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JAMAICA

2012

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE JAMAICA HOTEL & TOURIST ASSOCIATION


   

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10 MINISTER'S LETTER

Welcome

I am delighted to extend a warm welcome to you, our valued visitors, to our island home of Jamaica. Many of you may have already experienced the unique flavor of our island and have come once again to taste of its bounty. For some this may be your first excursion into the medley of flavors Jamaica has to explore. Whichever you may be, we are elated you have chosen to experience the variety and versatility of destination Jamaica, and are confident your visitor experience will meet your every expectation. As you prepare to visit the various attractions, of which we have the finest and the largest number in the Caribbean, permit me to share with you my own favourite way of enjoying my Jamaica. Capture each moment, each experience, as you would a picture, while you are introduced to our culture, food, history, architecture and our people. Then carefully stitch each picture together, reflecting on our national motto, “Out of Many, One People.” You will invariably find yourself inextricably tied together with us, creating a unique flavor that you can only taste again while vacationing in Jamaica. As Minister of Tourism I am particularly pleased to have you experience the world class service from our exceptional cadre of hospitality workers who pour their hearts into shaping these unforgettable memories and experiences for you. I am sure it is memories such as these that are the basis on which our visitors give such exceptional feedback. Such winning feedback contributes annually to Jamaica’s firm position as a world-class destination, delivering tourism service excellence. As we strive to maintain a tourism product that will continue to deliver on its promise, it must be said that ours is a business of partnerships. The various tourism stakeholder groups represented in the hoteliers, attractions, shopping experiences, tours and ground transportation, to name but a few, are all integral to the final product delivery. While in Jamaica I would encourage you to indulge fully in what is to offer in our Jamaica, and in that moment you will know why we say, “Once you go, you know.” Thank you for making it Jamaica.

Hon. Edmund C. Bartlett M.P. Minister of Tourism


12 JHTA LETTER

Welcome

As the Jamaica Hotel and Tourist Association celebrates 50 years of service to Jamaica, we thank you for having given us the opportunity of sharing our island with you throughout these five decades. Together we embark upon the next 50 years, confident that one of our island’s most attractive attributes will continue to be the diversity of experiences it offers you! We remain committed to further increasing and improving these experiences in each and every facet of your vacation. It’s no secret that Jamaica has it all — in one fabulous destination — and we know you will find a part of our Jamaica to claim as your very own. Our Jamaica offers you a range of accommodations, from luxury villas and large internationally acclaimed hotels, to quaint and cozy cottages; a wide variety of shopping experiences; and attractions for lovers of nature, history, culture and adventure alike. Our six resort areas, differing in style and tempo, welcome you, as do all communities across Jamaica. We encourage you to explore, taste our cuisine and immerse yourself in our culture. We know that as you enjoy our Jamaica you will encounter the warmth and vibrancy of our people whose indomitable spirit and legendary hospitality have made us a world-class destination. We are delighted that you chose Jamaica. Enjoy your stay and come back soon!

Evelyn Smith President, JHTA


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1. Cheryl Blackerby Cheryl Blackerby is a journalist based in Florida whose stories have appeared in The Miami Herald, The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Toronto Globe and Mail, Atlanta Journal-Constitution and other newspapers. She has written and photographed for travel books, including Fodor's Bahamas 2011, Destination Jamaica, Destination Belize, and was editor of Montego Bay Guide, Negril Guide and Kingston Guide. As travel editor at The Palm Beach Post, her assignments included stories in Africa, the Middle East, Europe and Asia. Among the awards she has received is the 2006 Marcia Vickery-Wallace Award for excellence in travel journalism, presented by the Jamaica Tourist Board. 2. Patricia Borns Patricia Borns writes regularly about culture, food, travel and yachting for The Boston Globe, as well as other U.S. dailies and national and international magazines. She also consults for publicists, executives and local governments seeking thought leadership in their fields. Her work has received awards in genres from fiction to video documentary, and her expertise includes land use and historic preservation, the American South where she was born, and Colonial history. Patricia keeps an old Mitsubishi on Barbados, and considers being called "a true Caribbean" her greatest compliment. She is a member of American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA), Society of American Travel Writers (SATW) and Boating Writers International (BWI). 3. Melanie Reffes Melanie Reffes is a travel journalist based in Montreal, Canada; however, she is often in sunnier climes. She is the Caribbean editor for the travel trade publication JaxFax, and her Caribbean reports have been published in The Miami Herald and Canadian Traveller, among other outlets. She co-wrote the 2011 AOL Travel Guide to Kingston and authored both the Sherman's Travel Guide to Jamaica and the Northstar Jamaica guide for travel agents. Melanie is the humble recipient of several Caribbean Tourism Organization writer awards and was the Jamaica Tourist Board Writer of the Year in 2009. When she's not racing through airports to catch flights to the Caribbean, you'll find her in her backyard garden growing the hottest scotch bonnet peppers this side of Montego Bay. 4. Mark Rogers Mark’s travel assignments have taken him to 51 countries. He’s well-known in travel trade circles for his coverage of the Caribbean, Hawaii, Mexico, the South Pacific and Asia, as well as California, where he is based. In 2005, Mark won back-to-back awards for his writing: the CTO Worldwide Travel Writer/Photographer Award for Best Feature Article in a Trade Publication, for his cover story on St. Lucia in Travel Agent magazine; and the Marcia Vickery-Wallace Award for excellence in travel journalism, presented by the Jamaica Tourist Board for his Hurricane Ivan coverage. 5. Chanize Thorpe Chanize Thorpe is a travel and lifestyle writer who has spent more than 15 years traveling in the Caribbean islands. Her work has appeared in publications and websites such as Caribbean Travel & Life, HotelChatter.com and a variety of in-flight magazines. She spent 10 years as a professional honeymoon writer for Brides Magazine before divorcing the subject, though sometimes she misses the bridal world and occassionally writes for Destination Weddings and Honeymoons. She also plans honeymoons as one of Jetsetter.com's Personal Travel Consultants.


A Subsidiary of The McClatchy Company One Herald Plaza, Miami, Florida 33132 Tel: 305-376-5250; Fax: 305-995-8108 OurJamaicaMagazine.com Publisher Garry Duell Jr. Chief Operations Director Giovanna Sanchez Editorial and Design Director of Editorial and Design Vanessa Molina Santamaria Editor Ken Rivadeneira Art Director Alfredo Añez Photography J. Kevin Foltz Managing Editor Rosa Calderon Associate Editors Jenny Acosta-Horta, Jorge Oliver, Desirée Vichot Creative Services Manager Taryn Wolf Graphic Designers Edwin Cruz, Jessica Becerra-Ortiz, Carlos Martin, Rodrigo Nuño Ruiz Production and Distribution Production Manager Luisa Zelaya-Morillo Distribution Manager Walter Franco Advertising Sales Sales Manager Liana Guilarte Rodriguez Sales Administration Manager Fabiana Jerez Walters Sales Representatives Kingston: Elena Lynch Tel: 876-469-3123 E-mail: experiencejamaica@gmail.com Negril: Daryl Bernstein Tel: 305-798-8933 E-mail: darylbern@aol.com Ocho Rios, Montego Bay: Ned Wong Tel: 876-990-8528 E-mail: nedricklloyd@yahoo.com Marketing Online Services Susan Boley Accounting Director of Finance Thomas Bardon Accounting Supervisor Cecilia Roca Administrative Manager / Publisher's Assistant Jeanie Schoonmaker Our Jamaica is a publication of the Jamaica Hotel and Tourist Association (JHTA). 2 Ardenne Road, Kingston 10, Jamaica 876-920-3482, 926-3635 - 6 / 2796, Fax: 876-929-1054 info@jhta.org Copyright ©2011 by HCP/Aboard Publishing All rights reserved. Reproduction by permission only. Cover photo ©Cris Haigh/Alamy


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What’s Inside 74 32 Welcome to Jamaica 34 Steeped in History From pirates to sugarcane to independence

42 Explore the Island Six regions, each with a unique avor

44 Sample Itinerary 46 Kingston 66 Port Antonio 74 Ocho Rios 92 Falmouth 96 Montego Bay

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132 112 Negril 126 South Coast 132 Adrenaline Rush Exciting activities and sports in Jamaica

140 All-Natural Rejuvenation Indulge in treatments full of island-grown ingredients

146 Tropical Nuptials Couples can choose from a variety of unforgettable options

152 Beach Bummin’ Take a tour of Jamaica’s many picturesque shores

158 Art and Soul The spirit of Jamaica captured in the artistry of its people

164 Calendar of Events Find out what events are happening now

166 Useful Information Transportation, tipping, taxes and much more

170 Map of Jamaica 172 JHTA Members

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Discover Jamaica’s Shining Stars

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Few destinations offer the spectacular service and stunning surroundings of IBEROSTAR. Gracing one of Jamaica’s most breathtaking shores, IBEROSTAR Rose Hall Beach & Spa Complex offers the best in gourmet dining, spacious rooms and a range of activities to please every interest. Whether you’re seeking a luxurious, romantic getaway in an adults-only setting at IBEROSTAR Grand Hotel Rose Hall, or looking to please every member of the family at IBEROSTAR Rose Hall Suites or IBEROSTAR Rose Hall Beach, you’ll enjoy the all-inclusive vacation of your dreams. Sparkling pools, stunning beaches, challenging golf and a relaxing spa, it’s all here and waiting to treat you like the star you are.

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Try an island getaway on for size. With daily flights to your favorite destinations throughout the Caribbean, it’s easier than ever to get into your comfort zone. To book your getaway, visit AA.com.

AmericanAirlines and AA.com are marks of American Airlines, Inc. oneworld is a mark of the oneworld Alliance, LLC. © 2011 American Airlines, Inc. All rights reserved.


Jamaica © Superstock

WELCOME TO

OURJAMAICAMAGAZINE.COM 31


From shore to shore, experience the beauty and uniqueness of Jamaica. Our rich traditions, exquisite food and soulful art meld into a feast for the senses you’ll cherish long after you’ve returned home — and will draw you back again and again.

OURJAMAICAMAGAZINE.COM 33


© Gary Gerovac

34 HISTORY


STEEPED IN HISTORY

For centuries, people from all walks of life have sought refuge in Jamaica. This prevailing theme follows the island of Jamaica throughout its post- Columbian history, and that characteristic remains to this day as millions of tourists flock to the nation’s plentiful resorts and hotels to find a blissful escape from their everyday lives. Jamaica welcomes visitors from the four corners of the globe with not only pristine beaches and world-class vacations, but also with rich historical sites that offer a glimpse into a magnificent past. BY KEN RIVADENEIRA

OURJAMAICAMAGAZINE.COM 35


36 HISTORY

Under the English, Jamaica prospered thanks in part to a proclamation that gave land to every British free citizen who settled on the island.

Before the Europeans arrived in the Americas, the Taino tribe inhabited Jamaica. These were the peaceful natives who greeted Christopher Columbus when he set foot on the island on May 5, 1594, during his second voyage to the New World. They called the island “Xaymaca” in their Arawak language, meaning “Land of Wood and Water.” Although Columbus claimed the island in the name of Spain, it would be more than 16 years before the Spanish returned and settled in what is now St. Ann’s Bay. The settlement of New Seville floundered for a number of years, but eventually it was abandoned in favor of another town in the southern portion of the island, Villa de la Vega. In 1655, the English, led by William Penn (of Pennsylvania fame) and Robert Venables, conquered Jamaica and renamed the city Spanish Town. The Spanish were unsuccessful in their attempts to regain control of the island; in a final attempt, they released their slaves in hopes of using them as a force to challenge the English. Though these freed slaves, known as Maroons, retreated into the mountains to create their own communities, they continued to resist the English and any attempts at colonization, occasionally raiding plantations. The Maroons’ adaptability to the island’s harsh, impenetrable interior offered them refuge from the slave system and allowed their recondite communities to prosper. Under the English, Jamaica prospered thanks in part to a proclamation that gave land to every British free citizen who settled on the island. This incentive led to an influx of settlers. Jamaica’s centric position in the Caribbean Sea also made it a popular stomping ground for privateers, who ransacked passing Spanish merchant ships and galleons headed to their colonies on the mainland. The town of Port Royal, near Spanish Town, quickly became one of the most

prosperous — and “wickedest” — places in the New World, as it harbored many pirates such as Henry Morgan, John Davis and Edward Mansveldt, who brought riches and trade. The city’s reputation as a haven for criminals and prostitutes led to comparisons with Sodom. In 1692, the town ironically met an end of Biblical proportions when a devastating earthquake sank much of it. Because of Port Royal’s shallow foundations on sandy ground, the city was literally swallowed by the earth, and the ensuing tsunami dragged it into the sea. Those who did not perish in those events then succumbed to disease resulting from the decomposing corpses that remained. Today, reminders of this earthquake can still be seen in places such as the famous Giddy House, which remains perpetually half-eaten by the earth, and much of the town lies wellpreserved underwater. After the destruction of Port Royal, the capital of Jamaica moved back to Spanish Town and later Kingston, as earthquake survivors sought to resettle. The fate of Port Royal effectively brought an end to Jamaica’s favorable relationship with piracy, as many saw it as a divine punishment, and succeeding governors adopted a more intolerant stance. In the 18th century, several infamous pirates were actually imprisoned or executed here, including the well-known Calico Jack Rackham, Charles Vane, Anne Bonny and Mary Read. With the death of piracy as an acceptable revenue stream, Jamaica turned to sugarcane production. The fertile savannas and valleys provided an excellent environment for sugarcane plantations. This, in turn, led to a hike in the trade of slaves from West Africa, as a labor force was needed for the cultivation of crops. At its peak, Jamaica produced 22 percent of the world’s supply of sugarcane. However, the particularly cruel slave system


OURJAMAICAMAGAZINE.COM 37


38 HISTORY

With the death of piracy as an acceptable revenue stream, Jamaica turned to sugarcane.

on the island led to many slave uprisings. In addition, runaway slaves sought help from Maroons, who aided in the rebellions against the British planters. More than a century of skirmishes and two Maroon wars, in addition to the anti-slavery movement in Europe, led to the abolition of slavery on Jamaica in 1834. An ineffective apprenticeship system was created, but it, too, ended just a few years later, and full emancipation was enacted in 1838. The end of the slave system, naturally, caused a decline in sugarcane production. Other crops were introduced to diversify the economy of the island, and labor was

imported from China and India. Society in Jamaica also took on a transformation, as social classes that once had no political clout began to rise, leading to social reforms. By the mid-20th century, Jamaica was well on its way toward claiming independence from the British crown, which it ďŹ nally received on Aug. 6, 1962. Since then, the country has grown commercially and politically into one of the leading nations in the Caribbean region. And with a well-established tourism infrastructure, it continues to be one of the world’s leading destinations for fun, sun and relaxation. A true refuge.


© SuperStock

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© vario images GmbH & Co.KG/Alamy

40 HISTORY

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50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

amaica’s multicultural history is best summarized in the national motto: “Out of many, one people.” Bringing together Amerindian, Spanish, British, West African, Chinese and Indian influences, among many others to a lesser degree, Jamaica is a welcoming cultural melting pot. This credo became a reality on Aug. 6, 1962, when the country finally became independent from the United Kingdom following centuries of British rule. This year marks the 50th anniversary of this momentous occasion, when this diverse island nation adopted a new constitution that not only acknowledged its people's varied backgrounds but their potential as leaders. Despite the abolition of slavery in 1832, the majority of Jamaica's population remained subjugated to wealthy landowners and received little to no educational advantages. It took more than 100 years to gain universal adult suffrage — which came to pass in 1944. This and other factors led to a rapid progression toward an independent Jamaica. After a stint as part of the ill-fated Federation of the West Indies, Jamaicans voted for independence. The cry for self-government resonated throughout the island in unabashed joy when this was achieved in 1962.

With independence came a new flag — one of the most identifiable national emblems in the world today. The ubiquitous green, black and gold can be seen throughout the planet thanks in part to the many successes of Jamaican athletes in international competitions. But beyond those achievements, Jamaicans' influence reaches far and wide, with many populations of islanders having established communities in the United States, Canada, England, Central America and many other countries. “The sun shineth, the land is green and the people are strong and creative." That's the symbolism behind the colors of the flag, and this is evidenced in Jamaicans' influence in the world stage. Having remained part of the Commonwealth of Nations, Jamaica has had the opportunity to expand and grow at its own pace. This year marks 50 years of that progress — and if there's one thing Jamaicans can do well, it's celebrate their pride. As you enjoy the serene beaches of the island and the unique blend of cultures that have given birth to food, art, music and lifestyles only found in this corner of the earth, keep in mind the many celebrations taking place all year long. You're welcome to join!


Half Moon


EXPLORE THE ISLAND The six main regions of the island — Kingston, Port Antonio, Ocho Rios, Montego Bay, Negril and the South Coast — offer riveting, relaxing and romantic options for every traveler.

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Coyaba Resort Jamaica

44 ITINERARY

There’s so much to see in Jamaica! Whether you’re here on a short visit or an extended stay, don’t

miss out on all the offerings that this island has in store for you. Here’s an idea of how you can explore our island.


SuperClubs

Cinnamon Hill Golf Course

Three-day Itinerary from Kingston Day 1. Visit the museums including the National Gallery and stroll through the lovely Hope Gardens. Explore the fishing village of Port Royal including Fort Charles, and follow up with a seafood lunch at Morgan’s Harbour Hotel, which offers a fantastic view of Kingston’s harbor. Spend at least some of the afternoon visiting historic Devon House, where you can shop and get ice cream. Don’t miss Kingston’s duty-free stores. Day 2. Leave early for a spectacular drive through the Blue Mountains to Port Antonio. Take a raft trip on the Rio Grande, stroll through scenic Port Antonio, and have lunch at Norma’s at the Marina — or enjoy jerk chicken grilled over fire pits at beautiful Frenchman’s Cove Beach. Stay the night in one of the area’s charming inns. Day 3. Take a quick hike on a lush mountain trail, or take a boat ride to the Blue Hole for a refreshing swim and snorkeling. Stop by Boston Jerk Centre for lunch before driving back to Kingston. Keep your camera ready for photo opportunities as the views are heavenly. Five-day Itinerary from Montego Bay Day 1. Explore the Hip Strip of downtown and relax at Doctors Cave Beach. Save time for a round of golf — there are five famous courses here. Have dinner at one of the town’s excellent restaurants. Day 2. Drive to historic Falmouth for a walking tour of the town. Take a raft trip on the Martha Brae River, and end the day nearby with an evening boat ride at Glistening Waters — where you’ll see a rare light show of phosphorescent microbes, which glow when the water is disturbed. Day 3. Save your energy for the exhilarating climb up Dunn’s River Falls in Ocho Rios. Ride a bobsled down a mountain at Mystic Mountain. Visit Noël Coward’s home, Firefly. Ride a horse at Prospect Plantation; take a catamaran sunset cruise; and have dinner at one of Ocho Rios’ fine restaurants before driving back to Montego Bay. Day 4. Take a full-day excursion to Negril to swim at the 7-mile-long beach, with a late-afternoon stop at on of the many restaurants and bars along the famed cliffs of the West End. Day 5. Shop at Montego Bay’s many duty-free stores, go to a beach or play golf. Relax! It’s your vacation.

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Š Axiom Photographic/Masterfile

46 KINGSTON


KINGSTON

Kingston is a city like no other. The city’s calendar is packed with some of the biggest events in the Caribbean, like wine and seafood festivals, fashion shows and much more. Visitors can find plenty of duty-free shopping and impressive art galleries, as well as countless sightseeing opportunities throughout the city and its surroundings. You can lie on a beach in beautiful Lime Cay or by a pool at a boutique inn. Then enjoy a lunch of spicy jerk chicken and a couple of bottles of Ting, Jamaica’s grapefruit soda. And once you’ve had your fill of sun and relaxation, you can take to the country’s most exciting nightclubs when the sun goes down. BY CHERYL BLACKERBY

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David Cumming

48 KINGSTON

Established by the government on the Hope Estate in 1873, this is the largest garden in the West Indies.

Take time to explore the 300 years of history at forts, museums, churches and historic buildings. Everything is “irie,” as they say in Jamaica — a perfect day. Sightseeing Even though Kingston is one of the busiest capitals in the Caribbean, there is more to be done here than just business. Plenty of sightseeing opportunities await, starting in the center of town. Make sure to visit the Parade, which is the city’s main square. Its name derives from its former use as parade grounds of the Colonial Militia and for public hangings and floggings. Here you’ll see

the recently restored Ward Theatre, the country’s largest and best-known arts theater; the historic Coke Methodist Church on the east side of the square; and crowded Coronation Market, the largest market on the island, where vendors offer everything from spicy Jamaican meat patties to bunches of refreshing guineps (grape-sized fruit), handmade baskets, music CDs and beachwear. On the south side of the Parade is the Kingston Parish Church, where graves date to 1699. Not too far away is the Devon House, offering visitors a glimpse of the city’s genteel past. Dating back to 1881, this mansion was built at the


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The Place To Stay in Kingston

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w w w. s p a n i s h c o u r t h o t e l . c o m 1 St. Lucia Avenue, Kingston 5, Jamaica 876 926 0000

corner of Trafalgar Road and Hope Road by Jamaica’s first black millionaire, George Stiebel. You’ll see fine ancient furnishings inside the home and also tour the 11-acre grounds and gardens. Afterward, enjoy a lunch or dinner in one of two restaurants there, or browse at a dozen shops located in the estate’s former stables and carriage house. You’ll also have your fill of natural splendor at Hope Botanical Gardens and Zoo. Established by the government on the Hope Estate in 1873, this is the largest garden in the West Indies, covering 200 green acres. Take a picnic lunch and sit on a bench in the shade to best enjoy the peaceful paths and sweeping lawns. There are gardens within the garden, among them a cacti garden; the bougainvillea walk with explosions of red, burgundy and pink; sunken gardens; lily ponds; an aviary; and orchid greenhouses. Most of the plants and trees, particularly the mango and spice species, originally came from a captured French ship on its way from Mauritius to Hispaniola in 1782. Also around here is the No. 1 destination for any reggae lover, the Bob Marley Museum. This is superstar Bob Marley’s former house and studio, with a life-sized statue of the singer playing his guitar in the courtyard. The museum tour offers an intimate look at Marley’s life, including displays of his personal belongings, like his favorite denim shirt that he wore at concerts, his star-shaped guitar still propped by his bed, and his gold and platinum records. For visual arts, the National Gallery of Jamaica is the place to go. Art lovers should plan to spend at least a half-day at this excellent art museum, the island’s oldest and largest public art gallery. The works of world-famous


52 KINGSTON

Jamaican artists are on display, such as Carl Abrahams, Cecil Baugh, John Dunkley, Edna Manley, Mallica “Kapo” Reynolds, Barrington Watson and many others. Guided tours are available, as well as lectures, discussions and children’s art programs. The African Caribbean Institute of Jamaica, which offers artifacts, audiovisual displays, cultural events and dance performances, is also in the gallery complex. Another bastion of culture is the Institute of Jamaica, the country’s oldest museum. Built in 1879, it houses The National Library of Jamaica with Jamaican newspapers, books, maps and photographs

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going back 200 years; The Natural History Museum; a herbarium; and a science library with more than 10,000 publications, including a collection of 18th-century science journals. Beyond the city Don’t miss the wonderful places near Kingston, where much of the island’s history and natural beauty thrives. Some 16 miles north of the city, beside the Wag Water River, are the Castleton Botanical Gardens. The first plants, 400 specimens, were brought from England’s Kew Gardens in 1862. Today it features more than 1,000 species, among them

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Plan to visit Fort Charles, built in 1660 by the British and the only one of six forts that still stood after the earthquake.

the descendants of 180 species of palms planted in 1897. You can also arrange an exciting tour to see the production of the famous Blue Mountain Coffee. Since 1737, coffee has been grown at elevations between 2,000 and 3,500 feet on the steep, misty slopes. The beans make one of the most flavorful and famous coffees in the world: Blue Mountain Coffee. One of the country’s most popular tours is the trip along twisting mountain roads 10 miles north of Kingston to the small town of Mavis Bank and the Mavis Bank Coffee Factory, Jamaica’s largest Blue Mountain Coffee facility. After witnessing the production

process, you can sample the freshly brewed coffee and even buy some of this “black gold” to take home. You may also wish to visit the narrow peninsula that protects one side of Kingston Harbor — you would never believe the quiet fishing village at the tip, Port Royal, was once one of the richest towns in the world. Headquarters for such infamous pirates as Sir Henry Morgan, Calico Jack and Blackbeard Teach, Port Royal exploded with life and wealth in the 17th century. In 1692, about two-thirds of the city was swallowed by the sea in an earthquake. The surrounding waters are rich with


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Not too far away is the Devon House, offering visitors a glimpse of the city’s genteel past.

artifacts, many of which are stored in the 18th-century, two-story British Naval Hospital. The impressive hospital building is closed to visitors, but you should plan to visit Fort Charles, built in 1660 by the British and the only one of six forts that still stood after the earthquake. Don’t miss the Maritime Museum in the courtyard or the Giddy House, an artillery store next to the fort that is now half-sunk into ground because of another earthquake in 1907. The largest marina in Kingston is on the peninsula near Port Royal at Morgan’s Harbour Hotel and Marina.

