Issuu on Google+

COMMUNITY 3 | OUR COLUMNISTS 4-5 | YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS 8-9

POSTAL CUSTOMER

union county

A great community newspaper.

VOL. 6, NO. 39

SEPTEMBER 24, 2011

INSIDE www.ShopperNewsNow.com

|

www.facebook.com/ShopperNewsNow

|

twitter.com/shoppernewsnow

Fair winners 4-H wins big See page 8

Home to roost Chicks go to the house See Cindy’s story on page 9

FEATURED COLUMNIST BONNIE PETERS

Hogskin Hero Part II of the Dr. Claudius Capps Story See page 4 The Pleasant Valley Boys – Mark Derringer, Burl Wynn, Harvey Rines, Tim Buckner, Terry Myers and newcomer to the group Bobby Mink – start the music at the Luttrell Bluegrass Festival. Photos by C. Taylor

Vote!

ite R Favor

PER-NEW OP F ST OF EST BE

S

SH

For YOU

See pages 6 and 7

ONLINE

DO YOU

LIKE? TELL US!

Festival hits a high note By Cindy Taylor The Luttrell Bluegrass Festival celebrated its third year, and 2011 certainly hit a high note with music, food and crafts. After presentation of colors and prayer, Luttrell Mayor Johnny Merritt opened the ceremonies by introducing the park board members, thanking Mayme Taylor and Jody Smith for their work in pulling the festival together and then presenting the “Key to the City” to two very important people. “I am fi xin’ to impress you,” said Merritt. “The city of Luttrell is blessed, and I have two very special Luttrell residents I want to present to you. It is a crying shame we haven’t recognized these two before now, and I am here to remedy that. I am proud and honored that both of you have chosen to stay and retire here in Luttrell. The first is Nancy Eileen Monroe.” Monroe taught in the Union County school system for 55 years and has been recognized statewide

for her contributions to the children of Union County as the longest serving teacher. Merritt asked for a show of hands from all those present who had been taught by Miss Eileen and nearly every hand went up. “I just did what was needed,” said Monroe. “I am proud to have taught in Union County schools and proud to be here.” Merritt then honored veteran Roy Williams. Williams fought with the Army Rangers in Korea, retired and then volunteered to join again with the Air Force during the Vietnam War. “This man took names and kicked butt,” said Merritt. “He has done some pretty impressive stuff in the service. He went above and beyond and we want to honor him. He is a true hero.” “I just did what I thought I had to do,” said Williams who will soon be 80 years old. The Pleasant Valley Boys entertained throughout the day, along with Ashley Diane, a children’s

competition and many other groups. Tim Buckner was responsible for coordinating the bands and folks were entertained from start to finish with bluegrass and then gospel from Michael and Delilah Kitts. Shade tree pickers livened up the top of the hill with down-home tunes. Bridget Mathews sold cotton candy to raise money for the Luttrell PTO to buy shades for the LES cafeteria. Uncle Butch’s BBQ returned this year as did the Masons with their chow-chow and apple butter. More vendors participated than in years past. Haley Brooks won the children’s music competition and received a paid spot to perform at the upcoming Union County Heritage Festival. Brooks is an accomplished artist who released her first CD with Josh Collins last April. The recording includes one track written by Brooks herself. Mayme Taylor is the facilitator of the event and feels that this year really started to bring people in and

Haley Brooks won the children’s competition to receive a paid gig at the Union County Heritage Festival.

help them realize all that Luttrell has to offer. “I want to give special thanks to the Park Board for their financial support,” said Taylor. “Also to Phil Ruth for volunteering his time, fuel and equipment to shuttle people into the park. To Mayor Johnny Merritt for his time spent on preparing the park, fuel and equipment for shuttling people, and money spent out of his pocket to recognize members of the community. To Merle FM for all their effort and support, our secret judges who had a really tough time picking a winner out of our outstanding children musicians and the kids who competed. All were awesome.”

To page 2

The Shopper-News is now on Facebook! Check us out for updates, photos and more! www.facebook.com/ ShopperNewsNow

Commission stonewalls school board No tax increase to fund school deficit

4509 Doris Circle 37918 (865) 922-4136 news@ShopperNewsNow.com ads@ShopperNewsNow.com EDITOR Cindy Taylor brentcindyt@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Darlene Hutchison hutchisond@ ShopperNewsNow.com Shopper-News is a member of KNS Media Group, published weekly at 4509 Doris Circle, Knoxville, TN, and distributed to 11,000 homes in Union County.

By Cindy Taylor It was a solemn-looking group of commissioners, school board members, school system employees and other officials who met in the Union County High School auditorium Sept. 19 to discuss the school budget. The auditorium was more than a third full by 6:30 for the 7 p.m. meeting, and residents and students continued to flow in for another 30 minutes. The audience and officials were united in mind for only

a few moments during the Pledge of Allegiance. For the remainder of the meeting, snickers and protests could be heard from the back of the room as commissioners and school board members either asked pointed questions or pleaded their particular cases. County Commission and the school board have been in talks for months over a school system budget that is more than $700,000 in the red. Those talks erupted into fullblown controversy last week due to a letter that was sent home with each student. At the time, no one would admit to the origin of the letter, Director of Schools Wayne Go-

forth denied any involvement with the letter, and school principals refused to acknowledge the author or individual who instructed them to send the letter home. On Sept. 19, Union County Mayor Mike Williams advised the audience on expected behavior before giving a slide presentation showing money budgeted to the school system in the past years. “The purpose of this meeting is for the County Commission and the school board to go over some budgetary items,” said Williams. “We appreciate your attendance and ask that you be respectful of one another. You may have questions

throughout the meeting, but hopefully as the meeting progresses those questions will be answered. If you will be patient until the end we will open up the mic, and if you have further questions we will allow those to be addressed. We do request that those questions pertain to the subject matter. We will not tolerate personal attacks or outbursts. If you cannot abide by this we have officers here who will escort you out.” Commissioner Jeff Brantley made a motion at the Sept. 12 County Commission meeting to keep the

To page 2

401(k) Rollovers Made Easy Toby Strickland Investment Representative

FREE

Large selection of

IGA 2 Ltr COLA

ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES

Plu# 18 Expires 9/30/11

THIS IS THE NEXT BIG THING!

2615 Maynardville Highway • Mon-Sat 8-8 • Sun 10-6

992-0785

• 1784 Maynardville Hwy.

7047 Maynardville Hwy. Knoxville, TN 37918

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

865-922-5575 MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING


business

2 • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS

Prevention is key at Makzy Pediatrics By Cindy Taylor

Men and their ‘man bags’ Chiropractic Outlook By Dr. Darrell Johnson, DC

I

t’s not just women who put themselves at risk when they place fashion and style considerations over the more pedestrian concerns of comfort and safety. Women still pretty much have a monopoly on wearing high-heeled shoes, the bane of orthopedic surgeons, podiatrists and chiropractors worldwide. But they no longer have the market cornered on oversized bags slung over one shoulder. Men, prompted perhaps by the example of celebrities like soccer’s David Beckham and others, are using oversized “man bags” on a more regular basis. As their arsenal of electronic gadgetry has grown – phones, laptops, Kindles, etc. (toss in a change of clothes for the gym) – it’s become arguably more necessary to have a way to carry it all. The problem, though, is the same for both men and women: carrying a substantial weight on one shoulder for a prolonged period is going to cause back and shoulder pain. It can also impact posture and ultimately lead to back pain. Chiropractors recommend carrying only what you need in a bag and switching shoulders frequently. Talk with your chiropractor about the danger of heavy shoulder bags. Brought to you as a community service by Union County Chiropractic; 110 Skyline Drive, Maynardville, TN; 992-7000.

Seeking preventative health care may not be at the top of most folks’ “to do” lists, but for Dr. Far (as he is known by his patients) it is one of the most important aspects to achieving a longer, healthier life. Dr. Mahmoud Farkhondeh has long been an advocate for good nutrition and healthy lifestyles that can benefit children and aid them in becoming healthy adults. “If we can educate parents and stop the mindless eating that we as a nation have fallen into, it would go a long way toward improving the health of our children,” said Far. Far, who has been recognized as one of America’s top pediatricians on two different occasions, is a Diplomate of the American Board of Pediatrics and has been practicing medicine for 10 years. Makzy Pediatrics in Maynardville was established in 2005, has been in the current lo-

Dr. Mark Far cation since 2008 and now has more than 4,000 patients in the practice. The office is more like a child’s playground than a medical office, with themed rooms such as Outer Space and Nemo, bright colors and a homey atmosphere. A fairly new parent himself with a 10-month-old, Far now has even more reason to be concerned about children’s health. “We have to start from the beginning,” said Far. “We need to introduce fruits and vegetables early and teach children how

Festival hits a high note

Commission stonewalls

From page 1

From page 1

New to the festival this year was a car show that drew more than 15 participants and offered food from Malone’s Chuckwagon at the Luttrell Elementary School parking lot. Taylor sent out a special thank-you to Cody Clabough for allowing grandparents Steve and Connie Clabough to show his 1940 Chevy. Taylor also thanked the secret donor who paid to have Michael and Delilah Kitts perform, Julie Graham at the Chamber for all her support, the Heritage Festival for giving the winner a spot at their festival and Lee Carver for managing the car show. She also thanked the Gibbs ROTC commanded by Col. Melvin Shafer for

presenting the colors and the Rev. Doyle Wolfenbarger who opened the festival with prayer. Taylor asked to be forgiven if anyone was forgotten or not listed. This year’s festival raised more than $2,000 to benefit the Luttrell Volunteer Fire Department. The fire department also sold food, and attendance was good enough that they had to purchase additional food to keep the festival attendees fed. “With help like I got this year, this event will continue to grow,” said Taylor. “I know we have issues with parking and we will be looking at ways to remedy that situation. But hey, good news, now we have parking issues!”

