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A PUBLICATION OF THE TIMES

Massage Therapist PEGGY BEHN at Spa Pointe in Munster

GIVE YOURSELF A

BREAK The importance of time out ALSO

What causes stomach pain? Lifestyle can impact arthritis Migraines and seasonal headaches JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014

NWI.COM/GETHEALTHY


january/february 2014

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NEW YEAR, NEW YOU

With a new year comes new opportunity for change. From pain management to dieting and kitchen hygiene, we have all the information you need to complete your goals for the new year.

Compiled by Times Staff

HEALTHY PRODUCTS SMARTYPANTS VITAMINS

Methodist Hospitals has opened a GERD Center at its Southlake campus in Merrillville for treating and managing patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and related conditions. The GERD Center provides patients access to diagnostics, treatments and technology that accurately diagnose and provide a more permanent solution to this condition. GERD is a chronic digestive disease caused by gastric acid flowing from the stomach into the esophagus. The acid irritates the lining of the esophagus and causes GERD signs and symptoms. “The center is designed to streamline, diagnose and improve care for chronic disease sufferers,” says Dr. Daniel Hurwich, a board certified gastroenterologist and medical director of the center. A nurse navigator coordinates all aspects of care from initial screening and treatment to follow-up. The GERD Center is in Methodist Hospitals Outpatient Surgery Center. Patients can call (219) 757-7534 or be referred by their physician.

PHYSICIAN JOINS LAPORTE GROUP Indiana University Health La Porte Physicians announced Dr. Sarah Bancroft recently joined the network and welcomes new patients at her LaPorte office. She joins the IU Health Orthopedics & Sports Medicine practice of Drs. Scott Fielder and Thomas Magill and nurse practitioner Laurie Jones. She is the practice’s medical director of sports medicine. Bancroft has worked with athletes at all levels and in various sports during her career. She is board certified in family medicine and sports medicine.

NEW SURGICAL SERVICES DIRECTOR St. Mary Medical Center has announced Mia Wolf, a nurse, as the new director of surgical services. She earned her BSN, RN and Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate from Purdue University and brings more than 32 years of nursing experience, 24 years of which she was in surgery leadership roles. Wolf comes to St. Mary Medical Center from the University of Chicago Hospitals, where she managed outpatient surgery and assisted in launching a new 26-suite surgical center.

GOUT CLINIC OPENS IN MUNSTER Franciscan Medical Specialists has opened a new gout clinic in Franciscan Healthcare — Munster hospital, 701 Superior Ave., Suite O. Clinic director and rheumatology specialist Dr. Kevin Joyce is trained in the diagnosis and treatment of gout, including resistant or recalcitrant gout. Gout is a form of arthritis that causes sudden, severe episodes of pain, tenderness, redness, warmth and swelling of joints. To reach the gout clinic, call (219) 922-3002. For more information, visit www. medspecindiana.com. To schedule an appointment, call (219) 326-2663.

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With SmartyPants, you get the benefits and essential nutrients of a multivitamin +Omega3+Vitamin D and the peace-of-mind that comes with knowing we use only the highest-quality ingredients. Smartypants Vitamins are available in Children, Adult and Weight management formulations (let us know which ones you want to try). SmartyPants Vitamins are free of gluten, casein, wheat and dairy, artificial dyes, flavors and sweeteners, salicylates, and preservatives. Learn more at: smartypantsvitamins.com. AT&T EVERTHERE

At least one-third of adults over 65 in North America fall each year and this is a serious issue that often leads to many other severe and chronic concerns for older adults. To provide peace of mind for the elderly and their families, AT&T EverThere ®, a small wearable device, can detect falls and quickly identify location. When a fall occurs, AT&T EverThere ® can detect a fall and automatically connect to a 24/7 call center for response and support, using the AT&T wireless network. This personal emergency response system (PERS) in one simple, mobile solution is durable, lightweight, easy to setup and has a rechargeable battery. The device is hands-free and allows two-way voice communication with the call center for fast assistance. The device also offers GPS location service that helps first responders determine where a fall has occurred. EverThere is available at att.com/everthere. MDHEARINGAID AIR

This doctor-designed, FDA registered hearing aid is a discreet behindthe-ear hearing aid with the latest digital technology that provides a clear natural hearing experience similar to devices costing thousands of dollars each. The AIR has 3 programs to match the most frequent types of hearing loss and listening environments, and a telecoil to allow for direct routing of sound from properly equipped cellphones, telephones, and certain looped environments (churches, movie theaters, etc). The AIR is affordably priced at $349.99 each and is backed by a 45 day 100% money back guarantee. Visit MDHearingAid.com or call 888-670-4327 for more information.

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the body shop

survivor spotlight

Triathlonin runner

BACK theRACE Forty-year-old John Babista, of Woodridge, is a nurse. However after crossing the finish line at a Hammond triathlon, he suffered a heart attack and became the patient. “What had happened to me is shocking but I am very thankful to everybody and especially to our good Lord that I am still here to tell our story,” says John. John, who for the past four years has trained year round for races, was competing in Wolf Lake’s Leon’s Triathlon back in June. John’s wife Alma, who is also a nurse, was with their two sons, ages 15 and 8, at the finish line cheering John on. “As I saw him coming to the finish line, I was relieved. I was standing by the arch and he gave his sons his signature airplane run before he crossed the finish line — I even took pictures of him. Then we walked and as I tried to find him, my brother-in-law, yelled, ‘Kuya (big brother) is on the ground,’” says Alma, who still gets emotional when speaking about the experience. “I called out his name, but he was losing consciousness and gasping for air. I cried for help and yelled, ‘check his pulse’. People all around were helping: doing CPR, hugging me and hugging my kids. It was the longest minute of my life.” Karen Callahan, R.N. at Franciscan St. Margaret Health-Hammond Emergency Department, says the team in the Emergency Department were prepared to deal with John’s grave condition when he arrived due to a phone call the department’s Emergency Medical Services had made to them. “The staff in the ED that day work every other weekend together for years and we just ‘click’ when it comes to critical situations. We know what each other does best and we flow in a methodical, systematic way. John was our focus from the minute we received the EMS call,” says Callahan. Once John arrived he received a therapeutic

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problems without open-heart surgery. After five and half months of rehabilitation, John successfully completed his Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Program on Nov. 21 and returned to work Nov. 25. Alma says there were countless people who provided support and made John’s recovery possible including visits from Leon’s Triathlon founder, Leon Wolek. “Our family is very thankful to all first responders, paramedics, co-cyclists, co-workers, staff at St. Margaret Hospital, Catholic Charities, Chicago Asian Running Endurance, family and friends. They all became our immediate family, who provided us with everything to make our life easier while John was in the hospital,” says Alma. “Of course the whole hospital staff — we are so glad we ended up at St. Margaret. They are all God’s instruments.” Callahan says as an ER nurse she rarely sees the outcomes of critical patients, due to most times they are not good outcomes. “I have been an ER Nurse here for 27 years and John, his story, his family and the true spirit of how the whole hospital pulled together is something I will never forget,” says Callahan. “John is a miracle and I am so blessed to have been a part of that miracle.” — Trish Maley

oga’s latest trend, hot yoga, has studios across the country turning up the heat, literally. Hot yoga is any type of yoga—Moksha yoga, Bikram yoga, Corepower yoga, etc—performed in a heated room with temperatures somewhere between 90 and 100 degrees Fahrenheit. For many, holding a yoga pose is hard enough without increasing the heat, so what is drawing so many to this yoga trend? Michelle Robinson, owner of YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI, thinks it’s the sweat. “There’s this misconception that when you sweat, you’re working harder,” Robinson says. “Hot yoga is for those people who really like that sweat.” At YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI, instructors offer different levels of Vinyasa Yoga, a sequence of poses synchronized with your breath, to make yoga more accessible to people of different skill levels. Students can choose a slower class, a power yoga class, or yoga with weights, among other options. The increased external temperature actually helps warm the body up faster compared to a traditional yoga class where you warm up from the inside out. Because your body is warmed up before getting into the poses, the risk for injury is reduced. Hot yoga even gets your heart pumping, says Cipriano Romero, instructor and owner of Reflections Yoga Center, whose center also offers Vinyasa Yoga classes. “Even though you stay on your mat while doing yoga postures in a heated room, your heart can work the same way as it does when you are running,” Romero explained. Due to the high temperatures in the room, there are some risks with practicing hot yoga—including dehydration and heat exhaustion. Students are advised to stay hydrated before, during and after

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}

}

The importance of taking a break

Y John Babista crosses the finish line of a triathlon in Hammond just before he collapsed due to a heart attack.

Franciscan’s ICU staff members and ER doctor were among the team who cared for Babista.

hypothermia treatment from the hospital staff that is new to Northwest Indiana. The treatment is performed by covering a patient’s back, chest and legs in cooling pads. Cooling the body helps to preserve the brain and heart. The process decreases the body’s metabolic rate, which protects the brain from neurotoxins that usually attack 24 to 48 hours after cardiac arrest. “Therapeutic hypothermia is fairly new to the staff at Franciscan St. Margaret Health. We were in-serviced approximately 6 months prior and John was the first patient I personally had to start it on,” says Callahan. John was hospitalized at Franciscan St. Margaret Health-Hammond hospital for nearly 3 weeks. After undergoing a slew of tests back home it was discovered that John’s right artery was 100% blocked, the left artery was almost 100% blocked and the posterior artery was more than 25% blocked. “It sounds strange because I have an active lifestyle and live healthy and still got those blockages in my heart. We are convinced that it is genetics since a few of my family members have had heart bypass surgery in the past.” Fortunately, John was able to resolve his heart

on your mind

HOT YOGA turns up the heat

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10-second hug was all it took for a high school teacher to change the routine at work. David Russell, a retired Munster High School English teacher, says even if you may feel there’s no time for a break, it can be anything that helps you feel better. “A lot of people get in a routine, get stuck in that routine and feel like no one cares about anything, them or anyone else,” he says. When a former student suggested he try a hugging session in class, Russell did. Each day his creative writing students came in and gave each other hugs. They felt like they mattered and enjoyed coming to class every day, he says. “It was a break in their day from what the ordinary was.” Inspired by that success, Russell decided to devote a week to hugging his co-workers during breaks. Each day he would hug two different people. “It was pretty amazing to see people’s reactions. It was a break but made me feel better every time I did it and made someone else feel better. For the 10 seconds, it caused so many smiles. It was well worth the time and effort and I enjoyed doing it more often.” Experts and research agree that taking breaks is important and that even a few minutes away from your workload can help. It recharges you and actually increases productivity. Some local workplaces have new ways to encourage employees to take

YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI. Michelle Robinson, owner of YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI leads a class. TONY V. MARTIN

YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI 354 E Lincoln Hwy, Fox Run Plaza, Schererville 219.864.3900 65 W 112th Ave (Broadway), Crown Point nwiyouniqueyoga.com Reflections Yoga Center 18675 Dixie Hwy, Homewood, Ill. 708.960.4996 17605 Oak Park, Tinley Park, Ill. 708.614.9642; ryogacenter.com class. Romero recommends not eating any heavy meals before class and sitting and resting if students feel overwhelmed during class. “We always remind the students to follow their own pace and to be connected to their inner reality rather than the reality of the other students in the class,” Romero says. “It is not a competition, so we let go of the competitive ego.” The instructors at YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI offer modifications, as well as props and straps to aid students. Robinson says. “Our responsibility as a teacher is to provide a safe environment with

modifications and props, and to assist our students so they do not get injured.” While anyone can do hot yoga, this form of exercise isn’t recommended for everyone, including people who are sensitive to heat and pregnant women. Students new to hot yoga should bring water, a towel and a mat and wear light clothing that allows the skin to breathe. Romero recommends wearing fitted capris, as exposed skin can become slippery when sweating, and a fitted tank top. You should avoid wearing one hundred percent cotton, which absorbs sweat and can become heavy. Also, students should not apply body lotion prior to class. Most importantly, beginning students should remember that learning and practicing any form of yoga is a journey and not a competition with themselves or other students. “The moment that the student falls into the game of comparing herself or himself to others is setting herself or himself up for disappointment,” Romero says. “The results of yoga are based on a process that takes time rather than an overnight one.” — Ashley Boyer

TONY V. MARTIN, THE TIMES

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The Paleo Diet

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ot many of us often ask what Fred Flintstone would eat. But for those considering the Paleo diet, the question is, if it was good enough for cavemen to eat, is it good enough for us? “It’s the diet of our ancestors,” says Elana Amsterdam, author of Paleo Cooking from Elana’s Pantry: Gluten-Free, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free Recipes (Ten Speed Press 2013; $17.99), who has been following the diet for 12 years. “Humans were hunter-gatherers during the Paleolithic era, some 10,000 to 2.5 million years ago.” Following a Paleo-based diet doesn’t mean serving brontosaurus steaks or scrambled pterodactyl eggs. But it is radical compared to what’s on our plates today. “The Paleo Diet mimics the diets of people who lived during the Paleolithic era,” says Lori Granich, Registered Dietitian at the Midwest Bariatric Institute at Franciscan St. Margaret Health in Dyer. “The diet focuses on natural foods that have been around since the beginning of time.” “It wasn’t until about 10,000 years ago, with the advent of the agricultural revolution, that grains were introduced into our diet,” says Amsterdam. “For 99% of our existence we lived on a grain free diet. This means grains are a new food and I think certain people, such as me, can’t adapt to digesting grains.” “The Paleo diet includes some of the things that I teach in my diabetes classes,” says Terri Sakelaris, M.S., a registered dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator at the Community Hospital Diabetes Center in Munster. “My classes emphasize the Mediterranean diet—fresh food, salads, filling up on fruits and vegetables, not too big into bread and baked goods and avoiding processed foods. The Paleo diet is similar though it’s also more restrictive.” While we can never totally recreate the foods of our forebears, for those following the Paleo diet, the main source of carbohydrates come from fruits

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ask the expert

senior scope

food & fitness

and vegetables, there’s an emphasis on the type of healthy fats found in nuts, and oils such as olive and flaxseed. Not recommended are dairy, refined sugars, processed foods, cereals and grains, potatoes and refined vegetable oils. “The supporters of the diet state that our food industry has developed faster than our bodies could adapt,” says Granich. “This is the reason for the rise in chronic diseases. The diet focuses on ‘real’ food which is something I believe people should focus on. It is rich in fiber, vitamins and minerals, and antioxidants; the components of our diets that fight off disease.” But there are, of course caveats. “The Paleo diet is short on carbohydrates,” says Leelarani Chigurupati, RD, CSO, a registered dietitian at Methodist Hospitals who is designated as a board certified specialist in Oncology Nutrition working directly with individuals at risk for, or diagnosed with, any type of malignancy or premalignant conditions, one of only 13 in the state. One-third of the diet is protein which exceeds the recommendations of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines. “It was a surprise for me to read about the exclusion of whole grains and dairy.” According to Kim Kramer, RDN, LDN, Ingalls Wellness Dietitian, Kids Eat Right Crew Illinois Representative and the Illinois Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Media Spokesperson, the Paleo diet appears to be the newest in a long run of trendy diets. But she worries that by chopping off the bottom of the food pyramid, we’re eliminating needed vitamins. “If people don’t consume dairy, then where will they get their Vitamin D?” she asks. “More and more

people are realizing that deficiencies in Vitamin D are very common particularly in the Midwest.” Chigurupati also wonders if many people can sustain Paleo 24/7. “It doesn’t seem practical for our society and it’s costly to eat only wild caught fish, grass-fed meats and organic vegetables,” she says. “The diet is set up that you can have three non-Paleo meals out of every 21 meals. And it talks about exercise and that is good.” Sakelaris notes that when people eliminate highcalorie processed foods they feel better and have more energy. “But it’s also important to make sure you’re getting the right nutrition which is what makes the Mediterranean diet so effective,” she says. According to Granich the Paleo diet has good basic principles—lean proteins, plenty of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats—that can be altered to meet the needs of people today. “But the Paleo diet does have its set of weaknesses,” says Granich. “First of all, it is very strict and would be hard for most people to stick to for a lifetime. Critics argue that the life expectancy in that era was dramatically different than today which make some question why we would try to mock that time period. The nutrition deficiency problems that used to plague our world have been addressed through fortification in foods, especially grains and dairy and dietary supplements.” Amsterdam has a suggestion to help with these concerns. “Many people do an 80/20 Paleo,” she says. “But it just makes sense to eat close to the earth. It’s real food.” — Jane Ammeson

LIFESTYLE CHANGES CAN HAVE A POSITIVE IMPACT ON ARTHRITIS n estimated 50 million adults in the United States suffer from some form of arthritis. In fact, there are more than 100 different types of arthritis, which causes painful inflammation of the joints. Experts say, however, there are steps sufferers can take to help minimize and manage arthritis pain. These steps can range from something as simple as a diet change to in extreme circumstances, surgery. Diagnosis Before learning what steps someone with arthritis should take to manage pain, it is important to diagnose the type of arthritis and determine a treatment plan, says Dr. Tania Ghosh, a member of Porter Physician Group and a Geriatrician and internal medicine specialist with Glendale Primary Care in Valparaiso. “The diagnosis is made starting with history,” Ghosh says. “Most of the time, the way in which the arthritis started, the duration of the problem, the course of its progression, and other associated symptoms and physical findings noted upon examination guide the physician toward the probably diagnosis.” That diagnosis is often then confirmed with the help of radiological testing like X-rays and MRIs, as well as blood work. “The underlying cause for the arthritis determines the modality of treatment,” Ghosh says. Lifestyle changes Overall health can have a direct impact on the amount of pain associated with arthritis, Ghosh says. “If it is related to weight, the most important lifestyle change is diet, exercise and weight loss,” she says. Arthritis related to gout—a complex form of arthritis that can be extremely painful—could benefit from dietary modifications as well, Ghosh says. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine recommends avoiding dairy products, citrus fruits, sugar, fats, caffeine and nightshade plants—tomatoes

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and eggplant, for example. Studies have shown other changes, like adding polyunsaturated oils and omega-3 supplements to a diet, can have mild, beneficial effects. Vegan diets—because of their low-fat and high in antioxidant qualities—have shown to be beneficial to managing the inflammation associated with arthritis as well, according to the organization. Other management If lifestyle changes don’t minimize the pain, Ghosh says mediation is a possible course of action physicians may prescribe. Ultimately, she says, treatment is determined by the cause of the arthritis. “That could vary from different types and strengths of pain pills, oral medications that help in reducing the inflammation in the joint, injections into the affected joints, and medications that are used to treat any systemic problems that might be causing the arthritis,” she says. If there is significant damage to the joint, which is not benefiting from medical management, surgery is sometimes required, she says. Examples include finger and hand surgeries to correct joint problems in the hand, arthroscopy that removes debris or inflamed tissue in a joint through a small lighted instrument, and arthroplasty to replace part or all of a joint in the hip or knee. — Christine Bryant

Before learning what steps someone with arthritis should take to manage pain, it is important to diagnose the type of arthritis and determine a treatment plan.

