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GOVERNMENT/POLITICS A4 | FEATURES A6 | YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS A11 | BUSINESS A12

A great community newspaper.

powell

VOL. 50, NO. 38

SEPTEMBER 19, 2011

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D-line depth Powell High has impressive depth at defensive line. Greg Householder takes a look.

Above: The exterior of the HPUD headworks at the Beaver Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. This is where waste water from the HPUD system begins its journey to Beaver Creek.

See story on page A-11

NEIGHBORHOOD BUZZ

At left: Clean, oxygenated water enters Beaver Creek from HPUD’s Beaver Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. The water quality of water from the plant exceeds the quality of water in the creek.

Emory Road talk on tap State Rep. Bill Dunn will meet with TDOT officials tomorrow, Sept. 20, to discuss the third phase Dunn of Emory Road improvements. Dunn says the meeting was pushed back from a planned spring date because of uncertainty over cutbacks in federal funds. “With the first two phases completed you can see how much it’s needed, five lanes narrowing down to a cow path,” Dunn says. He adds that projects like this that are fully funded by the state are sometimes delayed. Clark Hamilton, founding president of Better Roads in North Knox (BRINK), will also attend the meeting.

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Not a drop spilled HPUD upgrades pay off By Greg Householder During the Labor Day rain deluge a few weeks ago, if the multimillion dollar upgrade to the Hallsdale Powell Utility District’s Beaver Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant had not taken place, the utility and those who live downstream on Beaver Creek would have been in trouble – “big trouble” as HPUD plant and maintenance manager Nick Jackson told the board last Monday. According to Jackson, the plant measured 6 inches in rainfall on Labor Day alone and took in more than 19 million gallons of wastewater which includes not only residential and industrial sewage, but runoff water from the rain as well. The 19 million gallons was the largest one day total the utility has ever experienced.

And they didn’t spill a drop. Not a single drop of untreated water entered Beaver Creek from the plant. Water enters the plant through what is called the headworks. The new headworks can handle 36 million gallons of wastewater per day but the plant can’t treat that much. In the headworks, the bulk of solids are removed through a comblike system that pulls the solids out up a pair of towers. The solids are hauled to the landfill. Water is then pumped out of the headworks to the grit and flow distribution station. Here, fine grit such as small gravel and sand is culled from the water. The water then goes either to the new membrane biological reactor (MBR) or the oxidation ditch, or ox ditch, in part of the old plant. At both locations, the water takes on the look of a chocolate milkshake as biological agents, called “bugs,” literally eat the sewage.

‘Game On!’ Frontier to video Karns at Powell Frontier Communications has launched “Game On!” The original video productions will feature some of the country’s premier high school football games. The series continues Friday, Sept. 23, when the Powell Panthers host the Karns Beavers at Scarbro Stadium.

Hallsdale Powell Utility District will host County Mayor Tim Burchett and county commissioners this week for lunch and a tour of the district’s wastewater treatment plant in Powell. HPUD has not had a violation in more than five years. At the MBR, the water runs through membrane filters that remove microscopic solids. At the oxidation ditch, the water goes through the same process with the “bugs” and the water then goes to a clarifier. Some, but not all, of the water that goes through the MBR or ox ditch goes through a process called waste activated sludge to recapture some of the bugs for future use. The water then is chlorinated to kill any remaining pathogens and then

Frontier is partnering with www.MaxPreps. com to capture contests in seven- to 10-minute “condensed games.” The videos, shot in select Frontier markets, will feature game highlights, key plays, and player and coach interviews. The games will be available on demand 24 hours after the final whistle for free viewing exclusively at www.myfitv.com/GameOn. On game days, Frontier employees will be on site to cheer on their children and local teams, and to distribute prizes and giveaways for football fans. “We are thrilled to bring this program to our

