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A PUBLICATION OF THE TIMES

Dr. Joseph Hecht, senior partner at Orthopedic Specialists Northwest Indiana

RELIEF AND REMEDY

ALSO

Flavor without Fat Women in High Heels Healthy Senior Bones MAY/JUNE 2014

NWI.COM/GETHEALTHY

Innovation sparks orthopedic care Focus on the future of mental health treatment Speed recovery through technology


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TO THE BONES

New advances in orthopedics allow doctors to provide comprehensive care.

HEALTHY PRODUCTS NBA PLAYER MAKES STRIDES FOR PAIN RELIEF JB3 Innovations, a product development company focused on medical rehabilitation, physical therapy, and fitness training solutions that’s spearheaded by former NBA pro turned inventor and entrepreneur Jonathan Bender, has developed a therapeutic JBIT MedPro device designed to aid in the relief of chronic shoulder, back, hip, knee, joint and sciatica pain. The product is an enhanced version of the company’s flagship JB Intensive Trainer device, which continues to be merchandised nationally in brick-and-mortar “Relax the Back” retail stores among other outlets.

HEALTHLINC EARNS RECOGNITION The National Committee for Quality Assurance has endorsed the federally qualified health center HealthLinc as a Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home provider. The standards emphasize the use of systematic, patient-centered coordinated care that supports access, communication and patient involvement. HealthLinc CEO Beth Wrobel said the distinction exemplifies the vision of HealthLinc to be known for its compassion and quality of care. The clinic staffs physicians, nurses, behavioral health consultants, dentists and other medical staff.

HOSPITAL OFFERS DIABETES CLASSES Franciscan St. Anthony Health hospital will offer a series of diabetes courses on Tuesdays and Wednesdays in April, May and June. Classes help provide meal plans designed to meet specific needs, along with information in accordance with the American Diabetes Association standards. Sessions will be from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesdays and 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays in the Burrell classrooms on the hospital’s lower level.

PHOTOS PROVIDED

FRESH-TIPS PORTABLE MOUTH FRESHENER: THE BETTER “MOUTH TRAP” Fresh-Tips is a disposable toothbrush that contains rubber bristles and a xylitol (all natural, sugar-free) mint that cleans your entire mouth: teeth, tongue, and gums. It is gentle on your enamel and massages the gums. More importantly, Fresh-Tips are a lot of fun because you use them like a lollipop. You open one and place it in your mouth, twirl, suck, and enjoy just like a lollipop while also cleaning. It has an interdental toothpick for all those hard to reach places. Fresh-Tips are easy to carry for their comfortable size; a necessity for any man’s pocket and any woman’s purse. Fresh-Tips are ergonomic and fits perfectly in the mouth.

CANCER SCREENING KITS OFFERED Indiana University Health is offering free colorectal cancer screening kits for men and women ages 50 and older in LaPorte, Marshall and Starke counties. Kits can be picked up at multiple locations, including IU Health Wellness Services at LifeWorks, 3777 N. Frontage Road, Michigan City, and at the following LaPorte locations: IU Health Wellness Services at The Crossing, 1203 Washington St.; IU Health Wellness Services at Sagamore Center, 600 Legacy Plaza, Monroe Street; and at IU Health La Porte Physician offices for internal medicine at 7002 W. Johnson Road. Call 219.326.2048 or 800.235.6204, ext. 2048, for information. Screenings are funded by the IU Health La Porte Hospital Foundation and IU Health Starke Health Fund.

HOW AFFORDABLE CARE ACT WILL IMPACT MENTAL HEALTH TREATMENTS REMAINS UNCLEAR

SUNSCREEN BANDS KEEP SUMMER SAFE Sunscreen Bands, a new product that has hit retail shelves, is going to change the way families practice sun safety this summer. The wristbands, designed for both adults and children, detect UVA and UVB exposure and change color to indicate when it’s time to reapply sunscreen and seek shade. Nontoxic, Sunscreen Bands work with all sunscreens SPF 15 or higher and are designed for any outdoor activities, wet or dry, in both pools or saltwater. One size fits all and each band is good for one day use—even if the wearer goes from indoors to outdoors frequently. Created to work alongside SPF sunscreen, the bands measure UV levels in any location regardless of the climate or weather. They are perfect for outdoor activities such as swimming, gardening, sports, picnics, camping, boating, walking, etc. Sunscreen Bands, created by JADS International, are currently being sold at CVS, Toys R Us, Babies R Us and Bed Bath & Beyond. Bands are also sold in packs of 10 at sunscreenbands.com.

Although the Affordable Care Act has the potential to help millions of Hoosiers access mental health and substance abuse treatment care, its impact on the industry is yet to be determined, area healthcare officials say. • Linda Thompson, head of behavioral health for Franciscan St. Margaret Health, says the Affordable Care Act—commonly known as Obamacare—as hospital staff scrambling to determine what is going to be covered and what will not.

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hompson says it will take time to learn the nuances of the healthcare policy and gauge the impact. “It’s very elusive,” Thompson says. Thompson says her hospital has not seen any influx of patients as a result of the changes, and has no immediate plans to expand their services. “In today’s economy, until you have those patients and you don’t have employees to cover them, you don’t expand,” she says. “If it happens, we will address it. But at this time, we’re not.” LaTivia Carr, interim director of

Acute Care Services and Behavioral Medicine at Methodist Hospitals, says information provided by the US Department of Health and Human Services says the ACA will be one of the largest expansions of mental health and substance abuse treatment coverage in years. Currently, people either pay for their own coverage out of pocket if their insurance policy does not cover it, and many do not, Carr says. “As we know, with any uninsured condition, if you don’t have insurance, you’re twice as likely to delay or skip

medical care, which leads to more problems on the job, or hospitalization or emergency services,” she says. Under the health reform, mental health and substance abuse disorder services should be covered at the same level as any other medical and surgical benefits, Carr says. But millions more who have private insurance, either through their employers or on individual plans, will see expanded care. “It is very complicated, but overall, it is definitely a step in the right direction,” Carr says. — Carrie Rodovich

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Surgeon Dr. Stanish helped Jeannine Wolfe lose weight in a healthy way through bariatric.

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may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 11

the body shop

survivor spotlight

life

As a middle school math teacher, Jeannine Wolfe knows about numbers and hers were not adding up to good health. • Through her commitment to change and bariatric surgery, she has lost weight and rid herself of many health issues.

olfe, 33, of Michigan thinks.” City, said this has Her surgeon Paul Stanish, who has offices been a four-year through Community Hospital in Munster and St. process, which Mary Medical Center in Hobart, says there are two included attending types of bariatric surgery. Wolfe had laparoscopic a seminar about gastric bypass surgery, which involves making bariatric surgery a small pouch to section off the top part of the when she was 29. She suffered from type-1 stomach that adjoins the esophagus. The second diabetes, hypertension, chronic headaches, high part involves rerouting part of the intestine to join cholesterol, sleep apnea, a fatty liver and foot pain the pouch to the intestinal track. caused by plantar fasciitis. “That results in eating less food and getting a full Diagnosed with juvenile diabetes at age 10, “It feeling,” Stanish says. “You stay full for a longer was a challenge my whole life,” she says. “As my period of time. The food you eat is not digested or weight increased, the challenges became more absorbed as efficiently.” severe.” She required more insulin and her numbers “We do these surgeries for health related continued to get worse the heavier she got. problems. It’s not considered a cosmetic surgery. “Over a period of 10 years, every few months, We’re looking to get people healthier,” Stanish says. something else popped up. Every time I went to Candidates must also be of sound mind and are the doctor it seemed like there were more and screened by a psychologist, who works to find their more issues.” underlying eating issues. After work, she was exhausted and her feet “If we can solve those problems prior to surgery her so badly that all she could do was lay on the it’s more likely that their long term success will couch. improve.” “When your head hurts and your feet hurt, it’s They are careful to explain to patients from the difficult to be as good of a teacher as you could be beginning that this is a commitment, he says. … Certainly my quality of life wasn’t what it could “Like any other opportunity in life, if you make a have been.” full commitment to that and take full advantage of After seeing “a million doctors for a million the opportunity, you will be successful. On a daily different things,” taking a multitude of tests basis we see people happy with their outcome,” and being prescribed various medications, she Stanish says. There are potential complications just heard about someone who found success with like any surgery although he does not see them bariatric surgery. She did research and attended often. a seminar given by the team at Healthy 4 Life, a After surgery in July 2011, Wolfe maintained her comprehensive medical and surgical weight loss commitment to getting healthy. program. “Your stomach is so much smaller, you have to She worked with the team including Omar learn to gauge what size and what portion you can Shamsi, who is board certified in internal medicine, have of foods—how much sugar, how much fat, it and completed a six-month supervised weight loss can make you really sick. It was a learning process.” program. Still, nothing took off the weight she Although she always tried to exercise and control needed to lose, and she made her weigh on her own, she the decision to do the surgery. was unsuccessful until after She worried what people her surgery. She was also would think because weight loss able to lower the amount of Healthy 4 Life Center surgery is often portrayed as a medications she needed from has locations in Hobart and Munster and quick fix. 13 to 14 pills a day to two. offers comprehensive “It was still a tremendous “I do exercise every medical and surgical amount of work,” she says. day now and certainly weight loss services. “I decided my health is more didn’t before,” she says. FYI: Healthyme4life.com important than what anybody — Jennifer Pallay or 866.224.2059.

PRACTICALLY PERFECT

POSTURE

Most people experience back pain and at some point in their lives, and the causes of that pain can vary. • However, experts in the medical community say that back pain may be directly related to how you’re sitting right now. • “I worked in physical therapy for 17 years, and we saw a lot of people with cervical injuries and back injuries from poor posture,” says Jane Bogordos, a physiologist and fitness supervisor at Omni at Schererville.

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ood posture is the maintenance of proper spinal alignment, with without that proper alignment, people are much more susceptible to injury, says June Faelnar, a doctor of physical therapy from Advocate South Suburban Hospital’s therapy department. “Improper alignment and poor posture leads to many common complaints such as neck and lower back pain,” he says. “Alignment issues, not just traumatic injury, is a very common cause of spinal disc injuries as well.” Poor posture can also affect a person’s breathing, Faelnar says. “Without proper posture—shoulders back, chin down, chest out—it can be hard to draw deep breaths because of constriction caused by slumping forward,” he says. “This forward tilt, caused by poor posture, can negatively affect balance, leading to injury-causing stumbles and falls.” Those who work desk jobs are especially susceptible to poor posture, Bogordos says. “If you’re in a forward position, your head is forward and there’s a lot of extra stress and strain on your muscles,” she says. “If you then do something that is physical or you turn the wrong way, your muscles are already weak and stressed, so it puts you at more risk for injury because your base of support isn’t there anymore.” One of the most basic, but overlooked facts about

good posture is that it helps people project an air of confidence, says Nancy Trimboli, a doctor of chiropractic at Trimboli Chiropractic in Munster and Cedar Lake. “Posture is much more than sitting up straight,” she says. “Posture is a reflection of your mood and improving your posture can change your mood.” Your posture now can also have life-long impacts. “Recent research from the journal of American Geriatric Society shows that the more forward our head is, the more health problems we will have,” Trimboli says. “Your need for assisted living can be predicted by how far forward your head is compared to your hips.” It’s never too late to have a healthy posture, however. Here are some tips to help straighten your back and improve your overall health.

shoulders back. Regularly check your posture as a recurring part of your day, Faelnar says. Every 20 minutes, reach both hands up to the ceiling and then relax your arms, Bogordos says. “When you do that, you put your spine in the proper position,” she says. Trimboli suggests keeping your shoulders over your hips and your ears over your shoulders—allowing your muscles to perform their jobs properly and stay relaxed. “This will reduce pain and stress felt in the neck and upper and lower back,” she says.