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DR. SREEKANT CHERUKURI

Facial plastic surgery specialist

TONY V. MARTIN, THE TIMES

what’s new Local Health News GERD CENTER OPENS IN M’VILLE

Dr. Cherukuri, a leader in Northwest Indiana for minimallyinvasive cosmetic procedures for the face and neck, has helped thousands of patients since 2003. Dr. Cherukuri, a member of Carepointe Ear Nose and Throat Sinus Center, has offices in Munster, Merrillville and St. John.

Q: How are you different from other plastic

surgeons? Facial plastic surgery is a sub-specialty of plastic surgery and ear, nose and thoat (ENT) surgery. If you go to the Yellow Pages to find a plastic surgeon, most of the plastic surgeons in Chicago and the Midwest spend three-quarters of their time doing breast augmentations and tummy tucks and other non-facial procedures. We spend 100 percent of our time on the face and neck. We have the most experience in reconstructive and aesthetic procedures, including face lifts, eyelid lifts, nose jobs, Botox and other facial fillers. Q: Why is it important to go to a plastic

surgeon who specializes in the face? When you have the most experience, you have the most natural-appearing results. What’s unique about the face is you can’t really hide it under clothing. Everything is out there for everyone to see, so it’s important to do it right. Q: What are some trends in facial plastic

surgery? What’s the difference between visiting you versus a medical spa? The trend over the last 10 years has moved from extreme makeovers to minimally-invasive “no down time” procedures. People are becoming more accepting of improving body image. We perform eyelid lifts, which

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helps your eyes look less puffy and tired-looking. We also do Botox and facial fillers. It’s very important that the person doing your procedure be a surgeon. When it comes to these procedures, cheaper is not better. You want someone who has done this for 15 years, not learned how to do it during a weekendlong course. We offer free consultations so people can learn what will and won’t work for them, and so they know what to expect. We want well-educated, happy patients. Q: What is “The Weekend Lift? In 2003 we

pioneered a minimal-incision procedure called “The Weekend Lift.” A normal facelift takes four to six hours, requires general anesthesia, has extensive recuperation time and can cost up to $20,000. The Weekend Lift is designed for active people who don’t want much down-time. The Weekend Lift can get similar results, but relies on local anesthesia. It takes about an hour, recovery is many times the length of a weekend, and gets excellent results. It generally costs under $5,000. We aim for natural-looking results, making people look like they did five to 10 years ago. We have done more than 600 of these, and have more than 99 percent patient satisfaction. Q: What kinds of skin cancer treatments do

you do? We also work with dermatologists to treat

facial lesions and skin cancer. Many dermatologists don’t want to cut on the face and neck because they want their patients to have the least visible scar. We have extensive training in skin cancers and other lesions, and most patients have almost scar-free healing. If they have a suspicious lesion or mark on their face or neck, they can come see us directly. When it comes to lesions that are itching, bleeding or not healing right, we urge them to come see us immediately. Depending on the type of lesion, patients here are treated with local anesthesia in the office and in most cases can drive themselves home afterward. This saves time and money compared with going to a hospital setting. Q: What are the things we can do to

help prevent signs of aging and skin cancers? Avoid tanning beds, don’t smoke and stay out of the sun whenever possible. Always use sun block, even if it’s cloudy or if there’s snow on the ground. We recommend using SPF 30 or higher, but any SPF is better than none. It helps prevent aging from UV rays and it helps prevent skin cancer. — Carrie Rodovich FOR MORE INFORMATION

Visit his website at theweekendlift.com or call 219.836.2201.

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what’s new

survivor spotlight

the body shop

on your mind

food & fitness

senior scope

ask the expert

New gummi vitamins, wireless safety alerts and the new MDHearingAid Air.

Franciscan Alliance helps one of their own get back to his active lifestyle.

Hot Yoga helps prevent injuries and promote fitness.

Taking a break is important for both mental and physical health.

The Paleo Diet: Back to nature, or stick with modern?

How to prevent and treat pain caused by arthritis.

Dr. Sreekant Cherukuri offers insight into facial plastic surgery..

4 letter from the editor 2

GET HEALTHY | nwitimes.com/gethealthy

|

6 get healthy executive partners


I Chose Methodist “ I feel fantastic. I have absolutely no pain in my hip, and my knee is great. Whatever Methodist is doing, they’re doing it very well.” Mike Scamihorn, Crown Point

...for Joint Replacement Severe osteoarthritis ravaged Mike Scamihorn’s knees to the point where climbing just a few stairs was agony. Mike’s hip pain was so excruciating he was unable to walk or even lie on an MRI table. Now, since his hip and knee replacements by Dr. Vineet Shah at Methodist’s Total Joint Replacement Program, Mike is looking forward to restored mobility, free of pain and a new outlook on life.

Dr. Vineet P. Shah Medical Director, Total Joint Replacement Program

Methodist Hospitals’ Total Joint Replacement Program combines reduced trauma surgeries, appropriate pain management and total communication to optimize results and recovery times. Now, Northwest Indiana residents can access the latest knee and hip replacement solutions without leaving the area. Learn how Methodist Hospitals’ Total Joint Replacement Program is bringing the most advanced technology and treatment options to relieve chronic joint pain. Call toll-free 855-623-2098, or visit MethodistHospitals.org

Leading the Way to Better Health

M e t h o d i s t P h y s i c i a n G r o u P. o r G • M e t h o d i s t h o s P i t a l s . o r G



january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

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letter from the editor volume 9 | issue 1

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THE COMMON RESOLUTION

nother year, another opportunity. Everyone has New Years’ resolutions. Lose weight, save money, clean the house, do laundry more often. Sadly, many times these resolutions, no matter how good the intentions, get buried under the business of everyday life by the time March rolls around. And the following year, who even remembers what they resolved to do? Let’s face it, resolutions usually involve a goal or process that inspires dread. Who wants to carry on saving money when there are good dinners to eat, new movies to see, presents to buy? So this year, I have a proposal: What if, instead of setting a specific personal goal, we all resolve to take care of ourselves? It doesn’t sound so dreadful, does it? Taking care of ourselves can encompass any number of things, from making sure we exercise to simply giving ourselves a break — and some downtime. Often, the first problem that needs to be solved is finding a way to cure or manage pain. Many people go through life with significant chronic pain, whether it be from migraines, joints or other systemic ailments. Fortunately, many innovative procedures

are available in Northwest Indiana to combat all manner of pains. And they don’t all involve surgery. Another type of pain that is often overlooked is psychological pain. We work so hard all year long that we scarcely remember what it’s like to take a break, but as the saying goes, “All work and no play makes Katie a dull girl.” Allowing your system a short break from time to time can do wonders on your overall health and make you more productive in the long run. I know I can’t wait until my next chance to relax on the beach, but even simple breaks, like a half hour spent reading and drinking a soothing cup of tea, can make a big difference. And now that we’re all resolving to take care of ourselves in the new year, we can also take care of others. Encourage family members to take a rest, or to see a doctor about that longtime complaint. Teach children the importance of hygiene in the kitchen, and who knows — they may learn to love cooking more than they love video games. But above all, be there for each other. Resolutions are hard, after all, and everybody’s got them. Happy New Year. KATHLEEN DORSEY MANAGING EDITOR

CHECK OUT NWI.COM/GETHEALTHY, WHERE YOU’LL FIND: Our comprehensive calendar of Well-Being Events • Fresh new articles and information every day Health advice from local and national experts • The place to sign up for our weekly email newsletter with and ideas on nutrition, fitness, mental health and health care

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Publisher — CHRISTOPHER T. WHITE Associate Publisher/Editor — PAT COLANDER Managing Editor — KATHLEEN DORSEY Associate Content Producer — TARA MCELMURRY Design Director — BEN CUNNINGHAM Designer — AMANDA WILLIAMS Contributing Editors JANE AMMESON, LESLY BAILEY, ASHLEY BOYER, CHRISTINE BRYANT, TRISH MALEY, TARA MCELMURRY, JENNIFER PALLAY, PHILIP POTEMPA, CARRIE RODOVICH, ELOISE VALADEZ, SHARON BIGGS WALLER NICHE PUBLICATION SALES Account Executives MIKE CANE, ANDREA WALCZAK VP of Sales and Marketing JOHN TUCKER Advertising Operations Manager ERIC HORON Advertising Managers CRAIG CHISM, CHUCK SMITH Production Manager TOM KACIUS

Published by Lee Enterprises The Times of Northwest Indiana Niche Productions Division 601 W 45th Ave, Munster, Indiana 46321 219.933.3200 2080 N Main St Crown Point, Indiana 46307 219.662.5300 1111 Glendale Blvd Valparaiso, Indiana 46383 219.462.5151 Copyright, Reprints and Permissions: You must have permission before reproducing material from Get Healthy magazine. Get Healthy magazine is published six times each year by Lee Enterprises, The Times of Northwest Indiana, Niche Division, 601 W 45th Ave, Munster, IN 46321.


Get Heart Smart

Heart disease may be the leading cause of death, but the fact is, it is largely preventable because so many factors are in your control. Studies show that if you choose to take charge of your health and adopt a healthy lifestyle, you can dramatically reduce your risks of heart disease. Join cardiologist Jay Shah, M.D., to learn ways to prevent heart problems and improve your heart health today and into the future. February 6 • 6 p.m. • PRH

How Clogged Are Your Arteries?

Coronary artery disease, also known as hardening of the arteries, is a result of plaque buildup in your arteries. It blocks blood flow to your heart and heightens the risk for heart attack and stroke. Clogged arteries often develop over decades and can go virtually unnoticed until you have a heart attack. Interventional cardiologist Keith Atassi, M.D., will discuss the symptoms and treatment of blocked arteries and when interventions may be necessary. February 13 • 6 p.m. • PRH

PAD is Bad

It is estimated that by the age of 65, up to 20% of the population will have peripheral artery disease, or PAD, a circulatory problem in which there is partial or total blockage of an artery in a leg, an arm or the torso. It is the leading cause of amputation in diabetics. Presence of PAD is a surrogate marker for heart and vascular disease in the body. Join cardiologist Sandeep Sehgal, M.D., to learn more about how PAD is diagnosed and the best treatment options. February 20 • 6 p.m. • PRH

Get Back in Rhythm

Atrial fibrillation, commonly called A-fib, is a very common heart rhythm disorder that affects about 2.6 million people annually. The presence of atrial fibrillation increases your individual risk of stroke five fold. Join cardiologist Hector Marchand, M.D., to learn how A-fib is diagnosed and the treatment strategies utilized to reduce the risk of stroke. February 26 • 6 p.m. • PRH

Porter Regional Hospital, Community Room 85 East U.S. Highway 6, Valparaiso Registration is required for these FREE programs. Refreshments will be provided. Visit porterhealth.com or call 1-800-541-1861 to register today.

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YoUR HEARt GoinG StRonG.

Independent Members of the Medical Staff at Porter. Porter Regional Hospital is directly or indirectly owned by a partnership that proudly includes physician owners, including certain members of the hospital’s medical staff.



january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

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BABY STEPS: MOVING INTO THE SPECIALTY ERA Wellness in groups, futuristic medicine and getting there from here

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Jay Platt, DDS Oral Surgery and Dental Implant Center

John Gorski Community Healthcare System

Debbie Banik Lakeshore Bone & Joint Institute

Donald Fesko Community Hospital

John Doherty Doherty Therapeutic and Sports Medicine

Lou Molina Community Hospital

few years ago, a very well-respected Northwest Indiana CEO-physician predicted with certainty that in the future, for routine medical check-ups, monitoring medication, screening tests and other wellness care, most people would not be visiting doctors. The great majority of patients would be seeing healthcare professionals specializing in a particular service or treatment. In theory, not too far into the future, a typical healthy person could go for years without ever seeing a doctor. This was not very surprising to most people in the room including me. I had already had plenty of experience with highly trained nurse practitioners, mammography technologists, physicians’ assistants, midwives, physical therapists, audiologists and personal trainers. The first time I had a routine annual exam by a physician’s assistant happened by accident--my regular obstetrician was at the hospital delivering a baby. This had probably happened a half dozen times over the years I had been a patient of that group. And, though I had usually re-scheduled the appointment hoping for better luck, this time I was offered the opportunity to have an assistant do the exam. I was delighted. The next time was an emergency on my side of the scheduling matrix. I had the option to see an assistant physician immediately even though my regular doctor was unavailable. I began a course of treatment for the problem that was holding up a surgery and within a few days the surgery was scheduled. The world of routine health and wellness maintenance started evolving a long time ago by adapting new models to fit patient’s needs. While we were out leading healthy lives and having busy careers, training of health care professionals had split into thousands of sub-specialties. Hospitals were replaced by health systems and in-patient treatment, with a few rare exceptions, became out-patient treatment. Nurses now routinely complete continuing education units or get specialized training, but their career options have never been better. A couple of months ago, another Northwest Indiana CEO said that health care consumers would soon be scrolling through prices for medical procedures and treatments similar to the way we search in real time for airfares and hotel rooms. Though that seems hard to imagine, anyone who has ever looked at an explanation of benefits would welcome a quick search tool to use before the doctor visit or procedure, wouldn’t they? This issue of Get Healthy, as usual, contains a handful of miracles large and small, but don’t forget the rapid transition into the new world of wellness where even the patients can have something to say in making decisions about the care we get.

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GET HEALTHY EXECUTIVE PARTNERs

Mary Ann Shachlett Community Foundation of Northwest Indiana JoAnn Birdzell St. Catherine Hospital Janice Ryba St. Mary Medical Center

Dr. Alex Stemer Franciscan Medical Specialists Gregory P. McComis, MD North Point Orthopedics Nitin Khanna, MD, FAAQS Dwight Tyndall, MD, FAAQS Spine Care Specialists

Gene Diamond Franciscan Alliance

Nitin Khanna, MD, FAQQS Orthopaedic Specialists of Northwest Indiana

David F. Ruskowski Franciscan St. Anthony Health Crown Point

Dr. Bethany A Cataldi Center for Otolaryngology and Facial Plastic Surgery, L.L.C.

Daniel Netluch, MD Franciscan St. Anthony Health Crown Point

______________

Carol Schuster, RN, MBA Franciscan Alliance Thomas J. Gryzbek Franciscan St. Margaret Health Jim Lipinski Franciscan Alliance James T. Callaghan III, MD, MBA Franciscan St. Anthony Health Michigan City Trish Weber, RN, MBA Franciscan St. Anthony Health Michigan City Jonathan Nalli Porter Hospital Michael Davenport, MD Methodist Hospitals Denise Dillard Methodist Hospitals Haroon Naz Pinnacle Hospital Barbara H. Greene Franciscan Physicians Hospital Beverly DeLao Franciscan Hammond Clinic Rob Jensen Franciscan Hammond Clinic

marketing and community relations Mylinda Cane Community Healthcare System Angela Moore St. Catherine Hospital Kelly Credit Porter Hospital Karen Keltner Porter Hospital Mary Fetsch St. Mary Medical Center Marie Forszt Community Hospital Joe Dejanovic Franciscan Alliance Ellen Sharpe Franciscan Alliance Sister M. Aline Shultz, OSF Franciscan Alliance Maria E. Ramos Franciscan Alliance

Dr. Nancy Trimboli Trimboli Chiropractic

Neil Mangus, MHA IU Health LaPorte Hospital

John T. King, MD Franciscan St. Anthony Crown Point

Colleen Zubeck Franciscan Medical Specialists Centers of Indiana

Anton Thompkins, MD Lakeshore Bone & Joint Institute

Michael Shepherd St. James Hospital and Health Centers

Willis Glaros Employer Benefits Systems

Linda Hadley Methodist Hospitals

Adrianne May Hospice of the Calumet Area

Evelyn Morrison Methodist Hospitals

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HIGHLAND 9731 Prairie 219-922-4900

MERRILLVILLE DYER WINFIELD VALPARAISO 5825 Broadway 16000 W 101st Ave. 9150 109th Ave. 1551 S. Suite B 219-864-0101 Suite 2D Sturdy Rd. 219-981-9000 219-981-9000 219-464-7200 january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

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what’s new Compiled by Times Staff

Local Health News

HEALTHY PRODUCTS

GERD CENTER OPENS IN M’VILLE

SMARTYPANTS VITAMINS

Methodist Hospitals has opened a GERD Center at its Southlake campus in Merrillville for treating and managing patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and related conditions. The GERD Center provides patients access to diagnostics, treatments and technology that accurately diagnose and provide a more permanent solution to this condition. GERD is a chronic digestive disease caused by gastric acid flowing from the stomach into the esophagus. The acid irritates the lining of the esophagus and causes GERD signs and symptoms. “The center is designed to streamline, diagnose and improve care for chronic disease sufferers,” says Dr. Daniel Hurwich, a board certified gastroenterologist and medical director of the center. A nurse navigator coordinates all aspects of care from initial screening and treatment to follow-up. The GERD Center is in Methodist Hospitals Outpatient Surgery Center. Patients can call (219) 757-7534 or be referred by their physician.

PHYSICIAN JOINS LAPORTE GROUP Indiana University Health La Porte Physicians announced Dr. Sarah Bancroft recently joined the network and welcomes new patients at her LaPorte office. She joins the IU Health Orthopedics & Sports Medicine practice of Drs. Scott Fielder and Thomas Magill and nurse practitioner Laurie Jones. She is the practice’s medical director of sports medicine. Bancroft has worked with athletes at all levels and in various sports during her career. She is board certified in family medicine and sports medicine.