de-chlorinated as a final step before being discharged into Beaver Creek. According to Darren Cardwell, president and CEO of HPUD, the water going into Beaver Creek is of a higher water quality than what is in the creek. HPUD’s onsite laboratory constantly checks the water quality against state standards. While the plant took everything Mother Nature could throw at it, Cardwell did acknowledge problems at various points along the system’s approximately 400-mile collection system. These ranged from backups through manhole covers and missing cleanout caps to backed-up storm drains, and the district is looking at long-term fi xes to these issues. According to Jackson, the Beaver Creek facility currently has a capacity of treating 12-15 million gallons per day, give or take depending on factors such as the amount of stormwa-

communities,” said Mike Byrd, Powell area general manager for Frontier. “High school football is a real passion in the communities we serve. ‘Game On!’ is a great way to be a part of the excitement and let fans and faraway friends and family watch key matchups online. It’s a program where everyone wins.” “Game On!” also features a unique social media component that allows fans to share their experiences by uploading game videos to www. YouTube.com/FrontierGameOn. These videos will be highlighted on the “Game On” YouTube channel and rotated on www.myfitv.com/.

Walking by faith Seats still available for Compassion Coalition fundraiser tomorrow

4509 Doris Circle 37918 (865) 922-4136 news@ShopperNewsNow.com ads@ShopperNewsNow.com EDITOR Larry Van Guilder lvgknox@mindspring.com ADVERTISING SALES Patty Fecco fecco@ShopperNewsNow.com Darlene Hutchison hutchisond@ ShopperNewsNow.com Shopper-News is a member of KNS Media Group, published weekly at 4509 Doris Circle, Knoxville, TN, and distributed to 8,314 homes in Powell.

By Natalie Lester As he sits in his breakfast nook with his Bible each morning, Grant Standefer watches the birds eat out of the feeder on his back porch. He is reminded of Matthew 6:26-27 – “Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they? Can any one of you by wor-

rying add a single hour to your life?” “I am constantly reminded that God will take care of me, just like he takes care of them,” he said. Compassion Coalition sponsors numerous ministries throughout Knoxville, including a furniture ministry on Saturdays where crews deliver donated furniture to recently housed Compassion Coalition volunteer Char Taylor and clearing house formerly homeless men director Gina Whitmore connect a caller with a church family and women, and a clearing using their map of church partners all across Knox County. Photo house staffed by volunteers by N. Lester 2707 Mineral Springs Ave. Knoxville, TN 37917 Ph. (865) 687-4537 280 N. Fairmont Ave. Morristown, TN 37814 Ph. (865) 585-5023

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which connects the needy with various church families all over the county. “We don’t want it to be a one hot meal thing. We want to give them a body of believers to walk along with them,” Standefer said. The Coalition also partners with Knox County District Attorney General Randy Nichols to coordinate juvenile offenders who can do their community service hours alongside church members. “The recurrence rate for participants in the Restoring Justice program is less than 10 percent,” Standefer said. “The national average is more than 60 percent.”

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A-2 • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

Bikers visit ‘Wheels through Time’ The motorcycle ministry at First Baptist Church of Powell and Fountain City is a flexible bunch. With the home UT game on Sept. 10 cutting into attendance a bit, a group of 13 riders made the full trip.

The motorcycle ministry of First Baptist Church of Powell and Fountain City takes a lunch break at the Salty Dog in Maggie Valley, N.C. Pictured clockwise are: Eddie Wampler, Sandra Riley, Sandy Major, Steve Major, Mike Owens, David Riley, Eddie Keith, Pam Householder, Ann Hutson, Buddy Hutson and Wayne Irwin. Photos by Greg Householder

Greg Householder

The group originally planned to ride to Chimney Rock and Lake Lure, N.C., but at the first fuel stop near Maggie Valley the riders changed their plans. Instead of continuing on to Chimney Rock, the ministry made a stop at the Wheels through Time Museum in Maggie Valley. After touring the museum of vintage cars and motorcycles, including a jump bike once used by motorcycle daredevil Evel Knievel, the ministry rode a stretch of the Blue Ridge Parkway to just outside of Cherokee and through the Great Smoky Mountains National Park to Townsend. From Townsend, they made their way home. The FBC motorcycle ministry welcomes all riders. The ministry meets at “The Spring” – the annex across Ewing Road from the Powell campus Youth Worship Center at 7 p.m. on the last Tuesday of each month and rides each second Saturday during riding season.