INVESTIGATE HELPFUL ACTIVITIES Yoga and pilates are low-impact exercises that focus on proper spinal alignment, body mechanics and core strength—and all help maintain proper posture, Faelnar says. “There are many different flavors of yoga and pilates, so do some research and find something that works for you,” he says. Trimboli says over the years, people tire and pick up posture habits—yet gravity never tires. “You must fight it,” she says. “Yoga, tai chi, dance, martial arts are all forms of exercise that improve not only posture, but state of mind—which in turn improves our posture,” she says. — Christine Bryant

food & fitness

GIVE YOURSELF A BREAK

MAKE POSTURE CHECKS When in a chair, sit up straight and pull your

may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 13

HOW TO PREVENT

STICKS

bones BROKEN

They’re one of the most feared events for an older adult: falls that cause fractures. A broken bone can mean surgery, hospitalization, and certainly pain, but there are ways to lessen the odds of them ever happening.

GARY WOMAN’S INVENTION SEALS IN THE FLAVOR With five children to feed, church suppers to make, determination and a strong belief in the Lord, Mary Hunter created, with what she considers divine intervention, a new way to add flavor to meat without going through the long process of marinating. • “I’d be doing a turkey or a big roast and I’d have to get up at midnight to turn it in the marinade,” says Hunter who lives in Gary.

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t was back in 1994 when Hunter was writing down a psalm when an easier way to marinate came to her. “The Lord said to me, Mary you take that pen and stick it in the meat,” recalls Hunter. Of course, Hunter knew the command didn’t mean using a working ink pen. Instead, the idea was to take two pen-shaped object with holes, filled with her own special blend of aromatics—celery, onions, garlic and ginger—and insert one on each side deep into the meat. “That way when the meat heats up and the juices flow through the aromatics and into whatever you’re cooking—beef, pork, chicken, turkey,” she says. Not only would her marinating sticks keep her from having to get up in the middle of the night. It also would be a way to create a healthy delicious meal without having a lot of additives or fats. That was perfect for Hunter who had both cancer and diabetes as well as a warning from her doctor to change the way she ate including cutting down her salt intake.

Try not to sit too much, and if you sit a lot at work or at home, get up every 30 minutes to walk around and give yourself a break, Faelnar says. Give your desk chair a break as well by using an exercise ball instead, Bogordos says. “In order for you not to fall off it, you have to sit up straight,” she says. “It helps you work on your core muscles and sit up straight.”

ask the expert

senior scope

Marinating

But Hunter loved flavor and so by designing an internal way to add taste to her foods she was also following doctor’s orders. “It is healthier,” says Hunter, “but I wasn’t doing it for the health, I was doing it for the tang.” Still says her youngest son, Dwayne Hunter, “everything needs to be fresh, that’s when it works best.” Whatever her reason, bringing her idea to fruition took some doing. And that’s where the perseverance or should we say plain old doggedness came to play. Hunter enrolled in business classes and after that, to get a prototype made—the first step in getting a patent. And if all that sounds a little overwhelming for a mother with five children and no background in business or engineering, it certainly didn’t stop Hunter. With recommendations from her teacher, she convinced David Smith, a concept designer who also had worked as a professor at University of Illinois at Chicago, to design the prototype. He worked and worked at it wanting to give up several times despite much previous success in bringing concepts to market for major companies but Hunter convinced him that he was chosen by God to help her. Success came but sporadically. She initially got a contract to sell Mary’s Marinating Sticks at Jewel Food Stores and also signed up congregation members of Yes Lord church where Dwayne Hunter is pastor to become sales representatives. “We want to help people get off of assistance,” says Reverend Hunter who is also, along with David Smith, his mom’s business partner. “We feel that the Lord will open this up so we can help the people of Gary.” Another step towards success was when Dwayne Hunter

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t the top of the list for three area health professionals is exercise. “Of all the treatments for osteoporosis, the one thing that has been shown to help is weight training, 20 minutes a day,” says Dr. Gregory McComis at North Point Orthopaedics in Dyer and Munster, Ind. Dr. Nancy Trimboli at Trimboli Chiropractic in Munster, Ind., says weight lifting and muscle strengthening exercises can be done several ways. “You can do a class where you’re on the floor and it’s set to music. Tai chi and yoga are excellent for muscle strength and weight bearing exercises.” Dr. Kristine Teodori, gerontologist and staff physician at Franciscan St. Anthony Health-Crown Point, says walking is great exercise. “Ideally if you are capable you can walk in your

McComis

Trimboli

Teodori

own neighborhood, with wrist band weights.” If walking is limited, “You can perform exercises in a chair with leg lifts and hand weights.” Trimboli says diet plays a big role in bone strength. She suggests doubling the amount of fruits and green, leafy vegetables you consume, by adding greens to pastas and spinach in smoothies, for example. Avoid too much sugar and carbonated drinks like pop, Trimboli cautions: The phosphoric acid in soda pop weakens bones by removing mineral from them. And, according to nutritional research, “Acid-blocking drugs like Nexium, Prilosec, and the like inhibit the stomach from absorbing calcium from your food.”

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JOSEPH HECHT, M.D.

New trends allow for faster recovery times

Orthopedic Specialists of Northwest Indiana (OSNI) has been operating in Northwest Indiana for more than 17 years. Dr. Joseph Hecht, OSNI’s senior partner, specializes in arthritis-related conditions and treatments, with an emphasis on knee and hip reconstructions. He completed his residency at the University of Chicago Hospitals.

Q: What does an orthopedic specialist do? In the broadest terms, an orthopedic surgeon takes care of diseases of the musculoskeletal system. That encompasses everything from the spine, extremities and joints, including hips, knees, hands and feet. A general orthopedist covers everything from traumatic injuries to arthritis. I, myself, focus on things including hip and knee replacement but take care of most any problem considered general orthopedics. Q: Is there a difference in injuries people sustain when they’re younger or older? Older people tend to come in with problems such as joints wearing out, or thinning of the skeleton, osteoporosis, which can lead to fractures. Young people tend to have traumatic injuries, such as slipping and falling and twisting an ankle and breaking it. Sports injuries in young people vary based on the sport. Football injuries have a different set of problems than a marathon runner or someone who works out with weights.

TONY V. MARTIN

on your mind

Compiled by Times Staff

Ingalls Bereavement Services sponsors a free grief support group from 2-3 p.m. Mondays at Ingalls Memorial Hospital. The group provides a safe place for participants who have experienced the loss of a loved one to grieve with others that have had similar experiences, share feelings and start the healing process. Registration is required. Call Ingalls Hospice Bereavement Services at 708.331.1360. The group meets in the North Building, second floor, at the main hospital campus, 1 Ingalls Drive.

PROVIDED

what’s new Local Health News GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP AVAILABLE

the injury is. Thirty years ago, a wrist break would be put in a cast that would go above the elbow and it would be held into position for six weeks. Now, surgeries can restore alignment of the wrist, and therapy can begin much sooner. That’s true of shoulder and knee tendon and ligament tears and other significant trauma, as well.

Q: How has treatment and

technology changed over the last few decades? Techniques in surgery have moved towards making smaller incisions. Ruptured, torn tendons and other injuries that would have been invasive surgeries in the 1980s or 1990s are can now be fixed much more easily. Even the materials we use have changed. Stainless steel is still popular, but we also use titanium plates, which are lighter and more flexible, depending on where

Q: How has hip and knee replacement changed over the last few decades? Techniques have made quite a few advancements in the last decade. There are smaller incisions, newer ceramics, metals and plastics with the trend toward shorter hospitalizations. These practices are gaining more acceptance as time goes along. One hip replacement technique that is gaining acceptance is to perform the hip surgery from an anterior interval (commonly called the direct anterior approach). The advantage of that is you go between the muscle planes rather than cutting through muscles to access the hip joint. This technique can be more difficult

and requires additional training and experience, but specialized traction tables have been developed to facilitate the procedure. This causes less limping and within a month, patients are doing much better, much more quickly. Knee replacements are also making improvements. There are techniques to make smaller incisions and have less blood loss. Custom cutting blocks that are made from pre-surgical measurement planning techniques have become readily available. There are many ways to do hip and knee replacement surgeries, and new techniques are gaining popularity when they lead to faster patient recoveries. Is there a best technique that will hold up over the long term? There is no unequivocal proof or what we call level one evidence yet, but consistently good outcomes are always dependent on the skill and experience of the surgeon. — Carrie Rodovich FOR MORE INFORMATION

Dr. Hecht can be reached by calling his Munster office at 219.924.3300.

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what’s new

on your mind

survivor spotlight

the body shop

food & fitness

senior scope

ask the expert

A backstrengthening device, portable mouth fresheners and sunscreen bands.

The Affordable Care Act offers some expanded coverage for mental health care.

Bariatric surgery and hard work gives a math teacher a solution to her problem.

Posture is important for internal and external health.

A local woman’s invention provides flavor without the fat.

How to avoid broken bones during the golden years.

Dr. Joseph Hecht employs new techniques to care for the orthopedic system.

4 letter from the editor 2 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

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6 get healthy executive partners


Moving forward. Making a difference.

Vineet Shah, DO Orthopedic Surgery

Elian Shepherd, MD Spine Surgery

Alfred Bonjean, MD Orthopedic Surgery

Judson Wood, MD Orthopedic Surgery

Orthopedic and Spine Specialists Close to Home Methodist Physician Group has assembled a remarkable team of orthopedic and spine specialists, right here in Northwest Indiana. Together, these experienced, accomplished and compassionate physicians offer a wide range of The Region’s most advanced care in all areas of treatment, including spine care, total joint replacement, and podiatric care. They offer the latest techniques, including non-surgical and minimally invasive treatment methods to help minimize your pain and maximize your quality of life.