NEW SURGICAL SERVICES DIRECTOR St. Mary Medical Center has announced Mia Wolf, a nurse, as the new director of surgical services. She earned her BSN, RN and Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate from Purdue University and brings more than 32 years of nursing experience, 24 years of which she was in surgery leadership roles. Wolf comes to St. Mary Medical Center from the University of Chicago Hospitals, where she managed outpatient surgery and assisted in launching a new 26-suite surgical center.

GOUT CLINIC OPENS IN MUNSTER Franciscan Medical Specialists has opened a new gout clinic in Franciscan Healthcare — Munster hospital, 701 Superior Ave., Suite O. Clinic director and rheumatology specialist Dr. Kevin Joyce is trained in the diagnosis and treatment of gout, including resistant or recalcitrant gout. Gout is a form of arthritis that causes sudden, severe episodes of pain, tenderness, redness, warmth and swelling of joints. To reach the gout clinic, call (219) 922-3002. For more information, visit www. medspecindiana.com. To schedule an appointment, call (219) 326-2663.

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Attention Times Readers!

TM J

On The Go is moving to a new day and format! Chef luiS hernAndez bringS inventive Style to CiAo bellA

South Shore ArtS diSplAyS 70th AnnuAl SAlon Show

you su er rom

Top movie downloads on iTunes • Tuesday ➙ 1 “Roar” (Katy Perry) • 2 “Blurred Lines” (robin Thicke) • 3 “Applause” (Lady Gaga) • 4 “We Can’t Stop” (Miley Cyrus) • 5 “Crash my Party” (Luke Bryan) • 6 “Wake Me Up” (Avicii) • 7 “radioactive” (Imagine Dragons) • 8 “hold on, We’re Going home” (Drake) • 9 “Safe and Sound” (Capital Cities) • 10

mOViE rEViEW

about the frantic search for the kidnapper of two girls. When the chief suspect (Paul Dano) is released from custody by the police detective in charge of the case (Jake Gyllenhaal), Jackman’s father (“almost Charles Bronson-y,” he says) pursues and tortures him. “He just felt it was the perfect timing for him after playing the superhero and playing the nice guy a lot,” says Villeneuve. “He’s a very, very powerful and strong actor. He was ready to go there.” It’s a clear allegory for political issues, brought into a domestic setting. Gyllenhaal, whose pursuit is rational and next to Jackman’s morally questionable mania, says of the characters: “We are the right and left side of the brain of this film. We are the head and the heart.” hugh Jackman accosts Paul dano in a scene from “Prisoners,” opening this weekend in the area. But the 44-year-old actor, who will play Wolverine for the seventh time in next year’s interview. “I’m very averse to “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” the labeling you get. One of keenly recalls the few times the downsides of doing press, his children have, for even a which is a necessity, both the moment, been hard to find. media and audiences go, ‘Oh Once, he was at Sydney’s he’s this kind of guy. He’s a ‘Nice guy’ Jackman takes on the role of rage-filled family guy, nice guy.’ Whatever Bronte Beach when his son was label it is, it’s the hardest thing suddenly nowhere to be seen. family man in upcoming kidnapping thriller Panic started to set in. for an actor to get past.” Making the situation Jackman JAKE COYLE / AP EntErtAinmEnt EntErtA rt inmEnt WritEr rtA all the worse was acknowledges it’s “a o ie our MoV MoVie oV ratings that paparazzi were high-class problem a rage-spewing, formerly ugh Jackman ★ skip it there taking his of success.” But his alcoholic survivalist. may spend ★★ so-so photo. As Jackman years-long circling of That’s his character in the an inordinate ★★★ Good paced between a kidnapping drama “Prisoners,” the part speaks to his amount of time ★★★★ excellent playground and the strong desire to upend which debuted at the Toronto playing a mutant beach, he ignored their shouts. audience expectations. International Film Festival wolf superhero, but even the “Finally this guy goes, “For an actor,” he says, “it and will be released by Warner Australian actor realizes his ‘Hugh, he’s in the tree!’” says was one of those parts where Bros. on Sept. 20. It’s a new image is somewhat defanged. Jackman. “I’ve never been so you go, ‘OK, this is something kind of role for Jackman: A Whether it’s because he happy to have paparazzi follow rampaging father trying to find I haven’t done before, this is hasn’t shied away from his young, missing daughter at going to stretch me.’ It’s asking me. I said: ‘Whatever you musicals, on Broadway need.’” for a sustained intensity that I all costs. and in “Les Miserables,” or haven’t had before.” “I’m always looking to push because Jackman happens What Prisoners • run time 2:37 The film, directed by the boundaries of what people to be a charmingly upbeat • rating R • content Violence Quebec filmmaker Denis think I should be doing or family man, he isn’t typically • Where jpek-thearts.com Villeneuve (“Incendies”), is can do,” said Jackman in an the first candidate to play

nOrthWEst indiAnA The Times media Company

Sans claws, Hugh rages in ‘Prisoners’

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irector and choreographer Stacey Flaster has faith in connection audiences have to the musical “Godspell.” “When you talk to people and them them this is the musical you’re producing, the first thing they say is always something about how they love the songs from the show,” said Flaster, who is heading a new revival production of the stage tale based on the Gospel According to St. Matthew at Theatre at the Center in Munster. “They’re right, the songs are amazing. Hailed as one of Broadway’s most popular rock musicals, “Godspell” opens this weekend and run until Oct. 20. Featuring the sparkling score by Stephen Schwartz of “Wicked” fame and an energetic book by original director John-Michael Tebelak, “Godspell” is the upbeat retelling of a series of biblical parables. “It’s definitely a very different type of show to direct and not a production that you see done all that often these days,” Flaster said. “It was considered very innovative when it was first created for audiences.” Described as “a celebration of worldwide community, packed with hit songs and irresistible goodwill,” “Godspell still remains one of the biggest off-Broadway and Broadway successes of all time, running for more than 2,600 performances. The two-act musical follows a contemporary Jesus Christ as he recruits a group of followers and teaches them various lessons through song and dance. It originally opened off Broadway in 1971 to rave reviews, where it ran for nearly two years. The musical’s immense popularity later led to a 1973 film version set in New York

for stage praise with ‘Godspell’

ttheAtre heA he Atre A tre A Att the Center put putSS A unique SSpin pin on ‘g ‘‘godSpell’ god odSSpell’

see the show ‘GOdsPELL’ ‘G a 1971 musical by s tephen s chwartz and Johnstephen schwartz michael Tebelak. The Theatre at the Center production is directed and choreographed by stacey Flaster.

the cast of “godspell” at theatre at the center in munster running now until oct. 20 includes liam Quealy (center) portraying a contemporary Jesus christ and a cast of young talents as his followers.

Where: Theatre at the Center,

Photo by MIChaeL broSILow

rEFLECtiOns PhOtOGrAPhY ExhiBit Through sept 30 indiana Welcome Center W.F. Wellman exhibit Hall, 7770 Corinne Dr, Hammond. 800.255.5253. southshorecva.com. This fourth annual exhibit features 107 photographs taken in the area—from Chicago to new Buffalo, mich.—by 58 local photographers.

rOLLinG CAnVAs — Art And thE AutOmOBiLE Through oct 6 studebaker national Museum, 201 s Chapin st, south Bend. 574.235.9714. studebakermuseum. org. This exhibit centers on the idea of the automobile as an artistic medium and features artistic works on wheels— such as a wrought-iron Beetle from the Taj ma Garaj; Phantoms and Cigs Kill from the art Car museum in houston and a 1950 studebaker

these events are editor’s picks

‘CABinEt OF CuriOsitiEs’ opening is 7-10 p.m. saturday; exhibit runs through Oct. 26 • PHD Gallery, 2300 Cherokee Street • 314-664-6644; phdstl.com

art media—painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, fiber, glass, digital, mixed media, ceramics, video, multimedia and jewelry.

WE ArE POrtEr COuntY Through Feb 8 Porter County Museum of History, 153 Franklin st, Valparaiso. 219.465.3595. This interactive and engaging exhibit highlights the formation of the county from its founding in 1836 to present day and visitors can learn about the transformation of the county from frontier to modern landscape.

CitiZEn/sOLdiEr/ CitiZEn nov 1-Feb 9, Lubeznik Center for the Arts, 101 W second st, Michigan City. 219.874.4900. lubeznikcenter.org. Contemporary works by military combat veterans will be on display at this exhibition honors those who have fought for freedom and those fighting to reintegrate into society after their war experiences. also, through oct 27: The documentation of nature, Fabricating for Funding, magical realism—Possible not Probable, nesting instinct and Water Wrackets; nov 2-Feb 24: Theater of Conflict. michigan

70th AnnuAL sALOn shOW sept 15-oct 27 Center for Visual and Performing Arts, 1040 Ridge Rd, Munster. 219.836.1839. southshoreartsonline. org. Up to $10,000 of cash awards is on the line during this 70th annual exhibition. This juried exhibition accepts original art in all fine

mindi BAGnALL Through sept 22 Box Factory for the Arts, 1101 Broad st, st. Joseph. 269.983.3688. boxfactoryforthearts. org. mindi K. Bagnall’s works include paintings, drawings and murals with a dreamlike quality suggestive of some other world or plane of existence. also, through sept 22: Fred zemlick and Two sisters Two Lenses. shAttErEd — COntEmPOrArY sCuLPturE in GLAss sept 18-Jan 5 Frederik Meijer gardens & sculpture Park, 1000 e Beltline Ave, ne, grand Rapids. 888.957.1580. meijergardens.org. as part of artPrize, twenty-five carefully selected artists were selected for this exhibit for working formally and conceptually in ways that greatly expand definitions of both glass art and sculpture. also, through oct: Bernar

Venet at meijer Gardens; sept 7-8: Fall rose show; Sept 14-15: Herb & Gourd Fest; sept 20-oct 27: Chrysantemums and more! oct 5-6: Fall Bonsai show. mOuntAins And WAtErs — LAndsCAPEs FrOm ChinA throughFeb 2 Kalamazoo institute of Arts, 314 s Park st, Kalamazoo. 269.349.7775. kiarts. org. This collection of Chinese landscapes are extolled for their characteristic us of “negative space,” as well as seemingly impossible crags; unsurpassed dramatic waterfalls; intimate scenes of trekkers, monks and scholars’ retreats; and lone but commanding pines perched on inaccessible peaks. also, through sept 15: a Precious artistic moment— Paintings by Catherine hinkle and modern

Twist—Contemporary Japanese Bamboo art; through sept 29: For and against modern art—The Armory Show + 100; sept 14-dec 1: Copley to Kentridge—What’s new in the Collection? sept 28-dec 8: 2013 Kirk newman art school Faculty review; oct 5-Jan 26: Boo! images of the macabre. FErnWOOd PhOtOGrAPhY COntEst ExhiBit sept 6-oct 20 Fernwood Botanical garden and nature Preserve, 13988 Range Line Rd, niles. 269.695.6491. fernwoodbotanical.org. Visitors can get a look at Fernwood through the eyes of the best amateur and some professional photographers during this exhibit. also, sept 6-oct 20: Blown Glass Pumpkins from Water street Glassworks, exhibit and sale; oct 25-nov 20: monsters of the Garden, Great lkes

Fast Forward “Chicago,” sept. 20-22 at the Fox Theatre: John o’hurley, aka J. Peterman on “seinfeld,” and Paige davis, aka the host of “Trading spaces,” star in the Kander and ebb musical ➙ “The Wizard of oz,” sept. 20 in theaters: Visit the land of oz in 3-d when the classic film is rereleased in imaX theaters for one week only ➙ The Lumineers, oct. 4 at Chaifetz Arena: We’re still trying get the song “ho hey” out of our head ➙ Cinematic Titanic, oct. 12 at Family Arena: Creator Joel hodgson goes on a farewell tour with his show that riffs on bad movies from the past

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AmEriCAn PAintinG tOdAY — PhYsiCAL & VisCErAL sept 13-oct 20 Krasl Art Center, 707 Lake Blvd, st. Joseph. 269.983.0271. krasl. org. This painting exhibition looks at a diverse array of contemporary paintings that push boundaries and resist limitation. also, nov 8-Jan 12: sketches to sculptures—rendered reality, sixty Year with marshall m. Fredericks. 4th AnnuAL rEGiOnAL JuriEd shOW sept 27-nov 10 south Haven Center for the Arts, 600 Phoenix st, south Haven. 269.637.1041. southhavenarts.org. The fourth annual juried exhibit features art

illinois

CrEAturEs OF LiGht — nAturE’s BiOLuminEsCEnCE Through Jan 5 The Field Museum, 1400 s Lake shore Dr, Chicago. 312.922.9410. fieldmuseum.org. From glowworms to deep-sea fishes, this exhibit features the mysterious and magical world of bioluminescence. Visitors can discover the thousands of living organisms that blink, glow, flash and flicker. also, through Jan 20: Fractured—north dakota’s oil Boom.

aw d scom or you

Chiwetel Ejiofor (the “Dirty Pretty Things,” ‘’Kinky Boots” British actor of Nigerian roots, pictured below) plays Northop, a violinist taken from his family and put into servitude on plantations.

may be su er ng rom

The film is often harrowingly difficult to watch. But it’s ultimately concerned with being faithful to Northop’s experience (“Solomon deserved nothing less,” says McQueen), and capturing his undimmed dignity. Northop went on to be part of the abolitionist movement and lecture on slavery throughout the Northeast.

omand bu ar temporomand

The film, made with a budget of $22 million, was produced by Brad Pitt’s production company Plan B, and the actor appears in a small but pivotal role. —JAKE COYLE / AP

o nt dysfunct on TMJ n w i .co m /g o m ag a z i n e

When the Greeks ruled—egypt after alexander Great; oct 31-apr 14: Ugo rondinone—we run through the desert on burning feet, all of us are glowing our faces look twisted;

POrtAGE 16 imAx 6550 Us Hwy 6, Portage. 219.764.7569. portage16imax.com. The brand-new Portage 16 imaX showcases blockbusters as well as electrifying

10.08.2010

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The Times media Co.

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quality in common. a are you tough enough? focus on education is about 10,000 mud-covered runners supported by guest will navigate a matrix of ropes, balance lecturers, discussions andbeams courss and barbed wire in the st. Louis Tough mudder on sept. 14-15. next week, we’ll have your guide to the event.

more info: (219) 836-3255, (800) 511-1552; www. theatreatthecenter.com

boX office hours: mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; saturdays, 9 a.m. to 2

event “Teens sPecial youth event: Behind the scenes,” a special 4 p.m. performance on sept. 28, Cost is $10 per student.

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Fill ’er up on us

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p.m.; sundays, noon to 2:30 p.m. extended box office hours on day of show.

hoW much: $20-$42, available in person, by phone and online.

sundays, varying through oct. 20.

The magic of classic musical

10.08.2010

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TMJ Disorder?

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Top songs on iTunes • Tuesday ➙ 1 “roar” (Katy Perry) • 2 “Blurred Lines” (Robin Thicke) • 3 “applause” (Lady Gaga) • 4 “We Can’t Stop” (Miley Cyrus) • 5 “Crash My Party” (Luke Bryan) • 6 “Wake Me Up” (Avicii) • 7 “Radioactive” (Imagine Dragons) • 8 “hold on, We’re Going Home” (Drake) • 9 “safe and sound” (Capital Cities) • 10 “Cups” (anna Kendrick) the associated Press

enter our Fall Fuel-Up for a chance to win $1,000 in prepaid cards from QuikTrip. We’ll pick one winner each week throughout september. stltoday.com/contests

perForMance indiana

70th annual event kicks off Sunday at 1 p.m.

/

When: Wednesdays through showtimes,

1040 ridge road, munster.

NorthweSt INdIaNa SyMPhoNy

The ‘Cirque’ is in town compositions and the precision of circus arts will blend when “Cirque de la Symphonie” takes the stage Sept. 20 at Star Plaza Theatre in Merrillville. Continuing his theme of making it a priority to “amaze” audiences, Northwest Indian symphony Orchestra music director/ conductor Kirk Muspratt said the season’s opening concert is perfect the way for the rest of the to lead th concert season. The opening show also includes a gala event featuring a pre-concert dinner and drinks and a postconcert champagne and dessert reception. Among tunes on the “Cirque de la Symphonie” concert playlist will be compositions by Tchaikovsky, Bizet, Mendelssohn, Johann Strauss, Bernstein and more. Tickets for the opening concert are $25 to $65. Gala package is $115 per person in addition to a concert ticket. Proceeds will benefit the Symphony’s music and education programs. Concert season subscriptions are still available. For information, call (219) 836-0525 or visit NISOrchestra.org. —ELOisE mAriE VALAdEZ / GO!

Salon salute

! mma/g G aozmi n e a z/ i nTeh e T i m e s m e d i a C o . n wGio.co ag

ProvIded by MIChaeL broSILow

the cast of director stacey flaster’s production of “godspell” is a “leap of faith” with what flaster describes as casting of “young talents and fresh faces” for the run now until oct. 20 at theatre at the center in munster. City, and a number of Broadway and off-Broadway revivals. The production was most recently revived on Broadway at the Circle on the Square theatre in November 2011, running through June 2012. The score by Stephen Schwartz showcases a range of popular tunes like the international hit “Day by Day” and “Prepare Ye The Way Of The Lord,” “All Good Gifts,” “Turn Back, O Man” and “By My Side,” all sharing messages of kindness, tolerance and love. “Godspell” won the 1972 Grammy Award for Best Score from an Original Cast Show Album, and was a 1977 Tony nominee for Best Original Score. Audiences at Theatre at the Center will share the creative company of new talents on stage during the show’s run.

