readily available, and you’re not creating a whole new wound,” El-Samad says. “Dr. El-Samad did his first surgery on June 28, 2008, then another surgery and skin graft on August 20, 2008,” Fulton says. “And I was completely healed by Christmas. In fact, I found out that [Dr. ElSamad’s] family was going to be out of the country, so I invited him to join us for Christmas dinner.”

Dr. ElSamad, DPM, FACFAS

El-Samad laughs. “It was a beautiful result—the doctor and patient having a Christmas party together. Driving down [to Rochester, Indiana] I realized how far it was that Jeff drove every time he saw me—and never once complained, never once missed an appointment or was late. I have a lot of respect for his dedication. This is someone who is so eager to continue to do what he has a passion for.” He warns about the problems associated with diabetes and foot ulcers. “They’re absolutely very common. If you’re diabetic and you develop a problem with your foot it’s an emergency. Jeff started with such a simple wound that literally changed his whole life around. If I could have seen him two years ago when he only had a callus, we could have prevented his ulcer from becoming an ulcer.” Fulton laughs, “I’ve got about a $125,000 foot now. ’Course, if I’d seen Dr. El-Samad first it’d be a lot less.” He trails off. “If I was to give anybody advice, if they see their doctor twice and they’re not any better—go find somebody else.” march/april 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 23


COMPETITIVE

TREATMENT FOR ATHLETES WITH ADDICTIONS

consequences

Athletes, with their need for a competitive edge, enhanced speed and being able to play through pain, are at a greater risk of becoming addicted to drugs in general but prescription drugs specifically because of injuries and the rising pressure to keep playing even when injured says Peter Bradley, a therapist at Illinois Institute for Addiction Recovery, which has a unit at Ingalls Hospital.

B

radley is certified in working with dual diagnoses involving substance abuse and mental health. Professional sports figures are often afraid if they don’t play because of an injury, someone else will take their place. High school and college athletes worry about losing scholarships and prestige. “And there’s the fan level,” says Bradley. “You want to please them and that feeling just adds to the pressure.” At times, that’s apparent even to those watching the game. An athlete withers in pain on the floor, is helped back to the bench, he or she is talked to sternly and then suddenly they’re back on the floor. “Some of the medications they prescribe for injuries can be doozies,” says Bradley. “The opioids used in pain killers are very strong, very potent and they’re meant for short term use because they are highly addictive. Therein lies the problem; a lot of people get addicted who wouldn’t normally have the profile of someone who would become addict.” “Sports figures are high arousal people,” says Larry Brewerton, a psychology professor at Indiana University Northwest. By using the term high arousal, Brewerton is referring to the need for extreme physical and emotional stimulation. “They’re used to high arousal when they’re playing with a lot of adrenaline going on and

24 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

they really thrive on that,” he says. “When they’re not off, they still need it. They thrive on it and so many use amphetamines, cocaine, things that keep up that arousal. It makes them feel very good as well as omnipotent.” Bradley believes painkillers are the number one misused prescription drug. “If you use them too many days you develop tolerance and withdrawal symptoms where you try to stop and these are symptoms of drug addictions,” he says. “Pain patients’ withdrawal from opiate use is like having the flu a hundred times over and addicts know in order to stop these dramatically painful withdrawals is to take the drug. I’m a firm believer that certain people need prescription medicines for certain things, but the potential for misuse is pretty amazing” Brewerton, who used biofeedback when working with sports stars in order to train them to relax, says that there are many people who are addicted who are not aware of it mainly because of self medicating. “They look at medicine that is prescribed as being okay compared to drugs on the street,” he says. “Unfortunately general practitioners write a lot of prescription and don’t send patients to specialists to figure out why they’re anxious, can’t sleep and instead of just writing prescriptions…many people out there self medicating.” Treatment can make a difference but Brewerton offers some caveats. “Many times treatment programs for alcohol and substance abuse ask someone to give

something up but you also have to replace it with something to give the patient a way to put themselves in a place that’s very awarding but satisfying and healthy as well,” says Brewerton. Both Bradley and Brewerton agree that the best chance for recovery is when a patient is committed. If not, when confronted by loved ones, the addict withdraws from them and becomes angry as denial is part of the addiction process. “That’s an important part of recovery,” says Brewerton. — Jane Ammeson


food & fitness

LOSING

Jill Kilhefner, RD and certified diabetes educator at Porter Regional Hospital

WEIGHT

naturally

For anyone deciding it’s time to grab onto a diet plan and hang on for dear life, there are plenty of diets out there. But which to choose?