Mark Jones, DPM Foot and Ankle Surgery

Welcoming new patients at our nearby offices in Gary & Merrillville: GARY 600 Grant Street, 4th Floor MERRILLVILLE 99 E. 86th Avenue, Suite C 200 E. 89th Avenue, Suite 3C 8777 Broadway, Suite C 9235 Broadway Evening Appointments Available To learn more about our Orthopedic and Spine Specialists, call 888-549-5648, or visit MethodistPhysicianGroup.org

The right doctors make all the difference.

Arrange your appointment online. Visit our specialists’ profile pages at MethodistPhysicianGroup.org www.MethodistPhysicianGroup.org

may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 3


letter from the editor volume 9 | issue 3

NO PAIN, NO GAIN? NO WAY.

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hen I was a kid, I was such a girly girl. I know there are a few different sets of photos of myself clomping around the house in my mother’s high heels (pink, I think I recall, and straight out of the ’80s). I remember begging for years for a pair of my own. And I’m certain I wasn’t allowed any until I was at least 13. In fact, I remember my first pair of high heels. They were very Spice Girl-chic with a big chunky heel and some red embroidered flowers on the toe (Mary Janes, of course). And right along with learning how to walk in my training-wheel high heels, I also learned that they hurt like the dickens. I’m pretty sure every pair of heels I’ve ever owned have been exquisitely lovely, and just as exquisitely painful at the end of the day. So I find myself with a giant collection of heels that I rarely wear—maybe three times a year on average. Even now, I’m sure I have at least 8 pairs (though my husband

would tell you it’s closer to 20). I just can’t bring myself to endure the pain for anything routine—sorry coworkers. To my immense relief, when I was in high school ballet flats hit the shelves of my neighborhood Target, and I found my niche. I may have 8 pairs of heels gathering dust on my shoe rack, but I have at least 10 pairs of ballet flats in myriad colors that are used far more often. (My favorite pair is a custom painted set of flats I wore at my wedding reception, in case you were wondering.) And it turns out what I thought was fashion laziness was actually me being health-conscious! In our story about fashion and foot care, Northwest Indiana doctors advise us to make heels an occasional treat, not an every day habit, to reduce long term stress injuries and even foot deformities. So why suffer for fashion? Switch to flats— your feet and ankles will thank you. KATHLEEN DORSEY MANAGING EDITOR

Publisher — CHRISTOPHER T. WHITE Associate Publisher/Editor — PAT COLANDER Managing Editor — KATHLEEN DORSEY Associate Content Producer — TARA MCELMURRY Design Director — BEN CUNNINGHAM Designer — APRIL BURFORD Contributing Editors JANE AMMESON, LESLY BAILEY, ASHLEY BOYER, CHRISTINE BRYANT, TRISH MALEY, TARA MCELMURRY, JENNIFER PALLAY, PHILIP POTEMPA, CARRIE RODOVICH, ELOISE VALADEZ, SHARON BIGGS WALLER NICHE PUBLICATION SALES Account Executives MIKE CANE, ANDREA WALCZAK VP of Sales JOHN TUCKER Advertising Managers ERIC HORON, CRAIG CHISM, DEE DEE WHITE Production Manager TOM KACIUS

Published by Lee Enterprises The Times of Northwest Indiana Niche Productions Division 601 W 45th Ave, Munster, Indiana 46321 219.933.3200 2080 N Main St Crown Point, Indiana 46307 219.662.5300 1111 Glendale Blvd Valparaiso, Indiana 46383 219.548.4300

CHECK OUT NWI.COM/GETHEALTHY, WHERE YOU’LL FIND: Our comprehensive calendar of Well-Being Events • Fresh new articles and information every day Health advice from local and national experts • The place to sign up for our email newsletter with and ideas on nutrition, fitness, mental health and health care

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Copyright, Reprints and Permissions: You must have permission before reproducing material from Get Healthy magazine. Get Healthy magazine is published six times each year by Lee Enterprises, The Times of Northwest Indiana, Niche Division, 601 W 45th Ave, Munster, IN 46321.


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Lou Molina Community Hospital

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he saga is ongoing and confusing. One week you get a bill for a simple test that costs as much as a compact car and you are thinking how is this ever going to be brought under control? Then, a few days go by and you look at a set of before and after photos of a heart valve repair job on one of your nearest and dearest and you know that you’ve just witnessed a miracle, and that miracle will very likely last for 20 more years. But what’s going on in education is even more mind-blowing. If you think you have too many choices at the grocery store try looking at possible undergraduate concentrations, certifications or post-graduate courses of study so tightly focused on a particular genre of research or clinical work that once you make a selection there is no possibility of turning back. Your career has automatically become too big to fail. Have you looked at your personal trainer’s resume lately? He or she very likely has an undergraduate degree in exercise science, sports management, biomedical engineering technology, kinesiology or plain, vanilla health studies. And the chances are that trainer may be contemplating more education to become an orthopedic specialist, a chiropractor, a PhD nurse, pharmacist or nutritionist. Because they have looked at the range of paths in front of them and made some very hard choices. The scope of possibilities is as wide as the time is narrow for getting the right training. With schools now graded on their ability to graduate rather than recruit there is even more pressure to make the right call about the future and be quick about it, when you are barely old enough to vote. From my vantage point, making these decisions requires more courage and self-knowledge than ever. This season of acceptance and rejection has gotten me thinking about the future of healthcare in terms of the people who want to be in it. Surprisingly, there are many of you. Almost every young professional I know is involved or working towards being involved in a giving and serving role whether it’s in education, public service or some larger cause or call to action. Gerontology has been expanding for a decade. Studies keep emerging that measure the positive correlation between happiness and giving. I heard a talk by an octogenarian who gave up a lucrative job heading an advertising agency in Los Angeles because he thought it would be better if he opened a mission to help people struggling with addiction. That was 40 years ago. It is easy to forget about these wonderful personal stories faced with a barrage of mental illness, violent behavior and kids in jeopardy. But the truth is, there are many more of the good stories out there. It’s our job to find them. Every seven or eight weeks. Fortunately, it’s not that difficult.

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Jay Platt, DDS Oral Surgery and Dental Implant Center

Mary Ann Shachlett Community Foundation of Northwest Indiana JoAnn Birdzell St. Catherine Hospital Janice Ryba St. Mary Medical Center

Dr. Alex Stemer Franciscan Medical Specialists Gregory P. McComis, MD North Point Orthopedics Nitin Khanna, MD, FAAQS Dwight Tyndall, MD, FAAQS Spine Care Specialists

Gene Diamond Franciscan Alliance

Nitin Khanna, MD, FAQQS Orthopaedic Specialists of Northwest Indiana

David F. Ruskowski Franciscan St. Anthony Health Crown Point

Dr. Bethany A Cataldi Center for Otolaryngology and Facial Plastic Surgery, L.L.C.

Daniel Netluch, MD Franciscan St. Anthony Health Crown Point

______________

Carol Schuster, RN, MBA Franciscan Alliance Thomas J. Gryzbek Franciscan St. Margaret Health Jim Lipinski Franciscan Alliance James T. Callaghan III, MD, MBA Franciscan St. Anthony Health Michigan City Trish Weber, RN, MBA Franciscan St. Anthony Health Michigan City Stephen Lunn Porter Hospital Michael Davenport, MD Methodist Hospitals Denise Dillard Methodist Hospitals Haroon Naz Pinnacle Hospital Barbara H. Greene Franciscan Physicians Hospital Beverly DeLao Franciscan Hammond Clinic Rob Jensen Franciscan Hammond Clinic

MARKETING AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS Mylinda Cane Community Healthcare System Angela Moore St. Catherine Hospital Kelly Credit Porter Hospital Karen Keltner Porter Hospital Mary Fetsch St. Mary Medical Center Marie Forszt Community Hospital Joe Dejanovic Franciscan Alliance Ellen Sharpe Franciscan Alliance Sister M. Aline Shultz, OSF Franciscan Alliance Maria E. Ramos Franciscan Alliance

Dr. Nancy Trimboli Trimboli Chiropractic

Neil Mangus, MHA IU Health LaPorte Hospital

John T. King, MD Franciscan St. Anthony Crown Point

Colleen Zubeck Franciscan Medical Specialists Centers of Indiana

Anton Thompkins, MD Lakeshore Bone & Joint Institute

Michael Shepherd St. James Hospital and Health Centers

Willis Glaros Employer Benefits Systems

Linda Hadley Methodist Hospitals

Adrianne May Hospice of the Calumet Area

Evelyn Morrison Methodist Hospitals

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One of America America’s 50 Best! Ingalls was named one of America’s 50 Best Hospitals,™ ranking it in the top 1% of the more than 4,500 hospitals in the country. We want to congratulate the exceptional physicians, nurses, staff, and volunteers at Ingalls on receiving this distinction. We thank them for making the decision every single day to bring their best to our patients and to our community. Their skill and commitment is reflected in superior clinical performance and patient outcomes. This is an honor we are proud to accept on their behalf. For more information, call us at 708.915.CARE (2273) www.Ingalls.org

Exceptional Care. Exceptionally Close.

SM

Flossmoor • Tinley Park • Calumet City • Crestwood • Harvey may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 7


Dr. Jay Platt has served Northwest Indiana for over 20 years with quality oral surgery care. Choosing an oral surgeon is an important decision. Our team is composed of experienced professionals who are dedicated to your care. Dr. Platt attends 80 or more hours of Continuing Education per year and provides many Continuing Education seminars to the surrounding dental community. Dr. Platt has extensive training and expertise in placing dental implants, preserving and rebuilding the jaw, and treating conditions that affect a person’s face, teeth and mouth structures. Dr.Platt has placed thousands of dental implants over the past 25 years - placing his first one in 1989. We have a state-of-the-art Cone Beam CT Scanner in our office which provides full-cranial anatomically correct 3D images enabling us to better plan for patient care and treatment. We offer a no-cost consultation and a complimentary CT scan if necessary for patients who are treated by Dr. Platt.

Do You Need to Go to an Implant Center?

since surgical procedures are involved, so that each patient receives You have undoubtedly seen and heard t.v. and radio ads promoting the optimal outcome. Some implant centers claim to be the leaders in implant centers which are springing up all over the country. Many of implant dentistry and to have more experience than other clinicians. It is them are advertising the convenience of having everything under one implied that because of the volume of implants placed and restored they roof: the surgeon, the prosthodontist, the dental lab and a CT scan. It is are more experienced. However, the volume of implants placed in some certainly convenient for the patients and the doctors providing treatment cases is for all of their centers. The truth is that some of the doctors to have everything in one location; however, convenience should not be in these centers are very experienced and some are not any more the primary consideration with implant treatment. The most important experienced than their colleagues in the area. Some implant centers factors should be the experience of the treating clinicians, especially have general dentists placing and restoring

8 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy


implants who do not have near the training or experience as specialists. It is important to remember that this “advertising” is intended to “sell” the benefits of those particular implant centers, and you should take this into consideration when evaluating your various options.