“I wanted to be very open with my casting and the result is a group of very pure and fresh talents, who work great together,” Flaster said. “We have a cast of 12 and when you watch what we’ve created, it’s very easy to see it’s the people and their portrayal of each of these identities that make this show what it is, all performing as one.” Her casting of “Godspell” stars Liam Quealy as Jesus Christ, Jim DeSelm as Judas and John the Baptist, Matt Deitchman as Jeffrey, George Keating as Lamar, Merrick Robison as Herb, Hillary Marren as Robin, Alexis Rogers as Joanne, Rose LeTran as Peggy, Kathleen Gibson as Sonia, Landree Fleming as Gilmer, David Hathaway as David and Lauren Paris as Lauren. “I knew immediately Liam was Jesus,” Flaster said. “And when he auditioned for the role, I was right. It was the fit I was looking for.” Quealy, who was born and raised in Mokena, Ill. and now lives in Chicago, has never performed at Theatre at the Center in Munster and said he was eager to be part of the production. “While people might often think of Andrew Lloyd Webber and ‘Jesus Christ Superstar,’ it’s ‘Godspell’ that has all of the songs so many people love to revisit and that’s one of the first things I thought about when I was auditioning,” Quealy said. “Doing this production at Theatre at the Center makes it even more special, because of the design of the stage and space, the audience gets to have a close connection to what’s happening in every scene and musical number.” “Godspell’s” production team is led by Artistic Director William Pullinsi and features Musical Direction and Orchestrations by William Underwood. The design team includes Scenic Designer Angie Weber-Miller, Lighting Designer Shelley Strasser Holland, Sound Designer Luis Garcia, Props Designer Bridget Earnshaw, Costume Designers Brenda Winstead and Julia ZayasMelendez and Wig Designer Kevin Barthel. The Stage Manager is Matt McMullen, the Production Manager/ Technical Director is Ann Davis and TATC’s General Manager is Richard Friedman.

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from artists living in the Great Lake states of Wisconsin, illinois, indiana, ohio and michigan in all media. also, through sept 22: Wild & Wooly—The Art of Barb Bare; nov 16-dec 8: 27th annual mistletoe market.

80 At 80 Through Feb 2 Museum of science and industry, 57th st and Lake shore Dr, Chicago. 773.947.3133. msichicago.org. Commemorating the museum’s 800th anniversary, this exhibit features 80 rarely displayed artifacts from the museum’s extensive collection. many of these items

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nov 12-Jan 27: art and 3d films that are ChiCAGO strEEt appetite—american uniquely suited to the thEAtEr Painting, Culture and imaX format. With WhAt VinCEnt 154 W Chicago Cuisine. projected images up sAW st, Valparaiso. to eight stories high to paintings to drawings, phomCA dnA — sept 10-nov 18, 219.464.1636. Hammond. After a brief hiatus and a spectacular, WArhOL And tography and the variety and the The Art institute during World War II, the exhibit chicagostreet.org. wraparound digital mArisOL of Chicago, diversity is just huge.” now in its 58th resumed, and became known as surround-sound Museum of 111 s Michigan season of bringing The diversity McClelland “the Salon Show.” system, this theater Contemporary Ave, Chicago. live theatrical offers a totalspeaks of is partially evident in “For a not-for-profit arts Art, 220 e Chicago 312.629.6635. artic. entertainment to the immersion moviegoing the large number of entries for organization, to be doing someAve, Chicago. edu/aic. greater northwest experience. 312.280.2660. Photographs of thing that’s gone on for 70 years, this year’s exhibit. indiana region, the mcachicago.org. the sites made CsT presents a variety More than 400 pieces of art I think is a testament to the Michigan inspired by the famous in the paintings of plays and musicals thE ViCKErs by 160 different artists were organization. There are a lot of multi-faceted of Vincent van Gogh each season, in thEAtrE submitted for the show, and 69 businesses that haven’t survived relationship offer insight into the addition to regularly 6 n elm st, Three pieces by 64 artists are 70 years,” said Mary of andy Warhol and beloved artist’s work. scheduled theater oaks. 269.756.3522. marisol, this exhibit also, through sept being presented. gallery classes for both McClelland, adults vickerstheatre.com compares and 22: zarina—Paper and children. sept iF you The demographics of manager of South Shore home of the annual contrasts Warhol’s Like skin; through 14: The World’s Worst the artists represented Arts. “sound of silents silk screen printings sept 27: [insert YoU Fairy Godmother; oct Film Festival,” this are diverse as well, with and marisol’s wood here]; through sept 18-nov 2: dr. Jekyll The Salon Show is painstakingly restored sculptures side-by-side. 29: impressionism, the age of artists ranging having its reception and and mr. hyde; nov turn-of-the-century also, through sept 29: Fashion and modernity 29-dec 21: naughty or ceremony, free from a gentleman in his award art house screens Chicago Conceptual and Undressed—The nice holiday double What: Artist 80s who made a bronze and open to the puba variety of notable abstraction; through Fashion of Privacy; Feature. Reception and independent films. a sculpture to individuals lic, at 1 p.m. Sunday. oct 6: Theaster through oct 6: africa Award Ceremony dEBArtOLO lofty, two-story gallery Gates—13th Ballad; Wrapped, robed in their 20s who subThis year’s juror, Paul PErFOrminG Arts space, showcasing the through oct 13: and Beaded and When: 1 to 3 mitted paintings and Klein, who was the Art CEntEr works of midwestern homebodies and Beyond the Great p.m. Sunday drawings. Consultant/Curator for artists, is open to University of modern Cartoonist— Wave—hokusai’s the public before Where: South The entrants are the McCormick Place notre Dame, notre The art of daniel images of mount and between shows. Dame Campus.West expansion in ChiShore Arts Clowes; through nov Fuji; through oct from Indiana, Illinois Further enhancing 574.631.2800. Gallery of Center 10: Think First, shoot 20: Tomoaki suzuki; and Michigan areas, cago, not only decided its art-house cachet, performingarts. Later, Photography through oct 27: oscar for Visual and with most entrants from what pieces would be the Vickers hosts live nd.edu. from the mCa niemeyer; through Performing music, performance art Northwest Indiana; displayed, but also the The state-of-the-art, Collection; through dec 1: Play, Pretend Arts, 1040 Ridge and poetry readings on however, other pieces artists who would earn 150,000-square-foot nov: amanda ross-ho; and dream—Caldecott Rd, Munster its stage. facility, newly opened through dec 3: José medal and honor are from artists farther their share of $10,000 in 2004, is host to Lerma; through Jan hoW much: Books, 2010-2013; away, including pieces in cash awards. illinois some of the world’s 5: Paul sietsema; nov through Jan 5: new Free thE GEnE sisKEL from West Lafayette, Among the prizes most celebrated 9-mar 9: The Way of Views—The rendered FiLm CEntEr fyi: (219) 836Ind. and Champaign, Ill. given is the Surovek artists. in addition, the shovel—art as image in architecture; 1839 or southschool of the its stages l as theAward of Excellence, archaeology; nov through Jan 12: isaac With this diversity, Art institute of shorearts.com south Bend symphony 29-apr 13: CiTY seLF. Julien—The Long road McClelland said she which is the $2,000 Chicago, 164 n orchestra, southold to mazatlán; through believes the show has state st, Chicago. dance, the notreprize dame given annually Jan 12: Japanese art 312.846.2600. something for everyin memory of Helen V. FilM symphony, the south of the 1960s—The siskelfilmcenter.org. Bend Civic Theatre, Challenge of Tradition; body. Surovek. indiana This film centerand more. sept 15: McClelland said many of the sept 14-Jan 5: shomei “I can’t imagine that anyone CinEmArK At renamed in 2000 for Third Coast Percussion; Tomatsu—island VALPArAisO would walk in here and say, ‘I artists come to the annual award its most passionate sept 18-20: actors Life; sept 28-Jan 5: 3 700 Porter’s Vale J. SULLIvaN, hate it all’,” she said. brIaN roMPer supporter, the laterooM, aCryLIC from the Londonceremony and it serves as an in 1—Contemporary Blvd, Valparaiso. film critic Gene siskelstage—othello; sep 22: explorations in “They may not like every incentive for others to make the 800.326.3264, has been exhibiting audra mcdonald;trek. sept architecture and piece, but I can bet they are 219.464.0260. critically acclaimed, 26: Project Fusion; design; oct 5-Jan 5: going to come in here and find at “Let’s say this gentleman cinemark.com. as well as entertaining oct 12: hot 8 Brass max Kozloff—Critic least one or two that they like.” Playing new releases “motion picture art” Band; oct 13: Jancomes [who made a particular and Photographer; as well as the McClelland said she felt each piece in its state-of-the-art Lisiecki; oct 18-nov 1: of art], and you want to oct 14-Jan 12: amar Cinemark Classic facilities since its macbeth; oct 27:know enso about it,” McClelland said. Kanwar—The Lightning piece in the gallery was the series, Cinemark is the inception in 1972. String Quartet; Nov Testimonies; oct 17product of a lot of hard work, “You can actually talk to the BY stEVE LEsKiEWsKi / timEs COrrEsPOndEnt leading motion picture Presenting more 7: estonian national Jan 9: Violence and and she enjoyed learning about artist about their work. Ask, exhibitor. Cinemark than 100 films each symphony orchestra; Virtue—artemisia at Valparaiso features the meaning behind some of the ‘Why did you do this? What the 70th Annual Salon Show annual South Shore month, the center nov 10: modigliana Gentileschi’she Judith roomy stadium showcases cuttingQuartet; Nov 15:does Turtle it mean?’ This show, in slaying holofernes; works. starting Sunday. Arts Salon show is a seating and reald 3d and edge, independent Island Quartet and oct 20-Feb 16: dreams display “To sit and do this [art], I particular, provides a tremenshow is a tradition datcreative digital tradipresentations The features and classic nellie mcKay; nov 17: and echoes—drawings can’t even fathom,” she said. opportunity to the public to the 10olesen; dous tion that has forcontinan all-around ing back revivals, From 1930s, hosting when Kristian nov and sculpture in the quality movie viewing “So, I give a lot of credit to they can come in here local artists gathered showuedhilliard for decades. the “annual Festival of and24: ensemblendbecause with david and Celia experience. from iran”in to The notre dame Vocale and Collection; oct 24-Jan the event people who are very thoughtful and see everything from a metal casedFilms an exhibit the Minas This weekend, Grapes of Wrath, Carmen-helena Tellez 26: focus—monika in regards to their work.” sculpture to a bronze sculpture Department Storethe in downtown reaches a milestone, unveiling diverse offerings have Baer; oct 31-Jul 27:

by sarah bryan miller

Chapter, Guild of natural scientific illustrators; nov 8-dec 8: Jan Frieden—Books and Trees.

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will ignite visitors’ memories from past exhibits—such as a gigantic Paul Bunyan statue and Tam, the Transparent anatomical manikin— while some are cuttingedge innovations. ongoing: The art of the Bicycle.

saturday

Traditional Victorian curio cabinets provided homes for objects that interested their owners: shells, perhaps, fossils, intriguing stones, a selection of mounted insects, often arranged in random ways that brought out unexpected aspects of each. Photographer Cary horton and metalsmith sherri Jaudes used those cabinets as a starting point for their new exhibition at Phd Gallery: silver haloid prints in black and white that offer unusual juxtapositions of context and object, the factual and the fantastic, next to metal sculptures of plants and insects, often presented in bell jars.

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hOBArt summEr mArKEt On thE LAKE Through sept 26 • 3-8 p.m. • Thu, Festival Park, 111 e old Ridge Rd, Hobart • 219.942.4511 • cityofhobart.org. This summer market offers fresh produce and handcrafted products, as well as sweet treats and live entertainment all evening.indiana

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in the clubs

Q+a

north mississippi allstars

Charles Murray, a gary native and Roosevelt High school alum is writer and director of the independent film “Things never said,” which is premiering sept. 21 in Merrillville. Murray will host a meet and greet session at 6 p.m. Friday just before the 7:25 p.m. screening at AMC showplace Theater12, 2590 southlake Mall in Merrillville. What’s the song “Best Days” all about? When i was selecting music for the album i heard this song (co-written by myron Butler) and i said, “Wow, this song is saying something i want to say to the people.” it was like a testimony, declaring our best days are yet to come.

What Tamela Mann • When 7:30 p.m. Thursday • Where Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church, 5515 Dr. Martin Luther King Drive • hoW much $25-$32 • more info jpek-thearts.com

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tunEs & tix

What was it like working with Franklin? it was amazing to me being with Kirk. i still miss it to this day. But the Lord saw fit to put me out front. What was your first meeting with Perry like? When i met him, i was just happy to be there. i said, “i’ll sing for you, and i don’t need no big role.” he told me he’ll have me acting too, and i gave him a smile.

BB’s JAZZ, BLuEs And sOuPs 700 s. Broadway, 314-436-5222

spotlight

Charles Murray and ‘Things Never Said’

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collectively, the Dickinsons lend their talents regularly to the likes of the Black Crowes and John Hiatt, they are arguably at North Mississippi Allstars, Stereophonics their best working side-by-side among acts preforming in the area this month as the all-stars they surely are. For proof, check out “World BY timE shELLBErG / t.shELLBErG@COmCAst.nEt Boogie Is Coming,” their most recent set released earlier this the ivories for the likes of the hile separated month. Rolling Stones and helmed the by a massive Hailing from Wales, Stereoboards for the varied likes of Big & tix body of water tunes phonics take their cue from Star, the Replacements and varying more recent and notable and Mudhoney, yet the stylistically, sources. Where the Dickinson siblings forte North Mississippi Allstars North Mississippians has, and remains, lo-fi, and Stereophonics, at critical draw from their bluesy homegrown blues rock junctures in their still-evolving surroundings circa mid reminiscent of their careers, made past musical 20th Century, lead (and namesake state. benchmarks sound like the next unrelated) Stereophonics Their debut, Y2K’s big thing. by tim Kelly and Richard Jones seem“Shake Hands With Shorty, ” shellberg North Mississippi co-foundingly found their muse on their was an out-of-the-box clasers, brothers Luther and Cody homefront as well, honing in sic when it was released and Dickinson, have been blessed on and finding success with a remains one of blues/rock’s with stellar musical genetics; Stones/Faces/Zeppelin fusion. finest debuts more than a dozen their father is the late, great While Stereophonics released years later. Individually or Jim Dickinson, who tickled

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YoUR gUiDe To THings To Do / 09.13.13–09.19.13 / nwi.com/gomagazine

hEArtLAnd — thE PhOtOGrAPhs OF tErrY EVAns Through nov 24 The snite Museum of Art, University of notre Dame, notre Dame. 574.631.5466. sniteartmuseum. nd.edu in her first retrospective, artist Terry evans invites viewers to explore a beautiful, intricate and often overlooked landscape. This traveling exhibition features 66 photographs—centered on the prairies, people and artifacts of the midwest—selected from her 30+-year career. also, through sept 22: The Challenges We Face— Civil rights Photography at the snite museum of art; through oct 13: José Guadalupe Posada and his Legacy; oct 27-dec 22: The academy exposed—French Figure studies from the Permanent Collection.

pa n m gra nes or

Steve McQueen, the British director of the sex-addiction drama “Shame” and the Irish Republican Army hunger strike tale “Hunger,” had planned to make a film about slavery, but it didn’t take shape until his wife came across Solomon Northop’s 1853 autobiography, which straightforwardly tells of his nightmarish odyssey.

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Day By Day Champion presented as a P38 Lightning airplane.

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“12 Years a Slave,” which Fox Searchlight will release in theaters Oct. 18, premiered over the weekend at the Toronto International Film Festival where it was hailed as a masterpiece and very possibly this year’s best picture Oscar winner. It is quickly gathering force as a kind of epochal achievement.

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their debut, “World Gets Around,” in 1997, it wasn’t until 2001’s “Just Enough Education To Perform” when the band found their grove. Their artistic peak continued with 2003’s “You Gotta Go There to Come Back” and concluded with “Language. Sex. Violence. Other?” two years later. After a four-year gap between new sets, Stereophonics released their eighth original set, “Graffiti on the Train,” in March. It peaked in the number three spot on the U.K. albums chart and was certified gold. Both the Allstars and Stereophonics have also earned reputations at top-notch live acts as well. With both Chicago shows falling on Sept. 28, live rock music fans may be faced with a quandary, albeit a winning one at that. North Mississippi Allstars, 9 p.m. Sept. 28, House of Blues, 329 N. Dearborn, Chicago. $25 in advance, $28 day of show (17 and older). FYI: (312) 923-2000, HOB. COM Stereophonics, 8 p.m. Sept. 28, Vic Theatre, 3145 N. Sheffield Ave., Chicago. $39 (18 and older). FYI: (773) 472-0449, JAMUSA.COM tiCKEts On sALE nOW For more information, contact the venues or ticket sales agencies listed below. Unless otherwise indicated, all shows are all-ages. • Bon Jovi, Oct. 23, United Center (UniTedCenTer.Com) • Mazzy Star, Nov. 13, Vic Theatre (JamUsa.Com) • Jay Z, Jan. 9, United Center (UniTedCenTer.Com) • Cut Copy, Nov. 14, Riviera Theatre (18 and older, JamUsa.Com) • Kanye West, Kendrick Lamar, Nov. 7, United Center (UniTedCenTer.Com) • Gary Clark Jr., Nov. 19, Vic Theatre (JamUsa.Com) • Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Dec. 31, Park West (18 and older, JamUsa.Com) • John Legend, Nov. 10, Chicago Theatre (TheChiCaGoTheaTre.Com) • Kelly Hogan, Nov. 14, Old Town School of Folk (oLdToWnsChooL.orG) • Cyndi Lauper, Nov. 1, Chicago Theatre (TheChiCaGoTheaTre.Com)

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Jamaican jazz comes to Chicago

Go! Is the complete guide to the weekend festivals and events, museums and galleries, family fun spots, live music and theater, nightlife scene, restaurants and gourmet shops, films and video, entertainment news and reviews. Go! Is NWI’s one-stop source for food, fun and the rest of the best.

• Ground Floor Band, 10 p.m. Friday.

Did you know reggae’s roots are in jazz? You can hear one of the originators of Jamaican jazz music as Derrick Harriott comes to Chicago’s Mayne stage at 1328 W. Morse Avenue on saturday, sept. 29 as part of The Jamaican oldies Weekend, put together by Chuck Wren of JUMP UP! Records.