A

nything that fits in the “fad” category is probably not a good fit for you. “People think you can do a fad diet (successfully), but that’s not the case,” says Kristina Greene, registered dietitian and diabetic educator at Methodist Hospital in Crown Point. “I have some patients who have juiced and lost fifty to sixty pounds—but they gained it all back. A diet of 500 to 600 calories per day cuts out whole food groups, and that’s not sustainable long term.” And Lori Granich, registered dietitian (RD) with Franciscan St. Margaret Health in Dyer cautions, “Eliminating food groups … puts you at risk for nutritional deficiencies.” Besides, “Eating a wide variety of healthy foods will keep you from being bored.” So drop the fad notion and go natural. “Losing weight naturally is all about lifestyle changes and sticking to

it for the rest of your life,” says Greene. That means, says Granich, “a balanced diet that promotes slow, steady weight loss”—the kind that stays lost. HOW DIETITIANS HELP Where to start? Granich explains for a diet tailored to individual needs, a registered dietitian can: • Make you aware of your eating patterns and suggest changes to aid in weight loss. • Identify “calorie creep”: areas of your diet that may be providing more calories than you realize. • Create realistic, attainable goals. • Help you change eating and lifestyle habits. • Design a diet specific to any medical issues. Be aware the terms “registered dietitian” and “nutritionist” are not interchangeable, says Granich. “Registered dietitians have met specific academic and professional practice requirements … In some states anyone can refer to themselves as a nutritionist,” with little or no nutrition education or training. You

can call your local hospital for a registered dietitian or visit eatright.org/ programs/rdfinder. If you’ve decided to go it alone or with a structured plan, Jill Kilhefner, RD and certified diabetes educator at Porter Regional Hospital, notes that a recent US News And World Report named the DASH diet, Mediterranean diet and Weight Watchers as the most frequently recommended. SETTING GOALS Kilhefner quashes a fond hope: “There are no magic foods. The proper formula for weight loss is simple: calories in, calories out.” From there, she says, educate yourself. If you’re not seeing an RD, utilize the Internet, free hospital support groups, RD’s cooking classes—any good sources for information on the best food choices and portion sizes. “Don’t put yourself at risk physically nor nutritionally by trying to recreate the wheel.” As for setting a goal, “I like to have them choose one activity goal and one dietary goal, and be specific and realistic: how many minutes

TONY V. MARTIN

of activity per week; drinking how much more water,” says Greene, who soon will also be a diet counselor at the Valparaiso YWCA. Keep in mind it takes about a month for a new behavior to become a habit. “Then choose a reward for when the goal is reached, one that will motivate you. Not candy,” she laughs. “Maybe some jewelry, or a trip.” READY, SET, ACTION Before starting an exercise regimen, “Absolutely check in with your family physician,” says Kilhefner. Then, says Granich, “Start slowly and gradually increase your intensity and duration,” to avoid injury. Healthy adults can aim for 150 minutes of moderate exercise and two or more days of strength training per week. She suggests changing the routine to stay motivated, and find fun classes like Zumba. Once you reach your goal weight, keep moving: “It will help you maintain your goal weight.” And that’s exactly the point of losing weight naturally. — Julie Dean Kessler

march/april 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 25


senior scope

maintaining a

HEALTHY

weight

You’re a senior who expects to maintain a healthy weight, but the scale numbers are creeping up. What’s going on?

A

ny number of changes occur as you age—and they can contribute to sabotaging your ideal weight, says Dr. Omar Shamsi, on staff at Healthy 4 Life Centers at Community Hospital in Munster and St. Mary Medical Center in Hobart. First, as you age, “Metabolism slows down. You may not be able to move around as well; a hip might be hurting,” says Shamsi. “A spouse may have passed away and you Dr. Omar Shamsi don’t want to cook for yourself, so you go out and eat. A husband alone may not know how to cook. And the elderly love to buy treats for grandkids; then they end up eating some chocolates themselves.” Jan Dowell, a registered dietitian at Ingalls Wellness Center at Ingalls Family Care Center, says many seniors are less active with every increasing year. “With time on their hands, the