The popular waterfront restaurant and bar is lively on weekends. Boats run from the marina on 15-minute trips to Lime Cay, which has one of the most beautiful beaches in Jamaica. Spanish Town About 13 miles west of Kingston is Spanish Town — one of the oldest continuously occupied places in the Western Hemisphere. Dating back to 1534, the town was founded as Villa de la Vega by the Spanish. Later, the English captured it and renamed it Spanish Town. Under the English, it served as the


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58 KINGSTON

This is superstar Bob Marley’s former house and studio, with a life-sized statue of the singer.

capital of Jamaica from 1662 to 1872. Today, it’s the island’s third largest town and its illustrious past definitely makes it worth of a day-trip from Kingston. Start your exploration at the town square. On the west side are the ruins of the Old King’s House, the residence of Jamaica’s British governors until 1872. Visitors to the once-elegant Georgian house, built of stones dug from the Hope River, included Capt. Bligh, Lord Horatio Nelson, Adm. George Rodney and Simon Bolivar. The declaration of the abolition of slavery in the British West Indies was read from the steps of its portico.

On the east side of the square is the stately two-story, red-brick House of Assembly. On the north side is the grand Rodney Memorial, built in honor of Admiral Sir George Brydges Rodney, who saved the island from a French invasion in 1782. Three blocks from the square is the St. Jago de la Vega Cathedral, a grand mix of Romanesque and Gothic architecture, which is the oldest Anglican cathedral in the Commonwealth outside the U.K. After exploring Spanish Town, it’s worthwhile to visit the Arawak Museum and Village, just three miles away in White Marl.


Shopping Duty-free stores dot the city of Kingston, with countless bargains on name-brand fashions, perfumes, jewelry, electronics and more. Visitors should head to the stores on Dominica Drive, the Sovereign Center and Treasure House Plaza on Hope Road, and the plazas along Constant Spring Road, where they can find plenty of bling at 20 to 30 percent lower prices than the U.S. and Europe. New Kingston Shopping Centre on Dominica Drive has a nice range of stores and merchandise. Intrepid shoppers who want inexpensive crafts and merchandise in an exuberantly Jamaican atmosphere can head to the Jubilee Market on the west end of the Parade and the Coronation Market. You would be wise to go with a guide or with a group, and keep an eye on your belongings. For a more relaxed shopping experience, visit the Crafts Market by the docks, where dozens of stalls in an old iron building offer batiks, straw hats and other crafts. And if you love Jamaican music, don’t miss the record stores on Orange Street in downtown Kingston. Dining Whether you want gourmet dining on the terrace of a historic great house, lobster at a waterfront café or steak at a downtown bistro, you’ll find it in Kingston. This is the premier dining destination in Jamaica, with world-class restaurants offering international fare.

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60 KINGSTON


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KINGSTON Trattoria Baci Restaurant Italian Wyndham Kingston Hotel 77 Knutsford Blvd.; 926-5430-7

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The Restaurant at Spanish Court International 1 St. Lucia Ave.; 926-0000

Traditional Jamaican foods are plentiful at high-end restaurants as well as outdoor barbecues. Enjoy traditional spicy jerk chicken and pork flavored with fiery scotch bonnet peppers; rice and peas; hot escovitch fish; festival dumplings; cassava bammies; fresh fish like snapper, wahoo and grouper; delicious rock lobster; and curried goat — all washed down with Red Stripe beer or a cold cocktail made with Jamaican rum. Jamaica’s versions of fast food are tasty patties, which are pastrywrapped spicy vegetables and meat. You’ll never go hungry while visiting Kingston. Nightlife True to its position as capital city, Kingston has an enviable nightlife, with plenty of bars, clubs, lounges and even outdoor venues to keep the party going all night long.

Some of the most sumptuous hot spots are in the city’s hotels in New Kingston. Numerous upscale nightclubs have overflow crowds downtown on Knutsford Boulevard, where patrons dress like they’re going to the Grammys. Others flock to dance bars on Dominica Drive and Constant Spring Road. Many upscale restaurants turn into nightclubs that usually start up around midnight. Live entertainment is presented at big outdoor venues such as Mas Camp, an outdoor arena on Oxford Road in New Kingston; Backyaad on Constant Spring Road; Jam World, which has hosted international performers such as Sting; and the Ranny Williams Cultural Centre, an arena on Hope Road that can seat 2,000 people. Check the city’s calendar of events for more information.

The Melting Pot Restaurant & Lounge International Knutsford Court Hotel 16 Chelsea Avenue; 929-1000/3407 Hotel Four Seasons Kingston Jamaican 18 Ruthven Road; 926-0682/8805 Gazebo Bar and Restaurant International Golden Shore Resort Ltd. Lot 288b Windward Drive; 962-9657 Alexander’s Jamaican / International Courtleigh Hotel 85 Knutsford Blvd.; 968-6339 The Venetian Room Caribbean Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel 17 Waterloo Road; 926-2211-3 Cocoro Restaurant Japanese Mayfair Hotel 40 West Kings House Close; 926-1610 Strawberry Hill Jamaican / International Irish Town, Blue Mountains above Kingston; 944-8400

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

Don’t miss all the exciting events happening in Kingston. For more details and dates, check visitjamaica.com. January Carnival in Jamaica/ Bacchanal Jamaica Mas Camp and Road March Launch Diplomatic Week February Reggae Month Spa Week Misty Bliss Festival March Port Royal Annual Seafood Festival Excellence in Music Entertainment (EME) Awards 10th Annual Fun in the Sun Festival Royal Jamaica Yacht Club Spring Tournament Jamaica Orchid Society Show April Bacchanal Carnival Climax Jamaica Oaks Kingston Pon Di River Literary Arts and Music Festival

May Jamaica International Invitational Athletic Meet Jamaica Observer Food Awards Style Week International Lotto Classics June Caribbean Fashion Jamaica Derby All Jamaica Grill Off 2012 Kingston On The Edge Urban Art Festival July International Reggae Day St. Ledger Day Bar Week Miss Jamaica Universe 2012 Jamaica Festival Queen Coronations National Dance Theatre Company (NDTC) Season Of Dance August Mello-Go-Roun’ 50th Anniversary of Independence Port Royal Music Festival

September Fashion’s Night Out Miss Jamaica World Beauty Pageant / Grand Coronation Caribbean Model Search Heart Foundation Wine And Food Festival Cable & Wireless Golf Academy October Stir It Up Film & Music Expo Jamaica Observer Teen Choice Awards Merritone Family Reunion Heritagefest November Kingston Restaurant Week JGA/UWI Golf Classic Jamaica Open & Pro Am December Kumba Mi Yabba Christmas Shopping Village Christmas Fest Harbour Fest And Fireworks On The Waterfront


Avis Rent-A-Car 1 Merrick Ave., Kingston 10, Jamaica, W.I. 876-924-8248-9 / 800-744-0006; Fax: 876929-4998; md@avis.com.jm; Mgr. Dir.: Michael DaCosta; Dir.: Joan Chin Bijoux Jewellers Ocho Rios: Tajmahal Shopping Centre, 9745446; Island Village, 675-8755; Montego Bay: Shoppes at Rose Hall, 953-9530; Sangster International Airport, 952-6718; Kingston: Dominica Drive, New Kingston, 926-4788. Exclusive dealers for Breitling, Hublot and Michele watches. Also Raymond Weil, Michael Kors, Fossil, DKNY, Armani and Kenneth Cole watches. Designer jewelry from Pandora, Roberto Coin and Judith Ripka. Diamond, tanzanite, emerald, ruby and sapphire jewelry. Lladro porcelain, Swarovski and Waterford crystal. Duty- and tax-free prices.

Bob Marley Museum 56 Hope Road 876-927-9152. Take an hour-long guided tour of the home of the late reggae superstar composer and singer. Memorabilia documents his work. Includes theater, garden, exhibit hall, shop and restaurant. Mon.-Sat., 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. US$20 adult, $10 children ages 4-12. Budget Rent-A-Car / Int’l Rental 53 South Camp Road, Kingston 4, Jamaica, W.I. 876-759-1793; Fax: 876-759-1826; budget@ jamweb.net; budgetjamaica.com; CEO: Richard Stewart; Gen. Mgr.: Diana Stewart. Island Car Rentals Kingston & Montego Bay, Jamaica W.I. Reservations Centre: 876-929-5875; Fax 876-9296987; islandcarrentals.com. Dir. Operations & Reservations: Dulcie Moody. Over 800 vehicles.

Jamaica Air Shuttle Tinson Pen Aerodrome Marcus Garvey Drive Kingston 11, Jamaica 876-923-0371 -3 reservations@jamaicaairshuttle.com jamaicaairshuttle.com Jamaica Air Shuttle is an airline operating scheduled services between Kingston’s Tinson Pen Aerodrome and Sangster International Airport in Montego Bay.The airline also offers international services to Port-au-Prince in Haiti and Santiago de Cuba in Cuba. Spanish Court Hotel 1 St. Lucia Ave. 876-926-0000 info@spanishcourthotel.com spanishcourthotel.com Spanish Court Hotel is located in Kingston,

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64 KINGSTON the “heartbeat” of Jamaica. This is a modern and chic hotel that is the home of The Restaurant at Spanish Court, The Café, The Sky Terrace and The Zen Spa. Swiss Stores Kingston The Mall Plaza 20 Constant Spring Road 876-926-4861 open Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m. SwissStoresJamaica.com Swiss Stores Ltd.: Time-honored tradition of excellence and dedication since 1935. Exclusive Rolex and Tudor dealer for more than 75 years. Swiss Stores Ltd. is also the agent for Victorinox Swiss Army, Citizen, Alfex, Thomas Sabo, Tirisi, IsabelleFa, Rochet and Caran d’Ache and Cross. The Courtleigh Hotel and Suites 85 Knutsford Blvd., New Kingston 876-929-9000

sales@courtleigh.com courtleigh.com The only address you will ever need to make the right impression in Kingston. The Courtleigh Hotel and Suites offers discerning guests unparalleled personalized service with deluxe rooms, suites and our ultra-luxurious Penthouse floor. The Knutsford Court Hotel 16 Chelsea Ave., New Kingston 876-929-1000 sales@knutsfordcourt.com www.knutsfordcourt.com The Knutsford Court Hotel offers the best of both worlds, whether you’re traveling for business or leisure. You’ll find a selection of standard, superior, junior suites, onebedroom suites and townhouses in a lush garden courtyard.

JHTA Hotel / Resort Members Altamont Court Hotel 1-3 Altamont Terrace Kingston 5 876-929-4497/8 / 876-929-5931 Christar Villas Limited 99A Hope Road Kingston 6 876-978-3933 / 7864 / 8066-71 The Courtleigh Hotel & Suites 85 Knutsford Blvd. Kingston 5 876-929-9000 Golden Shore Resort Limited Lot 288B Windward Drive Lyssons, St. Thomas 876-982-9657 / 734-0923 / 4 Gore Villas 22 Trafalgar Road, Suite 11 & 15 Kingston 5 876-978-1520 / 2 Hotel Four Seasons 18 Ruthven Road Kingston 10 876-926-0682 / 8805 Jamaica Pegasus Hotel 81 Knutsford Blvd. Kingston 5 876-926-3690/9 / 926-3100/8 Kircamp Properties / The Gardens 23 Liguanea Ave. Kingston 10 876-927-8275


Knutsford Court Hotel 16 Chelsea Ave. Kingston 10 876-929-1000 / 3407 Liguanea Club 80 Knutsford Blvd. Kingston 5 876-926-8144 Mayfair Hotel 4 West Kings House Close 876-926-1610 / 2 Medallion Hall Hotel 53 Hope Road Kingston 6

The Knutsford Court Hotel

Kingston 10

876-927-5721 / 5866 Shirley Retreat Hotel 7 Maeven Ave. Kingston 10 876-927-9208 / 946-2679-81 Spanish Court Hotel 1 St. Lucia Ave. Kingston 5 876-926-0000 Strawberry Hill Hotel & Spa Liguanea Kingston 6 876-944-8400 Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel 17 Waterloo Road Kingston 10 876-926-2211 Wyndham Kingston, Jamaica 77 Knutsford Blvd. Kingston 5 876-926-5430 / 7

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66 PORT ANTONIO


PORT ANTONIO When Errol Flynn, a swashbuckling actor and playboy, was literally blown into Port Antonio on his disabled yacht by a

hurricane in 1946, he declared, “Port Antonio is more beautiful than any woman I have ever seen.” Located in Portland parish, this area of Jamaica sprawls along the foothills of the John Crow Mountains and the misty Blue Mountains. It is a land of rugged rainforests, tumbling waterfalls and secluded white-sand coves — the perfect under-the-radar tropical paradise that has been a haven for the rich and famous for more than half a century. BY CHERYL BLACKERBY

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A land for adventurers through and through, this parish has a lot of magnificent natural beauty.

Celebrities come here to enjoy beaches off the paparazzi track. Keith Richards, Gwen Stefani, India.Arie, Common and Lily Allen recorded and stayed at Geejam Studio and its villas near San San Bay. Film star Sharon Stone celebrated her 50th birthday here. Denzel Washington stayed in a seaside villa while filming The Mighty Quinn, shot entirely in Port Antonio. Luciano Pavarotti famously stood on his balcony and burst into song at Trident Castle, a fanciful villa with storybook towers and turrets. Visitors to Port Antonio are colorful and varied, but one thing is certain: No one comes to Port Antonio by accident. If you don’t arrive by yacht, you’ll need to drive the twisting mountain roads from Kingston over the Blue Mountains on a hang-on-to-yourseat three-hour ride. A land for adventurers, this parish has a lot of magnificent natural beauty. In fact, since Portland parish gets more rain than the rest of the island, the area is particularly verdant and lush.

You can hike muddy mountain trails through orchids and ferns, raft down the swift Rio Grande, and explore the Georgian and Victorian buildings of Port Antonio, or “Porti,” as it is fondly known. Wedged between the mountains and lovely twin harbors, Port Antonio is a bustling coastal town and home to the world-class Errol Flynn Marina, which attracts yachts and small cruise ships. However, you won't find gargantuan all-inclusive resorts here. Port Antonio thrives on its seclusion and offers visitors eco-inns surrounded by jungle, seaside cottages and glamorous villas. You'll find a smattering of gourmet restaurants to please the most refined palates, but, true to its adventurous nature, Port Antonio is the perfect spot for sampling uncomplicated, rich local food. After all, this is the birthplace of jerk cooking — so don't miss the delicious jerk pork and chicken sold by the beach.


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Sightseeing One of the best things to do in Port Antonio is to take a stroll downtown and around the two harbors. Start at Market Square at the center of town and check out the variety of fruits, straw work and local fashion at Musgrave Market on West Street. Continue walking east and you will see the Victorian Clock Tower facing the two-story red-brick Courthouse, a Georgian building with ornate iron verandas. Also across from the Courthouse is the Port Mall, formerly called the Village of St. George, a two-story shopping complex with a variety of small shops. Across the street is the entrance to the Errol Flynn Marina. Built in 2006, the beautiful marina stretches alongside the southern side of the West Harbour and houses the Cruise Ship Pier, the Marine Police, Coast Guard stations and the customs office. A wooden promenade runs along the beach, A

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and you can walk the manicured grounds, look at the yachts, eat at an upscale beachside restaurant and go for a swim at the white-sand beach. You can also hire a water taxi for the short ride to Navy Island, and explore the beaches and trails. The island was used by the British Navy in the 1700s to repair its ships, and is today owned by the Port Authority. From the marina entrance, turn left on Fort George Street and walk up the hill of Titchfield Peninsula, which separates Port Antonio’s twin harbors. You still can see some Victorian buildings, including DeMontevin Hotel. At the tip of the peninsula, you will see Fort George, constructed in 1729, and Titchfield High School, founded in 1785. Heading back to town you will find the Methodist Church, built 175 years ago by Dutch naval officers, and the red-brick Portland Parish Church, built between 1837 and 1840. The Portland Library is the best place to get information about the area — its K

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PORT ANTONIO Mille Fleurs European / Caribbean In the Hotel Mocking Bird Hill, North Coast Highway; 876-993-7267

staff is extremely helpful. From there you can continue along the harbor, past the cricket oval to the ruins of Folly Estate, a 60-room mansion built in 1901 by American millionaire Alfred Mitchell. Near Folly Estate is the red-and-white-striped Folly Point Lighthouse, which has beamed light over the shoreline of the East Harbour since 1885. Beyond Port Antonio, you can explore the area’s natural beauty, beginning with its many dramatic waterfalls. A hike high into the mountains yields the more remote falls, where you can swim in jade pools surrounded by rainforests. Several ecotour companies at downtown Port Antonio and hotels can arrange hikes to waterfalls. Reach Falls (also spelled Reich), near Manchioneal east of Port Antonio, is the most exciting, with the Drivers River tumbling down limestone terraces in a series of falls and refreshing pools. The rocks are slippery so climb carefully or hire a guide to show you the best way. It’s about a US$50 taxi fare round trip, which is worthwhile considering the two-mile steep walk from Manchioneal.

The Daniels River cascades over Somerset Falls, about eight miles west of Port Antonio near Hope Bay, taking you through a gorge of lush ferns, lilies and heliconias. You can take a boat across a grotto to the Hidden Fall (included in the admission fee). There’s a restaurant and jerk pit. Other waterfalls include Scatter Falls in the Rio Grande Valley, Nanny Falls near Moore Town, White River Falls in the Upper Rio Grande Valley, Fishdone Waterfalls near Buff Bay, and Kwaaman and Tacky Waterfalls near Robin’s Bay. Between the Blue and John Crow Mountains is one of the most stunning settings on the island — the Rio Grande Valley. The best way to see it is on 30-footlong bamboo rafts guided by sure-footed captains. The rafts shoot over the shallow rapids, then glide peacefully by the rainforest. The raft trips take between one to three hours depending on water levels, usually from Grant’s Level to Rafter’s Rest at St. Margaret’s Bay. During full moons, you can take evening raft trips. During the day, take a hat, sunscreen and plenty to drink

Norma’s at the Marina Jamaican / Continental At the Port Antonio Marina; 876-993-9510 Panorama Jamaican / International In the Fern Hill Club Hotel, Mile Gully Road; 876-993-7374 Restaurant at Bay View Villas International Anchovy, Williamsfield; 876-993-7759 San San Tropez Italian On San San Bay; 876-993-7213 Anna Bananas Jamaican 7 Folly Road; 876-715-6533 Woody’s Low Bridge Place Jamaican Drapers just outside Port Antonio; 876-993-7888 Frenchman’s Cove Beach Jamaican Outdoor grills on Frenchman’s Cove Beach; 876-993-7270 Boston Jerk Centre Jamaican A collection of roadside stalls in Boston, east of Port Antonio Your Place Jamaican Highway A4, Drapers. No phone

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72 PORT ANTONIO

BLACK GOLD Author Ian Fleming, who lived in Jamaica, loved Jamaican coffee. His literary hero, James Bond, declared in Live and Let Die, “Blue Mountain Coffee, the most delicious in the world." Indeed, the Blue Mountains harbor the perfect environment for cultivating premium-quality coffee. In fact, Blue Mountain Coffee is one of the world's most prized coffees because of its high demand and limited supply. Some refer to it as "black gold." Blue Mountain Coffee is exclusively made from the Arabica bean, originally from Yemen, which is more fragile to grow but is naturally sweeter and has less caffeine than the robusta bean grown in South America. This, combined with the climate and soil of the Blue Mountains, produces a smooth, flavorful coffee. The coffee industry in Jamaica began in 1723 almost by chance, and slowly it became a cash crop. By 1814, there were more than 600 coffee plantations in the Blue Mountains.

Coffee production was greatly reduced after the abolition of slavery, and by 1850 there were 186 plantations. However, the coffee industry received boosts from the government during the 20th century and was effectively revived. In 1973, the government decreed that only coffee grown in a specific region of the mountain range — only about 9,000 acres between Kingston and Port Antonio above the minimum height of 2,000 feet — and processed by four estates (Mavis Bank, Silver Hill, Moy Hall and Government Station at Wallenford) could be certified as 100 percent Blue Mountain Coffee. Other coffee would be graded as Blended Blue Mountain Coffee (minimum 20 percent Blue Mountain), High Mountain Blend or Low-Land coffee. Through these protections, Blue Mountain Coffee has become a unique Jamaican treasure. While you visit Jamaica, make sure to bring some "black gold" home with you.


Shopping As you may have gathered, small Port Antonio is not big on massive commercial centers. But you can pick up some amazing souvenirs from the local vendors in Musgrave Market, next to the town square. The best crafts, including wood carvings, are usually in the back.

For beachwear, coffee, rum, jewelry and Jamaican-made items, stop by the Port Mall. You can’t miss it, with its a mix of architectural styles such as Gothic, Tudor and Art Deco that coalesce into a one-of-akind landmark. You can also shop at upscale marine and souvenir shops at the marina, and more shops are planned. Downtown stores, particularly on Harbour Street, are worth a look if only to get a feeling of small-town Jamaica, which is always lively. Dining and Nightlife The upscale inns and eco-lodges in Port Antonio are known for their gourmet dining, and most are open to the public. Downtown, there’s a range of eateries from the excellent beachside restaurant at the marina to a handful of restaurants near the square that offer Jamaican staples such as steamed fish, peas and rice, curried goat and fried chicken. There are also a few Rastafarian “Ital” (for vI-TAL, which is vegetarian) restaurants, which offer vegetarian burgers, cabbage, yams, pumpkin soup and breadfruit. This area is also known for jerk pork and chicken, particularly at Boston hamlet near Port Antonio. A great place to enjoy jerk is Frenchman’s Cove, where you can swim at the white-sand beach, then sit in the cool shade of palm trees with a plate of jerk chicken and a Red Stripe. Plan to spend the day. Choices for nightlife are limited. Always true to its peaceful nature, Port Antonio lacks the raucous after-dark options of other areas of the island. Here, evening entertainment involves after-dinner drinks on hotel terraces or moonlight raft rides on the Rio Grande. Some smaller bars are open, offering lively music, but you'll find the true essence of Porti in its natural splendor. That's the best entertainment of all.

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— you can buy refreshments at Grant’s Level. Rafting trips are about US$60 per raft, and twice that for evening trips. Area tour companies offer quick and easy hikes, challenging hikes and overnight camping hikes, mountain biking tours and horseback riding tours. Another cool spot to explore is the Blue Hole, a 180-foot-deep lagoon fed by a cold spring that rushes up through the warm seawater. This gorgeous cove ringed by lush green hills has been a popular setting for movies like Cocktail and Club Paradise. If you love hiking, don't miss the tallest point in Jamaica, the 7,402-foot Blue Mountain Peak. Here you'll take in the breadth of the Blue Mountains, enveloped in a blue haze and topped with drifting clouds. Many hikers take the seven-mile trail, a four-hour trek that winds to the top. Some even go at night with flashlights so they can see the sun come up over the island. From this bird’s-eye vantage point on a clear day you can see Kingston, Port Antonio and sometimes Cuba. The popular hike starts at Whitfield Hall coffee estate, about six miles north of the village of Mavis Bank. But there are many trails in the Blue Mountains, and the huge Blue Mountain-John Crow Mountain National Park, ranging from short trails to overnight camping. The views are gorgeous, and you will walk past coffee fields and through lush tropical foliage. Hiking trips should be taken with guides and tour companies.