• Selwyn Birchwood Blues Band, 7 p.m. saturday. • Boo Boo Davis & The Blues all stars, 10 p.m. saturday. • Marbin Jazz Rock, 7 p.m. sunday. • Brandon Santini Blues Band, 9 p.m. sunday. • Tony Simmons Band, 6 p.m. monday. • Park Avenue On Call, 9 p.m. monday.

harriott is one of the legends of the Jamaican jazz and reggae era who began his career with the horns of jazz and ska behind his falsetto vocals. he is perhaps most well-known for his reggae tunes that he not only sang but produced. he promises to bring back some of those songs as he takes the stage, as well as songs from the earliest era when jazz and ska was all the rage. make sure to come back the next day for a book reading and signing at the mayne stage at 1 p.m. for the new book “don drummond: The Genius and Tragedy of the World’s Greatest Trombonist.” Then at 2 p.m., filmmaker Brad Klein will screen the U.s. premiere of his long-awaited documentary, “Legends of ska.” hear firsthand stories from the jazz and ska greats of Jamaica. To buy tickets and for info on derrick harriott visit maynestage.com. What Derrick Harriott • When 7:30 p.m. Thursday • Where

Mayne Stage, 5515 Dr. Martin Luther King Drive • hoW much $25-$32 • more info jpek-thearts.com

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Look for it every Thursday!

• Leroy Pierson, 7 p.m. Friday.

—hEAthEr AuGustYn

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• Bob “Bumblebee” Kamoske & South end eric mcspadden, 9 p.m. Tuesday. • Rich McDonough & Rough Grooves Blues Band, 9 p.m. Wednesday. • Iron Mike with the demian Band, 8:30 p.m. Thursday. BinFOrd’s BAr & GriLL 3915 mid rivers mall dr., st. Peters, 636-477-7953 • 2 Chixx, 9 p.m. Friday. • Killer Whails, 9 p.m. saturday. BOttLEnECK BLuEs BAr At AmEristAr CAsinO 1260 s. main st., st. Charles, 636-940-4964

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PHiLiP PoTeMPA philip.potempa@nwi.com, (219) 852-4327

Apostolic applause

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Add ‘12 Years’ to the must-see list this year

stage

stage

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neck or shou der

COminG AttrACtiOn

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Cirque Show: niSo tAkeS to the SkieS

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• The Dirty Muggs, 9 p.m. Friday, 9 p.m. saturday. BrOAdWAY OYstEr BAr 736 s. Broadway, 314-621-8811 • The Hatrick, 10 p.m. saturday. • Jason Garms, 9 p.m. Tuesday. • Steven Wooley, 9 p.m. Wednesday.

• Are you aware o gr nd ng or c ench ng your ee h? • Do you wake up w h sore s musc es around your aws? • Do you have requen headaches or neck aches? • Does your aw c ck pop gra e ca ch or ock when you open your mou h? • s d ficu or pa n u o open your mou h ea or yawn? • Have you had prob ems such as ar hr s w h o her o n s? • Do you have ee h ha no onger ouch when you b e? • Do your ee h mee d eren y rom me o me? • s hard o use your ron ee h o b e or ear ood? • Are your ee h sens ve oose broken or worn?

• Capture The Crown, 5:45 p.m. sunday.

• DJ Scooter Lavile, 10 p.m. saturday.

• Stolas, Strawberry & Other Guest, 7 p.m. sunday.

JimmY’s CAFE On thE PArK 706 de mun ave., 314-725-8585

• Acacia Strain, Within The ruins, and other Guests, 7 p.m. monday. • We Butter the Bread With Butter and incredible me, 7 p.m. Tuesday.

• Stardog Champion(XBreaking Benjaman) with other Guests, 8 p.m. Wednesday. hAmmErstOnE’s 2028 s. ninth st., 314-773-5565 • Honky Tonk Happy hour, 4 p.m. Friday. • Steve Reeb, 3 p.m. saturday. • Paul Bonn, 9 p.m. saturday.

• Jam Session with Voo doo Blues, 4 p.m. sunday.

• Erik Brooks, 8:30 p.m. sunday. • Tim Albert & stovehandle dan, 7 p.m. monday. • Naked Mike, 6 p.m. Tuesday.

• Park Avenue Jam session featuring John Farrar, 7 p.m. Wednesday. • Paul Bonn, 8 p.m. Thursday.

mEYEr’s GrOVE 4510 manchester ave., 314-932-7003

mOrGAn strEEt BrEWErY 721 n. second st., 314-231-9970 • Aaron Logan, 6 p.m. Wednesday.

niGhtshiFt BAr And GriLL 3979 mexico rd., st. Peters, 636-441-8300

• Karaoke, 9 p.m. Friday, 8 p.m. sunday, 8 p.m. Thursday. • Mike Matthews and Jeff Walchshauser acoustic rock show, 4 p.m. saturday. • Mike Matthews Project, 9 p.m. saturday.

• Joe Dirt & the dirty Boys Band, 9 p.m. Friday.

shAnti 825 allen ave., 314-241-4772

• That 80’s Band, 9 p.m. saturday.

hiLtOn st. LOuis At thE BALLPArK one s. Broadway, 314-421-1776 • DJ, 5 p.m. Friday.

• Steve Leslie Band, 4 p.m. saturday. hOriZOn At hArrY’s 2144 market st., 314-421-6969

FuBAr 3108 Locust st., 314-289-9050

• DJ Slant E, 10 p.m. Friday.

• Jud Mehler, 10 p.m. Friday.

• Steve Hunt, 10 p.m. saturday.

• Leslie Craig Duo, 4:30 p.m. Friday. • El Scorcho!, 9 p.m. Friday.

• Dance Floor Riot, 9 p.m. saturday.

• Steven D Hunt Band, 8:30 p.m. Thursday. thE CLuBhOusE 1048 Wolfrum rd., Weldon spring • StaggerCatt, 9 p.m. Friday. • Bitter Pill, 9 p.m. saturday.

thE CrACK FOx 1114 olive st., 314-621-6900

• Love Hz Drum and Bass, 9 p.m. Friday.

PAtriCK’s rEstAurAnt & sPOrts BAr 342 West Port Plaza, maryland heights, 314-439-0505

• Leslie Craig & the Hell Benders, 9 p.m. Friday.

• Leslie Craig & the hell Benders, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday.

sundECKEr’s 900 n. First st., 314-241-5915

sYBErG’s On dOrsEtt 2430 old dorsett rd., maryland heights, 314-785-0481

• The Painted Ladies drag show, 10 p.m. Friday, 10 p.m. saturday.

hELEn FitZGErALd’s irish PuB 3650 s. Lindbergh Blvd., 314-984-0026

• Roster McCabe, 9 p.m. Thursday.

n w i .co m /g o m ag a z i n e

p.m. saturday.

• Glorious Blue, 9 p.m. saturday.

• Jim Manley & Mark Friedricks, 11:30 a.m. sunday.

• Queen’s Blvd., 9 p.m. saturday.

• Conspiracy, 9 p.m. saturday.

• Jason and the Punknecks, the Griddle Kids, GGJim, 9 p.m. Wednesday.

tiF’s uGLY muG On thE LAndinG 801 n. second st., 314-241-3180

• DJ KDLZ, 9 p.m. Friday, 9 p.m. saturday.

• A+ Open Mic Night, 9 p.m. Tuesday.

• DJ Random, 11:30 p.m. Friday, 11:30 p.m. saturday.

sKY musiC LOunGE 930 Kehrs mill rd., Ballwin, 636-527-6909 • Lucy’s Palace, 6:30 p.m. Friday. • Vote for Pedro, 9 p.m. Friday.

• Steamroller, 6:30

tell our readers about your shows

are you a performer or venue owner? Then let our readers know about your upcoming events. it’s free. To get started, go to events.stltoday.com.

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C OOMM P A N Y

Hammond N • 219 931 3235

Accep mos ma o nsu ances Accep Hoos e Hea hw se and Med ca d Accep a ma o c ed ca ds and paymen p ans ava ab e

january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

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survivor spotlight

Triathlonin runner

BACK theRACE Forty-year-old John Babista, of Woodridge, is a nurse. However after crossing the finish line at a Hammond triathlon, he suffered a heart attack and became the patient. “What had happened to me is shocking but I am very thankful to everybody and especially to our good Lord that I am still here to tell our story,” says John. John, who for the past four years has trained year round for races, was competing in Wolf Lake’s Leon’s Triathlon back in June. John’s wife Alma, who is also a nurse, was with their two sons, ages 15 and 8, at the finish line cheering John on. “As I saw him coming to the finish line, I was relieved. I was standing by the arch and he gave his sons his signature airplane run before he crossed the finish line — I even took pictures of him. Then we walked and as I tried to find him, my brother-in-law, yelled, ‘Kuya (big brother) is on the ground,’” says Alma, who still gets emotional when speaking about the experience. “I called out his name, but he was losing consciousness and gasping for air. I cried for help and yelled, ‘check his pulse’. People all around were helping: doing CPR, hugging me and hugging my kids. It was the longest minute of my life.” Karen Callahan, R.N. at Franciscan St. Margaret Health-Hammond Emergency Department, says the team in the Emergency Department were prepared to deal with John’s grave condition when he arrived due to a phone call the department’s Emergency Medical Services had made to them. “The staff in the ED that day work every other weekend together for years and we just ‘click’ when it comes to critical situations. We know what each other does best and we flow in a methodical, systematic way. John was our focus from the minute we received the EMS call,” says Callahan. Once John arrived he received a therapeutic

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John Babista crosses the finish line of a triathlon in Hammond just before he collapsed due to a heart attack. Franciscan’s ICU staff members and ER doctor were among the team who cared for Babista.

hypothermia treatment from the hospital staff that is new to Northwest Indiana. The treatment is performed by covering a patient’s back, chest and legs in cooling pads. Cooling the body helps to preserve the brain and heart. The process decreases the body’s metabolic rate, which protects the brain from neurotoxins that usually attack 24 to 48 hours after cardiac arrest. “Therapeutic hypothermia is fairly new to the staff at Franciscan St. Margaret Health. We were in-serviced approximately 6 months prior and John was the first patient I personally had to start it on,” says Callahan. John was hospitalized at Franciscan St. Margaret Health-Hammond hospital for nearly 3 weeks. After undergoing a slew of tests back home it was discovered that John’s right artery was 100% blocked, the left artery was almost 100% blocked and the posterior artery was more than 25% blocked. “It sounds strange because I have an active lifestyle and live healthy and still got those blockages in my heart. We are convinced that it is genetics since a few of my family members have had heart bypass surgery in the past.” Fortunately, John was able to resolve his heart

problems without open-heart surgery. After five and half months of rehabilitation, John successfully completed his Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Program on Nov. 21 and returned to work Nov. 25. Alma says there were countless people who provided support and made John’s recovery possible including visits from Leon’s Triathlon founder, Leon Wolek. “Our family is very thankful to all first responders, paramedics, co-cyclists, co-workers, staff at St. Margaret Hospital, Catholic Charities, Chicago Asian Running Endurance, family and friends. They all became our immediate family, who provided us with everything to make our life easier while John was in the hospital,” says Alma. “Of course the whole hospital staff — we are so glad we ended up at St. Margaret. They are all God’s instruments.” Callahan says as an ER nurse she rarely sees the outcomes of critical patients, due to most times they are not good outcomes. “I have been an ER Nurse here for 27 years and John, his story, his family and the true spirit of how the whole hospital pulled together is something I will never forget,” says Callahan. “John is a miracle and I am so blessed to have been a part of that miracle.” — Trish Maley


At the

Heart of Valparaiso

Come join us in offering the area’s finest medical services TA VE. CAL UM E

conveniently situated in central Valparaiso

MCDONALD DR.

Excellent cross-referral opportunities

Glendale Medical center

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Porter Hospital Surgery Center

Remodeled office suites Timeshare suites also available

• Herniated Discs: Cervical,Thoracic, Lumbar • Post-Laminectomy Syndrome With and Without lnstrumentation • Sciatica and Pseudosciatica • Degenerative Disc Disease: Cervical,Thoracic, Lumbar • Spinal Stenosis: Cervical,Thoracic, Lumbar • Spondylolysthesis, Grade I • Sports Injuries & Overuse Syndromes • Pain Caused by Motor Vehicle Accident • Osteoarthritis • Spondylosis: mild, moderate, and severe • Short Leg Syndrome • Nutritional Advice for Joint Repair and Pain • Scoliosis - Child,Teen,Adult • Headache, Migraines,TMJ Syndrome • Facet Syndrome • Cervico-Brachial/Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

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updated & beautifully maintained facility

Pain Relief sPecialists

Come Visit Our Distinguished Physicians and Practices Obsterical and Gynecological Associates, Inc. Cheryl Short, M.D. Crystal Strickland, M.D. L. Jennifier Murphy, M.D.

Porter Physician Group Derek Gasper, D.O.

Associated Pediatricians, LLC

Valparaiso Internal Medicine Surya Nallari, M.D.

Midwest Fertility Center Amos Madanes, M.D. Porter Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine Douglas Mazurek, M.D. James Anthony, M.D. Urology Associates of NWI, PC Weil Foot and Ankle Institute

Dynamic Rehabilitation Services Porter Glendale Laboratory

Franciscan Medical Specialists Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Michael Spence, M.D. American Joint Preservation Institute Gregory Markarian, M.D. Psychiatry & Psychology Robert Reff, M.D. , FAPA John Stutesman, PsyD

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Offering The Best In Chiropractic Care for Over 20 Years. PPO with Anthem, BCBS IL, United Health Care We have affordable cash plans We love our cash patients! 706 Ridge Road, Munster • (219) 836-8890 12732 Route 41, Cedar Lake, IN • (219) 374-4144 www.trimbolichiro.net january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

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the body shop

HOT YOGA turns up the heat

Y

oga’s latest trend, hot yoga, has studios across the country turning up the heat, literally. Hot yoga is any type of yoga—Moksha yoga, Bikram yoga, Corepower yoga, etc—performed in a heated room with temperatures somewhere between 90 and 100 degrees Fahrenheit. For many, holding a yoga pose is hard enough without increasing the heat, so what is drawing so many to this yoga trend? Michelle Robinson, owner of YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI, thinks it’s the sweat. “There’s this misconception that when you sweat, you’re working harder,” Robinson says. “Hot yoga is for those people who really like that sweat.” At YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI, instructors offer different levels of Vinyasa Yoga, a sequence of poses synchronized with your breath, to make yoga more accessible to people of different skill levels. Students can choose a slower class, a power yoga class, or yoga with weights, among other options. The increased external temperature actually helps warm the body up faster compared to a traditional yoga class where you warm up from the inside out. Because your body is warmed up before getting into the poses, the risk for injury is reduced. Hot yoga even gets your heart pumping, says Cipriano Romero, instructor and owner of Reflections Yoga Center, whose center also offers Vinyasa Yoga classes. “Even though you stay on your mat while doing yoga postures in a heated room, your heart can work the same way as it does when you are running,” Romero explained. Due to the high temperatures in the room, there are some risks with practicing hot yoga—including dehydration and heat exhaustion. Students are advised to stay hydrated before, during and after

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YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI. Michelle Robinson, owner of YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI leads a class. TONY V. MARTIN

YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI 354 E Lincoln Hwy, Fox Run Plaza, Schererville 219.864.3900 65 W 112th Ave (Broadway), Crown Point nwiyouniqueyoga.com Reflections Yoga Center 18675 Dixie Hwy, Homewood, Ill. 708.960.4996 17605 Oak Park, Tinley Park, Ill. 708.614.9642; ryogacenter.com class. Romero recommends not eating any heavy meals before class and sitting and resting if students feel overwhelmed during class. “We always remind the students to follow their own pace and to be connected to their inner reality rather than the reality of the other students in the class,” Romero says. “It is not a competition, so we let go of the competitive ego.” The instructors at YOUnique Hot Yoga of NWI offer modifications, as well as props and straps to aid students. Robinson says. “Our responsibility as a teacher is to provide a safe environment with

modifications and props, and to assist our students so they do not get injured.” While anyone can do hot yoga, this form of exercise isn’t recommended for everyone, including people who are sensitive to heat and pregnant women. Students new to hot yoga should bring water, a towel and a mat and wear light clothing that allows the skin to breathe. Romero recommends wearing fitted capris, as exposed skin can become slippery when sweating, and a fitted tank top. You should avoid wearing one hundred percent cotton, which absorbs sweat and can become heavy. Also, students should not apply body lotion prior to class. Most importantly, beginning students should remember that learning and practicing any form of yoga is a journey and not a competition with themselves or other students. “The moment that the student falls into the game of comparing herself or himself to others is setting herself or himself up for disappointment,” Romero says. “The results of yoga are based on a process that takes time rather than an overnight one.” — Ashley Boyer


Pain Management Innovations at Pinnacle Hospital SPINAL CORD STIMULATION We believe in educating our patients to be in control of his or her own pain management. Our latest procedure is Spinal Cord Stimulation which works by intercepting pain signals before they reach the brain. To do this, a small system is implanted within the body. This system, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, is used to replace pain with a different feeling. Some people describe this feeling as a gentle massaging sensation or, in some cases, simply the absence of pain. • Pain signals travel up the spinal cord to the brain. • A generator sends pulses to a lead (a thin wire) • The lead delivers these pulses to nerves along the spinal cord.

• The pulses block the pain signals before they reach the brain. • The painful feeling is replaced with a more pleasant sensation.

Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) is a safe and effect therapy that has been used for more than 40 years to help people take control of their chronic pain.

What We Treat • Sciatica • Herniated Disc • Back Pain

• Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy • Auto Injuries • Diabetic Neuropathy

• Shingles • Foot Pain (Burning Pain in feet)

• Neck Pain • Knee Pain • Persistent Chest Wall Pain

What is the process? The first step is the trial, which is done in Dr. Kanuru’s office. Dr. Kanuru places 1 or 2 leads through a small needle and then connects them to an external system. The patient then goes home with the external system and “test drives” the therapy. After 1 week, the patient comes back to the office and the leads are removed. If the patient was able to reduce pain by greater than 50%, sleep better, and/or reduce their meds, then they are a candidate for a permanent implant. The second step is the permanent, which is done in the hospital. The permanent will be just like the trial, except it requires the leads and a small generator, similar to a pacemaker, to be implanted underneath the skin. The battery is rechargeable and last about 9 years. The procedure is usually done as an outpatient procedure and the patient can get back to their normal routine in a week.