Classy Kids Childcare NOW ENROLLING for our

Preschool Program & After-School Programs Classy Kids is in each Union County Elementary School providing care after school from 3pm - 6pm each day. CALL TODAY TO ENROLL

992-KIDS (5437) April Cox-Headrick

State assistance accepted at all programs

same tax rate and funding to the schools as 2010, but Williams requested that Brantley rescind the motion, and he did so. “I would ask Commissioner Brantley to give us at least one opportunity to work with the school board and the school system to see if we can come up with something,” said Williams. “I am only asking for one meeting to see if we can get closer to where there is some form of cooperation between the two. We want the public to fully understand that we are trying to work together.” When it became clear during the Sept. 19 meeting that there would be no resolution to the school system’s budget issues, Brantley made the motion once again to pass the same tax levy as the previous year. This drew a quick second and passed with a majority vote. Joyce Meltabarger abstained due to her employment with the school system. R.L. Jones held to a vote against the motion, along with Chris Upton and Jonathan Goforth. Jones was hoping to get an answer to his question on whether or not the bus service to schools would cease if he voted yes but was unable to get that answer once the voting had commenced. Dean Hill was not present at the meeting. All other commissioners voted a resounding yes in agreement to no increase in taxes.

Brantley has been accused of having his own agenda for standing against a tax increase since his sister, Yhonda Jones, had applied for the job Wayne Goforth now holds. Brantley contends that his sibling is happy with her position with Greene County Schools central office where she is a supervisor over six schools working under the Director of Greene County Schools. “This is not a personal attack against Director Goforth,” said Brantley. “I have talked to the people in my district and almost none are in favor of any kind of tax increase. My job is to represent those people.” This view has been voiced among the majority of commissioners. Some commissioners and most school board members were under the impression that this meeting was intended to provide an opportunity for a workshop between the two parties. Commissioner Gary England had said at the Sept. 12 meeting that setting a tax rate that night would pretty much end negotiations with the school board and wondered why a future meeting would be needed if a tax rate was set. Many admitted to being surprised when the Sept. 19 meeting became an official County Commission meeting and an official mo-

(865) 992-TEAM (8326)

Eddie Perry 865-414-9782

to maintain a healthy lifestyle. You should enjoy your food, but health comes first.” Far is a self-taught cook and would like to introduce classes in the future to teach patients what foods to rely on for their health. “I would like to see people practice good nutrition for good health,” said Far. “I’m not into having a practice where patients have to keep coming back because of health issues. I would like to heal any health issues they are experiencing and then see them mostly for well checks. I would like to see my patients have a balance of prevention and medication so hopefully they won’t have to be on permanent medications. These add expense, can cause other side effects and interfere with school and life.” The practice treats ages from birth to 18 years and is open six days a week. They will file all insurance and attempt to

tion was made. The school board members were asked pointed questions on what cuts they planned to make and if they had put a formula in place to avoid a budget deficit in the future. This question seemed to come as a surprise since most school board members were expecting the meeting to be a discussion setting, not a decision making one and were not prepared to respond to that question. “My understanding was that we would meet tonight with the commission to look at our budget and try to find a common ground where we could work this out,” said school board member Mark DeVault. Williams said that he spoke with school board chair Brian Oaks on Sept. 15 and told him that the meeting was listed in the Knoxville News Sentinel as a commission meeting and would be held as such. Williams said that he explained to Oaks that the school board should come prepared and bring all possible information. The audience was just as surprised when the meeting was adjourned with no opportunity for them to speak. Marsha Raley is a business owner and has a sophomore at Union County High School. “Most people are here because they wanted to address the commission and the school board,” said Ra-

work with patients who may not have full coverage. Their mission is to care for all children. Far believes vitamin supplements, especially vitamin C, are components to leading a healthy life and takes them himself. “Nutrition is the key to preventing a lot of illnesses and having good energy,” said Far. “Children can be started on multivitamins at 2 years of age. Your body will expel what it can’t use.” Far received his training in large cities but is happy to be practicing medicine in a small community. “I want to give back something to society,” said Far. “Kids like to learn things in a fun way. If I can help them learn one thing that makes a difference in improving their health, then I have achieved my goal.” The office is located at 147 Oakland Lane in Maynardville and can be reached at 992-9977.

ley. “My husband and I have a business, and if we have to cut something we are the ones who don’t get paid. People in the higher ups may have to take a pay cut to fund the smaller salaries. Also, if the school board is thinking of taking away extracurricular activities in the budget cuts, there will be more trouble with kids in the county.” “Since we will have to meet again, we didn’t want to have a public discussion,” said Williams. “We will let the public address the issues at our meeting Sept. 29.” Any hopes the school board may have had for additional funding from County Commission were dashed, and it’s back to the chalkboard for them to determine not if, but where cuts will have to be made. If no balanced budget is in place by Oct. 1, the state could make the decision to step in and implement its own agenda. The school board has called an emergency meeting 6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 26, in the high school auditorium. If no decision is reached, additional meetings are scheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 27, and Thursday, Sept. 29. Union County Commission will hold a special called meeting 7 p.m. Sept. 29 at the courthouse with plans to finalize the budget.

Debbie Cox 865-679-7084

Debbie Perry 865-809-1583 REDUCED! – Privacy, seclusion, wildlife all within walking dist to Norris Lake. Owner moving and must leave. Situated on dead end rd. Includes wood stove (wood included). Second living qtrs down for fam, friends or extra income! $179,900. REDUCED

4378 Suite A, Maynardville Highway • Maynardville Email: firstteamrealty@bellsouth.net • www.FirstTeamOnLake.com Mark Mahoney

to $140,000!

REDUCED! CUSTOM BUILT RANCHER – Union Crt S/D. Huge open floor plan, sloped ceiling, split BRs, trey ceiling in master, hardwood, berber carpets, alarm system & much more! REDUCED! $169,000. REDUCED! $35,995. $30,995. THREE ACRES – Near Knox Cnty line mins to Gibbs. Huge rd frontage, wonderful mtn views. Partial wooded w/great bldg sites. Liveable single wide. City sewer & water on property.

NEW LISTING! Nice lakewiew lot overlooking main channel of Norris Lake. Ready for your dream home. $19,900.

BRICK FRONT RANCHER – Updated windows, appliances & new heat pump. Awesome screened-in porch, lam flooring, berber crpt & more! Don’t miss this deal! $109,900.

PERFECT PLACE TO CALL HOME – 3BR/2BA, eat-in kit, 1.06 acre lot w/beautiful cabs in kit, hdwd flooring, front porch, deck & wood fencing on back. 2-car gar & strg in bsmnt. Great location! $124,000.

865-244-8870

GIBBS AREA – Within walking distance to Gibbs High. Many extra features. Full brick on corner lot w/professional landscaping, sidewalk, storage bldg, sunroom storm doors, drop-down ladder for strg access & work bench in gar. All appl to remain. $149,900.

NICE LEVEL BUILDING LOT off Tanglewood Road. Grand mountain views. $16,800.

ALL BRICK RANCHER! – On level lot, 1222 SF, 3BR/1BA, LR, kit w/all appliances. Laundry room, 1-car gar, cov front porch & patio on back. H&A unit 4 yrs old, roof 2 yrs old. New front & back doors & new gar door. PRICED TO SELL! BRING ALL OFFERS! $90,000.

UPDATED, REMODELED! – On 29.90 acres. 2BR/1BA, kit/dining w/ DW, range/oven. Office, lam & vinyl flrs. Dbl pane windows, 2 decks, full unfin bsmnt, siding & roof 2 yrs old. Approx 21 acres pasture & 8.50 woodland. Creek, shed, chicken house. Extra well & septic on prop for mobile hm, etc. Mins to Big Ridge State Park & Norris Lake. $210,000.

NEW DEVELOPMENT – with paved roads & city water. Beautiful views of mtns and Norris Lake! $19,000.

DOUBLE WIDE – with permanent foundation qualified for FHA financing. Eleven years old. 3BR/2BA, in very sound condition on almost 1 acre w/large spacious rooms and many extras.

$72,000.

JUST LIKE NEW & READY TO MOVE IN! – 1.13 acres, 3BR/2BA, eat-in kit w/range-oven, fridge, MW. Laund closet w/W&D. LR, blinds throughout, crpt & vinyl. BEST EVER GARAGES! 3-car on main w/openers + bsmnt gar w/opener, workshop & extra strg. Huge deck off kit w/built-in picnic table & swing. Mins to Big Ridge State Park & Norris Lake. $142,500.

2BR/1BA ON 2 ACRES! – LR has nice stone, woodburning fireplace, eat-in kit totally remodeled. Laundry room/sunroom, hardwood, laminate & vinyl flooring. 1-car carport, storage shed, seasonal lake views, lake access area minutes from home. Paved driveway, shared well. $89,000.


UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • 3

Leadership class hits the waves

community

Leadership Union County Class of 2011 held its final session Sept. 15 with a tourism and history day. It was a blustery day on Norris Lake, but class members took to the pontoon boats and cruised from Hickory Star Marina to Sunset Bay and back.

Humane Society motorcycle ride upcoming The fifth annual Union County Humane Society Ride Like an Animal Motorcycle Run will be held Saturday, Oct. 1. Registration starts at 10 a.m., and bikes are out by noon. The ride is a scenic 100 miles through Union, Grainger and Claiborne counties. The ride ends at Beach Island Marina for food, music and refreshments. Cost is $20 for one rider and includes a Tshirt. Cost for one rider and one passenger is $30 and includes two T-shirts. Preregister by Sept. 28 at www. unioncountyhumanesociety.org or by phone with Jerri Crews, 278-3187, or Susan Branson, 382-0829.