Immediate Full Arch Provisional Restoration

Immediate Full Arch Provisional Restoration is a specific treatment option that is not appropriate for all patients. It is a suitable treatment option for those patients who are missing all of their upper and/or lower teeth, and who have adequate bone conditions to support an arch of teeth with only 4 implants. For these select patients fewer implants would be required, no bone grafting would be necessary, and so it is typically less costly than other implant procedures.

No Need to Change Dentists!

Unlike some “one stop shop” dental implant centers that make you use their dentists; we work with you and your current dentist. We are very fortunate in that in Northwest Indiana and Northeastern Illinois, there are many outstanding restorative clinicians. Dr. Platt works with most of them on a regular basis. We would encourage you to seek treatment from your current dentist whom you have a long standing relationship with. If you do not currently have a dentist, we can refer you to one that we work with frequently.

Please feel free to contact our implant coordinator, Monette, if you have any questions about treatment or to schedule a no-cost consultation. 322 Indianapolis Blvd.,• Suite 100 (Behind Steak N’ Shake) • Schererville, IN Interest Free Patient Financing Available

We Welcome neW patients

Mon.-Thurs. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Fri. 7 a.m.-2 p.m.

219•864•1133

www.jplattdds.com

may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 9


what’s new Compiled by Times Staff

Local Health News

HEALTHY PRODUCTS

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP AVAILABLE

NBA PLAYER MAKES STRIDES FOR PAIN RELIEF JB3 Innovations, a product development company focused on medical rehabilitation, physical therapy, and fitness training solutions that’s spearheaded by former NBA pro turned inventor and entrepreneur Jonathan Bender, has developed a therapeutic JBIT MedPro device designed to aid in the relief of chronic shoulder, back, hip, knee, joint and sciatica pain. The product is an enhanced version of the company’s flagship JB Intensive Trainer device, which continues to be merchandised nationally in brick-and-mortar “Relax the Back” retail stores among other outlets.

Ingalls Bereavement Services sponsors a free grief support group from 2-3 p.m. Mondays at Ingalls Memorial Hospital. The group provides a safe place for participants who have experienced the loss of a loved one to grieve with others that have had similar experiences, share feelings and start the healing process. Registration is required. Call Ingalls Hospice Bereavement Services at 708.331.1360. The group meets in the North Building, second floor, at the main hospital campus, 1 Ingalls Drive.

HEALTHLINC EARNS RECOGNITION The National Committee for Quality Assurance has endorsed the federally qualified health center HealthLinc as a Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home provider. The standards emphasize the use of systematic, patient-centered coordinated care that supports access, communication and patient involvement. HealthLinc CEO Beth Wrobel said the distinction exemplifies the vision of HealthLinc to be known for its compassion and quality of care. The clinic staffs physicians, nurses, behavioral health consultants, dentists and other medical staff.

CANCER SCREENING KITS OFFERED Indiana University Health is offering free colorectal cancer screening kits for men and women ages 50 and older in LaPorte, Marshall and Starke counties. Kits can be picked up at multiple locations, including IU Health Wellness Services at LifeWorks, 3777 N. Frontage Road, Michigan City, and at the following LaPorte locations: IU Health Wellness Services at The Crossing, 1203 Washington St.; IU Health Wellness Services at Sagamore Center, 600 Legacy Plaza, Monroe Street; and at IU Health La Porte Physician offices for internal medicine at 7002 W. Johnson Road. Call 219.326.2048 or 800.235.6204, ext. 2048, for information. Screenings are funded by the IU Health La Porte Hospital Foundation and IU Health Starke Health Fund.

HOSPITAL OFFERS DIABETES CLASSES Franciscan St. Anthony Health hospital will offer a series of diabetes courses on Tuesdays and Wednesdays in April, May and June. Classes help provide meal plans designed to meet specific needs, along with information in accordance with the American Diabetes Association standards. Sessions will be from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesdays and 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays in the Burrell classrooms on the hospital’s lower level.

10 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

PHOTOS PROVIDED

FRESH-TIPS PORTABLE MOUTH FRESHENER: THE BETTER “MOUTH TRAP” Fresh-Tips is a disposable toothbrush that contains rubber bristles and a xylitol (all natural, sugar-free) mint that cleans your entire mouth: teeth, tongue, and gums. It is gentle on your enamel and massages the gums. More importantly, Fresh-Tips are a lot of fun because you use them like a lollipop. You open one and place it in your mouth, twirl, suck, and enjoy just like a lollipop while also cleaning. It has an interdental toothpick for all those hard to reach places. Fresh-Tips are easy to carry for their comfortable size; a necessity for any man’s pocket and any woman’s purse. Fresh-Tips are ergonomic and fits perfectly in the mouth. SUNSCREEN BANDS KEEP SUMMER SAFE Sunscreen Bands, a new product that has hit retail shelves, is going to change the way families practice sun safety this summer. The wristbands, designed for both adults and children, detect UVA and UVB exposure and change color to indicate when it’s time to reapply sunscreen and seek shade. Nontoxic, Sunscreen Bands work with all sunscreens SPF 15 or higher and are designed for any outdoor activities, wet or dry, in both pools or saltwater. One size fits all and each band is good for one day use—even if the wearer goes from indoors to outdoors frequently. Created to work alongside SPF sunscreen, the bands measure UV levels in any location regardless of the climate or weather. They are perfect for outdoor activities such as swimming, gardening, sports, picnics, camping, boating, walking, etc. Sunscreen Bands, created by JADS International, are currently being sold at CVS, Toys R Us, Babies R Us and Bed Bath & Beyond. Bands are also sold in packs of 10 at sunscreenbands.com.


on your mind HOW AFFORDABLE CARE ACT WILL IMPACT MENTAL HEALTH TREATMENTS REMAINS UNCLEAR Although the Affordable Care Act has the potential to help millions of Hoosiers access mental health and substance abuse treatment care, its impact on the industry is yet to be determined, area healthcare officials say. • Linda Thompson, head of behavioral health for Franciscan St. Margaret Health, says the Affordable Care Act—commonly known as Obamacare—as hospital staff scrambling to determine what is going to be covered and what will not.

T

hompson says it will take time to learn the nuances of the healthcare policy and gauge the impact. “It’s very elusive,” Thompson says. Thompson says her hospital has not seen any influx of patients as a result of the changes, and has no immediate plans to expand their services. “In today’s economy, until you have those patients and you don’t have employees to cover them, you don’t expand,” she says. “If it happens, we will address it. But at this time, we’re not.” LaTivia Carr, interim director of

Acute Care Services and Behavioral Medicine at Methodist Hospitals, says information provided by the US Department of Health and Human Services says the ACA will be one of the largest expansions of mental health and substance abuse treatment coverage in years. Currently, people either pay for their own coverage out of pocket if their insurance policy does not cover it, and many do not, Carr says. “As we know, with any uninsured condition, if you don’t have insurance, you’re twice as likely to delay or skip

medical care, which leads to more problems on the job, or hospitalization or emergency services,” she says. Under the health reform, mental health and substance abuse disorder services should be covered at the same level as any other medical and surgical benefits, Carr says. But millions more who have private insurance, either through their employers or on individual plans, will see expanded care. “It is very complicated, but overall, it is definitely a step in the right direction,” Carr says. ­— Carrie Rodovich

Choose your clothes. Choose your home. But not your doctor?

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If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with cancer, your freedom of choice will never be more important than it is right now. The right to decide who will treat you is yours. It’s your life-decision. Even a physician can’t take it away. And you also need to know that only one organization in the history of northern Indiana has treated more breast, lung, colon and prostate cancer than any other.

For nearly 50 years, we’ve focused exclusively on beating cancer and nothing else. We’re never distracted by any other kind of medicine. It’s how we’ve become the largest, most-sophisticated cancer care organization in the history of northern Indiana. You have a choice. Ask for Michiana Hematology Oncology’s Advanced Centers for Cancer Care.

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survivor spotlight

Surgeon Dr. Stanish helped Jeannine Wolfe lose weight in a healthy way through bariatric.

PROVIDED

W

BARIATRIC GIVES TEACHER A NEW LEASE ON

life

As a middle school math teacher, Jeannine Wolfe knows about numbers and hers were not adding up to good health. • Through her commitment to change and bariatric surgery, she has lost weight and rid herself of many health issues. 12 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

olfe, 33, of Michigan thinks.” City, said this has Her surgeon Paul Stanish, who has offices been a four-year through Community Hospital in Munster and St. process, which Mary Medical Center in Hobart, says there are two included attending types of bariatric surgery. Wolfe had laparoscopic a seminar about gastric bypass surgery, which involves making bariatric surgery a small pouch to section off the top part of the when she was 29. She suffered from type-1 stomach that adjoins the esophagus. The second diabetes, hypertension, chronic headaches, high part involves rerouting part of the intestine to join cholesterol, sleep apnea, a fatty liver and foot pain the pouch to the intestinal track. caused by plantar fasciitis. “That results in eating less food and getting a full Diagnosed with juvenile diabetes at age 10, “It feeling,” Stanish says. “You stay full for a longer was a challenge my whole life,” she says. “As my period of time. The food you eat is not digested or weight increased, the challenges became more absorbed as efficiently.” severe.” She required more insulin and her numbers “We do these surgeries for health related continued to get worse the heavier she got. problems. It’s not considered a cosmetic surgery. “Over a period of 10 years, every few months, We’re looking to get people healthier,” Stanish says. something else popped up. Every time I went to Candidates must also be of sound mind and are the doctor it seemed like there were more and screened by a psychologist, who works to find their more issues.” underlying eating issues. After work, she was exhausted and her feet “If we can solve those problems prior to surgery her so badly that all she could do was lay on the it’s more likely that their long term success will couch. improve.” “When your head hurts and your feet hurt, it’s They are careful to explain to patients from the difficult to be as good of a teacher as you could be beginning that this is a commitment, he says. … Certainly my quality of life wasn’t what it could “Like any other opportunity in life, if you make a have been.” full commitment to that and take full advantage of After seeing “a million doctors for a million the opportunity, you will be successful. On a daily different things,” taking a multitude of tests basis we see people happy with their outcome,” and being prescribed various medications, she Stanish says. There are potential complications just heard about someone who found success with like any surgery although he does not see them bariatric surgery. She did research and attended often. a seminar given by the team at Healthy 4 Life, a After surgery in July 2011, Wolfe maintained her comprehensive medical and surgical weight loss commitment to getting healthy. program. “Your stomach is so much smaller, you have to She worked with the team including Omar learn to gauge what size and what portion you can Shamsi, who is board certified in internal medicine, have of foods—how much sugar, how much fat, it and completed a six-month supervised weight loss can make you really sick. It was a learning process.” program. Still, nothing took off the weight she Although she always tried to exercise and control needed to lose, and she made her weigh on her own, she the decision to do the surgery. was unsuccessful until after She worried what people her surgery. She was also would think because weight loss able to lower the amount of Healthy 4 Life Center surgery is often portrayed as a medications she needed from has locations in Hobart and Munster and quick fix. 13 to 14 pills a day to two. offers comprehensive “It was still a tremendous “I do exercise every medical and surgical amount of work,” she says. day now and certainly weight loss services. “I decided my health is more didn’t before,” she says. FYI: Healthyme4life.com important than what anybody — Jennifer Pallay or 866.224.2059.


the body shop

PRACTICALLY PERFECT

POSTURE

Most people experience back pain and at some point in their lives, and the causes of that pain can vary. • However, experts in the medical community say that back pain may be directly related to how you’re sitting right now. • “I worked in physical therapy for 17 years, and we saw a lot of people with cervical injuries and back injuries from poor posture,” says Jane Bogordos, a physiologist and fitness supervisor at Omni at Schererville.