Barbara Kelley of Juice Plus +, Travis Reeves and Jenna Skuza of ServPro of North Knoxville play “networking bingo” at the PBPA’s meeting last Tuesday.

Nita Buell Black and Dr. Tony Bradley share a laugh at the PBPA’s “networking bingo.” ■

Noweta visits UT Gardens

Last Tuesday, the Noweta Garden Club paid a visit to the UT Gardens. This was a trip originally scheduled for Sept. 6 but was rescheduled after the Labor Day rain deluge. James Newburn, as-

sistant director of the UT Gardens, led the tour. The gardens, established n 1983, serve as the outdoor laboratory for the Department of Plant Sciences. Forestry students also use the garden and the Art Department provides metal sculptures. The gardens are also a test site for new plants breeders

The Noweta Garden Club visits the UT Gardens. Pictured are: (front) Carole Whited, June Jennings, Marjorie Gardner; (back) assistant director James Newburn, Regina Richardson and Suzanne Sweat. you in an emergency,” “you can stay with us,” etc. and the idea was to go around getting signatures from other participants whose ■ PBPA plays ‘bingo’ businesses matched the deThe Powell Business and scriptions. The idea was to get folks Association Professional talking to each other and departed from its usual format for its monthly meet- learning about other busiing last week. Instead of nesses. Rebekah Hill of Computthe usual guest speaker, the business group played er Depot was the first to get “networking bingo.” Partic- “bingo” and received a $25 ipants were given a bingo- Lowe’s card for her efforts. type scorecard with squares Valerie Stewart of the East labeled with “we can help Tennesseee Lions Eye Bank are looking to bring to the market. The gardens are open to the public 365 days per year.

got the most signatures and won a dinner and a movie. In other business, State Farm agent Sage Kohler of the Teen Driver Awareness committee reported that the first meeting with the Arrive Alive Club at Powell High School would be Wednesday, Sept. 21. The next new member reception will be held at Laura Bailey’s from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 4. The Business Spotlight for November shines on Walta Patt and Powell Florist.

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POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • A-3

Bridge jump survivor speaks at UT By Wendy Smith Kevin Hines attempted suicide by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. But he lived to tell about it and is now committed to sharing his mental health struggles to help others. He spoke at UT last week, courtesy of the UT Counseling Center and VolAware, a campus campaign to prevent violence, suicide and substance abuse. Only 2 percent of those who take the 220-foot leap from the bridge survive, and Hines believes he is still here for a reason. He was born to poor, drugaddicted parents in San Francisco. Both were diagnosed with manic depression, now known as bipolar disorder, and he was just a baby when he was taken from them and placed in foster care. He was eventually adopted by loving parents. He was raised in a beautiful house, went to the right schools, and had an abundance of food and clothes, he says. “How could anything go sideways from here? But it did.” At 17, Kevin was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. He had audial and visual hallucinations and was extremely paranoid. After two years of treatment, he was still in denial, he says. He didn’t take his medications regularly and pretended everything was fine. “I was able to fool everyone.” But his parents were aware of his deep depression on Sept. 25, 2000. The day before, his father had spent two hours on the