Standing in front of the fireplace in the old Irwin School, now located at the museum, are Leadership 2011 Class members: Mason Simpson, Kay Jones, David McIntosh, Debbie Perry, Liz Chadwell, Gariann Anesko and facilitator Brenda Sweet.

Cindy Taylor

Veterans open house upcoming All veterans are invited to an open house sponsored by American Legion Post 212, Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Tri-County Veterans Honor Guard and the American Legion Auxiliary from 1-5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8, at 140 Veteran St., Maynardville. Entertainment and refreshments will be provided. This is an opportunity for veterans and family to meet each other or join these organizations. No alcohol allowed on the premises.

Sunset Bay Property Owners Association president David McIntosh (also a class member) greeted the class when they disembarked at the Sunset Bay Clubhouse and spoke briefly about the area before providing a tour through the neighborhoods. Brenda Sweet and J.V. Waller entertained class members with information and history lessons during Barbara Williams and David Nevin greet students at Union County High School with a smile, an the cruise, then it was on to encouraging word and some free candy. Photos by C. Taylor the Union County Historical Society Library/Roy Acuff Museum where Martha Carter dispensed a wealth of information about Union County and the people who helped form the community. ■

Greeters go back to school

Students at Union County High School have been seeing some new faces this year when they arrive on campus. The Union County Children’s Center and ICARE Drug Coalition established a greeter program at the beginning of the school year, spearheaded by Carol Pratt. “Data shows that children do better in school and are less likely to have social problems if they receive positive reinforcement from adults who show a caring attitude,” said Pratt. “We hope that by starting their school day off with a smile and a friendly greeting from community representatives, the children of Union County will know they are appreciated. After all, they are our future leaders.” The coalition hopes to continue with enough volunteers to be on campus at the high school every day of school. If they fall short of volunteers, they hope to have someone at the school at least the first day of each school week. ■

Chamber welcomes new members

The Union County Chamber of Commerce welcomed three new members at the September meeting. Joining

Newly elected Chamber Ambassador Diane Allen

Owner of Adult Day Services Kathy Chesney

Aflac agent Kevin Shockley

Public meeting for grant A public meeting to discuss Union County’s grant application to the Recreational Trails Program will be held 10 a.m. Monday, Sept. 26, at the Union County Courthouse. The public is invited.

AARP driving class for seniors The AARP will offer a driving class for people in Union County ages 55 and older. The class needs 10 people signed up to begin. Cost is $12 for AARP members and $14 for nonmembers, and the class can yield a discount on car insurance. Info: 992-3292 or 9920361.

be rolling through Union County on Oct. 12 for a visit to high points in the county. Diane Allen reminded the members that the Best of Union County ballot would be starting in the Sept. 24 issue of the Union County Shopper-News and encouraged everyone to vote for their favorites. ■

the Chamber were SmartShots, Home Federal Bank and Norris Shores Property Owners Association. Special guest speaker was Kevin Shockley from Aflac who gave a brief presentation on the benefits to businesses of the insurance the company offered. Leadership Union County board president Brandi Williams Davis approached the Chamber to propose a partnership between the Leadership board and the Chamber. “It has been brought to my attention that the Chamber partnered with the Community Foundation last year for their annual banquet,” said Williams. “I would like to propose that Leadership partner with the Chamber on their banquet this year rather than have two separate banquets. I think we should have a relationship between the two entities.” The Chamber members elected to postpone a decision until a future meeting. Kathy Chesney was in-

troduced and spoke to the Chamber regarding her new business. Chesney has formed Adult Day Services on Maynardville Highway. “I started Adult Day Services to provide care for seniors or for mentally or physically disabled persons who need some supervision,” said Chesney. “This is kind of an extension of rehab services. We can provide transportation to and from our facility, and I can also provide information regarding long-term health insurance for those trying to understand which company, if any, is right for them.” Chesney advised that if anyone had been trying to reach her, she had changed cell phone companies but has moved back to AT&T. She requested that anyone who had been trying to reach her and had not gotten a response should try again at 566-3289. Tim Williams has resigned his position on the Chamber board, and Melinda Wilson Sharpe was

elected to take his place. The Chamber adopted an ambassador program, and Diane Allen was elected as the Ambassador for the Chamber of Commerce. Allen’s responsibilities will be to recruit businesses for Chamber membership and encourage new members to renew. President Julie Graham announced that the PlanET Kick Off tour bus will

Networking at BSG

A Business After Hours program was hosted by Steve Thompson of BSG Services on Sept. 15 at his business at 4373 Maynardville Highway. Todd Fisher, director and CEO of Throttle Up TN, attended and was available to talk with small businesses and entrepreneurs interested in growing or starting a business. Throttle Up TN is a pro-

gram formed to assist small businesses in East Tennessee with key decisions and to get companies started or to help them successfully move to the next level. Business owners who were unable to attend and would like more information may contact Todd Fisher at 228-4853 or tfisher@tech2020.org. Refreshments were served, and more than seven businesses were represented by attendees Doug Thompson, Steve Thompson, Diane Allen, Julie Graham, Debbie Perry and Eddie Perry. The next Business After Hours event will be held at First Team Realty at 6 p.m. Oct. 20. “We will be having taco soup and giving away free houses,” said owner Eddie Perry with a grin. Contact Cindy Taylor at brentcindyt@ gmail.com.

Our staff: Clarence Byrd, Owner E.J. Smith, Funeral Director Bryan McAdams, Embalmer/Director

Byrd’s Mortuary Maynardville, TN

865

992-5555 992 5555

865

992-8439 992 8439

FAX

24 HOUR OBITUARY LINE 992-1114

CARING MEDICAL CENTER 149 Durham Drive Maynardville, TN 37807 “Knoxville’s most trusted name in home comfort since 1981” www.pioneercomfort.com

992-2221 No appointments necessary Monday - Friday 8:30am - 5pm Saturday 9am - 5pm

Call or come see us before you buy!

Buildings & Carports of all sizes. Log, metal and wood

7600 Maynardville Hwy •

922-4770

NOW OPEN IN HALLS! OOPEN 7 DAYSS A WEEK! Biggest and BEST Pizza Buffet in Town!

$ 9LU9NCH

4

Mon-Fri

FREE PARTY ROOM available for up to 60 people. RESERVE NOW!

Watch UT FOOTBALL with us!

15 KINDS OF PIZZA • HUGE SALAD BAR HOT BAR • FRUITS • ICE CREAM 12” PIZZA or CALZONES up to 3 toppings

$ 99

PICK-UP ONLY (No Delivery)

$ 99

4

5

DINNER BUFF ET All Day Sat

7002 Maynardville Hwy (next to Ace Hardware)

& Sun

377-3358


4 • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS

Dr. Claudius Meade Capps of Hogskin part two

TALES OF UNION COUNTY | Bonnie Peters

L

ast week, I had the privilege of talking a little bit about Dr. Claudius Meade Capps at the 2011 Hogskin History Day. Capps had some rare experiences during his life that I thought need to be included in our history. When in medical school, one of his aunts either gave or loaned him the money she received when she sold her goose feathers. As soon as he finished school, I’m sure she got very good medical care when needed. Capps told of performing surgery on patients’ kitchen tables, by oil lamps or fireplaces. When he began practicing medicine at age 21 and traveling by horseback throughout this remote area, he kept his saddlebags of medicine under his large coattails so as not to seem haughty. He delivered babies at homes and rapidly built up his clientele when he correctly diagnosed typhoid fever after another doctor had failed to do so. After he specialized in Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat, he performed the first mastoid operation in Knoxville. He was one of the founders and early presidents of the Knox County Medical Association, a forerunner of the Knoxville Academy of Medicine.

As a young boy, he recalled the sky turning very dark. It was caused by a huge flock of passenger pigeons flying overhead. He was at school, and his teacher let the children out to see them go by. The event lasted several minutes. Also as a young boy, he encountered the famous Jessie James when going to the spring for a bucket of water. The following is his signed account of that meeting: The Tennessee mountains has long held a place in history for gunmen and fudests. More recently it has acquired a national reputation for distillers of the best Moonshine whiskey in the United States (see Major Andrews’ report). As a boy I lived in the hill country of east Tennessee between the Cumberland and the Great Smoky Mountains. When a small boy of the early 1870s I had my first and only view of the noted outlaw, Jessie James. The country between Knoxville, Tennessee, and Cumberland Gap, Kentucky, is a hilly country. In the seventies there were no railroads connecting the two points. The wagon roads were very poorly constructed; however, the main traveled road between the