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ood posture is the maintenance of proper spinal alignment, with without that proper alignment, people are much more susceptible to injury, says June Faelnar, a doctor of physical therapy from Advocate South Suburban Hospital’s therapy department. “Improper alignment and poor posture leads to many common complaints such as neck and lower back pain,” he says. “Alignment issues, not just traumatic injury, is a very common cause of spinal disc injuries as well.” Poor posture can also affect a person’s breathing, Faelnar says. “Without proper posture—shoulders back, chin down, chest out—it can be hard to draw deep breaths because of constriction caused by slumping forward,” he says. “This forward tilt, caused by poor posture, can negatively affect balance, leading to injury-causing stumbles and falls.” Those who work desk jobs are especially susceptible to poor posture, Bogordos says. “If you’re in a forward position, your head is forward and there’s a lot of extra stress and strain on your muscles,” she says. “If you then do something that is physical or you turn the wrong way, your muscles are already weak and stressed, so it puts you at more risk for injury because your base of support isn’t there anymore.” One of the most basic, but overlooked facts about

good posture is that it helps people project an air of confidence, says Nancy Trimboli, a doctor of chiropractic at Trimboli Chiropractic in Munster and Cedar Lake. “Posture is much more than sitting up straight,” she says. “Posture is a reflection of your mood and improving your posture can change your mood.” Your posture now can also have life-long impacts. “Recent research from the journal of American Geriatric Society shows that the more forward our head is, the more health problems we will have,” Trimboli says. “Your need for assisted living can be predicted by how far forward your head is compared to your hips.” It’s never too late to have a healthy posture, however. Here are some tips to help straighten your back and improve your overall health.

shoulders back. Regularly check your posture as a recurring part of your day, Faelnar says. Every 20 minutes, reach both hands up to the ceiling and then relax your arms, Bogordos says. “When you do that, you put your spine in the proper position,” she says. Trimboli suggests keeping your shoulders over your hips and your ears over your shoulders—allowing your muscles to perform their jobs properly and stay relaxed. “This will reduce pain and stress felt in the neck and upper and lower back,” she says.

INVESTIGATE HELPFUL ACTIVITIES Yoga and pilates are low-impact exercises that focus on proper spinal alignment, body mechanics and core strength—and all help maintain proper posture, Faelnar says. “There are many different flavors of yoga and pilates, so do some research and find something that works for you,” he says. Trimboli says over the years, people tire and pick up posture habits—yet gravity never tires. “You must fight it,” she says. “Yoga, tai chi, dance, martial arts are all forms of exercise that improve not only posture, but state of mind—which in turn improves our posture,” she says. — Christine Bryant

GIVE YOURSELF A BREAK Try not to sit too much, and if you sit a lot at work or at home, get up every 30 minutes to walk around and give yourself a break, Faelnar says. Give your desk chair a break as well by using an exercise ball instead, Bogordos says. “In order for you not to fall off it, you have to sit up straight,” she says. “It helps you work on your core muscles and sit up straight.”

MAKE POSTURE CHECKS When in a chair, sit up straight and pull your

may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 13


ask the foot pain experts services Diabetic Limb Salvage Wound Care Geriatric Care Foot + Ankle Trauma Sports Injury Custom Orthotics Deformity Reconstruction - Hammertoes - Heel Pain - High Arch surgery y - Flatfoot - Bunions - Arthritis

The insTiTuTe e of

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219.736.1010 • tifars.net 14 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT PODIATRIST

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hen it comes to choosing the right podiatrist it is easy to get lost in vast amount of information. Traditional research on search engines or word-of-mouth from friends, family or referring physicians simply does not cut it. “The health of your feet are extremely important and you must seek the top quality care you deserve,” says Dr. ElSamad, DPM, FACFAS, founder of The Institute of Foot & Ankle Reconstructive Surgery. “Ask questions like is your podiatrist double certified, where did they receive their training and how long had they trained and follow these simple steps.”

FOR YOUR INFORMATION THE INSTITUTE OF FOOT & ANKLE RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY 9239 Broadway Ave, Merrillville, Ind.

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DEFINE THE GENERAL ISSUE

Whether it is heel, toe or ankle pain you can never be certain what the root cause may be. A simple ache or pain can be the precursor to a larger issue and should be addressed immediately. For diabetics, this can be the fine line between amputation and salvage; an issue Dr. ElSamad is no stranger to (Best Foot Forward 2009). “What might seem like a simple cut or sore can lead to infection and quite possibly the loss of a limb in some cases,” states ElSamad.

FIND THE RIGHT SPECIALIST FOR YOU

This is where you need to make the right informed decisions. “There is a grave difference between someone who is diabetic with foot pain and someone who is not,” says Dr. ElSamad, former Director of Diabetic Limb Salvage at St. Catherine’s and St. Mary’s Hospital. Do not just settle for whom your primary care physician referred you to. “It is okay to ask for multiple options and find the doctor who will work for you to provide the care you deserve,” emphasizes Dr. ElSamad. There are numerous websites where you can locate podiatry offices around your local area that offer convenient, friendly locations with knowledgeable doctors.

PROVIDED

Dr. ElSamad, DPM, FACFAS, founder of The Institute of Foot & Ankle Reconstructive Surgery. “The best way to find this information is through the American Board of Podiatric Surgery at ABPS. org (abfas.org effective in June) or by viewing our certifications at TIFARS.net,” says Dr. ElSamad.

INFORM YOURSELF ABOUT YOUR SPECIALIST’S’ QUALIFICATIONS The American Board of Podiatric Surgery offers three certifications: Foot Surgery, Reconstructive Rearfoot & Ankle Surgery and Foot & Ankle. The average podiatrists obtain a Foot Surgery

Certification that indicates knowledge of podiatric surgery, diagnosis of problems and surgical management of foot disease, deformities and/or trauma. “Very few podiatrists go the extra mile to seek the “upper level” certification and that is what sets us apart from the rest,” states Dr. ElSamad, former U.S. Naval orthopedic team member. Board Certified Podiatrists in Rearfoot and Ankle, such as Dr. ElSamad, have all the knowledge of a typical podiatrist but harness more in-depth training in the structures that affect the foot, ankle and leg. “We strive to be the best and provide the best service for our patients and this can only done by taking our knowledge that extra step,” Dr. ElSamad says.

TAKE ACTION!

Once you have the names and numbers and are well informed, it is now time to take action and remedy your problem. “Do not let problems go untreated! I have seen too many cases that could have been avoided if the patient put their best foot forward and sought the proper treatment,” says Dr. ElSamad. To visit a video of The Institute of Foot and Ankle Reconstructive Surgery, scan this code.

may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 15


I Orthopedicsand

INNOVATION

HOW TECHNOLOGY HELPS PATIENTS RECOVER James Murphy, a third generation orthopedic surgeon, has seen firsthand how improvements in technology impact patient care. • Murphy, an orthopedic surgeon out of East Chicago’s St. Catherine Hospital, part of the Community Healthcare System, says his father and grandfather both practiced on the southeast side of Chicago. Between his father’s era and his, there has been a lot of innovation, he says.

n the 1950s and ‘60s, orthopedic surgery meant plastering fractures and putting patients in traction with long hospital stays. The technologies available today have changed all that for the better, he says, so that even patients with complex injuries can be treated as outpatients or have minimal hospital stays. When his grandfather completed his residency, the program was one of the first orthopedic residencies in the world. He was part of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons started in 1933 at Northwestern University in Chicago. Prior to that, doctors were either general surgeons who did every type of surgery or family physicians. “We need to appreciate where we came from so was we go forward, we know that we’re part of something bigger than just our clinic or our hospitals. It’s a fellowship of orthopedic surgeons that goes back over a century,” Murphy says. “The physicians who came before us really kind of blazed the trail for what we are able to do. A lot of times we forget about that.” The most major advancement is the treatment of arthritis, he says. Growing up in the 1970s, he remembers parties where one room was filled with the older family members who would sit and have food and drinks brought to them. There was also a bucket near every home’s front door where seniors would leave their canes. “That doesn’t exist now,” Murphy says. Nowadays, senior family members are walking around, talking about their golf games and latest travels. Joint replacement has been the greatest advancement as people age. When their knees and hips become arthritic, they can have them replaced to stay active. Murphy also does ankle replacements, a surgery not many doctors are trained to do. It is an area that is a little underserved, he says. The pain causes sufferers to limit activity in the workplace and recreationally and eventually affects their ability to walk at all. “It really is a life altering thing where now we can get people active and engaged.” Arthroscopic surgery has also done a lot to change the way doctors treat patients. They are able to make smaller incisions and


use a camera the size of a pencil to see the joint in question. Through a second incision they use instruments to correct whatever problems exist. “Recovery is such night and day difference,” he says, leaving doctors to abandon many of the older protocols. He compares the shifts in technology to personal computers. “The one you bought five years would never get to market now, the same has happened in arthroscopic surgery.” Some parts of practicing medicine are constant, Murphy says, no matter the generation. “The main denominator is to have the compassion and care to take the time for patients. They all come to you with a problem and they are looking to you to not only treat the problem but to educate them on the problem so that together you can navigate it and get through it. I’m sure it was rewarding then and it’s very rewarding now.” Gregory McComis, orthopedic surgeon at North Pointe Orthopaedics in Munster, says the anterior total hip replacement is a huge advancement in orthopedic medicine. “A traditional total hip, which was done for the past 50 years, was done through incision in your buttocks or backside of your hip,” he says. It was more painful and required more rehab. Patients were also at risk for dislocating their hips after surgery. The anterior hip procedure uses a smaller incision in the groin to remove the ball of the hip joint and replace it with one made of metal and plastic. Doctors do not cut through as many muscles, making it minimally invasive. Patients can get up and walk on day of surgery and go to normal activities in four to six weeks. The muscle sparing means patients will never have an issue with muscle weakness or chance for hip dislocation. “This can’t be duplicated in any

other way,” he says. William Biehl, orthopedic surgeon out of St. Anthony Health in Michigan City, uses technology while doing knee replacements. His technique involves having patients get an MRI scan of their knee. A model is then constructed of the knee for which Biehl can “make special jigs that are specific to the patient’s knee.” When he puts those jigs on the knee during surgery, it helps him make better cuts. Other surgeons utilize computer navigated surgery when making cuts. Biehl also says availability of vitamins is an important change for orthopedics. Over the last five years, over-the-counter vitamin D3

calcium with 800 iu of vitamin d3. Glinda Tufts, of Crown Point, had both knees replaced six weeks apart in 2009 at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. She had tried steroid injections for the osteoarthritis in her knees but it continued to get worse. She was most worried about pain and discomfort following surgery but says it went much better than she thought. Anyone considering the surgery should go the minimally invasive route, she says, and avoid methods that open the whole knee. She was home within 48 hours after the first knee replacement and within 24 hours after the second. The first week post-surgery, she had in-home care but by the second