Kevin Hines speaks to UT students about how he manages his mental health since being diagnosed with a bipolar disorder. Photo by Wendy Smith

phone with a psychiatrist, who told him not to worry, that Kevin was just having another episode. Patrick Hines was still concerned, though, and asked his son to come to work with him that morning. Kevin said no, he wanted to go to school. Kevin says his dad should have asked him outright if he was thinking about hurting himself. Those who are harboring suicidal thoughts typically answer that question honestly. After Patrick dropped him off at school, Kevin boarded a bus for the Golden Gate Bridge and cried the entire way. He spoke to the bus driver, then cried as he paced around the parking lot for 40 minutes. A police officer on a bicycle passed him. A tourist asked him to take her picture. He thinks that if one of those people had shown concern, he wouldn’t have jumped. As soon as his feet left the bridge rail, he knew he’d made a mistake. He was

falling head-first, but managed to turn his body into a seated position before he hit the water, which probably saved his life. Those who commit suicide by jumping from a bridge often die a slow, violent death, Kevin says. He found himself 40 feet under the water with a broken back and several shattered vertebra, but he somehow managed to reach the surface. Even though he’d felt he needed to die to relieve his emotional pain, he now had a strong will to live. He endured months of intense physical and emotional treatment after the ordeal. He now follows a prescription for mental health that includes therapy, medication, exercise, a healthy diet and plenty of sleep, and says he will never again attempt to harm himself. “Every day I wake up is a good day.”

Powell Middle commemorates 9/11 Powell Middle School students pose behind two of the more than 120 American flags donated to the school by Woodmen of the World to help commemorate the 10-year anniversary of the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. The students are Cameron Cagle, Austin Bradley, Aaron Burnett, Shelby Stover, Amelia Shontz and Olivia Sharpe. Photo by Greg Householder

Not a drop spilled From page A-1

ter versus sewage. The plant uses the equalization lagoons from the old plant for storage and the two lagoons have a 10 million gallon capacity each. During the recent rain deluge, the equalization lagoons were used to hold excess water and as the plant digested the incoming water it was pumped back through the headworks for treatment. According to plant superintendent Ronnie Qualls, the plant was built in 1963 and was upgraded through the years. The MBR went online during the winter of 2010. In other business at last

After water goes through the headworks and grit removal, it may pass through this membrane biological reactor at the Beaver Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, where “bugs” or biological agents literally consume the sewage. The water then passes through membranes for further cleaning. Monday’s board meeting, Cardwell reported that 31 meters were set and there were 27 sewer inspections in August, a marked improvement over July. The board also approved a loan resolution through the state

revolving fund for $4.8 million for improvements to the Raccoon Valley and Beaver Creek Wastewater Treatment plants. Several payments for other projects were approved by the board.

POWELL NOTES Knoxville’s Gold Standard

■ Powell Lions Club meets 7 p.m. each first and third Thursday at 7142 Old Clinton Pike. ■ Free flu shots will be given during the 17th annual Free Flu Shot Saturday 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 24, at Halls High School while supplies last. Anyone age 4 and older is eligible. Donations benefit the Empty Stocking Fund. Info: www.knoxnews.com/ charities.

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A-4 • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

Madeline Rogero (center, yellow kayak) and friends enjoy Paddlin’ with Madeline, a unique campaign event. Photo by S. Clark

Sizzle or fizzle Candidates make final pitches

Fun and funds from films

With tax revenue flat-lining, governments need new sources of funds. There are 8 million stories in the Naked County aching for a shot at the big screen.

‘Dirty Timmy’

Acclaimed director Dean Rice brings you a story for the ages, the tale of the man who wouldn’t say quit. They called him – “Dirty Timmy.” School board member: You got nothing, Dirty Timmy. Just try bringing that Carter Elementary project back here for a vote. Dirty Timmy: I know what you’re thinking, punk. Does he have five votes or only four? Tell you the truth, I forgot myself in all this excitement. So you have to ask yourself: Do I feel lucky? Well, do you, punk? Dirty Timmy, the man who stood tall even when his best developer deserted him. Devon: I’m pulling out, Timmy. We’re getting too much heat, and Commissioner Broyles is just too powerful to go up against. Dirty Timmy: You disappoint me, but I’ll find some new Partners. The “don’t miss” film of the year, the startling conclusion of “Dirty Timmy” will stay with you forever! Coming in October, November, December or whenever.