The home of Valentine and Minerva Jane Atkins Capps, parents of Dr. Claudius Meade Capps. two points passed some four miles of where we lived. There was a side road that you could cut off of the main road; and, by crossing a river, could cut back to the main road at Walkers Ford on Clinch River, which was the public crossing. Jessie James, in making one of his trips from Knoxville to Cumberland Gap, naturally would not want to camp along the main road for obvious reasons; so he took the byroad that came by where we lived. I remember the incident quite well, it was summer time and he was traveling with a one-horse buggy. He had as his traveling companion what I thought then was a boy of 18 or 20 years of age. Since I have grown older and considered the circumstance, I am quite sure that the supposed boy was a young woman dressed in boy’s clothing. He camped at our spring for the night and would not come into

the house to sleep. The next morning when I went to the spring for water he called to me and asked if I could get him some sugar for his coffee. I went to the house and got some of the brown sugar that was in lumps (that is all the kind we had back then) in a glass tumbler. In trying to pour the sugar out of the glass into a paper poke, some of the lumps fell on the ground; and I remember how particular he was in picking up these lumps of sugar. He offered to pay me for the sugar; but, of course, I refused because it was not customary at that time to charge a traveler for anything he wanted (how different it is today). Soon after daylight he hitched up his horse and crossed the ridge in the direction of Walkers Ford. I did not know then and did not know until several years later that I had waited on the great notorious outlaw Jessie James. Signed Claudius M. Capps – believed

to have been written about 1945. One of Capps’ hobbies was bird hunting, and he kept English setters and Gordon and Llewellan setters. His daughter, Ethel, said he would sometimes walk 20 miles in a day while hunting quail and doves. She said that even in his old age he could outwalk most. His wife, Ollie Letitia Beeler Capps, was also an outdoor person, and they frequently treated the children to gather chestnuts, chinquapins, large acorns, pine burrs, apples, plums and berries in season. Another hobby of Capps was his love for books and poetry. He wrote poems and collected and published an anthology, “Poems of the Civil War.” Although a proponent of Social Security and the “Old Age Pension,” he wanted it for others and never filed for it himself. In his daughter’s (Ethel) notes, she says her father attended the Debut of Ethel Barrymore in New York and shot against Annie Oakley when she visited the Arlington Gun Club, where Capps sometimes went to trap shoot. The picture I’ve included here is of an oil painting by B.S. Williams, which was painted from an old picture of Capps’ homeplace at Hogskin, Union County, Tenn. Notice the paling fence and the corn planted so close to the house. The reasoning for planting the corn so close to the house was so the family could go and come from the house without the Indians spotting them. Bonnie Peters is the Union County Historian and the author of many books. Contact Bonnie at bhpeters@esper.com or 687-3842.

Louie Bluie Festival accepting vendors

Morning Show Monday through Friday mornings from 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. on 96.7 MERLE FM

This year’s Louie Bluie Music and Arts Festival will be Saturday, Oct. 1, at Cove Lake State Park in the Cumberland Mountains. Festival organizers are seeking interested vendors. Booth fee is$40. There will be musicians, storytellers, workshops, drama, children’s activities, a crafters’ village and more. Info: 423-871-2097 or visit www.louiebluie. org.

Bull Run Creek Apartments Move-in special 3 bedroom only

ASS

TRY

RY •

UNT W CO

NE

EGR • BLU

e! nlin o rle m Me fm.co o t e ten .merl Lis w ww

OUN OLD C

$399 moves you in Does not apply to transfers. Does not apply to applications prior to Sept. 1, 2011. Must meet resident selection criteria. No exceptions. Expires September 30, 2011.

Celeste McClure, Property Manager 992-5888 1330 Main Street • Maynardville, TN

POWELL AUCTION & REALTY, LLC 4306 Maynardville Hwy., Maynardville

992-1100

371 SWAN SEYMOUR RD MAYNARDVILLE Nothing spared in this custom lake front home. Over 3200 SF, 5BR/3BA home. Too many ammenities to mention visit website for more info. Priced at only 479,000

VERY PRIVATE SETTING – Close to Hickory Star Marina. Over 1700 SF, 3BR/2BA. Ready to move-in condition. Reduced. Priced to sell at 75,900.00

TE OGA

R

HAR

FORECLOSURE – Just in need of TLC. home has over 2100 SF. 5BR/2full and 1 half baths. Oak cabinets, built-in china cabinets, open kitchen, some wood flooring, sunroom with tile flooring, on 1/2 acre lot. 1-car attached carport. Priced to sell at only 40,000

CUSTOM-BUILT HOME ON OVER 2 ACRES W/ ALL THE CONVIENCE – 6821 Millertown Pike. Over 3000 SF, 4BR/3BA home w/gourmet kit & lots of custom features. Too many ammenities to mention. Also a guest home w/2BR/full BA, kit, LR. Detached 2-car gar. Man-made stocked lake. Truly a must see property. Very private setting. All offered at only 359,900.00

Visit us online at www.powellauction.com or email us at sold4u314@aol.com

Heritage Festival upcoming The seventh annual Union County Heritage Festival will be held 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1, in Wilson Park next to Union County High School. There will be live entertainment all day, an authors tent, antique tractor show, oldtime demonstrations, great food, farmers market and more. The festival is seeking all types of vendors, including artists, crafters, food vendors, authors, genealogical researchers, antique dealers, business owners, professionals, nonprofit organizations and re-enactment groups of all kinds. Info: Betty Bullen, bullenart@aol.com.

Cancer support group to meet The Union County Cancer Support Group will meet at 7 p.m. every third Thursday at Fellowship Christian Church. Info: Debbie, 659-1052.

TENNderCare available for children The TENNderCare program wants babies, children, teens and young adults to get the health care they need. Good health begins at birth, so it’s important to “Check In, Check Up and Check Back” with your doctor every year. The program continues to increase the rate of children receiving health care services every year. Call today to set up a TENNderCare visit with your doctor or go to the Union County Health Department. Your health plan will help. Info: 1-866-311-4287 or www. tennessee.gov/tenncare/ tenndercare.

Contact Humane Society for lost pets The Union County Humane Society asks that pet owners contact them immediately if a pet becomes lost. Pets without identification and rabies tags are only required to be held for 72 hours by Tennessee state law. The Humane Society makes every effort to place animals in “forever homes” as soon as possible. Timely contact will ensure that your lost pet is not adopted by new owners. Remember, identification and rabies tags are your pet’s protection. Info: 992-7969.

Crafter’s Fall Porch Sale The Appalachian Arts Craft Center in Norris will host its annual Fall Porch Sale for two weeks beginning Thursday, Oct. 6. Handcrafted, local artwork will be for sale, including seconds, student work and crafts by non-juried members of the center. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Info: 494-9854 or visit www. appalachianarts.net.

LOTS/ACREAGE REDUCED! RESIDENTIAL LOT ON TAZEWELL PIKE just inside Union County. 1.44 acres w/346 ft. on Tazewell Pike. All utilities avail. $29,900. $25,000.

GORGEOUS LOT w/over 115' of frontage on the beautiful Holston River. Level 0.88 acre lot to build your new home. The best lot offered in River Point 2. Don’t let this one get away. $69,900. HUNTER’S RETREAT with abundance of wildlife located on Ailor Gap. Over 118 acres of woodland w/creek through prop. Several nice bldg. sites. Offered at $174,000. GREAT WATERFRONT LOT on the beautiful Holston River. 1.60 acres, semi wooded, corner lot. Great homesites. Utility water, elec. Priced at only $59,900. Located in River Island. Lot 9 NICE CUL-DE-SAC LOT in River Point II S/D. 5.70 acres. Gently sloping w/ great views of the Holston River. Public access in devel. Lot 161. Priced at only $79,900.

CUSTOM BUILT – Brick & vinyl w/stone accents. Approx 1600 SF. 3BR/2BA, open kit/dining/ living w/ FP. Hdwd flooring, lots of beautiful tile work. Trey ceilings, S/S appliances, 2-car att gar. A MUST SEE home. Cntry living w/all conv. Located in Timber Creek off Johnson Rd in Maynardville. Owner says sell at $159,900. Would consider trade for acreage. Contact agent for more info.

AWESOME MTN VIEWS from this great homesite in Lone Mtn Shores. Architecturally restricted comm. Close to Woodlake Golf Club. Lot 614. 2.80 acres. Priced at $19,900. 5.69 ALL WOODED ACRES. Very private. Great for hunters retreat. Located in North Lone Mtn. Shores. Lot 1046. Inside gated area. Priced at $27,500.

VERY WELL KEPT HOME– Ready to move in condition. 3BR/1.5BA. Lrg LR, oak cabs in kit w/appl. New 16x12 snrm. 1-car att gar. All level yard w/fruit trees. Located in Maynardville on Walker Ford Rd. REDUCED! Was $119,900 now only $115,500! BEAUTIFUL. GREAT CONV. LAKE LIVING – 2.18 acres. Gently rolling to the water. Views of 33 Bridge. Over 800' lake frontage. Will perk for 3-4BR home. Wooded, private, lightly restricted. Located on Swan Seymour Rd., Maynardville. Offered at only $199,900.

HICKORY POINTE LOT 99 HICKORY POINTE – Over 1 acre with main channel frontage. Fully dockable. Also with all the ammenities of clubhouse, pool & marina. Owner says SELL at only $199,000. LOT 56 HICKORY POINTE – Great views of the main channel. Located across from clubhouse. All ammenities of clubhouse, pool & marina. Inside gated community. 1.52 gently rolling acres offered at only $72,000. LOT 5 HICKORY POINTE – Great building lot just inside the gated community. Lays great. Several homesites. Wooded. Offered with all the ammenities of clubhouse, pool & marina.1.50 acres offered at only $32,000.


UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • 5

Buffalo or basketball TALES OF TENNESSEE | Marvin West

B

ehold Buffalo on the football horizon. Fortunately, basketball is near enough to be a substitute subject. To quote a past president, “Let me make one thing perfectly clear …” Cuonzo Martin is not Bruce Pearl. Never was. Won’t be. He is not a natural promoter, of himself or others. He is not a marketing major. He is spirited and determined but something less than flamboyant. ESPN will have to get along without much of his help. You are not likely to see him in orange body paint. You are not likely to see his team in the second round of the NCAA tournament. If it answers the opening bell, Martin

should be coach of the year. His Vols have been picked as low as last in the Southeastern Conference. As with most new coaches, he has this job because there were problems. Cuonzo faces a difficult task, which is one reason the dearly departed Mike Hamilton more than quadrupled his Missouri State pay and presented a five-year contract. Ah yes, I remember it well … “Cuonzo is among the most promising young coaches in the game, and we are excited about the coaching ability, toughness and energy that he brings to our program,” said Hamilton. In more ways than one, the former athletic director and the former coach

Enough:

A place of peace CROSS CURRENTS | Lynn Hutton In the evening quails came up and covered the camp; and in the morning there was a layer of dew around the camp. When the layer of dew lifted, there on the surface of the wilderness was a fine flaky substance, as fine as frost on the ground. When the Israelites saw it, they said to one another, “What is it?” For they did not know what it was. Moses said to them, “It is the bread that the Lord has given you to eat.” (Exodus 16: 13-15 NRSV) When it was evening, the disciples came to him and said, “This is a deserted place, and the hour is now late; send the crowds away so that they may go into the villages and buy food for themselves.” Jesus said to them, “They need not go away; you give them something to eat.” They replied, “We have nothing here but five loaves and two fish.” And he said, “Bring them here to me.” (Matthew 14: 15-18 NRSV)

WORSHIP NOTES

contributed to the overall difficulty. The schedule is daunting. There is good and bad. Tennessee gets to play in Hawaii. Tennessee has to play Duke. The only interruption in the SEC schedule is defending national champion UConn at Thompson-Boling on Jan. 21, just past the middle of a dangerous segment that could result in nine losses in 10 games. Give that some thought. Here’s what I know for certain about basketball: There is a critical link between recruiting and records. Great players make coaches seem much smarter. Going all the way back to Emmett Lowery, before Ray Mears, the best Tennessee teams had the best players. It is almost impossible to win on the road when rivals get top talent and you get good kids with heart and hustle. Much better story if it happened the other way but no go. Martin says his team will play hard. That won’t be enough. In fact, anything less would be an embarrassment. The upcom-

ing Volunteers need to play smart and somebody must rebound now and then and somebody must stick a few balls into the basket. To be blunt, I don’t know who that might be. There are no returning all-stars. I am not yet convinced newcomers can handle Vanderbilt, much less Kentucky. No doubt Coach has given that some thought. If this season is a downer, please do not blame Cuonzo Martin. You know who did it. And that explanation will work for a little while. Soon thereafter comes a new clock, tick, tick, tick. Tennessee has a lot to show and tell and sell prep prospects – fantastic facilities, fired-up fans, flags tied to the rafters, significant accomplishments in the recent past. The solution seems simple. Recruit a few top players. Top players beget dramatic victories. For more information on this thought process, dig up the details of Ernie Grunfeld and Bernard King in downtown Lexington. Marvin West invites reader reaction. His address is westwest6@netzero.com.

The Union County Humane Society asks that pet owners contact them immediately if a pet becomes lost. Pets without identification and rabies tags are only required to be held for 72 hours by Tennessee state law. The Humane Society makes every effort to place animals in “forever homes” as soon as possible. Timely contact will ensure that your lost pet is not adopted by new owners. Remember, identification and rabies tags are your pet’s protection. Info: 992-7969.

H

beast that is on everyone’s lips these days. We were talking about the economies of scarcity and plenty, and the ways in which each person’s perception of those extremes is set in place by our own experiences and our own expectations. We pondered those extremes and agreed that in the center was the ideal, the concept of Enough. And then the question arose, “Is the story of manna true? Or is it a parable? A fairy tale? Was the manna real?” There are all sorts of answers to those questions.

Scholars point out that there is a secretion from certain plants in the Sinai Peninsula that dries to an edible form they call St. John’s Bread. As for me, I am pretty sure it as not a fairy tale. You can’t live on fairy tales. But after the conversation was over, I kept reflecting on the question, and I arrived again at my version of God’s Rules of Manna: 1. There will be enough. 2. There won’t be any extra. 3. It may not be exactly what you would choose. 4. It won’t come until you absolutely have to have it.

ungry masses, deserted place: the settings for two stories. You know these two stories. You probably have heard them linked together in more than one sermon. You also may have heard them explained away, rationalized into nothingness. You may have heard them questioned. You may have heard them scoffed at. It was a conversation with a colleague, whose mind I enjoy, that set me thinking about these two accounts of miraculous feeding. We had finished the business at hand, and because we both work with populations who do not always have what they need, let alone what they want, the conversation turned to the economies in which we live. Not, please note, The Economy, that fearsome

Community services ■ Graveston Baptist Church, 8319 Clapps Chapel Road, is enrolling children 11 months through Pre-K for Parent’s Day Out. The program has small classroom sizes. Info: 465-9655 or www.graveston.org.

Men’s programs ■ Revival Vision Church, 154 Durham Drive in Maynardville, holds a men’s prayer breakfast at 7 a.m. each Wednesday. All are invited to join in praying and fasting for Union County. Info: Jim, 684-8916.

Music services ■ WMRD 94.5 FM hosts “Traditional Hymns Hour” with Kathy Chesney from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. every Sunday. Call in

your requests or dedications to 745-1467, and tune in to listen or sing along.

Special services ■ Hansard Chapel UMC, Maynardville Highway in Union County, will have a praise and worship service to celebrate Jesus with music 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24. There will also be a hot dog and hamburger cookout. The event is free to the public. Rain or shine.

Women’s programs ■ Fairview Baptist Church, 7424 Fairview Road in Corryton, will host MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers), 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. every third Monday for devotions, food and fellowship. Child care provided. Info: Anne, 621-9234.

Contact Humane Society for lost pets

5. When in doubt, see Rule No. 1. God’s rules are predicated on our being willing to give up control (tough assignment, that one!), to trust God, and obey the rules: the Israelites had to share, and they couldn’t be greedy. None of which removes our responsibility to do something to help ourselves: the manna did not fall directly onto the Israelites’ dinner plates; they had to gather it. But the hardest assignment is learning that Enough is a state of equilibrium – a place of peace, of grace.

ARE THEY CUTE OR WHAT? Can you just imagine the love and the fun these precious little pups could bring to your life? Visit us at the shelter or log onto www.unioncountyhumanesociety.org to see all our dogs and cats. Let’s put puppy mills out of business. Adopt your puppy from a humane society. You’ll be helping to stop the growing problem of homeless animals. You’ll get a healthy puppy with all its shots, that’s spayed or neutered, and with a microchip so your precious new friend can be identified if they are ever lost or stolen .

UNION COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY Loan rates applicable to new and used autos, trucks, boats, RVs, motorcycles, ATVs and farm equipment. Available to qualifying members for a limited time. Rate subject to change. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. Rate is based on Credit Union Managed Credit Program. No other discounts apply. Rate accurate as of 9/1/11. New money only.

Phone: 865-992-7969 Ad space donated by

www.unioncountyhumansociety.org


6 • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS

UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • 7

Take time to

best e h t r o f e t ke a ime to vo

BEST

your favorites! 992-3698 Maynardville’s Original Steakhouse 3905 Maynardville Hwy. 1 mile North of Union County High School

Best Of Union County

PPER-NE O H BBEE ST OF ST OF

S W

Vote for best Realtor

o offer! Ta t s a h y op t n llot and dr a Union Cou b is h t t u o fill o amber of h moment t C y t n u o nion C k building n a b ic it by the U r o t e in the his hop Union S o t it Commerc il a , treet, or m aynardville on Main S M , 8 4 8 x o .B ners will in w e h County, P.O T . by Oct. 21 r 29 Union e b o t TN 37807, c O e ced in th iginal be announ s. Only or w e N all re p op epted, and c c a e County Sh b l il ballots w halfway to t t s in a r p le s t w a e t n ou st be filled formation, call the u m s t o ll a b re in d. For mo e t n u o c e b 1. at 992-281 Chamber

S

PER-NEW P O OF

S

R U O Y For

SH

! e t o V Favorite

It’s t

BALLOT

Debbie Cox co-founded First Team Realty in Maynardville more than a decade ago and is highly respected by her peers. Her clients, both buyers and sellers, are always happy with her work ethic and commitment to integrity. She is an example to us all. Please join me in voting for my respected colleague, Debbie Cox.

___________________

__________________ _____ r____ er_ ge g ger urrge ur bur eb ebu eseeb heeees he Che Besstt C

Sincerely,

Be sure and

VOTE! , Veterinarian, etc.)

Best Professional Office (Atty, Accountant

Eddie Perry, Principal Broker/Owner

Debbie Cox, First Team Realty Inc. 4378 Maynardville Highway, Suite A Maynardville, TN Email: firstteamrealty@bellsouth.net Web: www.FirstTeamOnLake.com

______________________

____________________________________

_________________________

Best Hardware Store________________

_________________________

_______________ Best Cup Of Coffee__________________

________

Friendliest Bank Tellers____________ Maynardville • Luttrell

Next to Union Discount Pharmacy

_______________________

Best Hair Salon___________________

865-992-TEAM (8326)

2945 Maynardville Hwy Suite 3 • 745-1258

________________________

Best Tanning Salon________________

Abundant Health & Wellness

________________________

________________________

Best Last-Minute Gifts______________

Friendliest Daycare_________________

in Maynardville __________________________________

Union County

________________________

Best Bologna Sandwich___

ANIMAL HOSPITAL

________________________

Best Floral Arrangements___________

Cast your vote today!

Please Vote

Best Tobacco Store________________

_________________________

Best Gas Prices___________________

_______________________

Best Hunting/Fishing Store__________

________________________

Best Biscuits_______________________

_________________________

Best Car Repair___________________

__________________

______ Best Pizza_________________________

_________________________

Jared Graves, DVM and Staff 596 John Deere Drive • Maynardville, TN 37807

Best Greenhouse/Landscaping_____

____________________ t Restaurant________________________

_______________________

Best Place To Camp_________________

Maynardville Union Center 992-5757

Remember Old Fashion Customer Service…We do!

_______________________

Best Pharmacy______________________

_________________________

Best Live Music Venue_____________

_________________________

Friendliest Medical Office__________ ________________________

Best Marina________________________

_________________________

_________________________

Best Grocery Store________________

Best Handyman___________________

Show your support

Friendliest Church

We appreciate your votes and your business!