JHTA Hotel / Resort Members Bay View Villas Anchovy, Williamsfield Port Antonio, Portland 876-993-3118 Fern Hill Club Hotel Port Antonio, Portland 876-993-7374 / 7531-3 Geejam Outpost Ltd. San San, Port Antonio, Portland 876-933-7000 Goblin Hill Villas Port Antonio, Portland 876-993-7443 / 5737 / 7549 Hotel Mocking Bird Hill Port Antonio, Portland 876-993-7267 / 7134

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OCHO RIOS Columbus arrived in Jamaica in 1494, landing a few miles

west of what is now Ocho Rios at St. Ann’s Bay. Since that time, there has never been any dispute that the northeast coast of Jamaica is one of the most beautiful spots in the hemisphere. Because of the lush vegetation in the area, Ocho Rios has a mystique that’s unique in the Caribbean. This area is commonly referred to as the “garden center of Jamaica.” And it’s this beautiful setting that has attracted the majority of visitors who come to the island. BY CHERYL BLACKERBY

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76 OCHO RIOS natural wonder. The 600-foot waterfall attracts tens of thousands of visitors each year. Hollywood has been drawn to it, too, as the falls and its lagoons have been used in films like Dr. No and Cocktail. Geologists call the falls a living phenomenon because they continuously rejuvenate themselves by drawing mineral deposits from the river. The swift cascades flow directly into the Caribbean Sea, a rarity among the world’s waterfalls, most of which do not empty into seas and oceans. The best way to reach the top safely is with the help of an experienced guide, and there are many ready and willing to usher you along for a modest fee. For more splashing fun, visit Dolphin Cove, one of Jamaica’s most popular tourist attractions. This haven is home to about 20 dolphins, most of them accidentally captured in the nets of fishermen and brought to the attraction

Most Jamaicans tend to call this extraordinary place that’s halfway between Montego Bay and Port Antonio by nickname: To them, it’s just “Ochi.” For anyone who’s been lucky enough to visit here just once, “Ochi” says it all. The name Ocho Rios is a misnomer — a corruption of the Spanish word for rushing water or spouts (Las Chorreras) that got twisted in translation into a reference to eight rivers that simply don’t exist. Rushing river rapids, however, most notably Dunn’s River Falls, have dazzling cascades, which certainly fit the bill as Las Chorreras.

The 600-foot waterfall attracts tens of thousands of visitors each year.

Sightseeing One of the first things on your Ocho Rios list should be Dunn’s River Falls. One of the Caribbean’s most iconic images shows tourists climbing handin-hand over slippery rocks against rushing water, making their way through the torrents toward the top of this

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If you’re looking for a thrilling adventure, look no further than Mystic Mountain.

for training. There are usually four dolphin shows each day, in addition to individual swimming sessions with dolphins. If you’re not a swimmer, Dolphin Cove also has a tropical zoo with birds, snakes and lizards. You can also take a ride on mini-boat or a glassbottomed kayak. Another area around Ochi where nature takes center stage is the Green Grotto Caves. Centuries ago, pirates and runaway slaves found sanctuary in these majestic underground labyrinths. Today, the limestone caverns draw amateur and professional spelunkers from all over the world. Tours take about 45 minutes and require wearing a hard hat. A highlight is Grotto Lake, a pool of underground water that sits eerily among the stalactites and stalagmites that were cast thousands of years ago.

An experience of a lifetime

If you’re looking for a thrilling adventure, look no further than Mystic Mountain in the Drax Hall area of Ocho Rios. Here you will experience the adrenaline rush of speeding 700 feet down the tropical rainforest on a bobsled coaster ride. There are also ziplines and chair lifts to hoist adventureseekers above the canopy. For a calmer adventure, the 100-acre attraction also features tours on walking trails through the rainforest that offer an educational look at Jamaica’s natural wonders. Top your high-octane day by lounging at the infinity pool that overlooks the lush tropical greenery. More excitement awaits with the various activities that you can take with Chukka Caribbean Adventures, such as safaris on 4x4 vehicles, ATVs, buggys and dogsleds. You can also take zipline tours

Tel: (876) 974-5335 www.dolphincovejamaica.com


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You can also take zipline tours to glide through the rainforest canopy on a cable and even go river tubing. to glide through the rainforest canopy on a cable and even go river tubing. If you’re a history buff, visit Prospect Plantation, about three miles east of Ocho Rios. This 900-acre estate was founded in 1936 and continues to operate as an agricultural property. It is an ecologically sensitive area that attracts ecotourists from around the world. The best way to view the vast plantation is to take a tour on horseback, but there are also camel safaris available for those who want something far from the ordinary. For a dose of the arts and more panoramic views of Ocho Rios, visit Firefly, the former home of famed English playwright Sir Noël Coward. Perched on a mountaintop with spectacular views of the sea and tropical greenery, this is where Coward sought a serene lifestyle with his long-time companion, Graham Payn, and hosted occasional dinner guests — like the Queen Mother and Sir Winston Churchill. True reggae lovers must make a pilgrimage to the village of Nine Mile, the birthplace and final resting place of the legendary Bob Marley. Rastafarian tour guides will usher fans into the life of Marley, tracing his childhood and adolescence — he lived here from the ages of 6 to 13 — and creative metamorphosis.


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his summer Jamaica will be proudly represented at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London at the Jamaica Village in Finsbury Park. The exciting venue will showcase the country to Londoners and the world, demonstrating the beauty, culture, refinement and joy of its people. Just in time for the 50th anniversary of Jamaica's independence, the Jamaica Village will be in London August 3–12. With Jamaica being one of the most successful teams in modern Olympics history, the venue will be a fitting site for tourists, Londoners and traveling Jamaicans to gather and celebrate with food, shows and activities that will exhibit the best Jamaica has to offer. Have you ever wondered how much impact Jamaica has on the world? Or even on you? Even before you arrived on your trip here, maybe even before you booked your flight, you were most certainly touched by Jamaican culture, which has spread far and wide, making it one of the most distinguishable Caribbean cultures. It is so important, in fact, that it is considered a brand to be protected and celebrated. Jamaica is also a place of many firsts and onlys. If we're speaking of the summer Olympics, let's just mention that Jamaica gave birth to the world's current fastest man, Usain Bolt, as well as the first British black woman to win a gold medal, Tessa Sanderson. But in addition to them, Jamaica dominates the athletics disciplines in the Olympics, especially in the sprint and relay categories. It is the only country in the Caribbean to have this kind of success at the Olympiads.

Similarly, Jamaica was the first English-speaking Caribbean country to gain its independence. Other former British colonies followed suit. Speaking of firsts, Jamaica was the first place in the Western Hemisphere outside of North America to develop a railway system. Sugar was an important crop at that time and ruled the island economy. Sugar may no longer be king, but Jamaica remains the world's largest producer of allspice, known locally as pimento. This pungent and highly sought-after spice is native to the island, and the difficulty of growing it elsewhere has rendered Jamaica an important world player in its cultivation. In addition to its natural resources, Jamaica also has been a hotbed of literary and musical innovation. Most notably, the country is designated the official birthplace of reggae and dancehall — both musical styles that are still wholly Jamaican in character and wildly popular on the island. Just a few Bob Marley lyrics are enough to conjure images of Jamaica into most everyone's minds. Explore the heritage of Jamaica during your visit — the locals will be more than happy to share with you their intimate knowledge of the country and their pride in its wonderful resources and people. And if you're in London in time for the XXX Olympics, don't miss the Jamaica Village in order to learn even more about this Little Jewel of the Caribbean.


Even the casual Marley fan will be struck by the feeling of his presence on the walk through his two-room house and the small mountain village. Shopping Duty-free shopping has blossomed in the town as the numbers of cruising tourists has increased. You'll want to take advantage of the prices on cigars, watches, jewelry and perfumes, which can run as much as 40 percent less than the cost in the United States or Europe. Several malls in Ocho Rios offer a wide range of merchandise and duty-free shopping. Island Village, a short walk from the cruise port on Turtle River Road, is popular with shoppers looking for beachwear and Jamaican coffee and rum. Tajmahal, Ocean Village, Soni’s Plaza and Harbour Shops Plaza are also busy shopping complexes downtown. East of town, there’s Pineapple Place and Coconut Grove. Finding locally grown coffee and spices is easy. The Ocho Rios Craft Market on Main Street and the Dunn’s River Craft Park are good places to find locally made treasures, especially straw goods and pottery. Harmony Hall, three miles east of town, has an excellent selection of Jamaican artwork and hosts frequent arts and crafts fairs. Besides the gallery, there’s a gift shop that carries an assortment of Jamaican fashion and traditional clothing. Fern Gully, south of Ocho Rios, is lined with stalls offering wood carvings, straw work and other crafts. Dining Ocho Rios serves up a wide variety of cuisines. You won’t have any problems finding everything from French, Italian

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EXCEPTIONAL APPLETON O

ne of Jamaica's finest exports is immediately identifiable with the country, both because of its exquisite manufacture and its celebrated status: Appleton Estate Rum. The 260-year-old distillery has made exceptional rum synonymous with Jamaica, continuing to export an array of aged, award-winning rums. During your visit to the island, take the time to get more acquainted with Appleton Estate. The exceptional Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum range is of a unique style, produced only in Jamaica and only at the Appleton Estate. The Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum range comprises five exceptional premium aged rums. Appleton Estate V/X Jamaica Rum is the flagship brand. This smooth, mellow rum is an exceptional blend of 15 select aged rums and is perfect for making classic cocktails or serving with a splash of whatever! Appleton Estate Reserve Jamaica Rum is a blend of 20 select aged rums including two special marques of rum that were reserved by Master Blender Joy Spence to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the Estate. Enjoy this elegant and refined rum in sophisticated cocktails or over ice with water or club soda. The rums that make up Appleton Estate Extra 12 Year Old have been aged for a minimum of 12 years in oak

barrels, and its beautiful mahogany hue, bold character and smooth taste invite comparison to the world’s finest cognacs and scotches. Enjoy on the rocks or with a splash of club soda or water. Appleton Estate Master Blender’s Legacy was created in celebration of three generations of Appleton’s blenders using our rarest stocks of aged rums, at the heart of which lies the most exquisite 30-year-old rum. This luxury offering should be enjoyed neat or on the rocks. Appleton Estate 21 Year Old is a limited production luxury offering. A rare blend of the finest aged rums, each of which has been aged for a minimum of 21 years in oak barrels, Appleton Estate 21 Year Old Jamaica Rum is a smooth sipping rum. While in Jamaica, you can visit Appleton Estate and get a closer look at the manufacturing process of Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum. Appleton Estate Rum Tours allow you to walk through the famous estate and learn how to crush sugarcane, view the aging houses and more. After an exciting journey through the estate, you can enjoy a traditional Jamaican lunch and even take a bottle home with you as a souvenir. There is an Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum to suit every taste and drinking occasion so enjoy. Cheers!


FINE ITALIAN DINING OVERLOOKING OCHO RIOS

Enjoy fine dining in Ocho Rios, Jamaica in the setting of an authentic 1860's Gingerbread house with wooden floors and mahogany bar. You can enjoy lunch or dinner indoors or outdoors, on our verandah overlooking the cruise ship piers and Ocho Rios.

Open 7 days, 11am to 11pm. Eden Bower Rd. opposite Taj Mahal Shopping Center. www. evitasjamaica.com

876 - 974 - 2333


86 OCHO RIOS


DINING

OPTIONS

OCHO RIOS Le Papillon Restaurant Continental In the Royal Plantation, Main Street; 974-5601 Evita’s Italian Restaurant Italian Eden Bower Road; 974-2333 The Terrace at the Jamaica Inn Continental / Jamaican Main Street; 974-2514 The Jade Samurai Japanese In The Jewel Dunn's River Beach Resort & Spa; 972-7400 Almond Tree Restaurant Jamaican / Continental In the Hibiscus Lodge Hotel, 83 Main St.; 974-2813 Ginger Lily Asian In Sunset Jamaica Grande Resort & Spa; 974-2200-19 The Verandah Restaurant International In Franklyn D. Resort; 973-4591-8 Ocho Rios Village Jerk Centre Jamaican Da Costa Drive; 974-2549 Passage to India Indian 50 Main St.; 795-3182 Cardiff Hall Restaurant International In Runaway Bay H.E.A.R.T. Hotel; 973-6671-4

and Asian to Indian or Mexican — in addition to traditional Jamaican fare. And though even the most upscale restaurants march to a very relaxed vibe, you’ll find plenty of pub options in case you just feel like having a cheeseburger and fries. And while on the topic of delicious, unpretentious food, don’t miss the jerk chicken and pork found at family-run takeout stands away from the main streets. They are inexpensive, fast and authentically delicious. There is no better way to get a taste of the varieties of pepper sauces and jerk seasonings that make Jamaican cuisine unique. Adventurous diners should try Faith’s Pen, which is located 12 miles south of Ocho Rios. Here you’ll find a collection

of competitive local cooks and self-taught chefs who operate out of stalls. For only a few dollars, you can order curried goat or spicy grilled fish and enjoy the meal on a picnic table. Nightlife Many of the big restaurants in Ocho Rios turn into clubs around midnight. There are also plenty of neighborhood clubs and bars, as well as night spots on Main Street, which range from oneroom operations with pool tables to international chain restaurant/clubs. Many clubs have DJs and live music on Friday and Saturday nights. At a few of Ochi’s clubs, you pay one price and drink all you want at an open bar.

Overlooking Ocho Rios Number one for Romance, Ambience, Good Food and Great Value. Enjoy fine dining in Ocho Rios, Jamaica in the setting of an authentic 1860's Gingerbread house with wooden floors and mahogany bar. You can enjoy lunch or dinner indoors or outdoors, on our verandah overlooking the cruise ship piers and Ocho Rios. The menu, specializing in Northern Italian food, also has an extensive selection of creative Jam-Italian fusion dishes of fresh pasta, seafood, vegetarian, and meat entrees. 3TIRHE]WE[IIOJVSQEQXSTQ %PPQENSVGVIHMXGEVHWEGGITXIH %WOEFSYXJVIIXVERWTSVXEXMSR

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88 OCHO RIOS Couples Jamaica Couples find their own place in the sun at this all-inclusive, with every opportunity for romance to blossom — no singles, no children, no extra charge for dining, entertainment or sports. Ideal wedding and honeymoon location offers four restaurants, four bars and freshwater pool overlooking the sea. 172 rooms. Dolphin Cove at Treasure Reef West of Ocho Rios. 974-5335. Swim and enjoy various activities with friendly dolphins in their natural habitat. Also feed stingrays, swim with sharks and have a photo taken with friendly sea lions. Relax on 80 feet of pearly white-sand beach. Take a glassbottom boat ride to Dunn’s River Falls. Includes Pirate’s Village with boardwalk, cafés and shops. US$45 adult, $30 ages 6-12. House of Diamonds 11A Soni’s Plaza, 974-06161; #7 Tajmahal Shopping Centre 795-2921; #4 Harbour Shops 795-2921. Finest in diamonds and rare jewelry collection. Huge selection of branded and natural color diamonds. Swiss watches, Maurice Lacroix, Perellet, Festina Gold, Bertolucci, Chase Durer and more. Rainforest Adventures Bobsled Jamaica at Mystic Mountain This environmentally friendly attraction boasts over 100 acres of land stretching from the coast road entrance near Dunn’s River Falls to over 700 feet above sea level at the peak of Mystic Mountain. Great for all ages and provides ample opportunities to view and explore the unique seaside, tropical forest ecosystem through four unique and exhilarating adventure tours, including the Sky Explorer, Bobsled Jamaica, the canopy zip line and a unique water slide. Special events are designed by the park and set atop majestic Mystic Mountain in Ocho Rios. Nighttime festivals showcase Jamaica’s famous music scene. Wedding packages lift couples up to say “I Do” at 700 feet.


JHTA Hotel / Resort Members

Couples

Glenn’s Restaurant

Jamaica Treasures Villas

Ocho Rios

& Tower Cloisters Resort

17 Dacosta Drive

Ocho Rios, St. Ann

(Affiliate)

Ocho Rios, St. Ann

Beaches Boscobel

876-975-4271 / 5

Ocho Rios

876-974-6228

876-975-4763

Ocho Rios, St. Ann

The Jewel Dunn’s River

Couples Sans Souci

876-975-7777 Breezes Runaway Bay

Ocho Rios, St. Ann

Gran Bahia Principe

Beach Resort & Spa

876-994-1206

Jamaica Hotel

Mammee Bay, St. Ann

Salt Coppers

876-972-7400

Resort & Golf Club Runaway Bay,

Crystal Ripple

Runaway Bay, St. Ann

St. Ann

Beach Lodge

876-973-7000 / 7655

876-973-6099

White River Bay

Chrisann’s Beach Resort

Ocho Rios, St. Ann

Ocho Rios

Hibiscus Lodge Hotel

876-974-6132

83 Main Street

(Affiliate)

Prospect Plantation Villas 876-994-1373 / 1452

Ocho Rios,

Riu Club Ocho Rios

St. Mary

Fisherman's Point

St. Ann

Mammee Bay, St. Ann

876-975-4467 / 4766

Ocho Rios, St. Ann

876-974-2676

876-972-2200

Jamaica Inn

Rooms On The Beach Ocho Rios

876-974-4147 Club Ambiance

Franklyn D. Resort

Main St.

Main Street

Runaway Bay, St. Ann

Runaway Bay, St. Ann

Ocho Rios, St. Ann

Ocho Rios, St. Ann

876-973-6167

876-973-4591 / 8

876-974-2514 / 8

876-974-2008 / 6632

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Enjoy contemporary Jamaican cuisine at the exquisite on-site restaurant, Isabella’s. The Cardiff Hotel & Spa is the perfect hidden treasure, whether you seek a secluded hideaway, an intimate setting for your special event or a professional setting for your corporate engagements. Come ...... BE INDULGED

Cardiff Hall, Runaway Bay, St. Ann, Jamaica, W.I. 876-973-6671-4 876-973-6867-8 (T) 876-973-4704 (F) www.thecardiffhotel.com escape@thecardiffhotel.com

Jamaica Inn

Nestled amidst the hills of Cardiff Hall, Runaway Bay, St. Ann is a closely-guarded secret... The Cardiff Hotel & Spa. Ideally located within 45 minutes of both the Donald Sangster and Ian Fleming International Airports, the hotel is also in close proximity to some of Jamaica’s world famous attractions. Choose from 12 Junior Suites, each with its own one of a kind décor, and 44 beautiful Deluxe and Ultra Deluxe rooms situated in 4 blocks throughout the resort - all with private balconies and ocean/garden views.

Royal Decameron Club Caribbean

Sandals Grande Ocho Rios

Runaway Bay, St. Ann

Beach Villa Resorts

876-973-4675 / 6348 / 4802

Main Street Ocho Rios, St. Ann

Royal Plantation

876-974-5486

Golf Club & Spa 142 Main St.

Sunflower Beach Resort Villas /

Ocho Rios, St. Ann

Leisure Holiday

876-974-5601

Runaway Bay, St. Ann 876-973-4809

Runaway Bay H.E.A.R.T. Hotel Runaway Bay, St. Ann

Sunset Jamaica Grande Resort & Spa

876-973-6671 / 4

Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-2200

Sandals Golf & Country Club (Affiliate)

Super-Fun Beach Resort & Spa

Upton, Ocho Rios

Runaway Bay, St. Ann

876-975-0119-21

876-973-6924


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FALMOUTH An unassuming town on the north coast has recently risen in

status. Formerly an affluent enclave filled with stately homes, Falmouth became threatened over time by the flight of industry to other cities in Jamaica. But the town's enviable location and deep-water port led to an ambitious project that now, after

many years of planning, has given Falmouth cause to shed its misfortunes and look brightly toward the future. BY KEN RIVADENEIRA

OURJAMAICAMAGAZINE.COM 93


94 FALMOUTH

Founded in 1769, Falmouth was once the center of Jamaica’s sugar manufacturing and rum exports.

Last year, Historic Falmouth welcomed the first Royal Caribbean cruise ship into its new cruise terminal. The opening of this $180 million enterprise between the leading cruise company and the Port Authority of Jamaica in this town 18 miles east of Montego Bay was eagerly awaited by both locals and tourists, raising the profile of this ancient port as potentially one of the most important and transited cruise destinations in the Caribbean. A project that has long been in the works, the two-berth port’s construction involved land reclamation in the bay, allowing for the construction of 120,000 square feet of prime retail space. This, in turn, has led to thousands of employment opportunities for the local workforce and an influx of income. For visitors, however, it represents a new stop to enjoy the rich culture of Jamaica, and a launch point to explore other parts of the island that they may wish to return to in the future. Falmouth’s enviable location, midway between MoBay and Ocho Rios, allows passengers arriving on Royal Caribbean cruises to sample a variety of activities on Jamaica, such as river rafting excursions to the Martha Brae River, ziplining and off-road adventures with Chukka Caribbean

tours or a memorable trip through time in Falmouth itself. Founded in 1769, Falmouth was once the center of Jamaica’s sugar manufacturing and rum exports, as the island had become the No. 1 sugar producer in the world. Though decline in the industry and the rise of nearby port towns Ocho Rios and Montego Bay eventually brought hardship to Falmouth, the development of the port has reversed its fortune. Evidence of the city’s wealthy past lies in the Georgian architecture of many homes and public buildings, several of which have been restored. A great way to explore the town is by taking an escorted walking tour with Falmouth Heritage Walks. During the two-hour walk you will gain insight into Falmouth's rich history and colorful residents. Visit falmouthheritagewalks.com to book. The port itself has been built to reflect the Georgian tradition of the town, using local woods, limestone, brick and corrugated metal in its design. Here, visitors will find may retail and dining opportunities. They also will be treated to an expansive “town center” featuring plazas, fountains, restaurants and incredible duty-free shopping.


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MONTEGO BAY For many, Montego Bay is their first glimpse of Jamaica.

Jamaica’s second-largest city is located on the northwest coast, and MoBay, as it’s affectionately known, boasts

beaches, golf courses and plenty of resorts. This explains why more than 1 million visitors make it their annual vacation choice. They come for the sunny skies, rollicking music and easygoing atmosphere that spreads from the palm tree-dotted hills to the bustling downtown streets. BY CHANIZE THORPE

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The Rose Hall Resort & Spa

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Many of the activities you’ll find to do in Montego Bay can be arranged through your hotel’s concierge or activity desk.

In 1494, Christopher Columbus landed in Jamaica at Montego Bay and called it “El Golfo de Buen Tiempo” (The Gulf of Good Weather). But later on, the Spanish renamed it an unflattering “Bahia de Manteca” (Lard Bay) because the area had become the main shipping port for wild hogs and their lard. The 18th century marked the arrival of the British — and sugar and bananas took over as the primary exports and the region was renamed Montego Bay. This was an era of wealth; plantations and their great houses cropped up around the area, making it rich in history and tradition. MoBay was the first of Jamaica’s developed resort areas, so you’ll find the biggest range of hotels here — from

elegant five-star resorts and fun-in-thesun all-inclusives to modest inns and private villas. There’s no shortage of accommodations here whether you seek a charming hillside bed and breakfast perfect for a privacy-hungry honeymoon couple or a grand family-friendly beachfront property. Sightseeing Many of the activities you’ll find to do in Montego Bay can be arranged through your hotel’s concierge or activity desk. The list of must-do’s is as spread out as the city itself and appeal to a range of interests from history to nature buffs. Excursions can last just a few short hours or can keep you occupied for the whole day if you choose.


100 MONTEGO BAY Jamaica, and in particular, Montego Bay is well known for its 17th- and 18th-century sugar and banana plantations. This industry brought wealth to the area and gave rise to sprawling estates with immaculate Great Houses at their centers. Some of the most popular ones to visit in the area include the Bellefield Great House, an 18th-century mansion in the middle of a 3,000-acre former sugar plantation in Granville. A 90-minute tour reveals an ancient sugar mill and boiler house where rum was once produced, plus an an exploration of the house and a lavish lunch buffet. There’s also the Greenwood Great House, 15 miles east of Montego Bay. This 19th-century Georgian-style home was built by a cousin of poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning. The original library of the Barrett family is on display along with one of the island’s largest and most impressive collections of rare booak, musical instruments and antique furniture.