We’re still getting the same thing done, with the same objective. The techniques have changed so they have to throw all their preconceptions out the window as far as how long the surgery is going to take, how quickly they get home, how quickly they will recover. Dr. Dwight Tyndall, Spine surgeon tablets have become available and they are fairly inexpensive. Although Midwesterners may think they get enough vitamin D, they must have direct sunlight over 80 percent of their body to activate it, something unlikely to happen during the winter months. “Once it becomes warmer in spring and summer, more people get active and then I see a lot of kids with stress fractures or growth plate injuries. I think a lot of this is due to our vitamin d metabolism around here.” Biehl recommends taking the suggested amounts of calcium with vitamin d3, which for most adults will be 1200 mg

week, she was driving to physical therapy. Before you can leave the hospital, you have to be complete certain tasks, she says. “Within 24 hours of having a knee replaced you can climb a flight of stairs. It’s pretty amazing what they can do now.” Dwight Tyndall, a spine surgeon based in Munster, says that outpatient spine surgery offers many advantages for patients. “When I first came in practice, the way I was trained, if a patient was having any type of spine procedure, they would be in the hospital three to five days,” he says. “Now we’ve

gotten to the point, at least in my practice, where they are going home the same or next day.” With smaller incisions, new techniques and tools, patients can recover faster and can get back to their life sooner, he says. Blood transfusions and large amounts of pain medications are also no longer needed. “As one of the leaders to move us in that direction, it has been very exciting to see those developments,” he says. Patients don’t want to be in the hospital for multiple days and these advancements mean they no longer have to. Work related injuries and age related changes are among the top reasons for spine surgery, he says, with patients ranging from their 20s to 70s. Even his young patients often have preconceived or fairly negative ideas about spine surgery and Tyndall educates them about how much has changed. “We’re still getting the same thing done, with the same objective. The techniques have changed so they have to throw all their preconceptions out the window as far as how long the surgery is going to take, how quickly they get home, how quickly they will recover,” he says. “The beautiful thing about that is I’ve been able to move my surgeries from hospital based procedures to a surgery center based procedure.” Moving the procedures to outpatient buildings is more cost effective and efficient. Outpatient surgery centers have been used in plastic surgery and sports medicine for some time but the use of them for spine surgery is a fairly recent development. “It’s the wave of the future since we’re so preoccupied with costs and outcomes. I definitely think it’s the way we’re going to go,” Tyndall says. “I think it will be beneficial for the entire health care system and especially for our patients.” — Jennifer Pallay

may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 17


PROVIDE RELIEF

New innovations in healthcare

for many issues

Using innovative techniques gained from observing surgical procedures has led to the development of new treatments that are less invasive and often can be done in the doctor’s office delivering faster, more efficient and less expensive patient care says Sreek Cherukuri, MD, a Board-certified Otolaryngologist at CarePointe in Munster.

“We

have a really wonderful new procedure for sinusitis sufferers,” says Cherukuri about the inflammation or swelling of the tissue lining the sinuses which causes headache, halitosis, fatigue, discolored post-nasal discharge as well as dental and facial pain and results in more than 18 million office visits and nearly 30 million prescriptions being written a year. “In the past, if medication didn’t work, even with multiple courses and stronger antibiotics and the patient was still experiencing pain, it could lead to an operation which required a stay in the hospital and loss of time at work. Called functional endoscopic sinus surgery, this surgical procedure involves removing bone and tissue to enlarge the sinus opening and often resulted in post-operative pain, bleeding and scarring. Now, Cherukuri and his partner are performing minimally invasive Balloon Sinuplasty, a new technology used to open the sinuses to allow drainage, relieving the blockage and pressure. DR. CHERUKURI “It’s like angioplasty,” says Cherukuri, comparing the procedure to the one used to open narrow or blocked coronary arteries. “Before Balloon Sinuplasty it often took those with chronic sinusitis who had an operation a week or so to recover. Now it can be done in the ENT’s office. It’s a 30 minute procedure that significantly lowers major symptoms.” There are other new innovations which are making a difference in patients’ lives. Gastroparesis, a debilitating stomach disorder, occurs when the stomach doesn’t empty normally causing extreme nausea and vomiting. “In most people, when they eat, the stomach contracts and pushes the food into the small intestine,” says Harsh L. Dalal, MD,

18 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

a gastroenterologist affiliated with Methodist Hospitals. “When that doesn’t happen, the initial approach to treating gastroparesis is to suggest that patients eat six small meals a day so there’s less food in the stomach.” “We now have gastric pacemakers for those who don’t respond to medication,” says Dalal about a relatively new procedure called Medtronic Enterra Therapy. “We put the pacemaker in the muscle and then it stimulates the muscle to help food pass through more efficiently. Once the pacemaker is in the patient, their doctor can adjust the stimulation in the office if that’s needed.” A surgical procedure, Medtronic Enterra Therapy has been available on the east and west coasts and in Indianapolis but Dalal says that Methodist is currently the only hospital system using it in Northwest Indiana. He also notes that most insurance companies as well as Medicare and Medicaid cover its cost. “The majority of the gastroparesis cases we see occur in patients with uncontrolled diabetes,” says Dalal noting that diabetes is on the rise due to obesity and other reasons and that could translate into increases in the number of patients with the disorder. The Ingalls Lungs for Life screening and early detection program uses low-dose spiral CT scans to find cancerous lung tumors in their early stages—when the tumor is still highly responsive to treatment. “After years of research, the task force concluded that about 20 percent of lung cancer deaths might be avoided through early detection and treatment,” says Cressa Perish, M.D., a board-certified family practice physician at Ingalls Family Care Center in Matteson. “Spiral CT can pick up tumors that are just a few millimeters in size, while chest X-rays can only detect tumors between 1 to 2 centimeters—0.4 to 0.8 inches—in size.” These CT scan screenings are comparable in their effectiveness to other preventive exams like mammography for breast cancer and colonoscopy for colorectal cancer because they discover lung cancers at an earlier stage when they’re most treatable.


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“That’s why I talk to my patients at every visit about the risks of smoking,” says Perish. “I check for risk factors and have a frank discussion about smoking cessation. My biggest goal is to convince them it’s not worthwhile to smoke. If they don’t want to quit and they meet the criteria for the scan, I tell them about this program that can catch lung cancers earlier.” The CT scans are then reviewed by cutting edge computer-aided detection software designed to detect small nodules and also are interpreted by an Ingalls board-certified radiologist. For those who scans show an abnormality, Ingalls immediately notifies both the participant and their primary care doctor as well as recommends a consultation with a specialist regarding further evaluation. “The good news is that the five-year survival rate for individuals diagnosed with early lung cancer is 70 percent,” says Perish. “Even more encouraging, recent studies have shown that the 10-year survival rate for early-stage lung cancer is 92 percent. The key to surviving lung cancer is early detection and treatment. Spiral CT scanning is helping to make that possible.” Nutrition and activity are the two of the most vital parts of fighting osteoporosis says Kristy Darnell, RN, MSN, FNP, of the Methodist Hospital Spine Center in Merrillville, adding After years of giving up smoking and managing research, the task that your weight are other important force concluded factors as well. that about 20 The Spine Center offers free dietary consultations and an osteoporosis percent of lung class as well as free screenings at cancer deaths doctors’ offices and the hospital. might be avoided It’s wonderfully preventative and through early necessary with at least 44 million Americans affected by osteoporosis or detection and low bone density and with an aging treatment. population, the number of Americans with osteoporosis expected to increase Cressa Perish, M.D. significantly, up to one-half of all women and up to one quarter of all men are likely to suffer fragility fractures in their lifetimes. “We encourage people to get a baseline and see where their levels are at,” says Darnell. “So that when they get their annual check-ups, they can ask their doctors to check levels of Vitamin D and calcium.” Darnell also notes that Methodist offers the newest DEXA (Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry) scans along with FRAX (Fracture Risk Assessment Tool), a prediction tool for assessing an individual’s risk of fracture. “Another thing Methodist does that’s different is using the National Osteoporosis Foundation’s data base called Own the Bone,” continues Darnell about a system aimed at better identifying, evaluating and treating patients suffering from an osteoporosis or low bone densityrelated fragility fracture--broken bones that result from a fall from standing height or less. “We follow out patients closely and use the best technology and research available to ensure the best standards for treating osteoporosis.” — Jane Ammeson

Come Visit Our Distinguished Physicians and Practices Obsterical and Gynecological Associates, Inc. Cheryl Short, M.D. Crystal Strickland, M.D. L. Jennifier Murphy, M.D.

Porter Physician Group Derek Gasper, D.O.

Associated Pediatricians, LLC

Valparaiso Internal Medicine Surya Nallari, M.D.