Vote!

Thank you for your votes last year!

Maynardville, TN • 992-9455 Mon-Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-2 • closed Sundays

Call 992-1272 for more information

Bes

(865) 992-7181

and

Don’t forget to VOTE for your favorites!

Visit both stops! #1: 120 Hickory Star Rd. 992-0780 #2: 3940 Maynardville Hwy. 992-4203

_________________________

__

____________________________________

Best Wifi Site_____________________

________________________

_______________________

Best Auctioneer_____________________

_________________________

Best Employer_____________________

pany______________________________

Friendliest Insurance Com

Best Artist/Crafter__________________

________________________

Best Realtor________________________

Drive Thru ONE-STOP SHOP Milk, Bread, Snacks, Cigarettes, Tobacco, Roll Your Own and Friendly Service!

________________________

Best Educator______________________

992-0785

• 1784 Maynardville Hwy.

All major insurances accepted, E-Z transfers

Union County’s ONLY 5–Star Rated Bank or Credit Union!

PER-NEW P O OF BEST

S

SH

Full-Service Florist

Assortment of Fall arrangements now in stock

Flowers by Bob

Tennessee Voted us Florist Of The Year for 2010! Hall Of Fame Lifetime Achievement Award

Vote for your favorite bank.

215 Hwy. 61 East Maynardville 992-8148



Cast your vote for your favorites!

2969 Maynardville Hwy. • Maynardville, TN 37807

992-8050

Serving: Knoxville • Maynardville • Tazewell & Surrounding Area

Shop online: www.flowersbybob.com

Charles Harmon, Sales Manager A Full Service Heating and Air Conditioning Contractor

Vote! Vote! Vote!

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

www.fcbtn.com

For 28 years in a row, New South has achieved what no other bank or credit union in Union County has. A 5-Star Rating! We are in the top 10% of all financial institutions in the county for financial strength.

airquestamerica@tds.net P.O. Box 70627, Knoxville, TN 37938

925-3000 • 925-3028 fax

Brian & Missy Phillips

Powelll Auction & Realty l LLC 4306 Maynardville Hwy • Maynardville, TN 37807 Office 992-1100 • Fax 992-2355 Email: Sold4u314@aol.com • www.powellauction.com

Selling Property for Owners & Banks Houses, Lots, Farms, Equipment Knoxville’s Only Public Auto Auction Let our experieinced staff work for you.

New South – where Safety, Strength, and Service always have and always will matter! • FREE On-Line Banking • FREE Checking • No Service Fees • No Minimum Balance

• FREE Bill Pay • Great Rates • No Application Fees • CDs, 401K Rollovers

NEW SOUTH – The Better Way to Bank! (865) 862-6352 www.newsouthcu.com BauerFinancial Inc., is the nation’s premier independent bank rating and research firm. www.bauerfinancial.com


6 • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS

UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • 7

Take time to

best e h t r o f e t ke a ime to vo

BEST

your favorites! 992-3698 Maynardville’s Original Steakhouse 3905 Maynardville Hwy. 1 mile North of Union County High School

Best Of Union County

PPER-NE O H BBEE ST OF ST OF

S W

Vote for best Realtor

o offer! Ta t s a h y op t n llot and dr a Union Cou b is h t t u o fill o amber of h moment t C y t n u o nion C k building n a b ic it by the U r o t e in the his hop Union S o t it Commerc il a , treet, or m aynardville on Main S M , 8 4 8 x o .B ners will in w e h County, P.O T . by Oct. 21 r 29 Union e b o t TN 37807, c O e ced in th iginal be announ s. Only or w e N all re p op epted, and c c a e County Sh b l il ballots w halfway to t t s in a r p le s t w a e t n ou st be filled formation, call the u m s t o ll a b re in d. For mo e t n u o c e b 1. at 992-281 Chamber

S

PER-NEW P O OF

S

R U O Y For

SH

! e t o V Favorite

It’s t

BALLOT

Debbie Cox co-founded First Team Realty in Maynardville more than a decade ago and is highly respected by her peers. Her clients, both buyers and sellers, are always happy with her work ethic and commitment to integrity. She is an example to us all. Please join me in voting for my respected colleague, Debbie Cox.

___________________

__________________ _____ r____ er_ ge g ger urrge ur bur eb ebu eseeb heeees he Che Besstt C

Sincerely,

Be sure and

VOTE! , Veterinarian, etc.)

Best Professional Office (Atty, Accountant

Eddie Perry, Principal Broker/Owner

Debbie Cox, First Team Realty Inc. 4378 Maynardville Highway, Suite A Maynardville, TN Email: firstteamrealty@bellsouth.net Web: www.FirstTeamOnLake.com

______________________

____________________________________

_________________________

Best Hardware Store________________

_________________________

_______________ Best Cup Of Coffee__________________

________

Friendliest Bank Tellers____________ Maynardville • Luttrell

Next to Union Discount Pharmacy

_______________________

Best Hair Salon___________________

865-992-TEAM (8326)

2945 Maynardville Hwy Suite 3 • 745-1258

________________________

Best Tanning Salon________________

Abundant Health & Wellness

________________________

________________________

Best Last-Minute Gifts______________

Friendliest Daycare_________________

in Maynardville __________________________________

Union County

________________________

Best Bologna Sandwich___

ANIMAL HOSPITAL

________________________

Best Floral Arrangements___________

Cast your vote today!

Please Vote

Best Tobacco Store________________

_________________________

Best Gas Prices___________________

_______________________

Best Hunting/Fishing Store__________

________________________

Best Biscuits_______________________

_________________________

Best Car Repair___________________

__________________

______ Best Pizza_________________________

_________________________

Jared Graves, DVM and Staff 596 John Deere Drive • Maynardville, TN 37807

Best Greenhouse/Landscaping_____

____________________ t Restaurant________________________

_______________________

Best Place To Camp_________________

Maynardville Union Center 992-5757

Remember Old Fashion Customer Service…We do!

_______________________

Best Pharmacy______________________

_________________________

Best Live Music Venue_____________

_________________________

Friendliest Medical Office__________ ________________________

Best Marina________________________

_________________________

_________________________

Best Grocery Store________________

Best Handyman___________________

Show your support

Friendliest Church

We appreciate your votes and your business!

Vote!

Thank you for your votes last year!

Maynardville, TN • 992-9455 Mon-Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-2 • closed Sundays

Call 992-1272 for more information

Bes

(865) 992-7181

and

Don’t forget to VOTE for your favorites!

Visit both stops! #1: 120 Hickory Star Rd. 992-0780 #2: 3940 Maynardville Hwy. 992-4203

_________________________

__

____________________________________

Best Wifi Site_____________________

________________________

_______________________

Best Auctioneer_____________________

_________________________

Best Employer_____________________

pany______________________________

Friendliest Insurance Com

Best Artist/Crafter__________________

________________________

Best Realtor________________________

Drive Thru ONE-STOP SHOP Milk, Bread, Snacks, Cigarettes, Tobacco, Roll Your Own and Friendly Service!

________________________

Best Educator______________________

992-0785

• 1784 Maynardville Hwy.

All major insurances accepted, E-Z transfers

Union County’s ONLY 5–Star Rated Bank or Credit Union!

PER-NEW P O OF BEST

S

SH

Full-Service Florist

Assortment of Fall arrangements now in stock

Flowers by Bob

Tennessee Voted us Florist Of The Year for 2010! Hall Of Fame Lifetime Achievement Award

Vote for your favorite bank.

215 Hwy. 61 East Maynardville 992-8148



Cast your vote for your favorites!

2969 Maynardville Hwy. • Maynardville, TN 37807

992-8050

Serving: Knoxville • Maynardville • Tazewell & Surrounding Area

Shop online: www.flowersbybob.com

Charles Harmon, Sales Manager A Full Service Heating and Air Conditioning Contractor

Vote! Vote! Vote!

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

www.fcbtn.com

For 28 years in a row, New South has achieved what no other bank or credit union in Union County has. A 5-Star Rating! We are in the top 10% of all financial institutions in the county for financial strength.

airquestamerica@tds.net P.O. Box 70627, Knoxville, TN 37938

925-3000 • 925-3028 fax

Brian & Missy Phillips

Powelll Auction & Realty l LLC 4306 Maynardville Hwy • Maynardville, TN 37807 Office 992-1100 • Fax 992-2355 Email: Sold4u314@aol.com • www.powellauction.com

Selling Property for Owners & Banks Houses, Lots, Farms, Equipment Knoxville’s Only Public Auto Auction Let our experieinced staff work for you.

New South – where Safety, Strength, and Service always have and always will matter! • FREE On-Line Banking • FREE Checking • No Service Fees • No Minimum Balance

• FREE Bill Pay • Great Rates • No Application Fees • CDs, 401K Rollovers

NEW SOUTH – The Better Way to Bank! (865) 862-6352 www.newsouthcu.com BauerFinancial Inc., is the nation’s premier independent bank rating and research firm. www.bauerfinancial.com


8 • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS

Rebekah Kadron holds a Madagascar hissing cockroach as Nathaniel Kadron, Miranda Key and Josh Anderson look on.

4-H wins big at the fair By Cindy Taylor Union County’s Smokey Mountain 4-H Club had a great showing at this year’s Tennessee Valley Fair. Participants pulled ribbons in lots of categories and had fun serving homemade biscuits to fairgoers on Sept. 13. Union County Extension Office agents Shannon Perrin and Joy Grissom couldn’t be more pleased with the efforts of the students. Emily Hocutt won first place “Martin Dickey won in the Wool and Woolies conChampion senior yearling test, where participants modSouthdown ewe (Abby), eled their wool clothes after then went on to win Suwalking in with their sheep. preme Champion over all the sheep breeds in the Junior Division,” said Perrin.