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A visit to Montego Bay wouldn’t be complete without a stop at the famous Rose Hall Great House, an 18th-century mansion sitting on 6,600 acres of wellmanicured land. While the great house sits on an estate that now contains three golf courses, it is also infamous as an area haunted by the ghost of Annie Palmer. This voodoo-practicing mistress of the house earned the nickname “The White Witch of Rose Hall,” as she was said to have murdered three husbands before being killed by her slave lover. Other activities around MoBay include a day on the Animal Farm, home of the “Rasta Fowl” chickens. Jamaica’s newest six-acre animal sanctuary is 20 minutes outside of Montego Bay and visitors can explore the natural habitat of exotic birds and learn the benefits of solar electricity thanks to the farm's green initiatives. After enjoying a picnic lunch, there’s a playground and petting zoo available for

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If you want to have a maxin’ and relaxin’ day on the water, there’s an opportunity to take a gentle ride down the smooth Martha Brae River.

children, as well as rides on a donkey named Boxer. If you want to have a maxin’ and relaxin’ day on the water, there’s an opportunity to take a gentle ride down the smooth Martha Brae River, whose name comes from an Arawak Indian witch who tricked Spanish gold seekers into drowning themselves in its waters. The adventure starts at Rafter’s Village recreational area with rum punches and swimming, after which you can climb aboard a traditional 30-foot long bamboo raft and slowly glide three miles down the river, passing fragrant cottonwood, allspice and almond trees. Strolling about and taking in MoBay’s architecture is a must-do, especially at places like St. James Parish Church, said to be built between 1775 and 1872. Regarded as the finest church on the

island because of its Greek cross shape and luminous stained-glass window, it’s also home to two monuments by sculptor John Bacon. In 1957, an earthquake caused major damage to the church and it had to be rebuilt, but it still retains its glory today. The Cage is a small brick and cutstone building in Sam Sharpe Square and was once a temporary jail. Runaway slaves, drunken sailors and other vagrants spent the night before going to trial. Today it operates as a tiny museum and, conveniently enough, a foreign currency exchange kiosk. There’s no shortage of color in Jamaica, but for a full rainbow-worthy dose, visit the Gallery of West Indian Art. More than 40 years old, the bright red, green and yellow facade of the Gallery is a prelude to the colorful contents


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The new Whitter Village Centre, in the Ironshore section of Montego Bay, is a retail haven.

inside. You’ll find a vibrant collection of Caribbean paintings from Haiti, Cuba and local artists, as well as painted animal carvings, handmade pottery and other objets d’ art. It’s as much an artistic showcase as a retail establishment. Shopping Jamaica is tops for several specialty souvenirs — namely handicrafts, Blue Mountain coffee and excellent rum and reggae music. There are plenty of shops and markets on Gloucester Avenue, so look for these items there, as well as handmade soaps, signature spices and the jerk sauces pickapeppa, banana ketchup and Walkerswood. Also, thanks to Montego Bay’s position as a leading port of call, there are many duty-free stores where you can purchase luxury items like fine jewelry, perfume, cigars and more. Shopping hours vary, but business is generally conducted from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to Friday, and from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturdays. Some of the stores in the main resort areas will stay open later, but know that many shops are closed on Sundays unless a cruise ship is in port. Crafts Market on Harbour Street is the place to find straw baskets and hats, handmade leather goods, wall hangings, hand-dyed batik fabrics, and wood and bone carvings. Don’t be afraid to haggle over prices; however, keep in mind that once you start bargaining you’re pretty much expected to buy. Half Moon Shopping Village right outside the Half Moon Bay Resort is a plaza of more than 30 boutiques and duty-free emporiums. Just down the road is also The Shoppes at Rose Hall, a luxury retail center across from Rose Hall Great House. There are 30 specialty stores featuring name-brand jewelry, as

well as resortwear and souvenirs. When you’re done shopping, you can relax with a bite to eat and a cocktail at one of the sumptuous on-site cafés. The new Whitter Village Centre, in the Ironshore section of Montego Bay, is a retail haven comprising 200,000 square feet and 30 stores selling shoes, books, electronics and more. An al fresco dining area sits among the garden and water feature areas, as well as a bandstand section for special events and musical entertainment. Dining Even though many tourists find themselves dining within their resorts, Jamaica is home to some of the Caribbean’s finest fare. You’ll find small, homegrown eateries located in between bigger restaurants in the area. There are elegant resort restaurants offering white-gloved service as well as lickyour-fingers fast food places serving up casual fare. You’ll find a smattering of international restaurants offering good quality Italian and French cuisine, though many have added a Jamaican flare to their dishes simply by utilizing the island’s plentiful ingredients. If you’re looking for something different, ask your concierge for a recommendation. Often, some of the more formal restaurants provide a free hotel pick-up or round-trip shuttle service within their immediate area. And while there’s no shortage of “American” favorites at any restaurant you find, remember that this is Jamaica and the country’s cuisine is second to none in flavor and complexity. There are a host of dishes to try and chances are, you’ll find samples of local cooking on many of the menus you come across. First there’s the super casual beach restaurants where it’s all about lingering


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The Rose Hall Resort & Spa

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DINING

OPTIONS

MONTEGO BAY Sugar Mill Restaurant International At Half Moon Resort, Rose Hall; 953-2314 Horizons International At Ritz-Carlton Rose Hall Resort; 953-2800

with a Red Stripe beer or fruit punch while you wait for the food to be cooked. The menu is usually very simple — grilled or stewed chicken or fish, a heaping mound of rice and peas and vegetables, called “ground provisions.” There are also jerk stands or restaurants where the meats are usually spiced for the local palate, not the tourist taste buds. This is what makes The Pork Pit, in downtown MoBay, a local institution. Scotchie’s is also considered one of the island’s best jerk spots and a varied menu of chicken, fish, sausage and more. Both places operate on the same rhythm: you pay for your meal in advance, you’re given a ticket, then you then take it to the barbecue area where the grill man

prepares and gives you your food. You can take it to go, but there are usually a few chairs and tables around, and half the experience is sitting around with crowd, trying to pretend like your mouth isn’t burning while your taste buds erupt in delight. Other Jamaican foods one should try include the national dish of ackee and saltfish. Traditionally served at breakfast, ackee is an actual fruit that when cooked is similar to scrambled eggs. Saltfish is dried codfish. When cooked together, it makes an incredible and hearty meal, especially when served alongside bammy, which is fried bread made with cassava flour. Then there’s callaloo, a spinachlike vegetable that turns up in soups

Round Hill International At Round Hill Resort, Route A1; 956-7050 Great House International In Tryall Club, Hanover; 956-5660-3 Rosella Bistro Jamaican In Hotel Wexford 39 Gloucester Avenue; 952-2854-5 The Oleander Room Jamaican / International In Sandals Montego Bay; 952-5510-5 The Vineyard Caribbean In Coyaba Beach Resort & Spa, 22 Mahoe Bay, Little River; 953-9150-3 Scotchie’s Jamaican Falmouth Road; 953-8041 The Seaview Restaurant & Bar Jamaican In El Greco Resort, 11 Queens Drive; 940-6116 Three Palms International Across from Rose Hall Resort; 953-2650

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108 MONTEGO BAY

There's no shortage of accommodations here, whether you seek a charming hillside bed-andbreakfast or a grand beachfront resort.

and stews, festival, a type of hush puppy that’s often served with jerk meat, and don’t forget flaky Jamaican beef patties, filled with spicy ground beef. These make for great afternoon or evening snacks, especially when you wash them down with a cold Red Stripe beer or a Ting grapefruit soda. Nightlife Most evening activity in MoBay centers around resort and hotel happenings. However, you can always find a party on the famous “Hip Strip” or Gloucester Avenue, in the middle of the city. Here you’ll find music, dancing and dining in one big street party setting. It’s not unusual to hop from one venue to another. The Hip Strip is also the setting for a string of bars and nightclubs with interesting names like Rush Hour, Moves and Rehab. Music of all types can be heard, from the island-loved reggae, dancehall and calypso to a more mellow jazz. Many start with the famous Margaritaville, named after the famous Jimmy Buffett song. It’s a favorite with

both locals and tourists for its lengthy drinks menu, outdoor seating and its massive waterslide that goes from the restaurant’s top deck straight into the waves below. Jamaican Bobsled Café, also on the “Hip Strip” is dedicated to the real-life Jamaican bobsled team whose story was (loosely) told in the 1993 film Cool Runnings. It has the area’s longest happy hour, from 7 p.m. until midnight. Here your partying is for a good cause: a percentage of the café’s profits go to the Bobsled Federation of Jamaica. Discounted drinks, open-stage nights and other weekly events are just the beginning of the fun at Pier One Entertainment complex. There’s an open-air restaurant and bar where you can enjoy exotic drinks and freshly caught fish while watching the boats bob in the marina. The party goes on late into the night as the crowd dances the night away, especially if a performer like Fantasia or Beenie Man shows up and takes over the stage.


Casa De Oro Jewelers Suite 7C, Shoppes at Rose Hall, Rose Hall 876-953-3371; info@casadeoro.com; casadeoro.com Casa de Oro has been and continues to be the pinnacle of duty-free shopping in Jamaica since its inception in 1958, selling the top names in luxury watches, jewelry, and accessories. CDO has one of the largest selections of brands available in Jamaica, and is the exclusive agent for top name companies, including Cartier, Tag Heuer, Vacheron Constantin, Dior and many many more. A trip to Jamaica is not complete without a visit to one of the four Casa de Oro stores, located in Ocho Rios, Negril and Rose Hall Montego Bay.

restaurants, souvenir shops and duty-free vendors showcase the best that Jamaica has to offer!

Iberostar Rose Hall Beach & Spa Resort Rose Hall Main Road, Montego Bay-Little River PO St. James, Jamaica; Tel: 876-680-0000, Fax: 876-953-8019 iberostar.com

The Tryall Club P.O. Box 1206, Sandy Bay, Hanover 800-238-5290 administration@tryallclub.com tryallclub.com Managing Director: Gerald Giarla. One of the Caribbean’s legacy clubs, featuring 85 sumptuous private villas (1 to 8 bedrooms available), each one completely distinct in design and layout. Estate villas offer personal chef, housekeeper, laundress and gardener. Guests enjoy the lavish surroundings of a private luxury villa but remain footsteps from a vibrant club atmosphere. On-site wildlife and nature program, world championship golf and tennis, meeting space, four bars and two restaurants.

Jewels In Paradise Montego Bay: Shop #26, Shoppes at Rose Hall 876 953 9372 Ocho Rios: Shop #21, Tajmahal Shopping Centre, Main St. 876 974 6929; USA: 305 735 3076 info@jewelsinparadise.com; jewelsinparadise.com Duty- and tax-free retailers in Jamaica for over 50 years. Representing fine watches and exquisite jewelry at substantial savings. In Watches we carry: Audemars Piguet, Jaeger LeCoultre, IWC, Corum, Bell & Ross, Oris, Citizen and Swatch. In Jewelry, besides offering great deals on diamonds and beautiful jewelry, we represent the internationally recognized luxury brands of Roberto Coin and Carrera y Carrera MBJ Airports Limited MBJ Airports Limited manages and operates the Sangster International Airport (SIA) in Montego Bay, Jamaica. As the primary tourism gateway to Jamaica, the airport is served by over 40 scheduled and charter airlines from the United States, Canada and Europe. A US$180 million expansion and renovation was recently completed, upgrading the airport to international standards to serve the almost 3.6 million passengers that use the facility every year. SIA also boasts some of the best shopping in Jamaica and all in air-conditioned comfort! Our

Round Hill Hotel & Villas John Pringle Drive, Montego Bay 876 956 7050 info@roundhill.com roundhill.com Open and inviting, richly appointed and steeped in tradition, Round Hill takes you far beyond the ordinary vacation getaway with our luxurious accommodations, our world class-spa and sumptuous meal prepared by our awardwinning chef.

Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville 23-25 Coconut Way, Freeport, Montego Bay 876-979-8041; infor@margaritavillecaribbean.com margaritavillecaribbean.com “Waste away” at Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville in MoBay, Negril and Ochi, where the fun never stops! Enjoy a world-famous “Cheeseburger in Paradise,” tropical margaritas and shop at our trading posts for exclusive Margaritaville merchandise. Tropicana Jewelers #3 Tajmahal Shopping Centre: 876-974-2928 Island Village: 876-675-8774. Our outstanding offerings include renowned watch brands such as Patek Philippe, Breguet, Chopard, Harry Winston and Panerai. Classy yet distinctive designer jewelry from David Yurman, Marco Bicego, Dmodolo, Bulgari and many others. Credit cards are welcome.

JHTA Hotel / Resort Members Altamont West Hotel 33 Gloucester Ave. Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-9087 / 876-929-4497 Breezes Resort & Spa Trelawny Falmouth, Trelawny 876-954-2450 Coyaba Beach Resort & Spa 22 Mahoe Bay, St. James 876-953-9150 Doctor’s Cave Beach Hotel Gloucester Avenue Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-4355 El Greco Resort 11 Queens Drive Montego Bay, St. James 876-940-6116 / 940-6120 Grand Palladium Resort Point District Lucea, Hanover 876-619-0000 Half Moon, a Rock Resort Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-2211 Hilton Rose Hall Resort & Spa Montego Bay 876-953-2650 Holiday Inn Sunspree Resort Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-2485-9 Hotel Gloriana 1-2 Sunset Blvd. Montego Bay, St. James 876-979-0669

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110 MONTEGO BAY

Iberostar Rose Hall Beach & Spa Resort Rose Hall Main Road Montego Bay, St. James 876-680-0000 Luxury Tennis Golf Villas Rose Hall Montego Bay, St. James

The Rose Hall Resort & Spa

876-953-2732 N Resort Falmouth, Trelawny 876-973-4124 Palm View Resort & Conference Centre 22 Delisser Drive Montego Bay 876-952-1738/8321/1800 The Palmyra Resort & Spa The Palms, Rose Hall Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-9787 Richmond Hill Inn Union Street Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-3859 The Ritz-Carlton Golf & Spa Resort Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-2204 / 953-2800 Riu Montego Bay Mahoe Bay, Rose Hall, Montego Bay 876-940-8010 Round Hill Hotel John Pringle Drive Montego Bay 1, St. James 876-956-7050


Sandals Carlyle

Secrets St. James Montego Bay

Toby’s

Kent Avenue

Montego Freeport, St James

Resort

Montego Bay, St. James

876-953-6600

1 Kent Ave.

876-952-4140

Montego Bay, St. James Secrets Wild Orchid Montego Bay

Sandals

Montego Freeport, St. James

Montego Bay

876-953-6600

Kent Avenue

876-0952-4370 Tryall Club Sandy Bay Main Road

Montego Bay, St. James

Silent Waters Villas

Hanover

876-952-5510

White Sands Beach P.O.

876-956-5660-3

Montego Bay Sandals Royal Caribbean

876-971-9119-21

Resort & Private Island

The Wexford Hotel

Mahoe Bay, Rose Hall

Sunset Beach Resort & Spa

39 Gloucester Ave.

Montego Bay, St. James

Montego Freeport, Montego Bay

Montego Bay, St. James

876-953-2788

876-979-8800

876-952-2854-5

Where sibling rivalries disappear. Naturally.

Captivating and carefree, richly appointed and steeped in tradition, Round Hill takes you away and brings you closer together. Escape to understated elegance, in Ralph Lauren-designed oceanfront guest rooms, a luxury villa or a private villa suite with dedicated staff. Make the most of each day, from engaging family programs to relaxing spa treatments. Do what comes naturally. Visit roundhill.com

roundhill.com | 1.800.972.2159

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Š Prisma Bildagentur AG/Alamy


NEGRIL

It may seem strange that this small spot with a violent history — from pirate battles, to a British war outpost, to whale slaughters — would have been adopted as the destination of choice for the free-loving hippies of the 1960s. But one glance at Negril's enticing seven-milelong beach, its tranquil crystal-blue waters and its rugged seaside cliffs and you'll quickly see how one would consider this to be the perfect foundation for a utopian society. Today, Negril has grown up from its Bohemian days, but its spectacular sunset views are still the same. As before, there’s a loungy beach vibe and the jerk pits are still by the beach road, assuring the continual return of former beach bums, this time with children and grandchildren. BY CHERYL BLACKERBY

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114 NEGRIL

You can take an excursion on ATV, Jeep or kayak, go river tubing, or even a day-trip to spectacular YS Falls.

No matter your vacation style, whether you're still a hippie at heart or a first-class world traveler, multifaceted Negril is sure to satisfy. Huge resorts, all-inclusives, chic boutique inns and charming cottage complexes have popped up along Negril’s 10-mile stretch along the sea. Class and sophistication abound in the upscale East End, while the eclectic West End boasts a more funky vibe. A focus on physical and mental health is emphasized in the abundance of yoga retreats and classes, vegetarian meals, and spas offering therapeutic massages and reflexology. To take in the sights, jump on the wildly colorful and free One Love Drive bus, which makes many stops at hotels, art

galleries, crafts markets, bars, restaurants and attractions from the beach end of Negril to the lighthouse on the far West End. Get acquainted with Rastas and their lifestyle by signing up for Rastafarian experiences where you will learn about Rasta ceremonies, bee farming, roots brewing, cane juicing, herb and spice gardening, craft-making, doctrines, wellness and backyard farming practices. Weddings and honeymoons are big here. Many resorts have wedding planners who can arrange everything from the ministers to the flowers, reception dinner, photographer and videographer. Some of the all-inclusives even throw in the wedding for free. Negril is still the place to feel the love.


Sightseeing Somewhere between lounging on the beach, soaking in the sun and taking a dip in the sea, make time for a few of Negril's top sightseeing spots. Negril may be small, but there's still plenty to see and do here. Visit some island natives in the Great Morass, a 10-mile-wide swamp that stretches from South Negril River to Orange Bay. Catch a glimpse of its star residents, two species of crocodiles, at the mouth of the Orange River. Walking through this enchanting environment, you'll encounter endangered water birds, mangroves, native swamp cabbage palms, royal palm forests, buttonwood hammocks, bull thatch forests and many other unique environments. There are more 114 plant species and 26 bird species

FUN IN THE SUN Enjoy the best Jamaica has to offer: award-winning chefs, worldclass shopping, nonstop nightlife, talented artists, actionpacked adventures, captivating attractions and much more. During your travels, please be sure to mention Our Jamaica.

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Most nights there are live bands in town playing reggae, dancehall, calypso, R&B and rock ’n’ roll.

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plus 16 migratory species, including the endangered West Indian whistling duck. Although a visit to the Great Morass is very relaxing, remember to bring lots of sunscreen and water. For a more active pursuit, consider a horseback ride through natural beauty. Once a haven for pirates, today the Rhodes Hall Plantation has 70 horses that will take you on trails through the hills and into the surf. It's a beautiful way to see the fruit groves — papaya, mango, bananas, pineapples, oranges, limes and cocoa — and the coconut plantation and its beautiful beach. Save some energy for the 103 steps to the top of the 66-foot Negril Lighthouse on the far west end of the city, which offers a great view of the coastline. The lighthouse, built in

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1894 with a prism made in Paris, is solar powered and lights up the westernmost point of Jamaica every two seconds. An outside balcony at the top allows you to see in every direction. A tiny museum displays lighthouse artifacts such as the original kerosene lamp from 1894. If you want more action, check out the adventure tours from Chukka Caribbean Adventures. They can set you up with ATV, Jeep, kayak or river tubing tours, or even a day-trip to spectacular YS Falls, where you can take a treetop zipline canopy tour. Adrenaline junkies can take a jump off a cliff, quite literally! There are plenty of dramatic places to jump off cliffs on the West End, but the most famous by far is Rick’s CafÊ. That's where the crowds gather to see the spectacle of local divers and visitors jumping or diving

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Shopping For luxury items, Time Square Plaza on Norman Manley Boulevard has duty-free and jewelry stores offering china, crystal, leather goods, and electronics. Bayside Village is another mall that has dutyfree stores where you can buy jewelry, watches, beachwear, coffee, rum, cigars and crystal. The duty-free stores offer substantial savings on designer watches, perfumes, crystal and many other items. Other shopping complexes include Plaza de Negril, Sunshine Village and Coral Seas Plaza. Negril offers an excellent opportunity to shop for Jamaican crafts. Stop by Rutland Point Craft Centre, an open-air market, and Negril Crafts Market, which spreads along the Negril River, both on Norman Manley Boulevard. A Fi Wi Plaza, which means “Our Place” in the local Patois and is officially called Vendors Plaza, is located on One Love Drive. This plaza was created by the Negril Chamber of Commerce as a showcase for Negril’s arts and crafts dealers.

© 2010 SuperStock

from several levels on the sides and top of cliffs. Other places to dive include Pirates Cave and The Sands Bar at The Caves Resort, or behind your own cottage in one of the small resorts on the cliffs.

Dining In Negril, you can eat at jerk stands by the beach that serve jerk pork, chicken, fish, even jerk sausage from barbecue grills made from metal drums. And you can try Rastafarian “Ital” (a Rasta word that comes from “vital”) vegetarian restaurants that serve platters of callaloo, yams and cassava. Traditional Jamaican restaurants serve fried chicken, jerk chicken, pork, fish and lobster, Continued on page 121

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RETAIL THERAPY

egril is known as the "Capital of Cool" for good reason â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this balmy seaside resort town is as laid-back and relaxed as it gets. But even here, where life slows down a bit and fun is the top priority, there are plenty of stores and boutiques to squeeze in a day of world-class shopping. Sure, you can browse the workshops and roadside stands of local artisans. You'll find straw crafts made from the jipijapa plant, which is grown locally. Panama-style hats for men and women are made from jipijapa (in fact the hats in Panama are made from the same plants). These stylish, cool and one-of-a-kind hats take real skill to make. Purses, bags, totes and baskets are also made of jipijapa. Ask the weavers about the straw used in different items. Some are made of palmetto palm fronds.

Straw hats and handbags are customwoven at Time Square Plaza. Order in the morning and pick them up in the afternoon. Individual weaving classes also are offered. However, while at Time Square Plaza, you'll also see amazing modern boutiques. Everything from the latest fashions to gorgeous jewelry and accessories is available here â&#x20AC;&#x201D; duty-free. There's no reason why you wouldn't practice some well-deserved retail therapy, especially when prices are most likely lower than what you would pay at home. Whether you take back some masterfully made woven crafts, pottery and artwork or beautiful timepieces or jewelry from renowned designers, you'll love the shopping scene in Negril.


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DINING

© Prisma Bildagentur AG/Alamy

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Continued from page 117

spicy “peppa” shrimp, bammies (cassava cakes), roasted breadfruit, fresh fish Escovitch and curried goat at casual picnic tables. There’s a wide choice of cuisines in Negril including Italian, Chinese, French and Indian. You can eat at a table perched near the edge of a cliff, directly on the white-sand beach, and even in a candle-lit cave by the sea. Many of the restaurants have special dinners on certain nights, so check the local restaurant listings to see who’s having seafood buffets on the beach and who’s having lobster night. Many of the restaurants also have entertainment such as a reggae band, which will help you plan your evening. Some of the large resorts are known for their gigantic buffets. A few of the allinclusive properties sell night passes that include all-you-can-eat food, alcoholic drinks and entertainment for a certain time period. Budding chefs can take cooking lessons at any of about 50 restaurants

and learn how to make “run down” sauce, curry chicken, jerk, meat and vegetable patties, peanut and coconut drops, and rum punch. It’s a program to showcase the talents of local chefs. Nightlife Negril is sleepy during the day, but the town wakes up at night. Live bands often play reggae, dancehall, calypso, R&B and rock ’n’ roll. For a dose of cosmopolitan flair, check out Lair Lounge, a sexy gathering spot on Negril’s West End with a multimedia, air-conditioned lounge and bar hosting intimate musical and performance events in a cozy, world-class atmosphere. You may want to schedule your vacation around Negril’s events such as the Bob Marley Birthday Bash in February, Spring Break Beachfests in March and April, Independence Day parties in August, Negril JerkFest in November, and the Reggae Marathon parties in December.