About the physician Dr. Ramesh Kanuru is uniquely qualified to perform highly specialized pain management services and techniques. He has been practicing pain management in Northwest Indiana since 1981. Dr. Kanuru organized and started the first comprehensive pain management center in Northwest Indiana. Dr Kanuru produced first teaching video on spinal cord stimulator for physicians for a major device company in 1987. This video helps physicians who want to learn how to do this procedure. For information please visit painkanuru.com and controlyourpain.com.

Ramesh Kanuru, MD

Success Stories “I underwent the spinal cord stimulator it gave me my life back. It was a great experience. I was able to walk, stand, and sit without discomfort.” (D.G.) “Before having the Spinal Cord Stimulator I had pain and numbness in my legs. I also had difficulty sleeping and had to sleep in a recliner. Now I am able to sleep in my own bed and no longer have pain in my legs.” (D.S.)

Pinnacle is conveniently located on 93rd Avenue, just east of Broadway in Crown Point.

9301 ConneCtiCut Drive • Crown Point • 219-796-4000 • www.PinnaClehealthCare.net



january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

13


on your mind

}

}

The importance of taking a break

A

10-second hug was all it took for a high school teacher to change the routine at work. David Russell, a retired Munster High School English teacher, says even if you may feel there’s no time for a break, it can be anything that helps you feel better. “A lot of people get in a routine, get stuck in that routine and feel like no one cares about anything, them or anyone else,” he says. When a former student suggested he try a hugging session in class, Russell did. Each day his creative writing students came in and gave each other hugs. They felt like they mattered and enjoyed coming to class every day, he says. “It was a break in their day from what the ordinary was.” Inspired by that success, Russell decided to devote a week to hugging his co-workers during breaks. Each day he would hug two different people. “It was pretty amazing to see people’s reactions. It was a break but made me feel better every time I did it and made someone else feel better. For the 10 seconds, it caused so many smiles. It was well worth the time and effort and I enjoyed doing it more often.” Experts and research agree that taking breaks is important and that even a few minutes away from your workload can help. It recharges you and actually increases productivity. Some local workplaces have new ways to encourage employees to take TONY V. MARTIN, THE TIMES


that much-needed break. Jean Lubeckis, an Employee Assistance Program therapist with Franciscan Alliance, has been a therapist for 30 years. As a mental health counselor, she deals with employees’ personal, family and work related issues. “The top thing we see is stress related issues,” Lubeckis says. “People are anxious and stressed these days juggling families, work and the demands of life.” One area she works on with the staff is the importance of taking a break. She works with nursing leadership in Michigan City to encourage nurses to take a lunch and get out of the office. Taking a break may need to be a thoughtful process and purposeful breaks are especially important, she says. Eating lunch at your desk doesn’t count. If people plan a break, they are more likely to do it, Lubeckis says. “A lot of it is just habits people have to create,” Lubeckis says. There are many reasons people may not leave their desk, among them workplace norms and the social issues involving eating lunch with others or sitting alone. Lubeckis is working to change some of those issues to help employees. “Just 10 minutes of quiet meditation can significantly reduce stress,” she says. Some companies encourage breaks by giving employees access to mini fitness classes, massages or other stress reducers. Debi Pillarella, the fitness manager at Fitness Pointe, develops all its fitness programs as well as outreach efforts, including worksite programs for employees. Pillarella says the most common excuses for not taking a break at work include no time, not wanting to get sweaty, not liking to exercise and having a sporadic work day. She says to be effective, “you have to meet the employee where they are, make the break convenient, free and

“Just 10 minutes of quiet meditation can significantly reduce stress.”

hotel chain. She says that during breaks at her work, she and her coworkers like to relax together during down times. “My coworkers and I like to sit and eat our JEAN LUBECKIS, an Employee Assistance Program therapist with Franciscan Alliance meals. We chat with each other about everything from work to home life.” They also enjoy playing app games easy to do.” Once they experience the massage such as Family Feud, 4pics 1word and Fitness Pointe offers a program called therapy one time, then they realize Candy Crush but the hotel’s Wi-Fi Fitness at Work, where employees come they need it. Some people still feel that didn’t reach the break room. During an to an area at their work during their massages are a luxury, she says, but employee survey, they requested Wi-Fi break and spend 15 minutes engaging nowadays it’s maintenance. and were surprised and happy when it in mini-classes such as chair Zumba, “It can help as much as a workout. was put in less than a month later. Now chair yoga and sit and stretch. It’s not just a pampering thing. We get in addition to playing the games, they At work massages are also offered by more of a therapeutic clientele. I preach can watch TV and movies on Netflix. Fitness Pointe. you have to take care of yourself before “It’s nice to get away mentally, letting Toni Lozano, the SpaPointe superviyou can take care of other people. You our minds relax and have fun,” she sor at Fitness Pointe in Munster, says have to feel good so you can pass it says. their on-site massage therapy program onto others.” “Sometimes I do think having access has been increasing in popularity. For those who work on their feet, a to fitness equipment would be nice Massage therapists visit local hospidifferent kind of break can make their too but our jobs are very physical and tals, where employees can get a 15-min- day. we are on our feet, hard floors, for our ute chair massage. Appointments are Paula Ketcham, of Griffith, is a culinary entire shift. A good sit down is just booked online and can be paid through specialist for kitchen and events at a what we need.”— Jennifer Pallay payroll deduction. ating healthy doesn’t have to be With the addition of dim lighting Healthy eating for difficult. Local businesses make it and relaxing music, more employees easier to choose better eating habits, people on the go and interest in their life changing are signing up. programs continues to grow. “For this 15 minutes, it’s more like Seattle Sutton Healthy Eating, which provides 21 an escape,” Lozano says. “You’re really freshly-prepared meals each week, takes the guesswork doing something healthy for yourself out of how to eat better and costs less than eating out every day. Toni Smith, of the Highland Seattle Sutton and turning your mind off work for a location, says the diet is heart healthy, low in cholesterol, few minutes.” low in fat and sodium restricted. Lozano, who’s been in the business “It’s not just for losing weight,” Smith explains. It also 20 plus years, says breaks are good makes meal planning easier for those with high blood preventative maintenance, especially pressure, diabetes or high cholesterol. Clients have a lot of variety with a menu that changes every with so much computer and texting five weeks to avoid repetition. taking place during a work day. The diet is also easy to use for those with busy schedules. Stretching muscles and getting their Toni Salads, fruits and vegetables are included so clients Smith, blood flowing can really help with only need to add beverages to complete their meal. The of Seattle system offers either a 1,200- or 2,000-calorie-per day plan. preventing carpal tunnel, tendonitis, Sutton, shows Delivery is available at an additional charge. and issues with elbows and joints, she healthy meals. says. for more information TONY V. MARTIN,THE TIMES “I think people get so caught up in Call what they’re doing that they feel like Mention This Ad. they’re going to get behind if they stop. Save $10 first week of meals or (219) 972 3438 1-800-442-DIET But everything you ever read, it’s always Save $40 on 5 week of meals* *Prepaid. Discount off regular prices. better to get away for a little while than keep going, going, going, all day. You come back with a clearer perspective and it’s more clear after you’ve taken that little break.”

E

PHOTOS COURTESY OF www.seattlesutton.com



january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

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Dr. Jay Platt has served Northwest Indiana for over 20 years with quality oral surgery care. Choosing an oral surgeon is an important decision. Our team is composed of experienced professionals who are dedicated to your care. Dr. Platt attends 80 or more hours of Continuing Education per year and provides many Continuing Education seminars to the surrounding dental community. Dr. Platt has extensive training and expertise in placing dental implants, preserving and rebuilding the jaw, and treating conditions that affect a person’s face, teeth and mouth structures. Dr.Platt has placed thousands of dental implants over the past 24 years - placing his first one in 1989. We have a state-of-the-art Cone Beam CT Scanner in our office which provides full-cranial anatomically correct 3D images enabling us to better plan for patient care and treatment. We offer a no-cost consultation and a complimentary CT scan if necessary for patients who are treated by Dr. Platt.

Do You Need to Go to an Implant Center?

since surgical procedures are involved, so that each patient receives You have undoubtedly seen and heard t.v. and radio ads promoting the optimal outcome. Some implant centers claim to be the leaders in implant centers which are springing up all over the country. Many of implant dentistry and to have more experience than other clinicians. It is them are advertising the convenience of having everything under one implied that because of the volume of implants placed and restored they roof: the surgeon, the prosthodontist, the dental lab and a CT scan. It is are more experienced. However, the volume of implants placed in some certainly convenient for the patients and the doctors providing treatment cases is for all of their centers. The truth is that some of the doctors to have everything in one location; however, convenience should not be in these centers are very experienced and some are not any more the primary consideration with implant treatment. The most important experienced than their colleagues in the area. Some implant centers factors should be the experience of the treating clinicians, especially have general dentists placing and restoring

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implants who do not have near the training or experience as specialists. It is important to remember that this “advertising” is intended to “sell” the benefits of those particular implant centers, and you should take this into consideration when evaluating your various options.

Immediate Full Arch Provisional Restoration

Immediate Full Arch Provisional Restoration is a specific treatment option that is not appropriate for all patients. It is a suitable treatment option for those patients who are missing all of their upper and/or lower teeth, and who have adequate bone conditions to support an arch of teeth with only 4 implants. For these select patients fewer implants would be required, no bone grafting would be necessary, and so it is typically less costly than other implant procedures.

No Need to Change Dentists!

Unlike some “one stop shop” dental implant centers that make you use their dentists; we work with you and your current dentist. We are very fortunate in that in Northwest Indiana and Northeastern Illinois, there are many outstanding restorative clinicians. Dr. Platt works with most of them on a regular basis. We would encourage you to seek treatment from your current dentist whom you have a long standing relationship with. If you do not currently have a dentist, we can refer you to one that we work with frequently.

Please feel free to contact our implant coordinator, Monette, if you have any questions about treatment or to schedule a no-cost consultation. 322 Indianapolis Blvd.,• Suite 100 (Behind Steak N’ Shake) • Schererville, IN Interest Free Patient Financing Available

We Welcome neW patients

Mon.-Thurs. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Fri. 7 a.m.-2 p.m.

219•864•1133

www.jplattdds.com



january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

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STOMACH PAIN

S

can have many causes

Health

The new year brings a new opportunity to move forward with health goals. The first step to take toward those health goals is remembering to take care of yourself, starting with eliminating pain, to clear the way for major larger lifestyle changes in the year to come. Learn about the new paradigm in pain management, as well as the latest techniques to give your body a fresh start.

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GET HEALTHY | nwitimes.com/gethealthy

Stomach pain can be caused by a myriad of diseases, from a basic stomach flu or food poisoning to much more complicated conditions including inflammatory bowel disease, cancer of the gastrointestinal tract or irritable bowel syndrome. “There are hundreds of different causes of stomach pain because there are so many different organs, including the liver and pancreas, that could be giving you pain, and each organ has many diseases,” says Dr. Gene Chang, who is on staff at Community Hospital in Munster. “Most are common infections related to the flu or food poisoning. (But) sometimes it is more severe, like peptic ulcer disease or an inflammatory bowel disease.” Some stomach pains can be treated at home with rest or over-the-counter medication. But doctors say you should seek medical treatment if the pain becomes severe, is accompanied by a fever, or the inability to tolerate liquids or solids by mouth. Other symptoms that require immediate medical attention including difficulty swallowing, nausea with vomiting and vomiting blood. “For the short term, stay hydrated and drink plenty of fluids,” Dr. Chang says. “But if it persists and you have a high fever, seek medical attention immediately.” Dr. Rahul Julka, one of three doctors who operates out of the Digestive Disease Centers, which have offices around Lake and Porter Counties, says stomach pain is a common ailment because the symptoms for benign illnesses and severe illnesses overlap. “Any symptoms which are severe or persistent should be evaluated by a gastroenterologist to ensure that there is no serious

pathology underlying the symptoms which my require treatment,” Dr. Julka says. “With routine care by a gastroenterologist, even colon cancer can be largely preventable.” Once patients come in for medical attention, a doctor can determine, through testing, what the patient’s condition might be and how to treat it. Celiac disease, which is a sensitivity to gluten, can be diagnosed with a blood test and other testing and managed through diet. Crohn’s disease, for example, can be diagnosed by testing tissue and managed


through medication, surgery or nutritional supplementation. Crohn’s disease is one of two main diseases called inflammatory bowel diseases, Dr. Julka says. The disease is a chronic immune condition where the body’s immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract, and is most commonly found in the ileum, which is the last part of the small intestine. Crohn’s Disease usually is diagnosed in people in their teens into their 30s, but can also be diagnosed later in life. “Roughly 1 million people in the United States suffer from Crohn’s,” Dr. Julka says. “The cause of Crohn’s has not been 100-percent figured out yet, but there does seem to be a correlation between genetic predisposition and environment.” For some diseases, including gastro esophageal reflux disease,

also known as acid reflux, diet can play a role in managing the disease. “Symptoms like heartburn can be affected by caffeine, alcohol, acidic foods, spicy foods and greasy or fatty foods,” Dr. Julka says. “Other diseases like gall bladder, bile duct disease and pancreatitis can be affected by greasy or fatty foods.” Conditions like lactose intolerance are caused by the body’s inability to break down lactose, which is the main sugar in dairy products. Although not every disease of the stomach area can be managed through diet, both doctors agree that maintaining a healthy lifestyle can go a long way. “Minimize alcohol, don’t smoke, and try to lead a healthy lifestyle,” Dr. Chang says. “And if you have any questions, talk with your primary care physicians.” ­ — Carrie Rodovich

Pain Management Without Surgery and Injections

We specialize in chronic pain management, worker’s comp cases, industrial rehab and senior care.

8220 Calumet Ave. Munster, IN. 46321

Maximum Rehabilitation offers a wide range of services to help our patients recover from illness, injury, or surgery quickly with the best possible outcomes. Maximum focuses on a team approach to therapy including the doctor, patient and therapist which results in an unparalleled commitment to our patients and physicians.

(219) 836 5100 www.max-rehab.com 

Our facility’s rehabilitation equipment includes the special Repex machine for back pain rehabilitation, biofeedback units for urinary incontinence, balance evaluation unit and vestibular rehab program. We accept Medicare, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, PPO, Worker Compensation and private pay.

orthopaedic specialists

of Northwest Indiana

I have over 25 years experience with hip replacement surgery.The majority of hip replacements in the US were taught using posterior or lateral approaches to the joint and these have an excellent track record of successfully relieving pain from severe arthritic hip joint disease. Those techniques position the patient on their side and require some dissection (cutting) near muscles that can lead to postoperative limping. The posterior approach also had the problem of a higher rate of post-operative dislocations than other techniques. Our local hospitals now have the HANA traction table (see above), which extends the surgeon’s ability to perform the Anterior Approach to heavier and larger patients. X-Ray’s intra-operatively are facilitated with the traction table, confirming proper positioning of the replacement components and confirmation of leg length equalization.

Direct Anterior Hip Replacement Although most minimally invasive hip techniques involve a single incision that can be as small as 3-4 inches, the benefits of the Direct Anterior approach other than small incision include: ♦ Slightly lower risk of post-operative blood clots, possibly because there is less twisting of the leg during surgery. ♦ Patients lie on their back during surgery rather than their side. This makes it easier for the anesthesiologist to monitor the patient during surgery. ♦ Lying on your back (supine), during surgery also makes it easier for the surgeon to measure and match leg lengths. This means there’s a smaller chance of needing a shoe lift after surgery. ♦ Finally, some patients are walking without a limp or cane in as little as 2 weeks because the “walking muscles” were not directly affected during surgery.