“This is a big deal, and I am so excited for him.” Emmaline Perry, Caleb Key, Meredith Key and Bethany Long competed at the eastern region 4-H Life Skills judging contest. The 4-H’ers were educated on answering questions about physical activity needs and the different types of exercise and its benefits, choosing food products based on information on food labels, determining the correct change for two imaginary purchases, and babysitting scenarios with safe and appropriate toys. They visited a series of activity centers in which they worked in teams and

Your lumbar support can only do so much. Union County Chiropractic Clinic Dr. Darrell Johnson, DC 865.992.7000 110 Skyline Dr., Maynardville, TN 37807

Find a chiropractor at TNChiro.com.

With service and reasonable cost combined

Tyler Mink decorated a hay bale to represent Union County 4-H at the Tennessee Valley Fair. The theme was reflection to perfection. The hay bale stood at the entrance near the livestock barns. individually and earned points at each activity center by completing assigned tasks. Emily Hocutt, Joshua Sherritze, Dakota Sherritze, Tyler Mink, Martin Dickey, Mary Morgan and Jim Morgan competed in the Knox County invitational poultry judging competition. Members were educated on quality characteristics of dressed market birds, live birds, exterior eggs and interior eggs. They were then presented with hypothetical situations and asked to pick the best scenario based on the information they learned in practices. They were also asked to identify broken out parts. Eighth grader Martin Dickey placed first overall in the Junior High Division. The team consisting of Martin Dickey, Mary Morgan, Jim Morgan and Dakota Sherritze placed second overall in the Junior High Team Division. Down on the farm was held Sept. 13, with the objective to educate school groups about farm products

Elizabeth Kadron, Jeremiah Kadron, Emmaline Perrry and Emily Hocutt prep the biscuits to feed hungry fairgoers. like sheep, dairy and beef cows, horses, chickens, rabbits, fruits, vegetables, milk, honeybees and beneficial insects. It was an opportunity for 4-H’ers to teach other children about the animals they work so hard to raise on their farms. Mary and Jim Morgan brought sheep to exhibit and Bethany long brought her rabbits. There was also an entomology booth sponsored by Rebekah Kadron, Nathaniel Kadron and Miranda Key. Josh Anderson of the

Abundant Health & Wellness Jennifer Savage & Emily Harless Family Nurse Practitioners • Health care delivered in a compassionate & caring manner to patients of all ages • Medicare & most insurance plans accepted Monday thru Friday 8-5; Saturday 8-12

Open House: Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011, 4pm - 7pm 2945 Maynardville Hwy • Suite 3 • 745-1258 Next to Union Discount Pharmacy

NOW SHOWING THROUGH SEPT. 29 SMURFS (PG) 1:10; 3:30 DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (R) 6:25; 8:50 DRIVE (R) NO PASSES 1:15; 4:15; 6:35; 8:40 THE HELP (PG-13) 12:45; 3:30; 6:15; 9:00 WARRIOR (PG-13) NO PASSES 1:00; 3:40; 6:20; 9:00 ABDUCTION (PG-13) NO PASSES 1:20; 3:55; 6:20; 8:55 DOLPHIN TALE (PG) NO PASSES 1:15; 3:45; 6:15; 8:45 KILLER ELITE (R) NO PASSES 1:05; 3:55; 6:20; 8:45

We love birthday parties!

Cooke Mortuary, Inc. 220 Hwy. 61 East 992-5456 • Maynardville, TN 37807

Open daily 12:30 For group discounts call 922-1417 MOVIE LINE 922-2187 3800 Neal Drive

FREE Safe Deposit Box.

or visit us online at

hallscinema7.net

ADVANCE TICKETS NOW ON SALE FOR: WHAT’S YOUR NUMBER • REAL STEEL FRI - SUN ONLY: COME & SEE DOLPHIN TALE ON SUN, 9/25, w/SHARKY & SHARKETTE from the Ripleys Aquarium in Gatlinburg

For a limited time, you can get a Free Safe Deposit Box when you open a Free Checking Account with direct deposit at NEW SOUTH. With Free Checking, you’ll also enjoy: • • • • • • •

No Monthly Service Charge No Minimum Balance Required Discounted Loan Rates FREE ATM/Debit Card FREE ATM Access (over 2,000 Statewide) FREE On-line Banking & Bill Pay FREE First Box of Checks

New South is nationally recognized for its financial strength and is Union County’s ONLY 5-Star Rated Bank/Credit Union.

NEW SOUTH – The Better Way to Bank!

 Most Insurance Plans Accepted

HALLS VISION CLINIC

 Patients of All Ages Welcome!

Dr. Tommy Louthan & Dr. Melissa Pfeffer, OD

 High Fashion Designer Frames

DOCTORS OF OPTOMETRY

 Sports Vision  Complete Vision Exams  Contacts: Bifocal contacts m Contacts for Astigmatism Extended Wear Colored

Now Offering the Latest:

Vera Bradley

Frames and Sunglasses

Maynardville • 4587 Maynardville Hwy.

Other NEW SOUTH Locations: Rutledge (865) 828-6100 / Knoxville (865) 523-0757 *Free Safe Deposit Box good through December 2013. After free period, annual rental rate will apply. NEW SOUTH / serving anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in KNOX, UNION, & GRAINGER Counties!

Union County Youth Football 2011 schedule Union County Youth Football will play home games at Union County High School unless otherwise noted. Game times are: ages 5-6, 4 p.m.; 7-8, 5 p.m.; 9-10, 6 p.m.; and 1112, 7 p.m. Game times are subject to change. ■ Sept. 24, vs. Claxton, away ■ Oct. 1, vs. S. Clinton, away ■ Oct. 8, vs. Lake City, home ■ Oct. 15, vs. Scott County, home

Free GED offered The Union County Adult Education Program is enrolling students for the free GED testing program now. All testing is free, and the staff will help get candidates ready for the test. Classes are currently underway. Call the Adult Education Center or stop by between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. daily. Upcoming GED test dates are: Oct. 24 and 25 and Dec. 12 and 13. All tests begin at 3:30 p.m. Bring photo ID and a document showing Social Security number. Info: 992-0805.

SCHOOL NOTES Horace Maynard ■ School dance will be held 7-10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30. The 8th grade field trip to Cumberland Gap will be Friday, Sept. 30.

Sharps Chapel

(865) 862-6352 www.newsouthcu.com

UT Pesticide Safety Education Program attended and checked out the booth. Rebekah displayed a Madagascar hissing cockroach as a part of the entomology booth. There aren’t any around here, but it was fun for the kids and helped them relate to how insects can be helpful in agriculture. Overall, the students from Smoky Mountain 4-H in Union County made a terrific showing at the fair, and our community should be proud.

4626 Mill Branch Lane 922-7765 In Mill Branch Business Park

■ PTO will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4, in the school library. Purchase Boo Grams to be delivered during the Oct. 31 Halloween parties for 50 cents Sept. 24-28.


UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • 9

Union County High School Athlete of the Week Ashley Zielinski By Cindy Taylor Now a senior at Union County High School, veteran volleyball player Ashley Zielinski has been playing since 6th grade and is proud of this year’s Patriots team. “We do well when the whole team comes together,” said Zielinski. “We won last night against Pi-

geon Forge. Zielinski hopes to acquire a scholarship to ETSU and go on to play volleyball at the college level. “Ashley is probably the most reliable and consistent player we have,” said volleyball Union County High School coach Ken Howard. “We senior and volleyball team hope to be able to help captain Ashley Zielinski her find a college to play at next year.”

Biology ‘bake cell’ No, this is not a typo. Union County High School biology students learned a new way to identify components of cells by making an edible cell model. A cell is the functional basic unit of life, but then so is cake. Student Zack Massengile said he could better recognize the parts of a cell once he baked and labeled his cake. “I did this to get a good grade, but it did help me learn the parts of a cell,” said Massengile.

Chick Chain grand champion winners Kelsey Rivers, Sam Richardson and Martin Dickey. Not pictured is Abigail Kadron. Photo Submitted.

Chicks come home By Cindy Taylor Each year in early spring, the UT Extension office in Union County provides baby chickens to 4-H’ers. On April 6, 28 4-H students signed up and paid a $30 deposit to receive 25 chicks each. At 6 months old, the chicks returned, via their owners, to the Chick Show

and Sale at the Union Farmers Co-op. The students received their deposits back and relinquished six of their broods back to the county for sale. Buyers came from all over East Tennessee to “pick their chicks.” The highest selling pen was grown by Kelsey Rivers and sold for $21 per bird. The

MILESTONE

money from the sale of these birds goes right back into the program for next year. Blue ribbons winners were Ethan Dyer, Ashley Crawford, Hannah Tharp and Tyler Mink. Red ribbon winners were David Mattingly, Katie Wynn, Collin Sadoff, Katelyn Knight, Alex Zack Massengile shows off his cell cake. Vincent and Jacob Hensley.

Classes at the Craft Center

Riffey to celebrate 100 years Christina Riffey will celebrate her 100th birthday with a bowling party and celebration with family and friends Sept. 24. Her birth date is Sept. 26. Her husband is the late Dallas Riffey Sr. Christina has nine children, of whom six are still living. They and their spouses are Ruby and John Hitch, Edna and Jerry Newman, Hazel Bennett, Ruth and Ronnie Moore, Marion McClain and Frances Stalworth. She has two daughters-in-law, Jessie and Ginny Riffey. She has 28 grandchildren, 42 great-grandchildren, 32 great-great-grandchildren and two great-great-great-grandchildren.

REUNION ■ The Claiborne County High School Class of 1961 will celebrate its 50-year reunion at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1, by taking a tour of the old Claiborne County High School building and enjoying a cookout at a classmate’s cabin. Info: Charlotte McMurray Nole, 423-626-6068.