Midwest Fertility Center Amos Madanes, M.D. Porter Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine Douglas Mazurek, M.D. James Anthony, M.D. Urology Associates of NWI, PC Weil Foot and Ankle Institute

Dynamic Rehabilitation Services Porter Glendale Laboratory

Franciscan Medical Specialists Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Michael Spence, M.D. American Joint Preservation Institute Gregory Markarian, M.D. Psychiatry & Psychology Robert Reff, M.D. , FAPA John Stutesman, PsyD

1101 EAST GLENDALE BLVD. • VALPARAISO, IN

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Genetic testing OFFERS A

variety of possibilities Homewood resident Maureen Carlson had already decided to have a preventative double mastectomy when she opted to get genetic testing. Because Carlson, who turns 60 this year, had fibrocystic breast disease and had already had a biopsy, and because her mother had a mastectomy and her sister had breast cancer, she had decided to undergo the surgery to vastly reduce her risk of getting breast cancer herself. But she was uncertain whether she should have her ovaries removed—an oophorectomy—so she and her doctors decided she should have the BRAC analysis to see if she had a gene that would predispose her to ovarian cancer. She did not, so she decided to keep her ovaries. In April 2013, she underwent her double-mastectomy knowing she had made the choice that was right for her. “I thought, ‘Right now, I’m in pretty good health, have an excellent support system, and good health insurance. Why wouldn’t I do it now,’” Carlson says. “Now I can live another 20 or 30 years

20 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

without worrying.” Dr. Alex Starr, an oncologist and hematologist and chairman of the Breast Health Program at Ingalls Memorial Hospital, says about 10 percent of cancer has a familial component to it, and of those, 25 percent are due to a gene mutation in either BRCA1 or BRCA2. Testing is recommended for people with a strong family history, those who are part of Jewish ethnic groups or women who develop cancer at a young age. Testing for colon cancer is also possible, and recommended for those with a strong family history. If the colon cancer gene is detected, doctors can know to do colonoscopies much earlier or do other preventive measures, Dr. Starr says. The tests used to be confined to a university setting, but are becoming more and more readily available. Those who test positive are counseled about what their

next steps of treatment would be, he says. “The purpose of the test isn’t just to identify the gene, but also to talk to their families about it, because that gene is inherited,” he says. “It can be a lot of information to take in.” While testing for breast cancer and ovarian cancer might be what has been trending with the media lately, genetic testing has a wide range of applications, says Dr. Janice Zunich, director of the Genetics Center at Indiana University School of Medicine — Northwest. Dr. Zunich also consults with hospitals all across the region on genetics issues. Genetic testing can be used to screen embryos for disease before implantation and screening fetuses in pregnant women. It can also be used to diagnose

young children with anything from Down Syndrome to autism, or diagnose a host of other diseases. It can also be used to predict the likelihood of develop certain diseases, which is helpful not only for the patient but also for family members who might also have a predisposition for the disease, Dr. Zunich says. In the case of in vitro fertilization, embryos can be analyzed before they are implanted to screen for a variety of diseases. This is typically done when parents are at risk for the disease themselves or if there is advanced maternal age. “If the parents are both carriers and if the parent already had a child with Tay-Sachs disease, for example, you can analyze embryos and implant those that are not affected,” she says. “It gives the couple a greater chance of having a healthy child. You don’t want to find these things during a pregnancy.”


During pregnancy there are several types of genetic tests available in the first and second trimesters to screen for a variety of diseases and disorders. After birth, screenings are done for a wide range of issues, including sickle cell anemia. Testing all children who are born for those diseases tested for newborn screening is more costeffective than having one child slip through undetected with an identifiable condition, she says. If a child is born with dismorphic features, or if Down Syndrome is suspected, chromosome analysis can be used to confirm a doctor’s suspicions. Or if a child is suspected to have autism or developmental delays

as they age, a chromosomal microarray could be used to study fragments of chromosomes to help narrow down a diagnosis, Dr. Zunich says. There are also genetic tests that can test for diagnosing things including Huntington disease, cystic fibrosis and a host of other conditions, she says. While genetic conditions only account for a small percentage of illnesses and health issues, testing for them can be a valuable tool. “Testing can confirm a suspected diagnosis, help make a diagnosis and assess potential risk,” Dr. Zunich says. “We have incredible tools at our fingertips that can evaluate individuals and families.” ­— Carrie Rodovich

orthopaedic specialists

of Northwest Indiana

Direct Anterior Hip Replacement Although most minimally invasive hip techniques involve a single incision that can be as small as 3-4 inches, the benefits of the Direct Anterior approach other than small incision include: ♦ Slightly lower risk of post-operative blood clots, possibly because there is less twisting of the leg during surgery. ♦ Patients lie on their back during surgery rather than their side. This makes it easier for the anesthesiologist to monitor the patient during surgery. ♦ Lying on your back (supine), during surgery also makes it easier for the surgeon to measure and match leg lengths.This means there’s a smaller chance of needing a shoe lift after surgery. ♦ Finally, some patients are walking without a limp or cane in as little as 2 weeks because the “walking muscles” were not directly affected during surgery.

ARTHRITIS UPDATE: ADVANCES IN JOINT REPLACEMENT

♦ Residency/Training: Univ. of Chicago ♦ Diplomate of the American Board of Orthopedic Surgeons (ABOS) ♦ Member American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS)

For more information about Direct Anterior Hip Replacement Surgery, I can be contacted at:

Joseph Hecht, M.D

Orthopaedic Specialists of Northwest Indiana 730-45th Street, Munster, IN 46321

Phone 219-924-3300 • Fax (219) 922-5424 www.josephhechtmd.com may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 21


footwear FANCY

E

veryone knows that high heels can be the ultimate sacrifice on the altar of “beauty is pain”. But is it true? While high heels may be very bad for your feet, ankles and hips, they may actually be beneficial for some who suffer from back pain. According to Dr. Nitin Khanna of Spine Care Specialists, high heels can relieve a bit of pain in the lower back region. “High heels, in many patients, can make them feel better and can accentuate the curvature of the spine (sway back),” he says. “It can make discogenic back pain feel a little bit better, and with certain types of anatomy it can even be beneficial.” But don’t run to the nearest shoe store just yet. While high heels can relieve back pain, they can cause pain in other areas that should not be ignored. Dr. Khanna says that though the back may be feeling better, depending on the individual’s anatomy, high heels can place an unusual load on the hips that may be felt after long-term wear. According to Dr. Michael Nirenberg, podiatrist with Friendly Foot Care in Crown Point, regular high heel-wearers will first notice pain in their

22 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

High heels can have surprising effects

feet which can spread to other areas of the body. “When we walk we want the weight balanced between the front and heel of foot,” says Nirenberg. “When you take that heel away, you’re more likely to get deformities, bunions and pinched nerves, stress fractures and pain in the ball of your foot.” High heels put more pressure on the ball of the foot, which also causes toes to be pushed together into a smaller space. “People who wear heels long term will have their heels contract into ‘hammer toes,’” says Nirenberg. A narrowed toe box, such as can be found on high heels with pointed toes, can cause this condition. Nirenberg sees high heels as an occasional decadent treat. “High heels now and then are OK; I look at it like a dieter having a bowl of ice cream once in a while. “If you’re wearing high heels every day you’re probably heading for some foot problems.” Nirenberg advises his patients to look for a flat shoe, unless some specific type of support is needed. “Generally a shoe that’s flat is not going to hurt your foot, however if you need support for a flat foot or other issue, it will not provide that support for you. But for someone with a healthy

foot without problems and you wear a shoe without support you’re not going to hurt your foot,” Nirenberg says. “It may get tired a little sooner, but it’s generally safe.” According to Nirenberg, studies show that up to 88 percent of women will knowingly wear a shoe that is too small, which can result in pain and injury. “Pain is a sign that something is wrong,” Nirenberg says. “If you have to take the shoes off after a couple of hours, or if they hurt, you probably shouldn’t be wearing those shoes.” But it’s not just women. Khanna says that those on their feet for long hours, particularly industrial workers, should pay attention to footwear as well. “A hard sole shoe without good cushioning, with repetitive wear and tear can accelerate degenerative disk disease in the lower back,” he says. Khanna advises that avoiding pain and keeping your orthopedic system healthy takes more than just choosing the right shoes. “The things we have control over—smoking, daily exercise, weight, core strength—if you can check all those boxes, they will give themselves a better chance of avoiding back, knee or ankle issue,” he says. — Kathleen Dorsey


CANCER RESEARCH

Breast gene link to high-risk uterine cancer Women with a faulty breast cancer gene might face a greater chance of rare but deadly uterine tumors despite having their ovaries removed to lower their main cancer risks, doctors reported at a conference last month.

A

study of nearly 300 women with bad BRCA1 genes found four cases of aggressive uterine cancers years after they had preventive surgery to remove their ovaries. That rate is 26 times greater than expected. “One can happen. Two all of a sudden raises eyebrows,” and four is highly suspicious, according to the physician who did the study, Dr. Noah Kauff of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. His study, reported at a cancer conference in March in Florida, is the first to make this link. Although it’s not enough evidence to change practice now, doctors say women with these gene mutations should be told of the results and consider having their uterus removed along with their ovaries. “It’s important for women to have that information ... but I think it’s too early

to strongly recommend to patients that they undergo a hysterectomy” until more research confirms the finding, says Dr. Karen Lu, a specialist in women’s cancers at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. She plans to study similar patients at her own hospital, the nation’s largest cancer center, to see if they, too, have higher uterine cancer risks. About 1 in 400 women in the U.S., and more of eastern European descent, have faulty BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes that greatly raise their risks for breast and ovarian cancer. Doctors advise them to be screened early and often for breast cancer, and to have their ovaries out as soon as they have finished having children to help prevent ovarian and breast cancer, because ovarian hormones affect breast cancer as well. But the role of BRCA genes in uterine cancer isn’t known, as Kauff says. His study looked at 1,200 women diagnosed with BRCA gene mutations since 1995 at Sloan Kettering. Doctors were able to track 525 of them for many years after they had surgery that removed their ovaries but left the uterus intact. The vast majority of uterine cancers are low-risk types usually cured with surgery alone. Aggressive forms account for only 10 to 15 percent of cases but more than half of uterine cancer deaths.

Melissa Hennings helps her daughter, Aubree, climb a rope ladder while playing in the backyard of their Sioux City home. Hennings found out she carries the BRCA1 genetic mutation. Researchers were alarmed to see four of these cases among the 296 women with BRCA1 mutations. None were seen in women with BRCA2 mutations. Last year, the actress Angelina Jolie revealed she had preventive surgery to remove both breasts because of a BRCA1 mutation. Her mother had breast cancer and died of ovarian cancer, and her maternal grandmother also had ovarian cancer. — Marilynn Marchione AP Chief Medical Writer‌ may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 23


food & fitness

Marinating

STICKS

GARY WOMAN’S INVENTION SEALS IN THE FLAVOR With five children to feed, church suppers to make, determination and a strong belief in the Lord, Mary Hunter created, with what she considers divine intervention, a new way to add flavor to meat without going through the long process of marinating. • “I’d be doing a turkey or a big roast and I’d have to get up at midnight to turn it in the marinade,” says Hunter who lives in Gary.

I

t was back in 1994 when Hunter was writing down a psalm when an easier way to marinate came to her. “The Lord said to me, Mary you take that pen and stick it in the meat,” recalls Hunter. Of course, Hunter knew the command didn’t mean using a working ink pen. Instead, the idea was to take two pen-shaped object with holes, filled with her own special blend of aromatics—celery, onions, garlic and ginger—and insert one on each side deep into the meat. “That way when the meat heats up and the juices flow through the aromatics and into whatever you’re cooking—beef, pork, chicken, turkey,” she says. Not only would her marinating sticks keep her from having to get up in the middle of the night. It also would be a way to create a healthy delicious meal without having a lot of additives or fats. That was perfect for Hunter who had both cancer and diabetes as well as a warning from her doctor to change the way she ate including cutting down her salt intake.