ARTHRITIS UPDATE:

ADVANCES IN JOINT REPLACEMENT ♦ Residency/Training: Univ. of Chicago ♦ Diplomate of the American Board of Orthopedic Surgeons (ABOS) ♦ Member American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS)

For more information about Direct Anterior Hip Replacement Surgery, I can be contacted at:

Joseph Hecht, M.D

Orthopaedic Specialists of Northwest Indiana 730-45th Street, Munster, IN 46321

Phone 219-924-3300 Fax (219) 922-5424 january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

19


UNDER PRESSURE: Migraines and seasonal headaches

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More than a headache gone bad, migraines, those excruciating headings whose symptoms include throbbing pain, pulsing sensations, nausea, vomiting and an extreme sensitivity to lights and sounds, are a neurological disease. Migraines are caused by the activation of the trigeminovascular system, which then stimulates pain stimulating neurons causing the severe headaches associated with migraines says Sanjeev Maniar, MD, a board certified Clinical Neurophysiologist and Neurologist at Methodist Hospitals. According to Maniar, there are two types of migraines—aura migraines which come with such warning signs as photophobia or sensitivity to light, numbness and sleep difficulties and migraines without auras that start without any warning signs. Ranked in the top 20 of the world’s most disabling medical illnesses, according to the Migraine Research Council, more than 10% of the population including children suffers from migraine and nearly 1 in 4 U.S. households includes someone with migraine. For some, the pain is so intense, that they retreat to a dark and quiet room while waiting for the pain to subside. But despite their prevalence, migraines aren’t easy to diagnose since some of their symptoms are similar to headaches including those caused by sinus infections. Dr. Sreekant Cherukuri an otolaryngologist at Community Hospital in Munster, says that it isn’t unusual for people to confuse sinus headaches with migraines. “Their symptoms, such as pain and pressure in the sinuses, nasal congestion, watery eyes, are similar,” he says, “because both occur with migraines and sinus infections.”. Diagnosis can also be difficult because the symptoms can change from episode to episode. “Migraines can be devastating in terms of

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how they impact people,” says Dr. Crystal Tuncay, an internal medicine physician with the Porter Physician Group. “Some of the more severe symptoms mimic strokes and can include temporary blindness and weakness on one side or the other of the body.” The first step to treatment is an accurate diagnosis. “When people come to my office, I ask if they, in addition to their sinus symptoms also have a moderate-to-severe headache, nausea and sensitivity to light,” says Cherukuri, noting that true sinus headaches are, usually occurring because of a sinus infection. Symptoms of sinus infections include fevers as well as thick nasal secretions which are yellow, green, or bloodtinged. Treating a sinus infection should make the sinus headache go away. There are different theories of what causes migraine headaches says Tuncay. “Sinus or tension headaches can overlap with migraines and with women hormonal cycles can impact migraines,” she says. Studies show, reports the Migraine Research Council that more than 27 million adult women suffer from migraine in the United States which is three times more than adult men. Interesting, in childhood, boys are affected more than girls, but after adolescence the headaches increase more rapidly in girls than in boys. “Foods with gluten or MSG, coffee and chocolate can be associated with migraine says Maniar who also recommends that those prone to migraines get eight hours of sleep and avoid skipping any meals. Family history plays a big part as a large percentage of people experiencing migraines come from a family who have experience migraines. If one or both parents suffer from migraines that increases the odds you will too. “People who have migraines usually start at a young age,” says Tuncay noting that is another way to determine whether a headache is a migraine. “If someone reports migraine like


symptoms for the first time after age 55 we look for other causes and maybe do imagining and a normal neurological exam. Many headaches are usually caused by tension, poor posture and sinus.” “Taking a history also is important in determining whether a person has migraines,” says Cherukuri. There are more than 100 prescription medications available for treating migraines. According to Maniar, there are several kinds of medications for migraines. For those who have four or more a month, preventative medications like Depakote and Topamax can be effective. Abortive medications, like Imitrex, work well for those with less frequent headaches and can be taken with the onset of symptoms. For those with chronic migraines—15 or so a month—Maniar says that Botox has show to be a preventative. Cherukuri says that many people start with over the counter medication. Prescription medications providing acute treatment can be taken at the onset of a migraine and for those with frequent attacks, preventive treatment “Importantly, if includes drugs taken daily. you’re over 55 “Some people say and the worst acupuncture helps and headache you ever there is some evidence magnesium had just came on, that supplements might proceed to the help,” says Tuncay. Emergency Room. “Also exercise and good sleep hygiene are Don’t put it off.” important. For those who take over the DR. CRYSTAL counter medications, TUNCAY, an internal medicine physician with the one of the big problems is overuse.” Porter Physician Group. Tuncay also suggests that migraine patients keep a journal listing what you ate, what stresses you were under, activities you participated in, environmental changes and anything else that might help you pinpoint what causes your migraines. Journaling can also help you beginning learning triggers—sensory warnings like flashes of light, blind spots or a tingling in arms or legs that precede a migraine. Finding the right medication can help reduce the frequency and severity of migraine headaches though it may take some trial and error to find the right one. Meds are more effective with lifestyle changes such as good eating habits. “Importantly, if you’re over 55 and the worst headache you ever had just came on, proceed to the Emergency Room,” says Tuncay. “Don’t put it off.” — Jane Ammeson 

Options available to minimize scarring,

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POST-SURGERY PAIN Pain and scarring is often a reality of surgery that is difficult to avoid. However, physicians say certain actions before and after surgery can help minimize the discomfort and scarring a patient experiences. Here are some tips from local doctors about what you can do to minimize scarring and best prepare for the discomforts of surgery. Before Dr. Jay Dutton, a plastic surgeon and otolaryngologist on staff at Advocate South Suburban Hospital, says it’s important to make sure a patient is getting the proper nutrients prior to surgery. “You should make sure your vitamins aren’t deficient because they are important for the wound healing process,” he says. Dr. Mubarak Mirjat, founder and president of Maximum Rehabilitation Services in Munster, says patients should also spend time in advance preparing for the weeks immediately following surgery. These preparations can help minimize pain that could be experienced during the process of adapting afterward, and can be made with the help of physicians and physical therapists. “If they need crutches to walk or have any needs where they must have proper training beforehand, a few visits with us beforehand will help them,” he says. Even practicing exercises that will be performed in physical therapy or at home following surgery can minimize discomfort, as well as figuring out a plan on how to best move up and down stairs in multi-level homes. “Communication is so important,” Mubarek says. “Surgery is hard, but post surgery is the mother of harder.” Dr. Adam Conn, a member of Porter Physician Group and part of Associates in Surgery, says talking with a doctor about minimally invasive procedures, which are available for a number of surgical diseases, can produce a game plan that results in less discomfort post surgery.

“We always try to choose the least painful, and the best procedure for the patient,” he says. Laparoscopic and robotic are all options for major abdominal operations, and doctors can perform minimally invasive procedures on hernias, gallbladders and colons, for example, as well. “The smaller incisions lead to less pain, quicker recoveries and lower risk of post operative infection in most cases,” Conn says. Other options to minimize pain after surgery include using a long-acting local anesthetic that improves pain control for up to three days and using endoscopy to perform anti-reflux surgery for heartburn, he says. After One of the most important things patients should do post surgery is to protect themselves from sun exposure to minimize scarring. “It can affect the pigmentation of the wound,” Dutton says. “You want to have maximum sun block for at least six months after surgery.” Wounds also heal better in a moist environment, so keep it covered with a dressing and moist with a topical treatment, he says. While Neosporin can speed the healing process, Dutton says he cautions patients to watch out for topical allergic reactions. “So if you have redness, make sure you stop,” he says. Avoid alcohol early on after surgery, and choose acetaminophen like Tylenol over ibuprofen like Motrin and Aleve. “Those promote bleeding and will make you bruise more,” Dutton says. If acetaminophen is not strong enough to help with pain, Dutton advises talking with the patient’s physician about a controlled substance prescription. “Continue taking a multivitamin as well,” he says. “Make sure you don’t have a vitamin deficiency.” — Christine Bryant

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Katie Sannito, owner of The Gourmet Goddess, educates about healthy cooking practices. Katie shows cutting board covers that could be used instead of separate cutting boards to prevent cross-contamination.

Kitchen CLEANLINESS

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An untidy bedroom won’t make you ill but a dirty kitchen potentially can. “I heard a story in culinary school, during my safety and sanitation class, about a young girl who died from eating watermelon that was cut on the same cutting board as raw meat that was tainted with E.Coli. That really stuck with me because carelessness in the kitchen can have very serious consequences,” says Katie Sannito, owner of The Gourmet Goddess in Munster. There’s a lot going on in a kitchen: temperature and moisture fluctuations, potentially pathogenic material on site, water, high heat, electricity, sharp objects — all in close proximity to one another. The best way to control this environment, which can breed bacteria or promote cross contamination, is by keeping it clean and organized. Scott Gilliam, Director of Food Protection for Indiana State Department of Health, says it’s important to routinely clean to avoid the development of biofilm, a slimy film of bacteria that adheres to a surface. “Biofilm build up shouldn’t be happening — you want to avoid that. It can happen over time usually in the nooks and crannies that are hard to clean,” says Gilliam. Bruce Applegate, Associate Professor in the Department of Food Science at Purdue, says to prevent biofilm from developing surfaces must be mechanically scrubbed. “When you clean something, make sure you physically scrub it. Once biofilms have a source, they become resistant to cleaners. Then they become a source,” says Applegate. “As biofilms form they undergo changes and it allows them to survive better.” Norm Faiola, a professor of hospitality and tourism management at Purdue University Calumet, agrees scrubbing the kitchen regularly with hot soapy water is important. But it’s critical after handling raw meat as this can cause foodborne illness. “Let’s use Thanksgiving as an example. You take the giblet bag out, you’ve got Tom in the sink and you run water over him to rinse out all of the stuff inside. But now you have bacteria on your hands. You touch the faucet, grab a towel – get Tom in the pan and into the oven. If that area is not cleaned and sanitized properly and you go to make the salad next, that’s a classic case of cross contamination,” says Faiola.

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DR. CHERUKURI

Faiola says so much contamination happens in the process of rinsing raw meat, that it should be avoided all together. After all, water won’t kill bacteria — heat will. This is why cooking meat to its proper temperature is necessary. What is used to scrub a mess can determine the severity of a bacteria load. For example using a sponge or dish cloth that has not been properly cleaned and dried can do more harm than good. “After you prepare any raw animal food in your kitchen you need to clean it up immediately, preferably using disposable towels rather than a cloth towel or sponge. They will hold contaminates and you can’t really get them clean,” says Gilliam. Faiola and Sannito agree that if you choose to use dish cloths make sure they are rotated on a regular basis – especially when handling raw meat. Most bacteria and viruses can’t survive on dry surfaces so avoid leaving wet rags or sponges lying around. “My biggest pet peeve in the world is a soaking wet sponge left in the sink. You’re just asking for trouble and to get sick,” says Sannito. Applegate says although there isn’t a way to be certain a sponge is thoroughly cleaned, heating a moist sponge in the microwave can help reduce bacteria; however, the microwave heats unevenly. Using a heating method such as boiling is better as the temperature is more consistent. “Just because a surface or dish is free from visible soil, that doesn’t mean it’s sanitary. It can still have a bacterial load on it. By following proper procedures: wash, rinse and sanitize, we can reduce the bacteria load to safe level,” says Faiola. — Trish Maley 

FOR THE WOMAN THAT LOOKS OLDER THAN SHE FEELS The Weekend Lift is the perfect present for the vibrant person inside you

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our to-do list gets longer as the holiday season gets shorter, and during this time of happiness and cheer, you can’t seem to look in the mirror without grimacing at the reflection staring back at you. You look tired. And while it may be easy to blame it on the hustle and bustle of the season, you know the truth. Despite eating healthy and exercising regularly, your face simply does not represent the vibrant person that you are on the inside. And frankly, you are tired of feeling this way. If this is you, this just might be the holiday season when you treat yourself for a change. Created in 2003, the Weekend Lift is a mini-facelift of sorts, giving an overall lift to the neck and lower half of the face with a short recovery time (approximately 1 weekend, hence the name). A safer, quicker, and less expensive alternative to a full facelift, the Weekend Lift focuses primarily on trouble spots such as the neck, jowls and the lines around the nose and mouth. But perhaps most importantly, it serves as a way to invest in you for a change. “Women spend so much time taking care of others,” says Dr. Sreek Cherukuri, a board-certified facial plastic surgeon and Northwest Indiana’s leader in minimally-invasive, no-downtime cosmetic procedures of the face and neck. “Maybe it’s time to celebrate the New Year by celebrating yourself for a change. There is nothing better than matching the energy and youthfulness that is inside us with a rejuvenated and refreshed appearance.” Indeed, not loving the face staring back at you in the mirror is a common occurrence for baby boomers especially. “There was a time when being 65 years old meant slowing down and starting to get comfortable in that ole rocking chair,” explains Dr. Cherukuri, who also offers eyelid procedures for those men and women looking to get that youthful look back into their eyes. “And while people are now all about self improvement, what they don’t realize is that no matter how much they are working out or eating healthy foods, it’s simply not going to stop the way their face is aging.” “Frankly, my kids were tired of hearing me gripe about my face,” adds Beth Tonsoni, a satisfied patient of Dr. Cherukuri who received the Weekend Lift procedure five years ago at the age of 57. “To say that it changed the way I felt about myself would be a huge understatement. Being able to look in the mirror and love what I saw just hours after the procedure? Well, there was nothing like it. It was an amazing feeling.”

For a free, no-obligation consultation, call 219.836.2201 today.

DR. CHERUKURI 219.836.2201 TheWeekendLift.com

special advertising page january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

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GETTING IN SHAPE with fitness apps

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Gone are the days of physically writing down on paper a daily food diary or exercise journal, personal trainers say. In fact, fitness apps have become so common, many personal trainers have integrated them into workout plans for their clients. “In the past, we provided clients with a small notebook to track their nutrition and exercise,” says Karen Schutters, personal trainer and owner of Priority Fitness Personal Training Center. “The trainer would look at the journal during the client’s session, providing direction and advice on how to better reach their goals based on what the client recorded.” Now, nearly everyone has access to online sources to track those things, which also provide much more useful information quickly and accurately that can help the client stay motivated and on track, she says. Erik Carpenter, operations supervisor with Omni Health and Fitness, says the club uses a system called ActivTrax that can be utilized in the club, but also has a mobile app. “Essentially, all clients and members who are signed up for the service can access their workouts from anywhere in the world, as long as they have the app,” he says. The system recently added a nutrition feature that Carpenter says Omni wants to roll out to its members in 2014 so they can track their eating habits and their exercise all in one place. “Most apps offer either one or the other — diet or exercise, but ActivTrax has the ability to do both,” he says. With the holidays fast approaching, many are headed to their phones or tablets to download fitness apps to help with their New Years resolutions. When searching for an app, however, Schutters recommends using a well-known one that has many positive reviews from other users. “MyFitnessPal is an app many of our clients use,” she says. “It has a vast nutritional database to choose from when recording food intake and will give accurate caloric values for a variety of food choices and popular restaurants.” The app also allows one to enter his or her exercise performed to assess caloric expenditure, she says. Another option is MapMyRide, which provides pre-planned routes or allows someone to map a unique route of her own. “This app tracks activity, allows the user to log their food intake, and the information may be shared on social media sites,” Schutters says. 24

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Endomondo Sports Tracker is used by one of Schutters’ trainers as well. This app utilizes GPS to track outdoor exercise. “Users can analyze their training on their own, compete with others on pre-planned local routes and communicate with others worldwide,” she says. “This app also provides audio feedback during the workout, letting the exerciser know how they are measuring up if they are competing with others who have completed a pre-planned course they are currently using.” Aside from ActivTrax, Carpenter says he likes fitness the more old fashioned way. “I’m a little old school and prefer hard work and sweat over technology,” he says. But for beginners, he says mobile apps definitely have their benefits. “I don’t need my phone to tell me when I’ve worked out hard enough, but for beginners, it’s a great way to learn how much exercise is the right amount so that you can eventually do it on your own.” Just as the notebook idea worked for some clients, but not all, apps work well for those willing to spend the time learning how to use them and entering the appropriate information, Schutters says. “Accountability is key to achieving results,” she says. “So regardless of the source, whether trainer or app, if the person maintains consistency in using it and maintains use over a long period of time, results will be evident.” Carpenter says he advises clients to remember an app is just an app. “You still have to be motivated to get up and move,” he says. “A lot of times people get all excited when they get a new app, just like a kid with a new toy, but eventually the novelty wears off and you still have to have that drive and desire to get the results. The app is really just a tool to assist along the way.” — Christine Bryant




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IMMUNIZATIONS

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not just for kids

Parents with young children know immunizations is a common topic at the pediatrician’s office. However, doctors warn vaccinations aren’t only for kids. Here are some vaccinations doctors recommend for adults. Influenza All adults should get the influenza vaccination each year, says Dr. Geraldine Feria, a member of the Porter Physician Group and a physician with Wanatah Primary Care. This is especially important for new parents if their babies will not have reached the 6 month mark yet during the winter period, she says. “We cannot give the flu shot to babies younger than 6 months,” she says. Those with high risk of serious complications if they catch the flu, such as the elderly or people with chronic illnesses and weakened immune systems, also are advised to get vaccinated. While some vaccinations last several years — even decades — the flu vaccine only protects for one year because it is based on what experts believe will be the top three or four virus strains that year. “The flu shot should be given yearly, as the formulation within the vaccine changes every year based on existing circulating strains,” says Dr. Kamo Sidhwa, who is part of Metro Infectious Disease Consultants and on staff at Advocate South Suburban Hospital. Tdap (Pertussis) “Pertussis (Tdap) vaccine is certainly one of the very important vaccines for adults,” says Dr. Charlene Graves, chairman of the Immunization Committee of the Indiana Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. More commonly known as whooping cough, pertussis cases or outbreaks were reported in a majority of states in 2012. While pertussis can have a mild effect on adults, it can be deadly to young children. “Influenze and pertussis in particular can cause mild upper respiratory illnesses in adults, but in 26

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babies, can cause severe respiratory distress and occasionally death,” Sidhwa says. The Tdap is a 3-in-1 vaccine that offers protection against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. The Centers for Disease Control recommends getting a Tdap vaccine once, and then a Td (tetanus and diphtheria) booster every 10 years. Feria says it’s especially important to get immunized if routine contact will be made with a young child. “The OB community is doing a good job in advising parents to get it and advising grandma and grandpa to get a booster, so when new baby comes along, they won’t give pertussis to the baby,” she says. Shingles The shingles vaccination, called the Varicella Zoster vaccine, should be considered for older adults because the virus can be especially debilitating in this patient population, Sidhwa says. Shingles is a painful localized skin rash caused by the same virus that causes the chickenpox. Anyone who has had the chickenpox can develop shingles because the virus remains in a person’s nerve cells even after the infection clears. The vaccination protects a person’s body from a reactivation of the virus. Though the CDC recommends the vaccine be given to those 60 and older, the vaccination has been licensed and approved for those 50 and older. Pneumococcal Like the flu, contracting pneumonia at an older age can be a serious health threat, Graves says. “The pneumonia vaccine is recommended for seniors and for other people of all ages who have medical conditions that make them high-risk for pneumococcal infections,” she says. “Sixty and over we want them to get the pneumonia shot, especially if they’re diabetic, asthmatic or have bad COPD,” Feria says. “Those are really the ones you want to target, along with those whose immune systems are compromised.”