NEGRIL Le Vendome French In the Charela Inn, Negril Beach; 957-4648 Norma’s on the Beach International In the Sea Splash Resort, Norman Manley Boulevard; 957-4041 Rockhouse Restaurant International In Rockhouse Resort, West End Road; 957-4373 Pushcart Jamaican West End Road; 957-4373 Ciao Jamaica Italian West End Road, Negril Cliffs 957-4395 Ivan’s Jamaican At the Catch a Falling Star Resort, West End Road; 957-0390 Cosmos Jamaican Seven Mile Beach 957-4330 Kuyaba on the Beach Jamaican Kuyaba on the Beach Resort, 957-4318 The Lodge at Tensing Pen Jamaican, International West End, 957-0387 Sherita's International Sea Wind Hotel Norman Manley Boulevard, 957-4692

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COOL DRINKS

t’s always a gastronomic adventure to eat in Jamaica, but don’t forget to try Jamaica’s special drinks, especially fruit juices. There’s a mind-boggling variety of fruit, most of which are made into drinks. Mango, pineapple, naseberry, sweetsop and mamey are just a few. Sorrel. This bright red tea, which you can drink hot or cold, is especially popular at Christmas. It’s made from the sorrel flower that grows wild. Brew with cinnamon, cloves and orange peels. Sorrel is rich in vitamin C, calcium, niacin, riboflavin and a group of compounds called flavonoids, which are powerful antioxidants. Sorrel bags packaged in boxes are inexpensive gifts you can buy at many Jamaican souvenir stores. Ginger Beer. The ginger-flavored soda has a crisp, spicy taste similar to ginger ale. Serve icy cold with a slice of lime. It’s made by the Jamaican company D&G, which brews Red Stripe beer. Ting. This unusual sparkling soda made with grapefruit juice is tart and refreshing, a perfect complement to spicy jerk chicken or pork. It is also an invention of D&G. Soursop. The dark greenish-brown spiky fruit is big, as long as a foot, with soft white flesh, which you put it in a blender with ice and perhaps a little sweetened condensed milk, nutmeg or

cinnamon to create a tasty, fruity drink that looks like a milkshake. If Jamaicans are depressed or anxious they drink soursop, which they say has tranquilizing effects. Carrot/Beet Juice. Carrot juice and carrot/beet juice is a popular drink, especially on Sundays. A typical recipe might include juiced carrots, one juiced beet, condensed milk, sugar, nutmeg and vanilla. You might also use juiced cucumber and a tiny bit of ginger. Coconut Water. This refreshing drink is the clear liquid of the young, green coconut, before it turns milky. It’s often sold by the side of the road. The vendor will chop the top off with a machete and give you a straw to drink from the coconut. You can’t leave Jamaica without trying coconut water fresh from the tree. Irish Moss. The reddish seaweed that grows in shallow water is rinsed to get the salt off and soaked overnight, then boiled about 30 minutes until it dissolves and has the consistency of a thick milkshake. It is then mixed with steaming milk or water with lemon, cinnamon, vanilla or nutmeg and sugar. It is thought to be an aphrodisiac for men. Sugar Water. Add two ounces of brown sugar to 16 ounces of water and you have Jamaican Sugar Water. Add a few slices of lemon and you have lemonade. It was named “the poor man’s drink” because there was plenty of free sugar in the land of cane fields.


Idle Awhile Hotel Norman Manley Blvd., Negril 877-243-5352 / 876-957-9566 stay@idleawhile.com idleawhile.com Idle Awhile is a boutique hotel with eight rooms and six suites. Located on a prime location on Negril's famous Seven Mile Beach, guests can stroll in either direction and find cafes, bars and nightlife. The hotel has a beach-chic ambience with gracious staff and comfortable accommodations. For action a little further afield, we can arrange for a taxi to the town of Negril (eight minutes) or to

“Perhaps Negril’s best cuisine. . .” – Lonely Planet

the West End Cliffs (15 minutes), where you can find a variety of restaurants, bars and shopping. Negril is one hour's drive from Sangster International Airport, in Montego Bay

JHTA Hotel / Resort Members Beach House Villas Jamaica Ltd. Norman Manley Boulevard Negril, Westmoreland

Margaritaville Caribbean Margaritaville Caribbean, where entertainment is included! Take a ride on our famous two-story slides, dine at the water’s edge and have the time of your life. There’s a cheeseburger in paradise waiting for you after you’re done and a cool JB T-shirt with your name on it to remember us by.

876-957-4731 / 4647 / 9162 Beachcomber Club Norman Manley Boulevard Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4171-4 Beaches Negril Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-9270-4

& THE LODGE RESTAURANT “Excellent cuisine, spectacular sunsets, cliffs and ocean views.”

Toll free USA and Canada: 1.800.957.0387 r Tel: 876.957.0387 r Fax: 876.957.0161 r E-mail: reservations@tensingpen.com r www.tensingpen.com

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124 NEGRIL Beaches Sandy Bay

Foote Prints On

Negril Hills Golf Club

Negril, Westmoreland

Negril, Westmoreland

The Sand

& Resort

876-957-5216-7 / 5230-1/ 5254-5

876-957-5100-3

Negril, Westmoreland

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-4300

876-957-4638 / 4240 / 3614

Breezes Grand Resort & Spa

Sea Splash Resort

Negril, Westmoreland

Fun Holiday Beach Resort

Negril Tree House Resort

Norman Manley Boulevard

876-957-5010-8

Norman Manley Boulevard

Norman Manley Boulevard

Negril, Westmoreland

Negril, Westmoreland

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-4041-3

876-957-3585

876-957-4287-8

Lighthouse Road, Negril

Grand Pineapple

Negrilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Resort

876-957-0270

Beach Resort

Idle Awhile Ltd.

Norman Manley Boulevard

Norman Manley Boulevard

Norman Manley Boulevard

Negril, Westmoreland

Charela Inn Hotel

Negril, Westmoreland

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-9018

Norman Manley Boulevard

876-957-4408 / 4475

876-957-3302 / 3303

The Golden Sunset

Riu Negril

Seastar Road

Negril, Westmoreland

Norman Manley Boulevard

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-4241 / 9703

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-0553

Caves Resort & Spa, The

Seawind

Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4277 / 4648-50 Cocolapalm Resort

Seastar Inn

Norman Manley Boulevard

876-957-5700 / 5985

Negril, Westmoreland

Hedonism II

876-957-4227 / 3457

Negril, Westmoreland

Riu Palace Tropical

Hotel Ltd.

876-957-5200

Bay Resort

Norman Manley Boulevard

Coral Cove

Sunrise Club

Bloody Bay

Negril, Westmoreland

2 Old Hope Road

Hotel Samsara

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-4293

Little Bay

Norman Manley Boulevard

876-957-5900

Westmoreland

Negril, Westmoreland

217-649-0619

876-957-4395

Sunset at The Palms Rockhouse

Resort & Spa

Hotel

Norman Manley Boulevard

Country Country Ltd.

Jackie's on the Reef

Lighthouse Road

Negril, Westmoreland

Norman Manley Boulevard

West End, Negril

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-5350 / 5360

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-4997

876-957-4373

876-957-4273

Tensing Pen Hotel Kuyaba Negril

Rondel Village

West End Road, Negril

Couples Negril

Norman Manley Boulevard

Norman Manley Boulevard

876-957-0387

Negril, Westmoreland

Negril, Westmoreland

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-5960-9

876-957-9815 / 4318

876-957-4413 / 4651-2

Couples Swept Away

Moon Dance Villas

Rooms On The Beach Negril

Norman Manley Boulevard

Negril, Westmoreland

Negril, Westmoreland

Norman Manley Boulevard

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-4062-6

876-957-9000

Negril, Westmoreland

876-957-9308 / 3039

Firefly

Merrils Beach Resort

Beach Cottages

Norman Manley Boulevard

Sandals Negril

Cottages Ltd.

Negril

Negril, Westmoreland

Beach & Spa

Norman Manley Boulevard

876-957-4368 / 9325

876-957-4751

Norman Manley Boulevard

Negril, 876-957-4291 / 4445

Travellers Beach Resort

876-957-3500 White Sands


Our

JAMAICA

2012

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE JAMAICA HOTEL & TOURIST ASSOCIATION

Take us with you as you explore Our Jamaica from coast to coast!

An Exclusive Beachfront Resort Unique family owned and operated hotel on Negril’s famous 7-mile Beach offering elegant accommodations amid lush tropical gardens. We invite you all to enjoy the incomparable experience that is Rondel Village.

Norman Manley Boulevard PO Box 96, Negril, Jamaica WI 876-957-4413 | Fax 876-957-4915 | info@rondelvillage.com | www.Rondelvillage.com

…'VOUIJOHTUPEP BOETFF …#FTUTIPQTBOE SFTUBVSBOUT ….BQTBOEUJQT …&WFOUTBOE TQFDJBMPGGFST …4IBSFZPVS QIPUPTBOE DPNNFOUT OurJamaicaMagazine.com

OURJAMAICAMAGAZINE.COM 125


SOUTH COAST River safaris, cascading waterfalls, seaside cliffs, miles of colorful beachesâ&#x20AC;Ś If rugged adventure is your idea of a perfect getaway, then the natural treasures of Jamaica's South Coast are sure to leave you breathless. While the island's beach resorts and attractions are mostly found along north shore mainstays like Montego Bay, Negril or Ocho Rios, the South Coast rewards travelers who like to head off the beaten path in search of sights and experiences. BY MARK ROGERS

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128 SOUTH COAST

The South Coast rewards travelers who like to head off the beaten path in search of sights and experiences.

True to its off-the-beaten-path nature, the South Coast is accessible by road from Jamaica’s main gateways. The South Coast is a 90-minute drive down from Montego Bay, and about three hours from Kingston. On-island tour operators offer excursions that cover all the bases. It's possible to explore the region on a day tour, but you'll want to include a few overnights in one of the area's resorts or small hotels in order to enjoy a richer and deeper experience. There are at least four South Coast sights that most people would agree are not to be missed: a safari excursion on the Black River; a tour of the Appleton Rum Estate; some serious leisure time enjoying the outdoor attractions of YS Falls; and a visit to Treasure Beach. Sightseeing Once a busy logging and sugar town, the port town of Black River is packed with history and local color. Most people arrive for a river excursion, but try to reserve a little time to stroll through the town itself, which is refreshingly free of commercial tourism. One

of the most famous structures is Waterloo at 44 High Street. Built in 1875, this was the first building in Jamaica to be powered by electricity. Nature enthusiasts can book an excursion at the river. Tours depart five times a day from the dock at the Black River Bridge. A 90-minute boat tour takes you into the lower river delta’s mangroves and the Great Morass, where you’ll have the chance to observe a multitude of birds, including snowy egrets, a variety of herons, and the endangered West Indian whistling duck. But the American crocodile is the star attraction. Approximately 300 of these reptiles live in the river and tour guides have a knack for calling the crocs to the side of the boat, where you’ll have a chance for an up-close encounter. Deeper inland, head along the road between Lacovia and Middle Quarters to view the two-mile stretch called Bamboo Avenue. The towering bamboos along both sides of the road form a deep-shaded archway where you can browse handicrafts and recharge with some coconut water. Bamboo Avenue is now officially protected


© Robert Harding Images/Masterfile

130 SOUTH COAST

Bamboo Avenue is now officially protected by the Public Gardens department of the Ministry of Agriculture.

by the Public Gardens department of the Ministry of Agriculture. Nearby YS Falls is a place that cries out for you to relax and commune with nature. Located on the YS Estate, a working farm near St. Elizabeth, the attraction began as a simple site featuring a seven-tiered waterfall, and has now grown into a fully realized rustic attraction with ziplines, river tubing and swimming pools. Your visit starts off with a tractor-drawn jitney ride through the farm. When you arrive at the base of the waterfall, you can choose to take the plunge or stay dry by ascending a series of wooden steps with viewing platforms. Daredevils can try their hand at the swing over the waterfall’s pool. YS Falls can be experienced in an hour, but plan a longer visit and consider bringing a picnic lunch. Rum enthusiasts can witness the island’s love affair with the drink in a tour of the the Appleton Estate Rum facility, set among fields

of sugarcane near the village of Maggoty. Appleton Estate has blended rum since 1749. Visitors can tour the facility and see an on-site museum chronicling rum production. The Appleton Estate Rum Tour ends with a rum toast and a complimentary bottle of rum. When it comes to beaches, the South Coast never disappoints. The six-mile stretch of Treasure Beach spans four main bays with colorful names of Calabash, Great, Billy and Frenchman’s. Calabash Bay is the largest and most active. It’s a colorful spot with local fishing boats and clusters of beachfront food stands, where a plate of roast fish is perfectly complemented by an ice-cold Red Stripe. Coral reefs, ideal for snorkeling, lie just offshore. East of Treasure Beach you’ll find Lovers Leap, a 1,600-foot seaside cliff with an aweinspiring view. It got its name from the story of two Jamaican slaves who were lovers, and who leaped to their deaths rather than be separated.


Dining If your idea of a perfect night is lingering over a leisurely dinner, playing dominoes and listening to tree frogs, then you’ll be in heaven. In lieu of a wide selection of restaurants, the South Coast offers a handful of venues that guarantee authentic, downhome Jamaican cooking. Jake’s, an Island Outpost property, offers dining in Treasure Beach. The oceanside alfresco seating is a great setting for candlelit dinners, with fresh seafood, vegetarian options and homemade ice cream. The Treasure Beach Hotel is the site of the Yabba Restaurant, overlooking the hotel’s lush gardens. Yabba serves local and international fare, with an emphasis on catch-of-the-day and regional dishes. At Marblue Villa Suites is the elegant and award-winning Sea Side Restaurant, featuring some of the most innovative meat and seafood dishes in Jamaica. One venue that’s become destination in its own right is Little Ochi Seafood Restaurant, in Alligator Pond. Little Ochi has become so beloved that it hosts an annual Seafood Festival every summer.

JHTA Hotel / Resort Members

Mandeville Hotel

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& Restaurant

876-962-2138

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& Restaurant Old Wharf,

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Calabash Bay P.A.

& Conference Centre

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5 1/2 Caledonia Road

St. Elizabeth

Mandeville, Middlesex

876-965-3408

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European Village & Spa

Calabash Bay P.A.

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Appleton Estate Rum Tour Northwest of Mandeville near Siloah. 876963-9215.Take an air-conditioned bus ride to tour the rum factory and estate. Tour explains the fermentation and distillation process. See the mini-museum, artifacts, wishing well, Italian café and gift shop. Take home a complimentary bottle of rum and taste samples. Groups of up to 150. Lunch available on request. Monday–Saturday, 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. The Mandeville Hotel 876-962-9764. The Mandeville Hotel serves breakfast, lunch and dinner in The Arches restaurant by the pool. While you eat dinner, with moonlight streaming through the Spanish-style arches, enjoy the smooth sounds of Keith Powell, the hotel’s one-man jazz band. The Sunday Jamaican Buffet includes fresh fruit, ackee and codfish, mackerel rundown, escovitch fish, callaloo, fried plantain, bammies, dumplings and boiled green bananas.

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ADRENALINE RUSH Whether you prefer being active on land or enjoy

aquatic adventures, Jamaica is a leader in sports activ-

ities. Along with the tranquil beaches and easygoing culture are unique opportunities to whet your appetite for excitement. Every year, Jamaica draws consummate champions in dozens of sports competitions, including runners, sailors and anglers, as well as everyday enthusiasts who desire to practice their favorite activity in a tranquil, tropical atmosphere. BY JEFF BORG

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Cinnamon Hill Golf Course

134 SPORTS

At Cinnamon Hill Golf Club, the course consists of a rolling front nine under the gaze of the Great House.

On Land Golf. Every golfer’s dream vacation begins in Montego Bay. Among the most celebrated spots here is the White Witch Golf Course, part of the Ritz-Carlton Rose Hall. This haunting layout gets its name from Annie Palmer, the 19th-century mistress of Rose Hall Plantation who earned infamy for mistreating her slaves and (allegedly) murdering her husband and lovers. The course is not easy, but the heavenly sea views and elegant dining at the clubhouse are your rewards. At the adjoining Cinnamon Hill Golf Club, part of Rose Hall Resort, the par-72 course consists of a rolling front nine under the gaze of the Great House and a back nine in the remote hills of the plantation, with narrow canyons, picturesque waterfalls and panoramic views. Nearby, you can also play at Half Moon, A RockResort, which has an elongated, 7,119yard Robert Trent Jones course hugging the sea. On the outskirts of MoBay awaits the stately Tryall Club, taking you through forested hills and streams past the 18th-century waterwheel of an old sugar mill. Several resorts offer golf packages allowing play on all the great courses. And

you needn’t be in MoBay for amazing golf opportunities. All around Jamaica, great courses await, whether it’s on the North Coast (Breezes Rio Bueno, SuperClubs Runaway Bay, Sandals at Ocho Rios), in Kingston (Constant Spring, Caymanas), near the South Coast (Manchester Club) and at Negril (Negril Hills). Tennis. Most of the top resorts in Jamaica offer plenty of hard-hitting tennis opportunities. You'll find an array of hard and clay courts in Montego Bay at the major hotels, like Half Moon, Rose Hall Resort, Tryall Club, El Greco, Holiday Inn SunSpree, Hotel Riu, Iberostar, Ritz-Carlton, Round Hill, Royal Decameron, Sandals and Sunset Beach. Along the north coast, you can find multiple courts at Sandals Grande Ocho Rios, Beaches Boscobel, Breezes Rio Bueno, Breezes Runaway Bay, Breezes Trelawny, Couples Ocho Rios, Crane Ridge, Goblin Hill, Royal Decameron and Sunset Jamaica Grande. In Kingston, try Jamaica Pegasus. Along the South Coast, play Sandals Whitehouse. At Negril, check out Beaches Sandy Bay, ClubHotel Riu, Couples Negril, Couples Swept


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136 SPORTS

Coral reefs around Jamaica vibrate with life, making it an ideal place for both snorkelers and divers.

Away, Breezes Grand, Hedonism II, Hotel Riu Palace Tropical Bay and Sandals. In 1951 Althea Gibson, who became the first African-American to reach the finals of a U.S. Lawn Tennis Association tournament, won her first international title here in Jamaica. Cricket. A cricket match sparks great emotion and excitement in Jamaica. The sport may look like baseball — and indeed it is a bat-and-ball game similar to America’s pastime — but it has some crucial differences. The main objective is for a batsman in pads and helmet to protect his wicket by smacking the ball with his bat as far possible. If he can run to the other end of the oval without a fieldsman catching the ball, he scores. Games can go on for days. You’ll see a cricket field in just about every town in Jamaica — stop to watch a game if you see one in play. Running. Since 1948, Jamaicans have won 114 Olympic medals, all of them in track and field except one (track cycling). It stands to say that Jamaica raises some of the world’s best runners. Arthur Wint won Jamaica’s first Olympic medal, a gold for the 400-meter race in the 1948 London Games. Sports legend Merlene Ottey was Jamaica’s first woman to

win an Olympic medal, for the 200-meter race in Moscow in 1980, and has since won numerous times to hold a total of nine Olympic medals. Fellow Jamaican Asafa Powell held the record as the world’s fastest human until recently. Currently, Jamaican Usain Bolt holds the world records in the 100 meters, 200 meters and, with his teammates, the 4-by-100-meter relay. “Lightning Bolt” also holds the Olympic records in these events. You can partake in Jamaica’s running heritage at any point, but the most exciting time is during one of the country’s many athletic events. The island’s big annual track event is the Reggae Marathon & Half Marathon each December in Negril, organized by Jamdammers Running Club of Kingston. Bobsled. Jamaica’s unlikely turn at the winter sport of bobsledding was chronicled loosely in the popular Disney film Cool Runnings. Thought never champions in the sport, Jamaicans hold pride in their pursuit of winter gold. Today, visitors to Ocho Rios can get their own taste of bobsledding at Mystic Mountain. The thrill ride starts with a picturesque 15-minute ride up in a chairlift, followed by a gravity-driven 3,300-foot plunge on a custom


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138 SPORTS

GOLF LIKE THE PROS Check out these top golf courses throughout Jamaica! Tryall Club. Designed around a 19th-century sugar plantation by architect Ralph Plummer, the course located west of Montego Bay offers nine level holes kissing the shoreline and nine more rolling through the hills. (6,775 yards, par 72, $100–$175, Flint River, 876956-5681, tryallclub.com) Half Moon Golf Club. Among the world’s best, this Robert Trent Jones layout at Half Moon Resort hugs the coast east of Montego Bay. On the infamous 535-yard 3rd, you must choose to drive over a stand of trees or down an open side guarded by water. (7,141 yards, par 72, $110–$168, Half Moon P.O., Rose Hall, 876-953-2560, halfmoongolf.com) White Witch Golf Course. Championship links by Von Hagge, Baril and Smelek undulate across 600 acres. The signature par-3 17th plays to a tabletop green spooked by sand traps. Greens fees include caddie. (6,758 yards, par 71, $99–$175, One Ritz-Carlton Drive, Rose Hall, 876-684-0174, whitewitchgolf.com) Cinnamon Hill Golf Club. Von Hagge, Smelek and Baril designed this course at Rose Hall Resort, east of Montego Bay, from sea level to 350 feet. The signature 7th, Majestic Blue, is a 453-yard par-4 dogleg left that tees toward the beach. The scenic 15th — named Bond, James Bond — appeared in Live and Let Die. (6,800 yards, par 72, $79–$159, Queen’s Highway, Rose Hall, P.O. Box 999, Montego Bay, 876-953-2984 / 9381, cinnamonhilljamaica.com) Superclubs Golf Club at Runaway Bay. Within sight of the sea, this championship course designed by British Naval Commander James D. Harris offers exhilaration for beginners and purists. Play progresses over a gully toward the sea. (6,814 yards, par 72, $35–$85, Main Street, Runaway Bay, 876-9737319, superclubs.com)

Sandals Golf and Country Club. In verdant hills 750 feet above Ocho Rios, elegant Sandals Golf at Upton presents a scenic course with narrow fairways and miniscule greens, a plantation-style clubhouse and a fully stocked pro shop. Golf Digest gave these links four stars. Greens fees and transportation are included for guests of Sandals Grande Ocho Rios, Beaches Boscobel and Royal Plantation. (6,404 yards, par 72, $40–$140, P.O. Box 771, Ocho Rios, 876-975-0119, sandals.com) Constant Spring Golf Club. One of Jamaica’s first courses, Constant Spring is the largest green space remaining in Kingston. (6,900 yards, par 70, $74–$78, 152-158 Constant Spring Road, P.O. Box 743, Kingston 8, 876-755-2066 / 924-1610) Caymanas Golf & Country Club. Set between Kingston and Spanish Town, Caymanas provides a great golf getaway for city residents and visitors. Designed by Canadian architect Howard Watson, it features elevated tees and greens, lush fairways amid craggy hills, and big beautiful trees. (6,844 yards, par 72, $76, Caymanas, 876-746-9772, caymanasgolfclub.com) Manchester Golf Club. Vacationers in historic Mandeville and the South Coast play at Manchester Club, 2,000 feet above sea level. Established in 1868, the oldest golf club in the Western Hemisphere is set on 55 acres. It has nine greens but 18 tee boxes, enabling you to play 18 holes. (5,776 yards, par 70, $35–$47, Mandeville, 876-962-2403) Negril Hills Golf Club. A fun, affordable golf course designed by Robert Simmons. Fairways twist and turn, with uphill approaches to invisible flags. (6,333 yards, par 72, $106, Negril Hills P.O., Jamaica, 876-957-4638 / 3614/4240, negrilhillsgolfclub.com)

Advertised rates were correct at time of publication, and are subject to change. Some courses require a caddy.


bobsled coaster. For something a little less intense but just as fun, Mystic Mountain also offers a 550-foot zipline adventure, a rainforest tram ride and a pool with water slide. In The Water Diving and Snorkeling. Coral reefs around Jamaica vibrate with life, making it an ideal place for both snorkelers and divers. Besides natural reefs, divers can also explore various wrecks that harbor denizens of the deep like multicolored tropical ďŹ sh, sharks, coral, anemones and more. Divers certiďŹ ed by the Professional Association of Dive Instructors (PADI) can take advantage of these beautiful sites. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have certiďŹ cation, many dive shops and resorts offer classes to get you out in the water in a matter of days. And you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a certiďŹ cate for a fun day of snorkeling! Yachting and Sailing. Going back to the golden days of jet-setting, Jamaicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s yachting tradition is not well-known to the mainstream world, though it is treasured among sea lovers on the island. There are a number of yacht clubs and marinas around the island, including Montego Bay Yacht Club, Royal Jamaica Yacht Club in Kingston, and the Errol Flynn Marina in Port Antonio. Just check in with immigration and customs at any port of entry: Bowden, Discovery Bay, Montego Bay, Ocho Rios, Port Antonio, Port Esquivel, Port Kaiser or Port Royal. OfďŹ cers request a crew list, ship registration, list of ship stores and departure permission from your previous port. Each person should have a passport and visa, if applicable. If you do not own your own boat, charter companies offer bareboat, skippered and fully crewed options, usually for a week or 10 days. Fishing. What would a top island destination be without championship ďŹ shing? Jamaica ranks as one of the Caribbeanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best ďŹ shing spots, and anglers from all around the world ďŹ&#x201A;ock to these waters to rein in dorado, wahoo and marlin. Each October, the prestigious Port Antonio International Marlin Tournament qualiďŹ es its winner to represent Jamaica in the huge IGFA Offshore World Championship in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, which draws 70 teams from 33 countries in May. Started in 1959, the Port Antonio classic draws 30 to 40 boats each year and educates anglers on the need for marlin conservation by releasing specimens under 99 inches or 345 pounds. Other annual contests include the Montego Bay Yacht Club and James Bond ďŹ shing tournaments in October; the Sir Henry Morgan Port Royal Kingston Tournament in December; the PWD Hunting and Sporting Fishing Tournament in January/February; and the Royal Jamaica Yacht Club Spring Fishing Tournament in March.