‘Beck: I told you so’

This provocative documentary from director Sam McKenzie captures the Beck Cultural Exchange Center’s struggle to clear its name and keep its doors open after its funding was slashed and County Commission ordered an audit of the center’s books. “The auditor ‘went the extra mile’ and didn’t find anything,” McKenzie said. “I’d been saying all along the audit would come out clean.” But the film reveals that the battle may not be over. “Beck got a good report, but the critics may not be satisfied,” said McKenzie. “I’m guessing they’ll say the auditor was incompetent or the audit didn’t go far enough.” McKenzie’s incisive analysis introduces what he calls “the Obama factor” in local politics. “Although their logic escapes me, some will blame Obama. Not enough rain? Too much rain? It’s Obama’s fault. That’s just how things are around here.” McKenzie plans to release “Beck: I told you so” in late September.

The Rogero Armada gathered at Gov. Ned McWherter Park to set sail for Sequoyah Park and the symbolism was palatable. Madeline Rogero climbed on a rock to address her followers: “We’re going right through the middle of downtown, along the South Knox waterfront. Let’s enjoy each other and focus on quality growth and our natural assets,” she said. It was a perfect Sunday afternoon. The paddlers wore maroon and white T-shirts. Most tacked campaign signs on their watercraft. A couple even brought two black Labs, suitably attired in life jackets. “Watch out for each other,” someone yelled as they set out. “Don’t drink the water!” yelled another. Team Rogero may look back on this event and wish they had gone door-to-door instead. But for one day the political outliers from eight years ago looked ready to take control of their city government. What was their reception in Sequoy-

Sandra Clark ah Park? Madeline said fresh made Cruze Farm ice cream awaited. It’s doubtful the Sequoyah residents stood with pitchforks to repel the invaders. Rogero has been around long enough to feel familiar. She’s worked for Bill Haslam, Dolly Parton and Colin Powell. The sun is shining on her campaign for mayor. There’s not a cloud in sight. Mark Padgett looks like a mayor (or Robert Redford playing “The Candidate”). At age 33, he’s raised the most money and produced the slickest advertising. His family (wife, kid and dog) beams from giant billboards. And no candidate has worked harder. So why is Mark not catching on? Politicians say he’s not paid his dues. He lacks loyalty among hardcore

Democrats (they’re for Madeline) and Republicans (most are for Ivan Harmon). Padgett has support from the business community, but not the business establishment. For credibility, he needed endorsements. But Madeline scored with the News Sentinel, Metro Pulse and the Public Trust PAC. Mark failed to sell the Haslam establishment. Maybe he should have nailed up some yard signs for Bill in that 2010 gubernatorial race. City employees want to back the winner. That’s why many voted against their self-interest in supporting Haslam in 2003. They don’t need to do that this time. And don’t discount the support Ivan Harmon has among city employees. Padgett is third among this group of motivated, surebet voters. But Padgett doesn’t need to beat Rogero on Sept. 27. He just needs to beat Harmon and prevent Rogero from winning outright with 50 percent plus one. Will Mark sizzle or fizzle? We’ll know in a week and a day.

GOSSIP AND LIES ■ Anthony Weiner not only lost his dignity with a foolish Internet posting. He also lost his Congressional seat to a Republican, the first to hold the New York seat since the 1920s. ■ John Stancil, running for City Council at-large, says he’s been to so many candidate forums that he could give any other candidate’s stump speech without notes. ■ Cappy Padgett, Mark’s dog, has a Facebook page with 300 friends as of last Thursday. He even has a favorite quote from that good Democrat Harry S Truman: “You want a friend in Washington? Get a dog.” ■ Marilyn Roddy ’s youngest daughter is counting votes, telling her mom that she’s up to six. “With this turnout, that may be enough!” joked the candidate. ■ Got friends? A quick look at Facebook shows 1,381 people “like” Madeline Rogero, while 1,531 like Ivan Harmon. Mark Padgett has 2,222 friends while Joe Hultquist has 341 and Bo Bennett has 417. The prize for most friends, however, goes to County Commissioner Jeff Ownby with 3,265.