HPV “A potential new vaccine that adults should be aware of is the HPV, which is indicated for young adults age 19 to 26,” Sidhwa says. Human Papillomavirus — or HPV — is a common virus spread through sexual contract. Most who have HPV have no symptoms, and there are about 40 types of the virus — including some that can cause cervical cancer in women and other types of cancer in both men and women. The HPV vaccine prevents the most common types of HPV that cause cervical cancer and genital warts, and it’s given in three doses. Hepatitis B Though babies are given Hepatitis B vaccinations as part of their routine schedule of immunizations, doctors say adults who haven’t been vaccinated, should. A virus causes Hepatitis B, a disease that attacks the liver. It can cause infection, cirrhosis of the liver, cancer, liver failure and even death. “This is one of few vaccines that can prevent liver cancer,” Feria says. — Christine Bryant

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Advancements in pain reduction

All patients want a pain-free answer to their problems and new technologies and knowledge are helping doctors provide that. Whether it is an implantable pain blocker, a new technique for spinal surgery or advancements in anesthesia, local doctors are helping their patients alleviate pain. Blocking pain signals Minimally invasive technology like spinal cord stimulation helps Ramesh Kanuru, MD, lessen back pain for his patients. Kanuru is an interventional pain management specialist at Kanuru Interventional Spine with locations in Highland, Valparaiso and Merrillville. He says the stimulator treats back pain by blocking the pain signals traveling to the brain. It’s an implantable system, which is entirely inside the body. One of the advantages of this system is that patients do a trial run with an external version of the device to see if spinal cord stimulation works for them. The trial can be easily done in the office, Kanuru says. During the one-week trial, the system is connected to an outside battery. “If they get a minimum of 50 percent relief and are able to sleep better and are able to do daily activities better, then we’ll do the permanent implant,” Kanuru says. The permanent procedure involves implanting electrodes in the spine connected to a generator, which is the size of a pacemaker in the body. The battery for the generator is rechargeable with a remote control. Most patients get at least 75 percent pain relief and are able to be off of narcotics or significantly cut down their pain medications, Kanuru says. “It’s a simple system patients can manage themselves,” Kanuru says. Patients can turn it on or off any time they like. “This helps to reduce their pain medications significantly. Because they’re not under the influence of narcotics, the alertness of their brain is not compromised. This is especially important in the elderly who under narcotics may sustain injuries secondary to falls. If they can control the pain without pain medication, they can be really sharp.” If major spinal surgery is needed in the future, the system does not get in the way, Kanuru says. Some patients, like plumbers and construction workers, elect the stimulator over surgery because their occupations require a lot of twisting and bending . “If they have spinal fusion, they may not be

able to do their jobs”, he says. “With the spinal cord stimulator, they can keep working and have the surgery done at a later time.” For more information, visit controlyourpain.com and painkanuru.com or call 219.838.1100. State of the art spinal surgery An advanced surgical technique has revolutionized a Northwest Indiana doctor’s ability to take care of his patients. Nitin Khanna is an orthopedic spine surgeon and founder of Spine Care Specialists in Munster, a division of Orthopedic Specialists of Northwest Indiana. He co-developed a minimally invasive approach to back surgery, known as MAS PLIF. “The area where patients can be helped the most with surgical intervention is in the face of neurologic compression. By that I mean something pinching or pressing on a nerve,” Khanna says. The new technique allows doctors to free those nerves with minimal disruption to the surrounding tissue, allowing patients a more consistent and quick recovery. The fusion operations are performed through incisions that are typically 1.5 inches in length and patients typically go home within 23 hours of their procedure, Khanna says. There’s minimal blood loss and most patients are off all pain medication within two weeks. “The concept of being able to move those patients to typically overnight stays is a major, major step forward for both patients and for medicine in general,” says Khanna, who teaches this technique around the country. “Everybody is wanting to learn how to do this because it’s so revolutionary … I’m as blown away by it as my patients are and my colleagues are.” Ninety-seven percent of his patients have a positive outcome, Khanna says. “I’ve done spinal surgery 11 years, all day, every day with 400-plus cases a year. That anatomy, you know better than you know anything else.” For information, visit spinecarespecialists.com or call 219.924.3300. For information on the MAS PLIF technique, visit nuvasive.com. Post-op pain advancements How pain is treated before and after surgery is an important part of a patient’s recovery and a hot topics among doctors.

Joseph Hecht, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in joint replacement with Orthopaedic Specialists of Northwest Indiana in Munster, says, “there are different protocols to make post-op pain more tolerable. Almost every surgery we do, there’s a certain amount of forethought in terms of trying to make the patient comfortable.” Hecht’s most common operations are hip and knee replacements. “There is a lot of discussion in meetings nowadays about controlling the pain around the surgery and different protocols.” The actual medicines used during a joint replacement are fairly wide ranging, he says. In the last year or two, an intravenous Tylenol has been used that is effective up to 24 hours after a surgery. A new twist on the traditional ice pack also helps treat pain. Polar Care is a sleeve that can be wrapped like a brace around the knee. It’s connected to a cable, which connects to a small cooler. An electric motor in the cooler circulates the cold water produced by ice. The technology is portable so patients can take it home. “The cooling effect also has pain killing effect and keeps swelling down,” Hecht says. “Swelling is a problem in itself, creating stiffness and more discomfort.” For information, visit osni.org or call 219.924.3300. — Jennifer Pallay january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

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food & fitness

The Paleo Diet

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ot many of us often ask what Fred Flintstone would eat. But for those considering the Paleo diet, the question is, if it was good enough for cavemen to eat, is it good enough for us? “It’s the diet of our ancestors,” says Elana Amsterdam, author of Paleo Cooking from Elana’s Pantry: Gluten-Free, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free Recipes (Ten Speed Press 2013; $17.99), who has been following the diet for 12 years. “Humans were hunter-gatherers during the Paleolithic era, some 10,000 to 2.5 million years ago.” Following a Paleo-based diet doesn’t mean serving brontosaurus steaks or scrambled pterodactyl eggs. But it is radical compared to what’s on our plates today. “The Paleo Diet mimics the diets of people who lived during the Paleolithic era,” says Lori Granich, Registered Dietitian at the Midwest Bariatric Institute at Franciscan St. Margaret Health in Dyer. “The diet focuses on natural foods that have been around since the beginning of time.” “It wasn’t until about 10,000 years ago, with the advent of the agricultural revolution, that grains were introduced into our diet,” says Amsterdam. “For 99% of our existence we lived on a grain free diet. This means grains are a new food and I think certain people, such as me, can’t adapt to digesting grains.” “The Paleo diet includes some of the things that I teach in my diabetes classes,” says Terri Sakelaris, M.S., a registered dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator at the Community Hospital Diabetes Center in Munster. “My classes emphasize the Mediterranean diet—fresh food, salads, filling up on fruits and vegetables, not too big into bread and baked goods and avoiding processed foods. The Paleo diet is similar though it’s also more restrictive.” While we can never totally recreate the foods of our forebears, for those following the Paleo diet, the main source of carbohydrates come from fruits

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and vegetables, there’s an emphasis on the type of healthy fats found in nuts, and oils such as olive and flaxseed. Not recommended are dairy, refined sugars, processed foods, cereals and grains, potatoes and refined vegetable oils. “The supporters of the diet state that our food industry has developed faster than our bodies could adapt,” says Granich. “This is the reason for the rise in chronic diseases. The diet focuses on ‘real’ food which is something I believe people should focus on. It is rich in fiber, vitamins and minerals, and antioxidants; the components of our diets that fight off disease.” But there are, of course caveats. “The Paleo diet is short on carbohydrates,” says Leelarani Chigurupati, RD, CSO, a registered dietitian at Methodist Hospitals who is designated as a board certified specialist in Oncology Nutrition working directly with individuals at risk for, or diagnosed with, any type of malignancy or premalignant conditions, one of only 13 in the state. One-third of the diet is protein which exceeds the recommendations of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines. “It was a surprise for me to read about the exclusion of whole grains and dairy.” According to Kim Kramer, RDN, LDN, Ingalls Wellness Dietitian, Kids Eat Right Crew Illinois Representative and the Illinois Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Media Spokesperson, the Paleo diet appears to be the newest in a long run of trendy diets. But she worries that by chopping off the bottom of the food pyramid, we’re eliminating needed vitamins. “If people don’t consume dairy, then where will they get their Vitamin D?” she asks. “More and more

people are realizing that deficiencies in Vitamin D are very common particularly in the Midwest.” Chigurupati also wonders if many people can sustain Paleo 24/7. “It doesn’t seem practical for our society and it’s costly to eat only wild caught fish, grass-fed meats and organic vegetables,” she says. “The diet is set up that you can have three non-Paleo meals out of every 21 meals. And it talks about exercise and that is good.” Sakelaris notes that when people eliminate highcalorie processed foods they feel better and have more energy. “But it’s also important to make sure you’re getting the right nutrition which is what makes the Mediterranean diet so effective,” she says. According to Granich the Paleo diet has good basic principles—lean proteins, plenty of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats—that can be altered to meet the needs of people today. “But the Paleo diet does have its set of weaknesses,” says Granich. “First of all, it is very strict and would be hard for most people to stick to for a lifetime. Critics argue that the life expectancy in that era was dramatically different than today which make some question why we would try to mock that time period. The nutrition deficiency problems that used to plague our world have been addressed through fortification in foods, especially grains and dairy and dietary supplements.” Amsterdam has a suggestion to help with these concerns. “Many people do an 80/20 Paleo,” she says. “But it just makes sense to eat close to the earth. It’s real food.” — Jane Ammeson


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senior scope

LIFESTYLE CHANGES CAN HAVE A POSITIVE IMPACT ON ARTHRITIS n estimated 50 million adults in the United States suffer from some form of arthritis. In fact, there are more than 100 different types of arthritis, which causes painful inflammation of the joints. Experts say, however, there are steps sufferers can take to help minimize and manage arthritis pain. These steps can range from something as simple as a diet change to in extreme circumstances, surgery. Diagnosis Before learning what steps someone with arthritis should take to manage pain, it is important to diagnose the type of arthritis and determine a treatment plan, says Dr. Tania Ghosh, a member of Porter Physician Group and a Geriatrician and internal medicine specialist with Glendale Primary Care in Valparaiso. “The diagnosis is made starting with history,” Ghosh says. “Most of the time, the way in which the arthritis started, the duration of the problem, the course of its progression, and other associated symptoms and physical findings noted upon examination guide the physician toward the probably diagnosis.” That diagnosis is often then confirmed with the help of radiological testing like X-rays and MRIs, as well as blood work. “The underlying cause for the arthritis determines the modality of treatment,” Ghosh says. Lifestyle changes Overall health can have a direct impact on the amount of pain associated with arthritis, Ghosh says. “If it is related to weight, the most important lifestyle change is diet, exercise and weight loss,” she says. Arthritis related to gout—a complex form of arthritis that can be extremely painful—could benefit from dietary modifications as well, Ghosh says. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine recommends avoiding dairy products, citrus fruits, sugar, fats, caffeine and nightshade plants—tomatoes

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and eggplant, for example. Studies have shown other changes, like adding polyunsaturated oils and omega-3 supplements to a diet, can have mild, beneficial effects. Vegan diets—because of their low-fat and high in antioxidant qualities—have shown to be beneficial to managing the inflammation associated with arthritis as well, according to the organization. Other management If lifestyle changes don’t minimize the pain, Ghosh says mediation is a possible course of action physicians may prescribe. Ultimately, she says, treatment is determined by the cause of the arthritis. “That could vary from different types and strengths of pain pills, oral medications that help in reducing the inflammation in the joint, injections into the affected joints, and medications that are used to treat any systemic problems that might be causing the arthritis,” she says. If there is significant damage to the joint, which is not benefiting from medical management, surgery is sometimes required, she says. Examples include finger and hand surgeries to correct joint problems in the hand, arthroscopy that removes debris or inflamed tissue in a joint through a small lighted instrument, and arthroplasty to replace part or all of a joint in the hip or knee. — Christine Bryant

Before learning what steps someone with arthritis should take to manage pain, it is important to diagnose the type of arthritis and determine a treatment plan.


PAID CONTENT

Hartsfield Village’s community atmosphere Hartsfield Village Continuing Care Retirement Community is truly a community, uniquely designed for the well-being of its residents and dedicated to celebrating the full continuum of life. From individuals who wish to maintain their independence to couples planning for worry-free years to come, to seniors who already would appreciate a little assistance, Hartsfield Village offers thoughtful, professional support in every level of care. The Assisted Living neighborhood at not-for-profit Hartsfield Village is a welcoming community for people who are able to maintain their independence while receiving some assistance with everyday tasks. “We want to believe we will be completely independent for the rest of our days, but often we realize we need help with some everyday tasks,” says Kevin Orze, Director of Marketing and Sales. “Someone may be doing quite well, yet need help with such things as meal preparation, stairs that are difficult to manage, or keeping track of medications.” Beautiful campus Hartsfield Village Assisted Living makes transitioning from a family home to a private apartment in a neighborly community a welcome plan for residents and their families. There are one- and two-bedroom apartments and studios, located in a scenic, 38-acre campus right in Munster, and staffed around the clock with quality nursing care for those residents in need of health care assistance. As an Indiana state licensed residential care community, Hartsfield meets or exceeds the standards required by this highly regulated industry. As a not-for-profit, revenue is reinvested for the betterment of Hartsfield Village and its residents. High standards combined with a wonderfully professional and caring staff are why Hartsfield Assisted Living Community enjoys a reputation



more difficult. “I explained that she can continue to enjoy staying involved with others. Last Christmas we took our residents to high tea at the Drake Hotel in Chicago. They loved it! They may not have been able to go if they had been still living in their own home.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION Hartsfield Village Retirement Community 10000 Columbia Ave. Munster, IN (219) 934-0850 www.hartsfieldvillage.com who have lived a long time in their homes and are reluctant to leave their neighborhood. “Many people love the memories associated with their home, and they feel comfortable there. Yet they start worrying about things, like security — ‘What if I hear a noise at 2 for excellence. in the morning?’ Maybe the neighborAssisted living services allow hood isn’t as safe as it used to be. And residents to maintain the highest level so often, their longtime neighbors aren’t of independence possible, so important there anymore.” for people as they age. And residents are Socializing can become difficult, relieved to know there won’t be a sudtoo. “Lots of folks don’t like to drive den major move if a medical issue arises. at night or during the winter — and “If someone needs to move unexpectedly that can leave them with the feeling of to a skilled nursing level of care, what being trapped in their own home.” Yet senior citizen wants to go through all as people age, socializing remains just the upheaval of a major move in a crisis as important. Hartsfield Assisted Living situation?” Community offers the choice to socialize every day, if the resident wishes. Orze Choosing independence recalls a woman who was active and Orze has compassion for people liked to go places, but it had become

‘Living Wise, Living Well’ Planning ahead can be the most important thing for seniors to do to ensure life continues to be fulfilling. “There are a lot of circumstances that make planning ahead really important for peace of mind,” says Orze. For residents in Hartsfield Assisted Living Community, a fall, a health crisis, anything requiring assistance, doesn’t have to mean making hurried, stressful decisions. And 24-hour-a-day professional and caring nursing staff is there whenever it’s needed. Assisted Living residents also have the benefit of a wellness program that focuses on their level of activity. Often a fall, issues with balance, or neuropathies can make seniors tend to withdraw because they don’t want to risk anything. “That’s where our wellness program helps residents so much, improving their physical health and their brightness of mood. There’s yoga, stretch classes, even Wii bowling, with a big screen seniors stand in front of and simulate the movement of the bowling ball with minimal physical effort. Our wellness program is proactive, easily available, and fun.” The goal is to keep residents as independent as possible, enjoying life without the worry of cooking, cleaning, and maintenance. “Some are here for many years and remain very active and independent. Some may eventually benefit from more assistance, which we provide. It’s comforting to have that continuity and that plan in place, so they maintain neighbors and friends and a lifestyle.” It’s easy to see why Hartsfield’s motto is “Living Well, Living Wise.”

january/february 2014 | GET HEALTHY

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ask the expert DR. SREEKANT CHERUKURI

TONY V. MARTIN, THE TIMES

Facial plastic surgery specialist

Dr. Cherukuri, a leader in Northwest Indiana for minimallyinvasive cosmetic procedures for the face and neck, has helped thousands of patients since 2003. Dr. Cherukuri, a member of Carepointe Ear Nose and Throat Sinus Center, has offices in Munster, Merrillville and St. John.

Q: How are you different from other plastic

surgeons? Facial plastic surgery is a sub-specialty of plastic surgery and ear, nose and thoat (ENT) surgery. If you go to the Yellow Pages to find a plastic surgeon, most of the plastic surgeons in Chicago and the Midwest spend three-quarters of their time doing breast augmentations and tummy tucks and other non-facial procedures. We spend 100 percent of our time on the face and neck. We have the most experience in reconstructive and aesthetic procedures, including face lifts, eyelid lifts, nose jobs, Botox and other facial fillers. Q: Why is it important to go to a plastic

surgeon who specializes in the face? When you have the most experience, you have the most natural-appearing results. What’s unique about the face is you can’t really hide it under clothing. Everything is out there for everyone to see, so it’s important to do it right. Q: What are some trends in facial plastic

surgery? What’s the difference between visiting you versus a medical spa? The trend over the last 10 years has moved from extreme makeovers to minimally-invasive “no down time” procedures. People are becoming more accepting of improving body image. We perform eyelid lifts, which

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helps your eyes look less puffy and tired-looking. We also do Botox and facial fillers. It’s very important that the person doing your procedure be a surgeon. When it comes to these procedures, cheaper is not better. You want someone who has done this for 15 years, not learned how to do it during a weekendlong course. We offer free consultations so people can learn what will and won’t work for them, and so they know what to expect. We want well-educated, happy patients. Q: What is “The Weekend Lift? In 2003 we

pioneered a minimal-incision procedure called “The Weekend Lift.” A normal facelift takes four to six hours, requires general anesthesia, has extensive recuperation time and can cost up to $20,000. The Weekend Lift is designed for active people who don’t want much down-time. The Weekend Lift can get similar results, but relies on local anesthesia. It takes about an hour, recovery is many times the length of a weekend, and gets excellent results. It generally costs under $5,000. We aim for natural-looking results, making people look like they did five to 10 years ago. We have done more than 600 of these, and have more than 99 percent patient satisfaction. Q: What kinds of skin cancer treatments do

you do? We also work with dermatologists to treat

facial lesions and skin cancer. Many dermatologists don’t want to cut on the face and neck because they want their patients to have the least visible scar. We have extensive training in skin cancers and other lesions, and most patients have almost scar-free healing. If they have a suspicious lesion or mark on their face or neck, they can come see us directly. When it comes to lesions that are itching, bleeding or not healing right, we urge them to come see us immediately. Depending on the type of lesion, patients here are treated with local anesthesia in the office and in most cases can drive themselves home afterward. This saves time and money compared with going to a hospital setting. Q: What are the things we can do to

help prevent signs of aging and skin cancers? Avoid tanning beds, don’t smoke and stay out of the sun whenever possible. Always use sun block, even if it’s cloudy or if there’s snow on the ground. We recommend using SPF 30 or higher, but any SPF is better than none. It helps prevent aging from UV rays and it helps prevent skin cancer. — Carrie Rodovich FOR MORE INFORMATION

Visit his website at theweekendlift.com or call 219.836.2201.

Get Healthy Jan/Feb 2014