The Appalachian Arts Craft Center is located at 2716 Andersonville Highway 61 near Norris. You must preregister and pay for all classes in advance. Info or to register: www. appalachianarts.net or 4949854. ■ Seat Handcaning, 1-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 1-2, with Betty Newman. Registration deadline Sept. 26. Cost: $30 for members; $40 for nonmembers. All students must also pay $50 to the teacher at the class to pay for the footstool to be made in class. Beginning. ■ Animal Masks (clay and mixed media), 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. two Saturdays, Oct. 8 and 29, with Nan Jacobsohn. Bring a lunch. Registration deadline Oct. 3. Cost is $185 members, $195 nonmembers. All students must also pay a studio fee of $30 for clay, glazing and firing, to the Pottery Studio at the first class. All levels.

■ Pottery For The Wheel 1-4 p.m. six Sundays: Oct. 9, 16, 23 and Nov. 6, 13, 20 with Amanda Bonar. Registration deadline Oct. 5. Cost is $100 for members; $110 for nonmembers. Students must also pay a $30 materials fee to the Pottery Department at the first class. Beginning. ■ Stained Glass Suncatcher Workshop, 6-9 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Oct. 17, 19, 21, with Teresa Arrington. Registration deadline Oct. 12. Register and pay by Sept. 29, cost is $70 for Craft Center Members; $80 for nonmembers. Beginning. ■ A Whole New Sock Monkey, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Saturday, Oct. 29, with Diane Getty. Students should bring at least one pair of clean socks and embellishments. The rest of the supplies will be provided. Bring a lunch. For adults and young people 12 and older. Must have some skills with handsewing. Registration deadline Oct. 25. Register and pay by Oct. 10, cost is $15 for Craft Center members, $20 for nonmembers; after Oct. 10, $20 for members; $25 for nonmembers. All Levels. ■ Nuno Felting, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, with Geri Forkner. Registration deadline Nov. 1. Register and pay by Oct. 20, cost is $35 for Craft

Center members, $45 for nonmembers; after Oct. 20, $45 for members; $55 for nonmembers. Prices include all materials. All Levels. ■ Exploring Patterns for Handbuilding with Slabs, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, March 3-4, with Jane Cartwright. Bring a lunch each day. Registration deadline Feb. 28. Register and pay by Feb. 10, $45 for Craft Center members, $55 for nonmembers. All students must also pay a studio fee of $30 to the Pottery Studio at the class. Students should have at least some experience working with clay.

UNION CO. SERVICE GUIDE AUCTION

TUESDAY, OCT. 4 • 6PM Cherokee Auction Co.

Home Improvement & Repair

BILL’S

10015 Rutledge Pike, Corryton, TN Furniture, coins, collectibles, box lots, and the building is FULL!

465-3164 TAL2386 FL5626

Consignments welcome. Will buy or sell.

• Kitchen/Bath Remodels No Job too small or too large

• Room Additions • Floors, Doors & Windows

20 YEARS EXPERIENCE

COUNTY BAIL BONDING Freedom is just 150 Court Street Maynardville, TN a Call Away 992-6511

Agents: Von Richardson & Kenneth Janeway Locally owned & operated 24/7 Hr. Service / 365 days a year Major credit cards

SPECIALS OF THE WEEK! '09 Ford Flex Limited, nav, moon roof, FWD, DVD loaded, R1164......$27,500 '10 Ford E-350 XLT, 15 passenger van, all power , R1158 ..................$25,900 '09 Ford Escape Limited, leather, moon roof, chrome wheels, R1154 .... $19,900 '10 Nissan Versa S auto, air pwr windows & locks SAVE $$$, R1137 ......... $14,900 Price includes $399 dock fee. Plus tax, tag & title WAC. Dealer retains all rebates. Restrictions may apply. See dealer for details. Prices good through next week.

Save $$$! Ray Varner

992-2573 or (408)893-7164

457-0704 or 1-800-579-4561 www.rayvarner.com

• Custom Tile • Custom Woodworking • Service Calls

ROOFING

Call

Southeast

RE-ROOFS • REPAIRS • METAL

Honest, Reliable Service Since 1971

Insured, licensed & bonded • Locally owned & operated

TERMITE AND PEST CONTROL

925-3700

HOME ON 3 LOTS! 226 Megan Lane, Luttrell. Lrg LR w/open, high ceiling & hdwd flrs. Ceramic tile in laund, kit dining & all 3 BRs. Dbl vanities in 2 BAs. Ceiling fans & recess can lights throughout the home. Pex plumbing, up & down H&A. Oak cabs & S/S appl. New paved driveway, lrg green yard, lrg front porch. A lot of home for the money! MOTIVATED SELLER will pay toward buyer closing cost! $219,900. REDUCED! $209,900! MLS#734669 NEWLY REMODELED INSIDE! 307 Pine St. Maynardville. 3BR/2BA. New HVAC unit, new tile in kit & 2 BAs, new carpet, new D/W, new kitchen cabinets & counter tops & much more. New garage door in basement, new garage door opener in large 24x30 detached garage. $114,900. REDUCED! $109,900! MLS#755593

Dan Varner

2026 N. Charles Seivers Blvd. • Clinton, TN 37716

• Electrical

DEBORAH ILES Office: 246-0300 Cell: 406-7938

24 Hr. Emergency Service Will work with your insurance company

Member BBB since 2000 FREE ESTIMATES!

524-5888

exthomesolutions.com

STONEGATE APARTMENTS 126 Prospect Rd., Maynardville

1 & 2 BR available. NOW accepting Section 8 Water & Sewer furnished. Energy efficient apartments, central H/A, stove, refrigerator and laundry facility. Leased by September 30 and receive $100 OFF first 2 months rent! Must present coupon.

992-4300 TDD# 1-800-848-0298 Rural Development • Connie Smith, Mngr. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer


10 • SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 • UNION COUNTY SHOPPER-NEWS

New ride, new you. Looking to purchase a new vehicle or refinance your current loan? 3825 Maynardville Hwy. Maynardville, TN 37807

2039 Highway 25E Tazewell, TN 37897

865-745-0304

423-626-5656

’07 Keystone Mountaineer

Maynardvillee

$11,900

’08 Mazda 6

’04 Dodge Ram 1500

Maynardville

$13,990

’04 Mercury Mountaineer

UTFCU is the right place for U.

’04 Ford Expedition 2WD

Tazewell

$9,795

’08 Ford Taurus SEL

$8,990 Reduced to Maynardville

$10,990

’03 Pontiac Grand Prix

Maynardville

$9,900

’03 Chevy Trailblazer

Tazewell

$9,990

’02 Dodge Durango

AUTO & TRUCK LOANS RATES AS LOW AS

Maynardville

$5,990

’00 VW GTI GLX

Maynardville

$5,960

$5,990

Tazewell

’04 Dodge Ram 1500

$7,450

Tazewell

Tazewell

$6,790 FIXED

’07 Nissan Quest

Tazewell

$11,395

UP

www.volunteermotors.com

66

APR* MONTHS

This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. *APR - Annual Percentage Rate. Estimated monthly payment is $16.45 per $1,000. Vehicle model years 2008 & newer. Requires automatic payment and e-statements. Actual rate may be higher based on term, collateral, and other factors. Rates subject to change. For additional details, please speak to a Financial Consultant at 865-971-1971 or 800-264-1971.

Cars, Trucks, Boats, RVs, Trailers, Motorcycles and more!

TO

<;-*<69.c  

n u t y o H C e n r o i i t a n g U e l a F u e n stiv n A a h l t 7 DIAMOND

FREE FUN whole

e for th ily! fam

American First Financial Services Betty Bullen Robert Campbell & Associates City of Maynardville Union County Animal Hospital Union Discount Pharmacy

Saturday, October 1 • 10 am - 5 pm Wilson Park, Roy Acuff Union Museum

• Antique Tractor Show • DEMONSTRATIONS of Blacksmithing, Woodworking & Corn Grinding • Quilt Show at Roy Acuff Museum • Dale Earnhardt Cheverolet Race Car Arts & Crafts • Food Vendors • Children’s Activities

Hay Bale Toss

For more information call 865.679.1071 or visit www.unioncounty heritagefestival.com

Luttrell Bluegrass Festival Winner 10:15am-10:45am Pleasant Valley Boys 11:00am - 11:45am Southern Spirit 12:00pm - 12:45pm Paul Williams & The Victory Trio 1:00pm - 1:45pm Original Betterway Quartet 2:00pm - 2:45pm Master Peace 3:00pm - 3:45pm Paul Williams & The Victory Trio 4:00pm - 4:45pm

! Seating Festival ur own Bring yo irs & a lawn ch as umbrell

PLATINUM Beverage Solutions Group Wanda Byerly

GOLD A&B Bookkeeping & Tax Service Abundant Health & Wellness Bailey Insurance Company Booker’s One Stop Market Commercial Bank Cutting Crew Lodge Cast Iron Norris Shores Property Owners State Farm Insurance Company Sunset Bay Homeowners Association Tree House Learning Center Woodmen of the World

SILVER Affordable Ace Hardware American Elite Realty B&B Swimming Pools Bi County Propane Eddie’s Auto Parts #2 First Century Bank First Team Realty Flatford Screen Printing Janet’s Hair Salon Keep Union County Beautiful Rondo’s Pizzeria & Grill Union County Community Foundation

Seed Spittin g Contest Skillet Throw Ad space donated by

Union County Shopper News & Union News Leader, Claiborne Progress, Metro Pulse, Knoxville News Sentinel, WBIR Live @ 5, WDVX FM 89.9 Public Radio, WMRD FM 94.5, WTNQ FM 104.9


Union County Shopper-News 092411