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140 SPAS


ALL-NATURAL

REJUVENATION If you thought the bounty of island-grown herbs, fruits

and vegetables were only for your eating pleasure, think again. The amazing spas throughout Jamaica have created soothing treatments that might just taste as good as they feel, including a chocolate massage and a pineapple body polish. Leave the fork and knife behind and come discover your newest indulgences. BY MELANIE REFFES

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142 SPAS

Pampering Produce Seaside massages complement the manicured gardens, rushing waterfalls and crystal-clear fountains that frame Round Hill Resort, a former pineapple and coconut plantation. Laid-back luxury abounds in the seven treatment rooms and an outdoor beachfront treatment area where skilled masseuses perform magic in a medley of massages, from a scrumptious Pineapple Body Buff to an energizing Citrus Hand Manicure or Pedicure featuring Jamaican oils and a tropical citrus massage. All-inclusive at the Rose Hall Resort means more than gourmet fare, fruity cocktails and watersports. Overlooking the 400-acre historic Rose Hall Plantation in Montego Bay and cuddling up between the mountains and the unruffled Caribbean Sea, the aptly named Soothe Spa dishes up a kaleidoscope of treatments — from the Mango Citrus Facial that melts away stress to the Ortanique Floral-Citrus Wrap that detoxifies and relaxes your body. Setting the gold standard for luxury in Montego Bay, the Ritz-Carlton Resort is home to a spa boasting 11 treatment rooms, a fitness center and saunas. Skilled massage therapists work miracles with a Chocolate N' Cherries Jubilee Organic Wrap and a Pear-fect Sugar Scrub. The two-hour Drift to Sleep is a relaxation bonanza, with an aromatherapy milk bath that submerges the body into a cloud-like sensation of soothing bubbles while sips of chamomile and passionflower-infused herbal tea seal the deal. Spice Things Up The Fern Tree Spa in Montego Bay hosts ancient healing remedies in a state-ofthe-art setting. On a sandy crescent dotted with fragrant gardens, the coveted spa at the Half Moon Resort is an überluxe refuge of calm. The signature oils that blend allspice, ginger and orange

are heaven on earth. For a bona fide island chill-out, soak away stress in a warm Jamaican Bush Bath that marries the healing herb known as cerasee with lemongrass, ackee leaves, aloe and citrus. A Rosemary Mint Awakening Body Wrap inside a candlelit cave with the comforting sound of the ocean is the secret to the success of the spa at The Caves Resort & Spa above the dramatic cliffs of Negril. Essences of rosemary and peppermint soften and smooth sleepy bodies, while the Elemental Nature Facial renews and revives happy smiles. Fresh from the sea, the Aqua Polish refines the skin with natural sea minerals and Dead Sea salts. For an après-massage glow, fineaged Jamaican rum at the Caves Rum and Cigar bar is a must. Fronting Treasure Beach in the South Coast and framed by the Santa Cruz Mountains and the cascading Pedro Plains, the Driftwood Spa at Jake’s merges holistic techniques with global wellness philosophies. Stand-out scrubs rejuvenate with wild ginger and lemongrass while body wraps refresh with rum, mint or rosemary. Emerging majestically from the cliffs of the emerald mountains in Ocho Rios, Couples Sans Souci envelops you into a world where worries disappear and a warm vibe prevails. Taking its name from the century-old resident turtle that lives in the mineral spring grotto on the resort, Charlie's Spa is an oasis of exotic massages like the Peppermint Sea Twist, which untangles the knots of nervous tension with splashes of minty oils and dollops of freshly harvested seaweed. A dip in the mineral pool, with its curiously curative powers, is the Jamaican antidote to the winter blahs. Hungry for More Pampering is paramount as the tranquil scent of lemongrass permeates the air at the Red Lane Spas in all the Sandals and


Beaches Resorts, including the swank Sandals Royal Plantation Ocho Rios. Revered for a myriad of massages that wed European traditions with Caribbean panache, the Red Lane Spas also entice with hot and cold plunge pools, eucalyptus saunas and perfumed garden sanctuaries. For superb skin hydration, try the Mud Massage Therapy, which combines detoxifying earth clays with olive and grape seed oils, or the Honey Ginger Wrap, which is ideal for sensitive skin. Body treatments like the Lively Up Coffee Wrap provide anti-aging and anticellulite cleansing. High atop the Blue Mountains, Strawberry Hill is an über-hip haven for rejuvenation. An hour from Kingston, the Living Spa specializes in organic healing based on the five elements of Ayurveda philosophies. A world away from the dazzling lights of the city below, the spa

sits 3,000 feet above sea level with a hydrotherapy room, plunge pool and yoga deck. Main draws include a Lemongrass Wrap that combines a citrus exfoliation with a scalp massage, and the Traveler's Foot Bath, which pampers tender tootsies in a hot herbal bath. Stretching across the cliffs in Negril, Rockhouse Hotel is nestled among blossoming gardens with thatched-roof villas perched on the cliff's edge. Onthe-rocks treatments like the Caribbean Drench, which mimics an island rainfall, and the Blue Mountain Coffee Scrub, with a whiff of orange, cinnamon, vanilla and brown sugar, will remind you why you booked a vacation in the first place. Life is a little easier at the KiYara Spa at the Jamaica Inn, snuggled in the cliffs of Cutlass Bay outside Ocho Rios. The name means “sacred place of the earth spirits” in the language of the native Taino Indians.

Spas are coveted refuges of calm. Treatments with oils blending allspice, ginger and orange are heaven on earth.

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Jamaica Inn

144 SPAS

Appropriately, the spa uses indigenous ingredients in a array of tempting massages like the Hot Stone Energy Balancing treatment, in which the heat from riversmoothed stones penetrates tight muscles, and a Chocolate Indulgence massage that is good enough to eat and too good to miss. Feeling Satisfied If you've had your fill of tantalizing, foodinspired treatments, there's still a vast array of options to discover. In the heart of New Kingston, serenity rules at the Spanish Court hotel edged by ruby-red poincianas and palm trees. Relaxation is top priority with a peaceful décor that evokes the Jamaican palette of black, gold and green. Spa services that can be custom-ordered for

singles or couples on an airy mountain deck that overlooks the sun-dappled horizon; and there's a 50-foot infinity-edge pool unlike any other in Jamaica. For sunrise meditation or sunset vows, the Sky Lounge is polished sophistication. Adults aren’t the only ones who enjoy a good rubdown while on vacation. At the Sunset Beach Resort in Montego Bay and the Sunset Jamaica Grande Resort in Ocho Rios, kids can relax Jamaicastyle with a host of pampering options. A clever menu of treatments geared to young spa enthusiasts and their parents include the Mommy & Me package of blissful neck and shoulder massages and the Daddy & Me option, which includes mini-facials for the boys in the family.


GET SPA SAVVY M

odern spas are known as havens of relaxation, zen-like temples with a natural rhythm and flow. But from the lounge and the steam room to the massage table and whirlpool, it can feel as if you're expected to know what to do. If you're new to spa culture, it may be an intimidating environment, causing stress. Before you commit a “spa faux pas,” make sure you acquaint yourself with proper spa etiquette. Most spas have full schedules and time is of the essence. While you should always be on time for your appointment, some spas recommend arriving early, adding access to steam rooms as an incentive. If you arrive late, you may have to reschedule. Also, be aware of the spa's cancellation policy — you may incur a financial penalty if you cancel without advance notice. A major contributor to the soothing atmosphere of spas is silence. As a result, turn off your cell

phone and any other device, and speak in a low voice so as to not disturb others. When you're ready for your treatment, don't be afraid to voice your preferences. State clearly if you would rather have a male or female therapist. Stop the massage if the pressure is painful. Ask questions if you're unsure about anything. Remember, no relaxation technique will work if you're stressed about your environment. In addition, if your treatment requires you to undress and you feel uneasy, most therapists will give you a moment alone to cover yourself with a sheet or towel. And you can always choose to not remove your undergarments. As you exit, it's important to always tip your therapist. A gratuity of 15 to 20 percent is customary. While this may be tacked on to a credit or debit card purchase, most therapists prefer to receive their tip in cash.

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Visual Ideas/Nora Pelaez

146 WEDDINGS


TROPICAL NUPTIALS

Fairy-tale weddings come true in Jamaica. Whether your dream is to walk barefoot down a sun- and surf-kissed aisle or celebrate your big day amid bright blooms in an elegant ballroom, the island has you covered. With countless romantic settings and expert wedding planners from coast to coast, when deciding to have your wedding in Jamaica, it’s so easy to say: “I do.” BY MELANIE REFFES

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148 WEDDINGS

Weddings are movie-set perfect at Round Hill in Montego Bay, where How Stella Got Her Groove Back was filmed.

Sandals and Beaches Resorts have teamed up with Martha Stewart to provide innumerable wedding options with six artistic themes: the “Vision in White” for couples who prefer a classic white wedding, from party favors to desserts; “Flutter of Romance,” incorporating butterflies for a splash of whimsy; “Seaside Serenade,” where couples exchange vows under a seashellstudded bamboo arch; “Chic and Natural” for the organic twosome; “Island Paradise,” a ceremony studded with rainbow-hued orchids; and the elegantly simple “Beautiful Beginnings.” Celebrating “second time around” and “third time lucky” weddings, Franklyn D. Resort is delighted to host couples with kids in tow. While wedding planners look after every detail from the minister to the music, newly blended families have plenty of quality time to bond on the beach or enjoy a round of massages in the spa. At Couples Tower Isle, Couples Sans Souci, Couples Swept Away and Couples Negril, marriage proposals carved in ice are a cool way to pop the question. Add a bottle of bubbly and a box of chocolatecovered strawberries, and eager grooms will get a “yes” every time. Honeymoons in paradise are the norm at Tensing Pen on the western tip of Negril. Here scattered along the cliffs you’ll find a collection of surreal thatch and stone cottages with interiors crafted by local artisans from bamboo, mahogany and cedar, and sunning patios carved out of the rocks. This is the stuff of storybook honeymoons for couples who dream of sultry sunsets and lazy mornings. Villa Cindy at the Sunflower Cottages and Villas welcomes active honeymooners who enjoy a round on the golf course, a game of tennis or an afternoon horseback riding on the beach. Secrets Ultimate Weddings at the adultsonly Secrets St. James and adjacent Secrets Wild Orchid in Montego Bay exude

grown-up sophistication from sunrise to sunset. Newlyweds toast their nuptials in Vera Wang-designed champagne flutes as a Jamaican musical trio sets the mood and a photographer snaps souvenir memories of the special day. A treasure trove of treats awaits honeymooners at the Sunset Beach Resort in Montego Bay, Sunset Jamaica Grande Resort in Ocho Rios and Sunset at the Palms in Negril. Room upgrades, complimentary photos of the happy couple, a bottle of sparkling wine and flower petal turndown service are some of the romantic signatures at this trio of all-inclusive resorts along the north and western coasts. Weddings are movie-set perfect at Round Hill in Montego Bay, where How Stella Got Her Groove Back was filmed, and where its star Taye Diggs returned to marry his sweetheart, Broadway singer Idina Menzel, in a seaside fairy tale wedding. Honeymooners create their own magic in chic villas with private pools while toasting the sunset with a chilled glass of the resort’s own Cabernet Sauvignon. For the independent-minded couple, arranging a ceremony without the advice of hotel wedding planners is part of the fun. On Cornwall Beach, fronting the Hip Strip in Montego Bay, barefoot weddings on the beach are a breeze in a seaside gazebo adorned with bouquets of vibrant blooms. A minister not only performs the ceremony but also offers counseling to warm up cold feet, while the Cornwall’s resident chef whips up a Jamaican feast. Adored as the garden parish, St. Ann in Ocho Rios lures with awe-inspiring views of gushing waterfalls and rainforests brimming with wild ferns. With a name that gets its meaning from the Arawak word for paradise, Coyaba River Garden is teeming with lush verdant backdrops at every turn. Sky-high weddings are taking off at Rainforest Adventures at Mystic Mountain


Half Moon

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This is the stuff of storybook honeymoons for couples who dream of sultry sunsets and lazy mornings.

in Ocho Rios. The “I Do at 700 Feet” ceremony woos daring couples that want to get hitched while flying high through the treetops on the Sky Explorer or on the lawn atop Mystic Mountain. Note to celebrity spotters: Olympic runner Usian Bolt is a fan of the park and visits often! Weddings include photographs of the highoctane ceremony and two witnesses — in case you forgot to bring them with you. Nestled in the foothills of the Blue Mountains, red cabana beds on a soft sandy beach are the stuff of musical memories at Geejam. Built as a recording studio for artists like No Doubt and Gorillaz, this Island Outpost boutique resort is pitch-perfect for newlyweds and honeymooners alike. Friendly innkeepers also roll out the regal red carpet to those in love at the eco-boutique Hotel Mocking Bird Hill outside Port Antonio. The quaint 10-room hideaway built on a hillside celebrates love with complimentary afternoon tea service, Sundowner cocktails on the hotel terrace and heart-racing views of the awesome countryside. The five-night “Heavenly Honeymoon” package woos newlyweds with a leisurely breakfast on the

balcony, gourmet dinner in the Mille Fleurs restaurant and an unhurried afternoon floating down the Rio Grande River in a bamboo raft built for two. A scenic drive from Port Antonio winding through the majestic Blue Mountains takes you to Kingston. In the capital, the Jamaica Pegasus is the hotel of choice for city slickers in love. The spectacular Talk of the Town ballroom on the 18th floor boasts panoramic vistas of the city and a dance floor guaranteed to keep the happy couple and their guests jammin’ and jivin’ till the sun comes up. With a wedding party of 50 revelers or more, the lucky couple will receive a bouquet of gifts from the hotel, including a night in the honeymoon suite, breakfast the next morning and expert advice from the wedding team — from arranging limousine service to hiring disc jockeys and cake decorators. Next door, the Courtleigh Hotel is a favorite of savvy locals and discerning travelers. Weddings in the garden terrace won’t break the bridal bank with extras like mimosas for the wedding party and the honeymoon suite for the bride and groom, with late checkout the next morning.


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TYING THE KNOT IN JAMAICA

ust 24 hours after arriving in Jamaica, couples can legally wed here, provided an application for a marriage license has been previously submitted. Although many hotels and resorts offer assistance in obtaining a marriage license, couples wanting to do it themselves can contact Jamaica’s Ministry of Justice at 876-906-4923. Unlike other countries, Jamaica does not require blood tests. However, for the ceremony to be legally recognized back home, proof of citizenship is required, including certified copies of birth certificates, parental consent if the couple is under 18 years of age, and the original divorce decree if this is a second marriage for one of the spouses. “Couples on the hunt for a tropical destination to exchange vows and celebrate the joys of wedded bliss will find their dreams come true on the enchanted isle of Jamaica,” says John Lynch, chairman of the Jamaica Tourist Board. “The ease and convenience with

which people can get married, coupled with the island’s vibrant culture and unparalleled beauty, have made Jamaica a preferred choice for destination weddings.” In addition to clergy who can perform weddings, there are also nondenominational marriage officers who can officiate either at their offices, in their homes or at a place chosen by the couple. The cost for arranging a private ceremony ranges from US$50–$250, with officers located in Kingston, Montego Bay, Negril, Ocho Rios and Port Antonio. “Passion fuels our culture and ignites our soul, therefore no other destination is as committed to a couple’s fantasy wedding and honeymoon than the land of ‘One Love’,” Lynch adds. “Whether couples prefer an all-inclusive hotel or a lush, private villa, Jamaica has accommodations to fit every desire and budget.” For more details on planning a wedding, go to visitjamaica.com, or call the Jamaica Tourist Board at 1-800-526-2422.

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BEACH BUMMINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; With their own distinctive personalities, sandy Jamaican

beaches nestle into cozy protected coves between rocky cliffs and offshore reefs. Streaks of emerald greens and turquoise blues close to shore morph into royal blues out at the horizon. Such vibrant colors just make people want to jump in and wallow. Grand resorts take care of many beaches, raking and keeping them picture-perfect for guests. Others are private, charging a few dollars to cover maintenance. Still others are thoroughly public. No charge to enter. BY JEFF BORG

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With clear waters, white sands and little else, Lime Cay is the perfect spot for a day of swimming, snorkeling and yachting near Kingston.

Starting at the West End and working clockwise, let’s take a tour. West End / Negril Bohemian Negril gives vacationers that end-of-the-world feeling. This happy hippie haven is half-beach, long and lively, and half-cliffs, where otherwise rational adults leap from the rocks — at Rick’s Café and many West End resorts — into the lapping waters 30 feet below. The pace along Seven Mile Beach is more languid than most places. Stroll the silky sands until you spot an inviting bar, then stop and chill awhile with the friendly mix of locals, Europeans and Americans debating rum, reggae and Rastafari. Stroll some more and pick your perfect perch for beachside dining. Start with some spicy-sweet pumpkin soup. Savor the spicyhot jerk chicken over pasta. Or choose a grilled red snapper that was still swimming this morning. Don’t be put off by the name of Bloody Bay, a sandy semicircle just north of Rutland Point, the site of Breezes, Riu and Sunset resorts. Some say it got its name from a vicious pirate battle. Others say it was the whalers who processed their quarry here. Today its white sands and azure waters lure beachgoers with their beauty — many patches open to the public, including one spot with pickup games of cricket and smoking barbecues of fresh lobster. Montego Bay Southwest of Montego Bay, the town of Sandy Bay offers the freedom to ride on horseback along the sea. Chukka Caribbean Adventures offers equestrian tours that provide panoramic views of the Jamaican coast and picturesque northern mountains. Ask about the nearby Lollipop Beach Club, which often brings in live bands. At the center of Montego Bay, private Doctor’s Cave Beach sprawls between Marine Park and the famous Hip Strip. Convenient to many hotels, these translucent waters known for their invigorating mineral content invite

swimmers. A food court, beach bar and cyber café provide meals, drinks and Internet access. The beach at Rose Hall, just east of Montego Bay’s airport, has attracted several of the island’s more exclusive resorts, including Half Moon, Rose Hall Resort, the RitzCarlton and Sandals Royal Caribbean. Visitors staying elsewhere can find soft sands and clear waters at the private Rose Hall Beach Club. Central North / Ocho Rios In the unassuming Trelawny town of Duncans, many would claim the beach at Silver Sands as best in Jamaica. Most of it is private, available to those who own or rent villas at Silver Sands Estate. Otherwise, look for the similarly spectacular public Fisherman’s Beach just west. It has a pleasant vibe and attracts fishermen, artists, craftsmen and cooks. At Island Village, a festival marketplace next to the cruise pier in Ocho Rios, there is a private beach along with the duty-free shops, reggae exhibition and local incarnation of Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville. East of the cruise pier is a sweeping arc of sand known as Turtle Beach, with the lofty Sunset Jamaica Grande at one end. The public sands are lined with resorts, sailboats, personal watercrafts, volleyball games, couples and kids. Down the coast a few minutes, golden afternoon sunlight illuminates the towering cliffs of Oracabessa, a name thought to derive from the Spanish words oro (gold) and cabeza (head). Certainly the world of literature found gold here. Ian Fleming, the former British spy who created James Bond, lived and drew inspiration at GoldenEye, now an Island Outpost resort that attracts jetsetters and celebrities. Scenes from the film Goldfinger were filmed down at James Bond Beach, a spectacular site of crystal clear-waters fronting lush mountains. Take a personal watercraft tour for a unique peek at the estates of the rich and famous. Catch a reggae concert on the beach. Perched high on a hill overlooking Port Maria sits the estate called Firefly, former home


© Eric James/Alamy

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of English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer Noël Coward. Today $10 gets you a tour of the historic house and view of the panoramic shore. Port Antonio More stunning and less crowded than elsewhere, the beaches here put Port Antonio on the map. Jamaican Reef Beach, a short, clean, private strip of sand within Port Antonio Marina, is convenient for cruisers in town for the day. The beach is well admired from a dining table or barstool at Norma’s. Once upon a time at private Frenchman’s Cove east of town, you might have run into Queen Elizabeth or the lesser royals Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. The beauty of this narrow beach derives from its sandy bottom and the fresh waters flowing from a stream. At neighboring San San Beach, frequented by the wealthy owners of fancy homes nearby, guests of the Jamaica Palace, Goblin Hill and Fern Hill resorts can use the private

beach for free. An offshore island is good for snorkeling, but beware of spiny sea urchins if you step onto it. The Blue Lagoon appeared in the movies Cocktail and Club Paradise, but not in the eponymous classic starring Brooke Shields. That’s a myth. Technically not a beach, this private swimming hole’s colors are recast by the sun, making the waters seem emerald, jade and sapphire. Arawak natives believed the inlet was bottomless, but current estimates are 180–200 feet, fed by the salty sea and freshwater springs. Rent a snorkel to see rainbow-colored fish. Another mile down the coast at Fairy Hill, beautiful Winnifred Beach offers clear waters and teeming coral reefs perfect for snorkeling. Popular with locals, this pretty gem buzzes with vendors selling crafts and preparing fresh fish and jerk delights. Sweating over the flames of a dozen pits at Boston Bay, the muscular masters of jerk, a fiery cuisine invented here in Portland


Club Hotel Riu Ocho Rios

parish during slavery, zealously guard their family recipes. This public beach is known as much for its piquant aroma of chicken and pork grilling slowly as for its golden sands or turquoise waters. Kingston Fifteen minutes from Port Royal, the languorous island of Lime Cay, with clear waters, white sands and little else, is the perfect spot for a day of swimming, snorkeling and yachting near the big city. The pretty public beach is open to anyone who can get out there. From Morgan’s Harbour at Port Royal, a boat shuttle or rental can be arranged. South Coast Travelers in search of an authentic, timeless Jamaica find it at Treasure Beach, a charming string of fishing villages on the southwest coast. Among its coves and bays, with a mix of

sandy and rocky shores, dark and light sands, fishermen’s enclaves and swimming spots, Treasure Beach lives up to its lofty name. Four lovely, laid-back, public beaches are perfect for swimming, snorkeling, biking or hiking. At Calabash Bay, friendly fishermen dock their brightly painted canoes to unload the daily catch. Visitors assemble in beachfront cafés and huts to taste the fare, seasoned and grilled to perfection. To hang awhile at Treasure Beach, check out bohemian Jake’s, which exudes the local personality from its secluded cottages and hotel rooms amid the ackee, almond and guinep trees. A more upscale South Coast can be found at Whitehouse, where Sandals maintains its section of beach to a very high standard, raked and cleaned each morning. Protected by a reef, waters are as still as a millpond. Visitors not staying at the luxurious Sandals can purchase a day pass that includes resort facilities, meals, drinks and watersports.

Stroll the silky sands until you spot an inviting bar, then stop and chill awhile with the friendly mix of locals.

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158 ART AND SOUL


ART AND SOUL At the crossroads of the Old and New Worlds, Jamaica united a mélange of cultures and nationalities over hundreds of years. Spanish, English, West African, Chinese, Indian — these and many other influences gave birth to various art forms that, over time, have evolved into endemic characteristics of this island nation. “Out of Many, One People” is Jamaica’s motto; however, out of one people, many artistic expressions. A country brimming with cultural and historical pride, Jamaica produces some of the Caribbean’s finest artists in a variety of ways. BY PATRICIA BORNS

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160 ART AND SOUL

Edna Manley, the wife of Prime Minister Norman Manley, brought the art of ordinary working folk to Jamaica's attention in the 1930s.