24 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

But Hunter loved flavor and so by designing an internal way to add taste to her foods she was also following doctor’s orders. “It is healthier,” says Hunter, “but I wasn’t doing it for the health, I was doing it for the tang.” Still says her youngest son, Dwayne Hunter, “everything needs to be fresh, that’s when it works best.” Whatever her reason, bringing her idea to fruition took some doing. And that’s where the perseverance or should we say plain old doggedness came to play. Hunter enrolled in business classes and after that, to get a prototype made—the first step in getting a patent. And if all that sounds a little overwhelming for a mother with five children and no background in business or engineering, it certainly didn’t stop Hunter. With recommendations from her teacher, she convinced David Smith, a concept designer who also had worked as a professor at University of Illinois at Chicago, to design the prototype. He worked and worked at it wanting to give up several times despite much previous success in bringing concepts to market for major companies but Hunter convinced him that he was chosen by God to help her. Success came but sporadically. She initially got a contract to sell Mary’s Marinating Sticks at Jewel Food Stores and also signed up congregation members of Yes Lord church where Dwayne Hunter is pastor to become sales representatives. “We want to help people get off of assistance,” says Reverend Hunter who is also, along with David Smith, his mom’s business partner. “We feel that the Lord will open this up so we can help the people of Gary.” Another step towards success was when Dwayne Hunter


Mary Hunter of Gary is the inventor of the marinating stick. PHOTOS BY TONY V. MARTIN

got her into the International Home and Housewares Show at McCormick Place which led to a contact with Luck Dog Filmworks, a company working with the Food Networks on the show Invention Hunters, a concept where hosts Steve Greenberg and Patrick Raymond search for the best kitchen gadgets in the country. Hunter’s son knew his mother would win and so she did, taking home first prize. Other breaks started coming fast. The New York Times came calling and did a story and included information about how testing indicated that meat infused with Hunter’s aromatics has a better taste. Lifetime Brands in 2012 offered a contract to sell her sticks in chefs’ catalogues and at Target. And she has a Website, marinatingstick.com, for people who want to buy her invention online. “If you could taste my mother’s cooking you would cry, it’s so good,” says Reverend Hunter. He, as well as his two sisters (one now deceased), learned to cook from an early age with their mother. “Dwayne, being the youngest, was home more when growing up,” says his mother before bestowing her most glowing accolade, “he’s a great cook.” Indeed cooking is so important to the family that Hunter, now 75, can’t quit giving advice. “Now the sticks are for the inside,” she says. “You still have to seal your meat. For ham, I like to use fresh pineapple, brown sugar and cinnamon. For meat I like to use a seasoned blend that includes my aromatics.” Hunter is happy with her success but what she most wants to do is share the gift of cooking and the gift of the idea given to her to do good for others. “God gave me this,” she says. “So I want to share it with others.” — Jane Ammeson

Community Care Network

James Murphy, MD From sports injuries to hip replacements, Dr. Murphy has a passion to meeting the healthcare needs of his patients. Board-certified in orthopedics, he focuses on latest advanced treatments to keep his patients well and active. He specializes in: • Achilles Reconstruction • ACL Injury/Surgery • ACL Reconstruction • Ankle Trauma • Arthroplasty • Arthroscopic Surgery/ Procedure • Aspirate • Cartilage Restoration • Cubital Tunnel Syndrome • Debridements • Ankle Replacement • Endoscopic

• Endoscopic Surgery • Foot and Ankle Surgery • Joint Injections • Joint Preserving Surgery • Joint Replacement • Knee Deformity • Knee Replacement • Knee Surgery • Ligament Injury/Repair • Minimally Invasive Surgery • Sports Medicine

Dr. Murphy is now accepting new patients. Please call for an appointment (219) 392-7664.

may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 25


senior scope

HOW TO PREVENT

bones BROKEN

They’re one of the most feared events for an older adult: falls that cause fractures. A broken bone can mean surgery, hospitalization, and certainly pain, but there are ways to lessen the odds of them ever happening.

A

t the top of the list for three area health professionals is exercise. “Of all the treatments for osteoporosis, the one thing that has been shown to help is weight training, 20 minutes a day,” says Dr. Gregory McComis at North Point Orthopaedics in Dyer and Munster, Ind. Dr. Nancy Trimboli at Trimboli Chiropractic in Munster, Ind., says weight lifting and muscle strengthening exercises can be done several ways. “You can do a class where you’re on the floor and it’s set to music. Tai chi and yoga are excellent for muscle strength and weight bearing exercises.” Dr. Kristine Teodori, gerontologist and staff physician at Franciscan St. Anthony Health-Crown Point, says walking is great exercise. “Ideally if you are capable you can walk in your

26 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

McComis

Trimboli

Teodori

own neighborhood, with wrist band weights.” If walking is limited, “You can perform exercises in a chair with leg lifts and hand weights.” Trimboli says diet plays a big role in bone strength. She suggests doubling the amount of fruits and green, leafy vegetables you consume, by adding greens to pastas and spinach in smoothies, for example. Avoid too much sugar and carbonated drinks like pop, Trimboli cautions: The phosphoric acid in soda pop weakens bones by removing mineral from them. And, according to nutritional research, “Acid-blocking drugs like Nexium, Prilosec, and the like inhibit the stomach from absorbing calcium from your food.”


Super supplements “The most important part in the treatment of osteoporosis is never getting it,” says Teodori. “Prevention is huge.” Do vitamins help? “Calcium and vitamin D are very important in preventing fractures and osteoporosis,” says Teodori. McComis says, “For women over 60 and men over 50, it should be 600 milligrams of calcium twice a day and 5,000 milligrams of Vitamin D per week for every woman. If a bone density test indicates a woman has osteoporosis, she should have 50,000 milligrams per week.” While health professionals’ recommended amounts of a vitamin or mineral may vary somewhat, Trimboli says tricalcium phosphate is the best calcium supplement because it’s absorbed better, though calcium citrate is a good second best. She advises purchasing it at a health food store or from a health professional. And “Vitamin D3 is the most digestible; the only way to know how much you personally need each day is through a blood test.” Teodori recommends vitamin D3 to maintain a Vitamin D level greater than 40. McComis recommends a bone density test for all women at age 50. Teodori screens all her geriatric patients every two years. McComis cautions, “Other vitamins don’t help (bone strength) at all, and the stuff advertised for cartilage and such, doesn’t do anything.” But green tea—just green tea in a tea bag—is good for bones, says Trimboli. All agree that while hormone

replacement therapy can help strengthen bones, “Most women have stopped taking estrogen replacement hormones because the risk for breast and ovarian cancers outweighs any benefit,” says McComis. Trimboli says an alternative can be bio-identical hormones. One thing to keep out of the body is cigarette smoke. “Smoking tends to cause more rapid bone loss and lower bone mass,” says Trimboli.

North Point Orthopaedics North Point Orthopaedics focuses on General Orthopaedics, Spine Care, Acute Trauma, Fractures and Sports Medicine with two locations to provide the best possible care.

Munster - 801 MacArthur Blvd. Suite 304 Munster, IN 46321 • 219-836-1060 Dyer - 15900 West 101st Avenue Dyer, IN 46311 • 219-836-1060 Gregory P. McComis, M.D.

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Preventing falls The three most common fractures for the elderly are spine, hip. and wrist, says McComis. Balance exercises can help keep seniors steady on their feet. Trimboli says it can be as simple as standing on one foot, then progressing to standing on two feet with eyes closed. Next, an exercise ball or mini trampoline. Simple preventative measures are crucial, says McComis: • Get rid of anything that might cause a slip or trip, like throw rugs and extension cords. • Put rubber mats in the bathroom and non-slip grids in the bathtub. • Have handicap rail bars at the toilet area and the bathtub. • For patients with diabetic neuropathy, daily examination of the bottoms of feet for ulcers is essential “Those can contribute to a fall or the loss of a foot or leg. Proper shoe wear is also important for those patients.” • A lot of seniors get spine fractures because they don’t lift properly. Women especially need to be careful of heavy lifting. — Julie Dean Kessler

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may/june 2014 | GET HEALTHY | 27


ask the expert JOSEPH HECHT, M.D.

New trends allow for faster recovery times

Q: What does an orthopedic specialist do? In the broadest terms, an orthopedic surgeon takes care of diseases of the musculoskeletal system. That encompasses everything from the spine, extremities and joints, including hips, knees, hands and feet. A general orthopedist covers everything from traumatic injuries to arthritis. I, myself, focus on things including hip and knee replacement but take care of most any problem considered general orthopedics. Q: Is there a difference in injuries people sustain when they’re younger or older? Older people tend to come in with problems such as joints wearing out, or thinning of the skeleton, osteoporosis, which can lead to fractures. Young people tend to have traumatic injuries, such as slipping and falling and twisting an ankle and breaking it. Sports injuries in young people vary based on the sport. Football injuries have a different set of problems than a marathon runner or someone who works out with weights. 28 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

the injury is. Thirty years ago, a wrist break would be put in a cast that would go above the elbow and it would be held into position for six weeks. Now, surgeries can restore alignment of the wrist, and therapy can begin much sooner. That’s true of shoulder and knee tendon and ligament tears and other significant trauma, as well.

Q: How has treatment and

technology changed over the last few decades? Techniques in surgery have moved towards making smaller incisions. Ruptured, torn tendons and other injuries that would have been invasive surgeries in the 1980s or 1990s are can now be fixed much more easily. Even the materials we use have changed. Stainless steel is still popular, but we also use titanium plates, which are lighter and more flexible, depending on where

Q: How has hip and knee replacement changed over the last few decades? Techniques have made quite a few advancements in the last decade. There are smaller incisions, newer ceramics, metals and plastics with the trend toward shorter hospitalizations. These practices are gaining more acceptance as time goes along. One hip replacement technique that is gaining acceptance is to perform the hip surgery from an anterior interval (commonly called the direct anterior approach). The advantage of that is you go between the muscle planes rather than cutting through muscles to access the hip joint. This technique can be more difficult

TONY V. MARTIN

Orthopedic Specialists of Northwest Indiana (OSNI) has been operating in Northwest Indiana for more than 17 years. Dr. Joseph Hecht, OSNI’s senior partner, specializes in arthritis-related conditions and treatments, with an emphasis on knee and hip reconstructions. He completed his residency at the University of Chicago Hospitals.

and requires additional training and experience, but specialized traction tables have been developed to facilitate the procedure. This causes less limping and within a month, patients are doing much better, much more quickly. Knee replacements are also making improvements. There are techniques to make smaller incisions and have less blood loss. Custom cutting blocks that are made from pre-surgical measurement planning techniques have become readily available. There are many ways to do hip and knee replacement surgeries, and new techniques are gaining popularity when they lead to faster patient recoveries. Is there a best technique that will hold up over the long term? There is no unequivocal proof or what we call level one evidence yet, but consistently good outcomes are always dependent on the skill and experience of the surgeon. — Carrie Rodovich FOR MORE INFORMATION

Dr. Hecht can be reached by calling his Munster office at 219.924.3300.

Get Healthy May/June 2014  
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