26 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

elderly may do things like watching TV, knitting, bingo, book clubs—all wonderful things. But you may be taking in more calories than you’re burning.” And up go the numbers on that scale. How can seniors stop the trend and stay at a healthy weight? Motivation and monitoring “The key is to stay active, to keep your metabolic rate up,” says Jill Kilhefner, registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Porter Regional Hospital in Valparaiso. “If you’re carrying too much weight, it puts you at risk for all kinds of disease—high blood pressure, diabetes, and more. You set yourself up for more pain if you become less mobile,” says Kilhefner, who also works with the hospital’s weight loss surgery patients. Time for a change. “Motivation is the biggest step towards a healthier lifestyle—and it’s the hardest step. People just need someone to push them a little bit,” says Shamsi, who is fellowship trained in Nutrition Support/Obesity Medicine. Seniors’ doctors may have told them to lose weight, but many physicians don’t know how to explain eating healthy or exercise, says Shamsi. Still, seniors realize weight may be causing problems like arthritis. “These seniors want to ambulate better, be able to put on their shoes; they know their sweets and stuff are not helping. Patients at Healthy 4 Life want to get healthy. They want to be there for their grandkids.” Dowell’s tips for staying at a healthy weight:

P R O V ID E D

Jan Dowell, registered dietitian

Pay attention to portion size and actual hunger: Do you really need a cookie? Would half that potato be enough? If you’re cutting portions, cut out things that don’t provide nutrition, like pie, regular soda, the extra glass of wine. Weigh yourself once a month so you can catch weight gain before it gets out of control. Shamsi cautions, “Don’t skip breakfast, otherwise your metabolism slows down.” And get enough shut-eye: Without enough sleep, certain hormones aren’t released—and that leads to stubborn weight loss. Think it’s too late to start exercising? Not so, says Shamsi. “It’s never too late to exercise. It decreases diabetes and cancers, builds strength in bones, and improves balance, reducing the risk of falling.” And it helps maintain proper weight. Dowell recommends the healthy eating budget from the Environmental Working Group at ewg. org. It tells how much of every $25 to spend on different food groups. Says Kilhefner, “All of us should be eating with an emphasis on plant foods; whole grains; lean, low-fat protein sources in small portions; low-fat or fat-free dairy; and a good variety of foods to get all the nutrition we need.” Food for thought: “I don’t know of anyone who’s overweight because they’re eating too many vegetables,” says Dowell. — Julie Dean Kessler


march/april 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 27


ask the expert JANE BOGORDOS, OMNI HEALTH & FITNESS

Personal training tailored for you

Q: How did you get started personal

Q: Who needs a trainer? Everyone would

training? I have always been active, played sports in high school and college, and loved helping people either get started on exercise programs or challenge them to higher levels with their current workouts. Working first in physical therapy and now back in fitness has allowed me to help so many people improve their strength, function, and overall health.

benefit from having a trainer. Anyone who is new to exercise would benefit from the expertise and education of a trainer to make sure they are learning proper form and technique. A person who has been exercising independently for a long time, but who is not getting the desired results of all their hard work, also would benefit from a trainer to change up their exercise routines and take their training to a higher level.

Q: What is a personal trainer? Do trainers specialize in different things? A personal trainer is a certified health professional who is there to help motivate, educate, suppor t, and provide accountability to their clients. Many of the trainers at Omni have different areas that they specialize in. A few of the specialties include functional training, body building, power lifting, Pilates reformer training, youth spor ts performance, body fat reduction, and endurance training. Omni offers not only one-on-one training, but also semi-private, small group training, and youth training as well.

28 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

Q: How do you choose a trainer who is

right for you? Choosing a trainer that is the right fit for you is very important. We assess everything from the clients goals, preference for female/male trainer, the desire for one-on-one vs. group training and the time/date availability of the client. Q: What should I expect in my first session

with a trainer? First, if the session is a private training session, the trainer and client will discuss goals, previous exercise experience, preference for specific exercises, medical history, and training schedule, followed by your first training session.

TONY V. MARTIN

Jane Bogordos has been an exercise physiologist for 21 years. She has been an exercise physiologist and fitness supervisor at Omni Health & Fitness since 2010. Previously, she spent 15 years working in outpatient physical therapy helping athletes, stroke patients, people suffering from industrial injuries and people recovering from surgery.

If you are participating in small group training, you will first complete an introductory session to learn the basic fundamental training exercises and then continue onto the small group training sessions that are available throughout the week. Q: What are the benefits of working with

a trainer? The greatest benefits of working with a trainer are motivation, accountability, and results! If you have a specific goal of reducing body fat and building upper body strength for instance, often it is very hard to do it on your own. We are creatures of habit and get stuck in a rut doing the same exercises week after week, not making any strides to reach our goals. Trainers are able to use their education, knowledge and experience to provide you with tips and tricks to help you develop a healthier lifestyle and make it easier for you to reach your goals. — ­ Carrie Rodovich

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Get Healthy March/April 2014  
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