A Feast for the Eyes Paul Rhodes not only fell in love with Jamaica on vacation, he fell in love with Jamaican art. His Port Antonio resort overflows with trophies from a collecting habit that he calls “one part investment and nine parts love.” A world-class museum, 30 galleries, the Edna Manley School of Visual Arts, and hundreds of working artists support the art scene here. Paul takes us inside, starting with the National Gallery in Kingston where his education began. “The art of Jamaica’s plantocracy was what I call ‘happy slave art’: Images of vast estates and smiling slaves painted in classic European style,” Rhodes says. Isaac Mendes Belisario, a Sephardic Jew painting at the time of emancipation, was the first artist schooled in those landscapes to look behind the smiles. His lithographs of the slaves’ Jonkonnu ritual — typically celebrated on Christmas Day — are so detailed that he captures the military and spiritual symbols on the costumes. Fast-forward to Edna Manley, the wife of Prime Minister Norman Manley, who brought the art of ordinary working folk to Jamaica’s attention in the 1930s. The National Gallery collection of her work shows the artist’s conscious shift to an Afrocentric style that better represented her country. Her early carving, Negroe Aroused, became a symbol of hope for the struggling masses. “From that point, a true school of Jamaican art began,” Rhodes says. The National Gallery also introduced Rhodes to Jamaica’s intuitive artists: the soulful paintings of Kingsley Thomas; the elaborately painted masks of Nakazzi Hutchinson; the beautiful portraits of Albert Huie; and his favorite artist, Everald Brown, whose Rastafari-inspired mountain scenes show the spirits connected to the land. “The intuitives took me away. Their art is easy to grasp and like,” he says.

The largest of Jamaica’s private galleries, Olympia Art Centre has exhibited contemporary Jamaican artists for decades. The must-see here is a huge mural on the mezzanine floor by Barrington Watson, a master painter known for his luminosity. More venerable still, Hugh Dunphy’s Bolivar Gallery is the island’s longestrunning, with a penchant for Asian art and Jamaican furniture. Rhodes purchased his first painting at the Mutual Life Gallery from Gilou Bauer: “Gilou’s mission is to make sure the artists get their due. She features the avant-garde at the front of the gallery, but don’t miss the many artists from different periods in back. Hers is one of the finest collections for sale.” Broken tools. Cat-eye marbles. The multimedia sculptures of Mazola, a Kenya-born Jamaican artist, are scattered throughout galleries around the island. William “Woody” Joseph is another sculptor who carves African spirits from the roots of cedar trees. Long before the art community embraced him, the Grosvenor Gallery exhibited Woody’s work. Scores of bronze and ceramic masks by Gene Pearson adorn the walls of Rhodes’ resort, Great Huts in Port Antonio, expressing this artist’s fascination with the Nubian people. Pearson is as accessible as his work is renowned. “In his kindness and his great dreads, Gene exudes the spirit of Africa,” Rhodes says. “Visit him in his studio if you have the opportunity. I was able to buy pieces off of his own wall.” Rhodes regularly combs Island Art and Framing and Lavange. “I’m blown away by these stores. Their eye for fine paintings and accessories is impressive,” he says. He finds inexpensive pieces everywhere, from roadside wood carvers to the Grosvenor Gallery’s collection of the ubiquitous Jamaican signs seen on telephone poles. “I can’t emphasize enough that Jamaican art is not elitist,” says Rhodes.


Patricia Borns

A DAY WITH ALBERT MINOTT “Y

ou gotta be a genius to play mento,” says the Jolly Boys lead vocalist Albert Minott as we set off for some sightseeing around Port Antonio, or “Porti” as it’s fondly known. Tall and rail thin, the septuagenarian superstar looks debonair in shades and a T-shirt emblazoned with the message, “Life is good.” “Minott! Grandpa!” friends call as we stroll through the warren of veggie vendors and crafters at Musgrave Market. A fan asks for Albert's autograph. Women want to take him home. For the stevedore’s son born in pre-Independence Jamaica, life is good, indeed. Albert was a performer from the time he dove for pennies tossed by cruise ship passengers who once flocked to Porti. “I answered an ad in the newspaper for a rumba boy,” he says as we stroll the waterfront with our scoops of Devon House ice cream. “Then a car arrived with this white man from America. He gave me a Fender guitar and $100 to learn to play.” Soon Albert was touring the U.S. in a carney show. Returning home, he and his friends played for food and drinks when Errol Flynn sailed into their lives aboard the Zaca and transformed the sleepy town with all the hijinks that a Hollywood millionaire could bring. Flynn called the mento players the Jolly Boys because they came across as a fun-loving bunch of guys. They became his house band. “A lot of movie stars walked this land,” Albert remembers as we wander through Frenchman’s

Cove. Where I see an empty beach that must be Jamaica’s most beautiful, he sees Liz Taylor and Dean Martin swanning around Jamaica’s most expensive hotel. Now, Albert is the show, leaping like a twentysomething onto stages in Europe, India and New York. No one is more surprised than he. “Jon bought this house for me,” he says, relaxing in the cool, in-town sanctuary where he lives with his daughter. Albert was holing up in a shack when Geejam producer Jon Baker began recording him and the other surviving Jolly Boys during a lull in studio bookings. What could their mento beat bring to Lou Reed’s “Perfect Day” or Amy Winehouse’s “Rehab?" With Albert’s crackling vocals, “Powda” Bennett on maracas, Johnny Henry on rumba box and three young newcomers, magic. “This is my beach.” Albert takes me to the sandy strip dotted with bright boats where he buys fish every morning and plays dominoes with his friends; then to the Old Hits Corner on Somers Town Road, where his generation took their dates to dance tight and slow. “This is the backside,” he says, smiling and moving his hips to remembered music. Rick Elgood, the band’s visual creator, opens his film A Jolly Boy with a flashback to young Albert diving for pennies. “It’s a back to the future moment. His ship has finally come in,” Elgood explains. Albert takes his fame in stride, anchored by life’s simple things.

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“It is art by and for the people. Anyone can find creations to delight the eye at a price they can afford.” Music to our ears Throughout colonial times, music and dance, not painting, gave Jamaica’s masses a release from the drudgeries of secondclass status. Today, music is the island’s chief export and social glue, pouring everywhere from boom boxes and open doors. Although you might not catch it at first, the beats running through the nightclub DJ’s dance mix connect every generation of Jamaican music back to West Africa. The result is a musical product that is hugely diverse yet bonded by a powerful identity, like Jamaica itself. Jamaican slaves learned the instruments and quadrilles of their masters, creating makeshift gowns for their own dances. Their cathartic musical form was called mento, a folk style that became the island’s first recorded music in the 1950s. “Mento is my life,” says 74-year-old Jolly Boys vocalist Albert Minott, whose band played as The Navy Swamp Boys for Errol Flynn and has made a smashing comeback in the 21st century. Played with a great variety of instruments, from banjo and clarinet to rumba box and sax, mento’s innocent-sounding melodies were laced with biting political satire and sexual double-entendres: The room is dark She said, “Come and eat This night food is very warm and sweet.” The lyrics from this 1950 song, “Night Food,” were banned by Parliament. With the electrification of the island after World War II, Jamaicans tuned to American movies and R&B in the 1960s, creating their own riff called ska. Ska’s choppy off beat and rude boy style were right for an island flexing its independence. This is also when enterprising artists like Prince Buster pioneered Jamaica’s sound system phenomenon, truck generator-powered turntables and speakers at street parties in Kingston neighborhoods, where DJs shuffled the tunes and stoked the crowd. In the late 1960s, ska evolved into rocksteady, infusing the sound with vocal harmonies and romantic lyrics. The style came and went so quickly that it’s tempting to dismiss it — but not so fast! Before reggae exploded onto the international music scene, an unknown trio — Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer and Peter Tosh — got their start singing three-part rocksteady harmonies as The Wailers. With their new Rastafarian consciousness and shuffle rhythms, The Wailers and other reggae bands still carried forward the harmonic thread.

What would the Marley phenomenon have been without Chris Blackwell, the Island Records founder who handed the artist $4,000 and said, “Go do an album”? At the Bob Marley Museum located in the star’s former home and recording studio on Hope Road in Kingston, the British music mogul who grew up in Jamaica is conspicuously absent. But watch the museum’s rare black-and-white footage of Marley rehearsing and performing. The transformation is mind-blowing. As Blackwell propelled Marley from talented rasta to rock star status, Jamaican music leapt to the world stage, becoming a product for mass export. Jazz musician and professor Seretse Small grew up with roots reggae. “In the 1970s, we were surrounded by amazing arrangers and tunesmiths writing great hooks. I thought Steel Pulse was the future; that we would improve on Marley layer after layer,” Seretse says. Everyone else thought so too, as Perry Henzell’s cult film The Harder They Come took world audiences inside the life of a young reggae singer played by Jimmy Cliff. But technology asserted itself in the form of computer software and dancehall. Each week in Kingston, 100 new dancehall CDs are born. The beats are laid down and improvised on in the recording studio, and play on the minibus two weeks later. “Dancehall digs deep into the well of our traditional kumina music,” observes Small. Widely practiced in St. Thomas parish, kumina is a religion, music and dance adapted from Africa’s Congo region. You can experience a kumina ceremony or learn its drumming patterns through occasional tours offered by resorts. If you do, you will hear echoes of its percussions and caller-response chants the next time you go clubbing. The Jamaica Cultural Development Commission had a hand in dancehall, too. For the past 40 years, drumming was the main diet of the island’s school music programs, and kumina’s rhythms were transcribed so they could be learned by computer-generated patterns. The average Jamaican child who couldn’t afford piano lessons could easily get hold of a pair of congo drums. Today, while dancehall cranks the night clubs and street parties, Jamaican music doesn’t stand still. “I’d like to see Jamaica become a live music capital,” says Small, whose publishing studio Griot Music is bringing a new generation of acoustic artists online. Performances by Bijean Gayle, Charmaine and Michael Harris fill Kingston with fresh sounds at Christopher’s Jazz Café, Redbones Blues Café, Whitebones Seafood Restaurant, Jo Jo’s Jerk Pit and the outdoor Terrace Bar at Susie’s Bakery. Seretse Small’s masterful guitar work supports many local performers and is not to be missed.

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Calendar of Events

Make sure to check the calendar to see whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening on Jamaica during your stay. Dates and venues are subject to change without notice. For more details and events, please go to visitjamaica.com.

January

Fi Wi Sinting

April

Accompong Maroon Festival

Somerset Falls, Portland

Jamaica Cricket Festival

Accompong, St. Elizabeth

876-913-0103

Kingston & Trelawny

876-952-4546

Misty Bliss Festival

876-967-03220 or 876-967-0657

Rebel Salute

Hollywell, Kingston

Jamaica International Kite Festival

Port Kaiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sports Club, Manchester

876-384-2923

Richmond Estate, St. Ann

876-934-0827

876-377-0622

Jamaica Jazz & Blues Festival

March

Trelawny 10K Road Race

Rose Hall, Montego Bay

Jamcen Health & Wellness Expo

Falmouth, Trelawny

305-932-9931

Mandeville, Manchester

876-610-0818

JSP High Mountain Coffee

876-381-4818

Trelawny Yam Festival

10K Road Race

Soul Rebellion Spring Break Party

Hague Show Grounds, Trelawny

Williamsfield, Manchester

Negril

876-610-0818

876-963-4211

516-850-6330

MBYC Easter Regatta

Royal Jamaica Yacht Club Spring

Montego Bay Yacht Club, Montego Bay

February

Tournament 2010

876-979-8038

Bob Marley Birthday Celebrations

Kingston

Treasure Beach Off Road Triathlon

Islandwide

876-383-2926

Treasure Beach, St. Elizabeth

Jamaica Polo Association

JAMFEST Spring Break

876-978-9950

Tournament

Concert Series

Kingston

Waves, Negril

May

876-952-4370

410-787-9500 ext. 230

21st Annual Jamaica

Jamaica Fat Tire Festival

AMCHAM/BMW Golf Classic

Product Exchange (JAPEX)

Ocho Rios

Caymanas Golf Club, Kingston

Ocho Rios & Montego Bay

876-975-3393

876-929-7866 / 7

876-926-3635 / 6

Sugarcane Carnival

Jamaica Orchid Society Show

Style Week Jamaica / Fashion Block

Round Hill Resort, Montego Bay

Kingston

Kingston

876-956-7050/5

876-927-6713

876-969-9645 / 3829


Calabash International

The Seville Emancipation Jubilee

Rose Hall Triathlon

Literary Festival

Seville Heritage Park, St. Ann

& Wellness Festival

Treasure Beach, St. Elizabeth

876-972-9407

Rose Hall, Montego Bay

876-965-3000

Jamaica Festival

888-910-7673

Kingston & Montego Bay

48th Port Antonio International

876-926-5726

Marlin Tournament

June All Jamaica Grill Off

Port Antonio, Portland

876-796-4008

August

876-927-0145 or 876-925-0699

Kingston

Mello-Go-Roun’

Jamaica Product Exchange (JAPEX) II

Caribbean Fashion Week

Kingston

Montego Bay

Villa Ronai, Kingston

876-926-5726 / 9

876-952-4425

876-968-1089

National Float Parade

Michael Holding Masters Cricket

Ocho Rios Jazz Festival

and Gala

Tournament

Islandwide

Kingston

Sabina Park, Kingston & Trelawny Stadium,

876-927-3544

876-926-5726 / 9

Trelawny

Treasure Beach Jazz Escape

Bath Food Festival

246-228-4717 or 718-270-5300

Treasure Beach, St. Elizabeth

Bath, St. Thomas

876-571-0818

876-860-2014

On the Edge Urban Art Festival

November Port Royal Music Festival

Kingston

September

Morgan’s Harbour Hotel, Port Royal,

876-909-9594

Stir It Up Film & Music Festival

Kingston

876-908-0398

786-208-0487

July

MBYC Annual

Restaurant Week

International Reggae Day

Fishing Tournament

Kingston, Montego Bay, Ocho Rios

Kingston

Montego Bay Yacht Club, Montego Bay

876-978-6245

876-929-0693

876-979-8083

Jamaica Open & Pro AM

Portland Jerk Festival

Wine and Food Festival

Montego Bay

Boston Playing Field, Portland

Knutsford Boulevard, Kingston

876-906-7636 / 7

876-715-6553

876-926-4378

Little Ochi Seafood Carnival

Shakti Love Fest

December

Alligator Pond, Manchester

Kingston & Negril

Flashpoint Film & Music Festival

876-965-4449

876-906-9403

The Caves, Negril

Makka Pro Surf Contest

975-957-0270

St. Thomas

October

Annie’s Revenge

876-750-0103

Pineapple Ball

Montego Bay

Reggae Sumfest

Ritz-Carlton Golf & Spa Resort,

305-665-0557

Catherine Hall, Montego Bay

Montego Bay

Reggae Marathon

876-953-2933

876-953-8150

Negril

Hi Pro Low / High Goal Family Polo

Jamaica Stay Week

876-922-8677

Tournament

Islandwide

Christmas Fest

St. Ann

876-437-4164

Kingston

876-952-4370

Lucea Across the Harbour

876-926-5567

Red Stripe Dream Weekend

Swim Meet & Regatta

New Year’s Harbour Fest and Fireworks

Negril

Lucea, Hanover

Downtown Harbour, Kingston

876-924-6761

876-977-0049

876-977-0049

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Useful Information As you get to know Jamaica, you'll learn the ins and outs of the culture and people who call this paradise home. But it always helps to have a little help â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and a nice crash course â&#x20AC;&#x201D; whenever exploring a new destination. Here is your guide to Jamaica to get you started on a memorable stay. Phone numbers and rates listed here were correct at press time.


Airlines Air Canada ....... 1-800-677-2485 / 924-8211 Air Europe...........................1-888-238-7672 Air Jamaica .......................... 1-888-359-2475 / 922-3460 Air Turks and Caicos .....................926-1762 American Airlines ...............1-800-744-0006 British Airways ....................1-800-247-9297 Caribbean Airlines ..............1-800-744-2225 Cayman Airways ...............1-800-422-9626 / 929-7778 / 929-7779 Continental Airlines ...........1-800-231-0856 Copa Airlines ....................1-800-234-2672 / 968-5330 / 926-0326 Delta Airlines ......................1-800-221-1212 Northwest Airlines ..............1-800-225-2525 Jamaica Air Shuttle.................. 906-9025-30 Spirit Airlines ......................1-888-477-4748 US Airways .........................1-800-428-4322 Virgin Atlantic ..................1-800-744-7477 / 971-8917 WestJet Airlines ..................1-800-538-5696 Airports Norman Manley International Airport, Kingston ..................... 1-888-AIRPORT / 924-8452-6 Donald Sangster International Airport, Montego Bay ........................................................952-3124 ATMs Most Jamaican ATMs (called ABMs on the island) accept international bank cards with Visa, MasterCard, Cirrus and Plus logos. Buses Buses are a cheap way to get around, although it will be an unfamiliar experience to most Westerners since bus stands are rarely marked and vehicles do not follow a strict schedule. Some resorts offer bus excursions to different tourist sites. Check with your hotel’s concierge for more information.

Climate Jamaica enjoys a tropical climate, characterized by high temperatures and humid conditions year-round. Average temperature ranges from 66 degrees Fahrenheit (19 degrees Celsius) to 99 degrees Fahrenheit (32 degrees Celsius). Though it’s known for warmth and sunshine, the island sees two rainy seasons from May to June and September to November. Also, hurricanes may pass over the island primarily from June to September. If it rains during your stay, don’t worry. Most times, the short tropical showers provide a welcome break from the afternoon heat. Credit Cards Major credit cards such as Visa, MasterCard and American Express are accepted throughout the island.

The fastest and most economical taxis are those used by locals, called “route taxis” — cars that drive a designated course and pick up and drop off passengers at will.

Currency The currency of Jamaica is the Jamaica Dollar. Licensed “cambio” (exchange) centers and commercial banks are accessible in all resort areas. Official currency exchange rates vary daily, so it’s advisable to shop around for the best rate before converting your cash. Customs and Duty United States residents who have been out of the country for 48 hours or more may take home items valued up to US$800 once every 30 days without incurring duty. Adults may include 200 cigarettes, 100 non-Cuban cigars and one liter of alcohol. A second liter of alcohol is allowed duty-free if it is produced by a Caribbean Basic country. Family members who return home together may combine their personal exemptions on a joint declaration. Visit cbp.gov/xp/cgov/ travel/vacation/kbyg/duty_free.xml for more information.

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Canadian residents who have been out of the country for more than 48 hours can claim up to CAN$400 worth of goods without paying duty if they carry the goods with them. After each absence of seven days or more, they can claim up to CAN$750 worth of goods without duty. Except for tobacco products and alcohol, they do not need to have the goods with them. Visit cbsa-asfc.gc.ca for more information. United Kingdom residents 17 or older may take home duty-free two liters of table wine and one liter of spirits or liquors, or two liters of fortified or sparkling wine or other liquors; 200 cigarettes or 100 cigarillos, or 50 cigars or 250 g of tobacco; 60 cc of perfume and 250 cc of eau de toilette; plus other goods worth up to £145. Travelers cannot group their allowances. Visit hmrc.gov.uk for more information. Departure Tax There is a $27 departure tax that must be paid upon departure. However, most airlines include this tax in their tickets. Otherwise, the fee may be paid only in cash upon check-in. Driving In Jamaica, drivers must keep to the left, although some flexibility is required to avoid collisions with pedestrians, cows, goats, chickens and other domestic animals. The speed limit is 30 mph (50 kmph) in urban areas and 50 mph (80 kmph) on highways. Given the mountainous terrain, rural roads are often winding, bumpy and narrow. Tourists can rent cars in most major towns and cities, and usually, clients must be no less than 25 years old to rent. The driver and front passenger are required to wear safety belts, and

children under 3 years old must travel in infant carriers or child safety seats. All drivers are required to carry a valid license. Jamaica recognizes valid International Driver’s Licenses, but visitors from North America may use their country’s license for up to three months per visit, and United Kingdom residents may use theirs for up to one year. Drugs In Jamaica, the use, sale and possession of drugs such as marijuana (ganja), cocaine, crack, ecstasy, heroin and any other controlled substances is illegal. Offenders are subject to severe punishments, including arrest, fines and imprisonment. Electricity Standard electrical service is similar to that of the United States and Canada: 110 volts, 50 cycles AC. However, there is 220 volts service available at some hotels. Holidays 2012 On public holidays, all government agencies, schools and most private businesses are closed, and much of the country celebrates. Please plan accordingly. New Year's Day .....Sunday, January 1 (actual) Monday, January 2 (celebrated) Ash Wednesday ........Wednesday, February 22 Good Friday ..............................Friday, April 6 Easter Monday ...................... Monday, April 9 Labor Day .......................Wednesday, May 23 Emancipation Day ........ Wednesday, August 1 Independence Day ............ Monday, August 6 Heroes’ Day ................... Monday, October 15 Christmas Day ............ Tuesday, December 25 Boxing Day ............Wednesday, December 26

Language The official language of Jamaica is English, although most locals speak Patois, a colorful dialect. Safety As with any place in the world, you should always remember to follow basic precautions to avoid possible predicaments. Keep all luggage in view at all times and your personal effects close to your body; don’t carry large amounts of cash; and avoid wearing expensive jewelry outside of your resort. Taxis Taxis are the most convenient mode of transportation, but not always the cheapest. All registered taxis in Jamaica are required by law to have red “PP” license plates. You are advised not to board any taxi operating illegally. Although all taxis have meters, drivers will rarely use them and will instead negotiate a fare with you. It is best to discuss this fare with the driver before boarding the taxi. The fastest and most economical taxis are those used by locals, called “route taxis” — cars that drive a designated course and pick up and drop off passengers at will. These are shared cabs that will usually pack several people willing to go on the same route. Tipping It is customary to leave a 10 to 15 percent gratuity at restaurants. Please make sure to check your bill, as some establishments will have already included the gratuity to your total. Water All piped water in Jamaica is treated and purified in accordance to international standards. You may drink it, bathe in and brush your teeth with it.


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172 JHTA MEMBERS HOTELS / RESORTS JHTA MEMBERS KINGSTON Altamont Court Hotel 1-3 Altamont Terrace, Kingston 5 876-929-4497/8 / 876-929-5931

Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel 17 Waterloo Road, Kingston 10 876-926-2211 Wyndham Kingston, Jamaica 77 Knutsford Blvd., Kingston 5 876-926-5430 / 7

MONTEGO BAY

Christar Villas Limited 99A Hope Road, Kingston 6 876-978-3933 / 7864 / 8066-71

Altamont West Hotel 33 Gloucester Ave., Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-9087 / 876-929-4497

The Courtleigh Hotel & Suites 85 Knutsford Blvd., Kingston 5 876-929-9000

Breezes Resort & Spa Trelawny Falmouth, Trelawny 876-954-2450

Golden Shore Resort Limited Lot 288b Windward Drive Lyssons, St. Thomas 876-982-9657 / 734-0923 / 4

Coyaba Beach Resort & Spa 22 Mahoe Bay, St. James 876-953-9150

Gore Villas 22 Trafalgar Road, Ste. 11 & 15, Kingston 5 876-978-1520 / 2

Doctor’s Cave Beach Hotel Gloucester Avenue, Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-4355

Hotel Four Seasons 18 Ruthven Road, Kingston 10 876-926-0682 / 8805

El Greco Resort 11 Queens Drive, Montego Bay, St. James 876-940-6116 / 940-6120

Jamaica Pegasus Hotel 81 Knutsford Blvd., Kingston 5 876-926-3690 / 9 / 926-3100/8

Grand Palladium Resort Point District, Montego Bay, St. James 876-619-0000

Kircamp Properties / The Gardens 23 Liguanea Ave., Kingston 10 876-927-8275

Half Moon, a RockResort Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-2211

Knutsford Court Hotel 16 Chelsea Ave., Kingston 10 876-929-1000 / 3407

Hilton Rose Hall Resort & Spa Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-2650

Liguanea Club 80 Knutsford Blvd., Kingston 5 876-926-8144 / 5 or 6

Holiday Inn Sunspree Resort Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-2485-9

Mayfair Hotel 4 West Kings House Close, Kingston 10 876-926-1610 / 2

Hotel Gloriana 1-2 Sunset Blvd., Montego Bay, St. James 876-979-0669

Medallion Hall Hotel 53 Hope Road, Kingston 6 876-927-5721 / 5866 Morgan’s Harbour Hotel Port Royal, Kingston 1 876-967-8040 Shirley Retreat Hotel 7 Maeven Ave., Kingston 10 876-927-9208 / 946-2679-81 Spanish Court Hotel 1 St. Lucia Ave., Kingston 5 876-926-0000 Strawberry Hill Hotel & Spa Liguanea, Kingston 6 876-944-8400

The Palmyra Resort & Spa The Palms, Rose Hall Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-9787

NEGRIL

Richmond Hill Inn Union Street, Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-3859

Beachcomber Club Norman Manley Boulevard Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4171-4

Beach House Villas Jamaica Ltd. Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4731 / 4647 / 9162

The Ritz-Carlton Golf & Spa Resort Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-2204 / 953-2800

Beaches Negril Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-9270-4

Riu Montego Bay Mahoe Bay, Rose Hall, Montego Bay 876-940-8010

Beaches Sandy Bay Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-5100-3

Round Hill Hotel John Pringle Drive, Montego Bay 1, St. James 876-956-7050

Breezes Grand Resort & Spa Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-5010-8

Sandals Carlyle Kent Avenue, Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-4140 Sandals Montego Bay Kent Avenue, Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-5510 Sandals Royal Caribbean Resort & Private Island Mahoe Bay, Rose Hall, Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-2788 Secrets St. James Montego Bay Montego Freeport, St James 876-953-6600 Secrets Wild Orchid Montego Bay Montego Freeport, St. James 876-953-6600 Silent Waters Villas White Sands Beach P.O., Montego Bay 876-971-9119-21

Caves Resort & Spa, The Lighthouse Road, Negril 876-957-0270 Charela Inn Hotel Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4277 / 4648-50 Cocolapalm Resort Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4227 / 3457 Coral Cove 2 Old Hope Road, Little Bay, Westmoreland 217-649-0619 Country Country Ltd Norman Manley Boulevard Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4273 Couples Negril Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-5960-9 Couples Swept Away Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4062-6

Iberostar Rose Hall Beach & Spa Resort Rose Hall Main Road, Montego Bay, St. James 876-680-0000

Sunset Beach Resort & Spa Montego Freeport, Montego Bay, Hanover 876-979-8800

Firefly Beach Cottages Negril 876-957-4368 / 9325

Luxury Tennis Golf Villas Rose Hall, Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-2732

Toby’s Resort 1 Kent Ave., Montego Bay, St. James 876-0952-4370

Foote Prints On The Sand Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4300

N Resort Falmouth, Trelawny 876-973-4124

Tryall Club Sandy Bay Main Road, Hanover 876-956-5660-3

Fun Holiday Beach Resort Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-957-3585

Palm View Resort & Conference Centre 22 Delisser Drive, Montego Bay 876-952-1738 / 8321 / 1800

The Wexford Hotel 39 Gloucester Ave., Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-2854-5

Grand Pineapple Beach Resort Norman Manley Boulevard Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4408 / 4475


The Golden Sunset Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4241/ 9703 Hedonism II Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-5200 Hotel Samsara Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4395 Jackie's on the Reef West End, Negril 876-957-4997 Kuyaba Negril Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-9815 / 4318 Moon Dance Villas Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-9000 Merrils Beach Resort Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4751 Negril Hills Golf Club & Resort Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4638 / 4240 / 3614 Negril Tree House Resort Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4287-8 Negril’s Idle Awhile Ltd. Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-3302 / 3303 Riu Club Negril Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-5700 / 5985 Riu Palace Tropical Bay Resort Bloody Bay, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-5900

Sandals Negril Beach & Spa Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-5216-7 / 5230-1/ 5254-5 Sea Splash Resort Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4041-3 Seawind Resort Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-9018 Seastar Inn Seastar Road, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-0553 Sunrise Club Hotel Ltd Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4293 Sunset at The Palms Resort & Spa Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-5350 / 5360 Tensing Pen Hotel West End Road, Negril 876-957-0387 Travellers Beach Resort Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-9308 / 3039 White Sands Cottages Ltd. Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril 876-957-4291 / 4445

OCHO RIOS Beaches Boscobel Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-975-7777 Breezes Runaway Bay Resort & Golf Club Runaway Bay, St. Ann 876-973-6099

Rockhouse Hotel Lighthouse Road, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4373

Chrisann’s Beach Resort (Affiliate) St. Mary 876-975-4467 / 4766

Rondel Village Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-4413 / 4651-2

Club Ambiance Runaway Bay, St. Ann 876-973-6167

Rooms On The Beach Negril Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-3500

Couples Ocho Rios Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-975-4271 / 5

Couples Sans Souci Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-994-1206 Crystal Ripple Beach Lodge White River Bay, Ocho Rios 876-974-6132 Fisherman's Point Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-4147 Franklyn D. Resort Runaway Bay, St. Ann 876-973-4591 / 8 Glenn’s Restaurant & Tower Cloisters Resort Ocho Rios, 876-975-4763 Gran Bahia Principe Jamaica Hotel Salt Coppers, Runaway Bay, St. Ann 876-973-7000 / 7655 Hibiscus Lodge Hotel 83 Main St., Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-2676 Jamaica Inn Main Street, Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-2514 / 8 Jamaica Treasures Villas c/o 17 Dacosta Drive, Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-6228 The Jewel Dunn’s River Beach Resort & Spa Mammee Bay, St. Ann 876-972-7400 Prospect Plantation Villas Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-994-1373 / 1452 Riu Club Ochos Rios Mammee Bay, St. Ann 876-972-2000 Rooms On The Beach Ocho Rios Main Street, Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-2008 / 6632 Royal Decameron Club Caribbean Runaway Bay, St. Ann 876-973-4675 / 6348 / 4802 Royal Plantation Golf Club & Spa 142 Main Street, Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-5601 Runaway Bay H.E.A.R.T. Hotel Runaway Bay, St. Ann 876-973-6671 / 4 Sandals Golf & Country Club (Affiliate) Upton, Ocho Rios 876-975-0119-21

Sandals Grande Ocho Rios Beach Villa Resorts Main St., Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-5486 Sunflower Beach Resort Villas / Leisure Holiday Runaway Bay 876-973-4809 Sunset Jamaica Grande Resort & Spa Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-2200 Super-Fun Beach Resort & Spa Runaway Bay, St. Ann 876-973-6924

PORT ANTONIO Bay View Villas Anchovy, Williamsfield Port Antonio, Portland 876-993-3118 Fern Hill Club Hotel Port Antonio, Portland 876-993-7374 / 5 Geejam Outpost Ltd. San San, Port Antonio, Portland 876-993-7000 Goblin Hill Villas Port Antonio, Portland 876-993-7443 / 5737 / 7549 Hotel Mocking Bird Hill Port Antonio, Portland 876-993-7267 / 7134

SOUTH COAST The Astra Country Inn Mandeville, Manchester 876-962-7758 Golf View Hotel & Conference Centre Mandeville, Middlesex 876-962-4471 / 4474 Jake’s Village Calabash Bay P.A., Treasure Beach, St. Elizabeth 876-965-3000 / 0635 / 3185 Mandeville Hotel 4 Hotel St., Mandeville, Manchester 876-962-2138 Marblue Villa Suites & Restaurant Old Wharf, Calabash Bay P.A. Treasure Beach, St. Elizabeth 876-965-3408 Sandals Whitehouse European Village & Spa Whitehouse, Westmoreland 876-640-3002 / 9

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174 JHTA MEMBERS SERVICES AND ALLIED AIRLINES & AIRPORTS Air Jamaica Limited 72-76 Harbour St., Kingston 876-922-3460-9 / 876-922-3560-3 / 4661-9 1-888-359-2475 British Airways Norman Manley International Airport 876-656-8961 Caribbean Airlines Norman Manley International Airport, Kingston 876-924-8318 Delta Airlines Inc. Sangster International Airport, Montego Bay 876-952-4033 Jamaica Air Shuttle Ltd. (Airways International Ltd.), Tinson Pen Aerodrome P.O. Box 50, Kingston 11 876-901-5196 / 818-8964 (c)

ASSOCIATIONS Association of Duty Free Shops of Jamaica, The P.O. Box 538, Montego Bay 876-952-6982-3 / 979-9028 Association of Jamaica Attractions Ltd., The c/o Tropical Battery 14 Ashenheim Rd., Kingston 11 876-923-6231-3 Jamaica Association of Villas & Apartments Pineapple Place, P.O. Box 298, Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-2508 / 975-5653 Jamaica Automobile Association 7 Central Ave., Swallowfield, Kingston 5 876-968-6007 / 929-1200-1 Jamaica Reggae Industry Association 18 Trafalgar Road, Kingston 10 876-978-7755 Jamaica Rent-A-Car Assoc. Ltd. 31 Hope Road, Kingston 10 876-920-2872 National Cruise Council Of Jamaica Shop #2, Montego Freeport Shopping Centre Freeport Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-6691

Business Recovery Services Limited T/A Eco Tours – The Enchanted Gardens 3rd Floor, Victoria Mutual Building 53 Knutsford Blvd., Kingston 5 876-920-8128 / 974-8508

AUDITORS

Chukka Caribbean Adventure Tours Ltd. Shop #2, Freeport Shopping Centre Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-6699 / 684-9934

CAR RENTALS

Doctor’s Cave Bathing Club White Sands Beach P.O. Gloucester Avenue, Montego Bay 876-952-2566

Challenger Transport Ltd. 24 Lyndhurst Road, Kingston 5 876-960-5974-5

Dolphin Cove P.O. Box 21, Dunn’s River, Ocho Rios 876-795-2272 Falmouth Jamaica Land Company 6A Holborn Road, Kingston 10 876-954-4321 or 305-539-6071 Galleon Captain Hook Jamaica #9 Half Moon Shopping Village Rosehall, Montego Bay, St. James 876-953-8016 Green Grotto Caves & Attractions St. Ann Development Company P.O. Box 205, Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-973-3217 / 2841 Kool Runnings Water Park Norman Manley Boulevard P.O. Box 3475, Negril, Westmoreland 876-957-5400 / 5620 / 5418

Budget Rent-A-Car / International Rental 53 South Camp Road, Kingston 4 876-759-1793

Fiesta Car Rentals (Ja) Ltd. 14 Waterloo Road, Kingston 10 876-926-0133 / 929-3832 Galaxy Leisure & Tours Ltd. 75 Red Hills Road, Kingston 20 876-925-4176 Island Car Rentals Ltd. 17 Antigua Avenue, Kingston 10 876-925-4176 Hertz / Liberty Car Rentals Ltd. 28 Sunset Blvd., P.O. Box 210 White Sands P.O., Montego Bay 876-952-4250 / 5200 Sunsational Car Rental & Tours Ltd. Suite 206, Chatwick Plaza 10 Queens Drive, Montego Bay 876-952-1212

CONFERENCE CENTERS Jamaica Conference Centre 14-20 Port Royal St., Kingston 876-922-9160-9

Mystic Mountain Limited P.O. Box 259, Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-3990 / 382-6124

Montego Bay Convention Centre Rosehall, Montego Bay 876-293-0393

VIP Attractions (Lost World Airport Attractions) 2A Hillcrest Avenue, Kinston 6 876-618-3651

ENTERTAINMENT

Zipline Adventure Tours P.O. Lithe Estate, Hanover 876-940-7394

AUDIO VISUAL COMPANIES ATTRACTIONS

Pricewaterhousecoopers P.O. Box 180, 32 Market St. Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-5065 / 6151

Appleton Estate Rum Tour c/o Appleton Estate Siloah P.O., St. Elizabeth 876-963-9215-7

Frame By Frame Film and Video Productions Ltd. (Island Stylee & R&R Television) 80a Lady Musgrave Road, Kingston 10 876-978-2200

Bob Marley Group of Companies 56 Hope Road, Kingston 6 876-978-2991 / 927-9152

Jamaica Audio Visual Company Ltd. (JAVCO). Shop #3, Half Moon Shopping Village Rose Hall, St. James 876-953-2546

Havana Club & Cigar Lounge Industrial Park Way/Gand Cayman BWI 345-954-6276 Headline Entertainment Ltd. 8 Haughton Ave., Kingston 10 876-754-1526

GROUND TOUR OPERATORS & TOUR COMPANIES Bamboo Beach Club Prospect, St. Mary 876-975-5122 Best Travel Ltd. 121 Main St., Ocho Rios 876-974-0653


Caribbean Cruise Shipping & Tours 66 Claude Clarke Ave., Montego Bay 876-952-6260 / 2007 Caribic Vacations Ltd 1310 Providence Drive, Ironshore Estates White Sands Beach P.O., St. James 876-953-9895 / 9878 Glamour Destination Management Company Lot 1225 Providence Ave., Ironshore Industrial Estate Montego Bay #2, St. James 876-953-3810 / 0762 Hola Tours & Travel Ltd. Chatwick Plaza, 10 Queens Drive, Montego Bay 876-971-1298 Holiday Services Ltd. 73 Main St., Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-2948 / 5377 / 0192 Island Hoppers Helicopter Tours Reynolds Pier, P.O. Box 226, Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-1285 Island Routes 5 Kent Ave., Montego Bay 876-979-9130 / 549-5940 Islandestiny Tour & Travel Shop #1, Tajmahal Shopping Plaza, Ocho Rios, St. Ann 876-974-6031

Knutsford Express Services Ltd. 69 Gloucester Ave., Montego Bay 876-971-1822 Leisure For Pleasure Holiday & Tours Ltd. 14 Ballatar Ave., Kingston 10 876-968-6986 / 6988 / 6819 Prestige Leasing & Tours Ltd. 53 South Camp Road, Kingston 4 876-759-1793 / 953-9764 / 952-8495 Sunshine Adventure Jamaica Ltd. Providence Drive, White Sands Beach P.O., St. James 876-953-2919 Tourism Consultants Ltd. P.O. Box 383, Ocho Rios 876-974-1921 Tourwise Ltd. 103 Main St., P.O. Box 17, Ocho Rios 876-974-2344 / 2323 Tropical Tours Ltd. 28 Queens Drive, P.O. Box 85, Montego Bay 876-952-1126 Vacation Master Jamaica Ltd. Shop #44 P.O. Box 394, Blue Diamond Shopping Mall Morgan Road, Montego Bay 876-953-2691 / 8357

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Echos Consulting Ltd. Technology Innovation Centre, 237 Hope Rd., Kingston 6 876-9512-2558

INTERIOR DESIGNERS Inter-Dec Designs Ltd. 35 Burlington Ave., Kingston 10 876-929-2683

MANAGEMENT COMPANIES Airports Authority of Jamaica Norman Manley International Airport Palisadoes, Kingston 876-924-8452-6 Evelyn Smith & Associates 43 Orange Bay Country Club Orange Bay, Hanover 876-869-8156 Falmouth Jamaica Land Company Limited 6a Holborn Road, Kingston 10 305-539-6071 Jamaica Business Development Corporation (JBDC) 14 Camp Road, Kingston 4 876-928-5161-5 Time Square Plaza P.O. Box 2989, Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril 876-957-9263

IN-BOND JEWELERS J.U.T.A. Negril Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril 876-957-4620

B.D. Dadlani Jamaica Ltd. 36 City Centre Building, P.O. Box 350, Montego Bay 876-952-3502 / 3476

Jamaica Co-Operative Automobile Limousine Tours Ltd. 80B Claude Clarke Ave. P.O. Box 265, Montego Bay 876-952-7574 / 8277

The Shoppes at Rose Hall P.O. Box 6576, Half Moon P.O., Montego Bay 876-953-3245 / 8739

Jamaica Cooperative Automobile Limousine Tours Ltd. 80B Claude Clarke Ave. P.O. Box 265, Montego Bay 876-952-7574 / 8277 Jamaica Tours 1207 Providence Drive, Ironshore P.O. Box 227, Montego Bay 876-953-3700

Swiss Stores Ltd. 107 Harbour St., P.O. Box 171, Kingston G.P.O. 876-922-8050-4 Tropicana Duty Free Jewellers 42-44 City Centre Building P.O. Box 538, Montego Bay 876-952-6982

MARKETING, PROMOTION & PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPANIES American Chamber of Commerce of Jamaica, The Room 119, Jamaica Pegasus Hotel 81 Knutsford Blvd., Kingston 5 876-929-7866-7 Amstar DMC Jamaica 28 Queens Drive, Montego Bay, St. James 876-971-9887 Caribbean World Enterprises Ltd. 28 Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive Montego Bay, St. James 876-952-6404

INSURANCE COMPANIES

Jamaica Union Of Travellers Association (JUTA) Negril Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril 876-957-4620

Billy Craig Insurance Brokers 28-30 Portsville Plaza, Montego Freeport Montego Bay #1 P.O. Box 214 St. James, Jamaica W.I. 876-952-5070

Johns Hall Adventure Tours 26 Hobbs Ave., Montego Bay, St. James 876-971-7776

CGM Gallagher Group 27 Harbour St., Kingston 876-948-6995

Creative Communications Inc. (Affiliate) 29 Munroe Road, Kingston 6 876-977-5020-4 JAMPRO Trade & Investment Jamaica (AFFILIATE) 18 Trafalgar Road P.O. Box 8658 C.S.O., Kingston 10 876-978-7755 / 3337

OURJAMAICAMAGAZINE.COM 175


176 JHTA MEMBERS

Marzouca Marketing & Sales Ltd. 39 Gloucester Ave. P.O. Box 326, Montego Bay 876-952-8784

MEDICAL SERVICES Allure Cosmetic Medical Centre. 644 Kingsley Ave., Suite 106 Orange Park, Florida, 32173 904-537-8118 Heart Institute Of The Caribbean Ltd. 23 Balmoral Ave., Kingston 10 876-906-2105-8 Hospiten Jamaica Ltd. Half Moon Shopping Village P.O. Box 2025 Half Moon, Rose Hall. Montego Bay 876-618-0290

PURVEYORS Appliance Traders Limited 35 Half Way Tree Road, Kingston 5 876-926-3371-5 Barnaby Engineering & Testing Serivces Ltd. 27 Queens Ave., Kingston 10 876-929-6111 Bogues Brothers Industries Ltd. 471/2 Old Hope Road, Kingston 5 876-978-4310-4 Caribbean Producers (Jamaica) Ltd. Unit #2, L.O.J. Freeport Center 1 Guinep Way, Montego Bay 876-979-8725-8 / 8134-6 Chas E. Ramson Ltd.. 449 Spanish Town Road, Kingston 11 876-923-5051 Cleopatra's Collection 13 Constant Spring Road Shop 22, Pavillion Mall 876-938-7633/ 968-4781 Cool Connection Ltd. / X-Pose Services (Affiliate) 12 Central Road, Kingston 10 876-968-9032 / 3 Diverseylever Jamaica Ltd. 83 Hagley Park Road, P.O. Box 230, Kingston 11 876-926-8678

Ecolab 6 Elgin Road, Kingston 5 876-926-0750 / 0755 GraceKennedy Ltd. 73-751/2 Harbour St., Kingston 876-922-3440-9 / 3540-5 Humiclima Jamaica Limited 77 Claude Clarke Ave. Flanker, Montego Bay 876-564-2959 Implementation Limited (Affiliate) 56 Hope Road, Kingston 6 876-978-2997-9 J. Wray & Nephew Ltd. 234 Spanish Town Road, P.O. Box 191, Kingston 11 876-923-7331-5 / 6670 Jamaica Bedding Company Ltd. 29 East St. Old Harbour, St. Catherine 876-983-0583 / 0646 Jamaica Broilers Group McCooks Pen, St. Catherine 876-943-4370 Kimberly-Clark Corporation 8 Olivier Road, Kingston 8 876-925-9723

Sun Island Jamaica Ltd. (Cm Associates) 45 Molynes Road, Kingston 10 876-926-1330-4 Therapeutic Caribbean Co. Ltd. (Morgans Group Of Companies) 68 Lady Musgrave Road, Kingston 10 876-927-7307 / 9466 / 5439

RESTAURANTS & BARS Cosmo’s Restaurant Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril 876-957-9072 / 4784 Evita’s Italian Restaurant Eden Bower Road, Ocho Rios, P.O. Box 118 876-974-2333 / 1718 / 1012 Margaritaville White Sands P.O., Montego Bay 876-952-4777 / 3290 Margaritaville Caribbean Bar & Grill P.O. Box #2819, Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril 876-957-4467 Versair In-Flite Services Norman Manley International Airport 876-924-8131-6

SPORTS

Perry’s Manufacturing Co. Ltd. 82 Hagley Park Road, Kingston 10 876-923-4810 / 4340

Caymanas Track Limited Gregory Park P.O. St. Catherine 876-988-2523-6

Red Stripe 214 Spanish Town Road, Kingston 11 876-923-9291

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

Rainforest Seafood Ltd. 23-25 Coconut Way, Montego Freeport Montego Bay 876-953-6688 Sealy Mattress Co. (W.I.) Ltd. 519 Spanish Town Road, P.O. Box 229, Kingston 11 876-923-8420 / 0363 or 765-2225 / 2233 Smith & Stewart Distributors Ltd. 2-10 McArthur Ave., Kingston 11 876-923-3020 / 5610

Anbell Agencies Ltd. 51 Hagley Park Road, Kingston 10 876-968-5640-1 Columbus Communications Jamaica Limited (Flow) 6 St. Lucia Ave. Courtleigh Corporation Centre (Ground Floor), Kingston 5 876-620-2200 / 3111 LIME (Cable & Wireless) 2-6 Carlton Crescent, Kingston 10 876-926-9455 / 936-2725


cartier.com

BALLON BLEU DE CARTIER CHRONOGRAPH 8101 MC CARTIER’S PASSION FOR DESIGN INNOVATION IS BROUGHT TO THE TRADITIONAL ROUND FACE WATCH. THE BALLON BLEU DE CARTIER’S CURVED FORMS ARE AS SOPHISTICATED AS THEY ARE ORIGINAL: THE SAPPHIRE-DECORATED CROWN, AROUND WHICH THE DIAL ORBITS, FEATURES UNPRECEDENTED DETAILS. ONCE AGAIN, CARTIER’S UNIQUE CREATIVITY TAKES A STEP FURTHER WITH DESIGN. POLISHED STAINLESS STEEL 44 MM CASE. SELF-WINDING MECHANICAL MOVEMENT, CARTIER CALIBRE 8101 MC (33 JEWELS, 28,800 VIBRATIONS PER HOUR), CHRONOGRAPH FUNCTION. SILVERED FLINQUÉ DIAL WITH SUN-LIKE FINISH. SCRATCH-RESISTANT SAPPHIRE CRYSTAL. ALLIGATOR STRAP.

Ocho Rios: 5 Tajmahal Shopping Center • Tel: 876 • 974 • 9341 - Island Village • Tel: 876 • 675 • 8998 Montego Bay: 24 Shoppes at Rose Hall • Tel: 876 • 953 • 9755 Negril: 2 Time Square Mall • Tel: 876 • 957 • 4922 Falmouth:106 Historic Falmouth Pier. Tel: 876.632.4875 www.casadeoro.com • info@casadeoro.com • Fax: 876 • 953 • 3377


E V ERY R OL E X I S M A D E FOR G R E ATNE S S . THE YACHT-M A S TER COME S W ITH A UNIQUE S A IL ING HER ITAG E . IT I S THE INS TRUMENT OF CHOICE FOR INSHOR E A ND OFFSHOR E R ACER S, A S W ELL A S THOSE ON L A ND. T H E YA C H T- M A S T E R I S P R E S E N T E D H E R E I N R O L E S I U M , A U N I Q U E COMBINATION OF 90 4L STEEL AND PL ATINUM.

the yacht-master

KINGSTON

The Mall Plaza, Constant Spring Road 926 4861

OCHO RIOS

Island Village Shopping Centre

OfямБcial Rolex Retailer since 1935 MONTEGO BAY Shoppes at Rose Hall

675 8975 953 9274

our-jamaica-2012  

JAMAICA 2012 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE JAMAICA HOTEL &amp; TOURIST ASSOCIATION FUN IN THE SUN A little more Taj Mahal Plaza &amp; Harbour...

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