New hires for new mayor

Early voting has been weak. Based on voting to date, the city total on Sept. 27 may be close to 18,000 – which is less than 20 percent of eligible voters. This is unfortunate, as 2011 marks the first time in 24 years that someone other than Ashe or Haslam (and Dan Brown for 11 months) will be mayor of Get ready for the horror ride of your life. Not since “X Knoxville. the Unknown” have moviegoers experienced the terror If only 18,000 vote in the that awaits them in “It came from the trustee’s office!” city election, then 9,001 votes You’ll shiver as it embezzles, quake as it cashes in un- will win the election for mayearned comp time and vacation pay. Try not to scream as it or outright. Madeline Rogero buys personal entertainment devices with county purchas- will be close to half plus one, ing cards! and if she falls short, it will Based on a true story, scenes from “It came from the not be by a lot. trustee’s office!” will haunt you long after you leave the theThat then raises the quesater. Watch as young “J.D.” battles this unspeakable evil. tion of whether she faces J.D.: I’m going in. Somebody has to clean this up. Mark Padgett or Ivan HarTBI agent: It didn’t happen on your watch, but it’ll mon in the runoff. Again, the take somebody with a ton of moral fiber to beat this thing, difference between second kid. and third place may be close. J.D.: I’m your man. Now stand aside! If there is a runoff, expect If you don’t see another movie this year, you must see “It issues to sharpen and more debates between only two came from the trustee’s office!” Coming soon! candidates. It also means Contact Larry Van Guilder at lvgknox@mindspring.com.

‘It came from the trustee’s office!’

Victor Ashe

voter turnout on Nov. 8 will increase by another 20 percent. Should the race be decided on Sept. 27, then the winner has a long transition which is helpful. Who will a new mayor hire? My estimate is that Rogero offers the least change in personnel as she worked closely as a former city director with almost everyone there now. Larry Martin and Bill Lyons are each $1,000 donors to her campaign. They would likely stay if she wins and depart should one of the other candidates prevail. Ivan Harmon would probably pick Rick Emmett as his chief of staff. This should

be reassuring to those who question Harmon’s executive skills as Emmett is a low key, steady and even cautious longtime city employee. He currently oversees many downtown projects. Who Padgett picks is anyone’s guess, but it’s safe to say he would bring in the most personnel changes. His father, Mike Padgett, would have influence. It is unlikely that any of the mayoral candidates would change either the current fire or police chiefs. Stan Sharp and David Rausch are widely applauded as able and solid. Notes: A recent mailer urging support for four candidates has each denying involvement. The four candidates are Becky Massey for senator, Padgett for mayor, and George Wallace and Marshall Stair for council. Obviously, someone spent money and effort to create

the mailer and violated state law by not showing who is paying for it. On the other hand, each of the four named candidates had their picture mailed without cost to them to hundreds if not thousands of voters. ■ Interim council member Charlie Thomas baffled many when he withdrew as a write-in candidate after signing up just a few weeks earlier. This assures Mark Campen’s election as one of the four new council members. The brief on and off campaign of Thomas did cause Campen to campaign more actively than he had previously done. Campen has a strong environmental bent and favors parks and greenways. He is informed on issues but will be reserved when he speaks out. He brings integrity and knowledge to his new position.

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POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • A-5 home-schooled her children initially.) I don’t believe humans should be institutionalized early on. I favor an elected superintendent. We need people who are vested in our community to be Massey: There is a lot leaders in our schools. of conversation (about eduMassey: (on the Tennescation reform), but we’re see Education Association). not including the teachers. Many educators do not join We need teacher buy-in. TEA, finding the organizaWe must let educators be tion too liberal. creative and not be so data Roddy: I do not support driven. We are a society of collective bargaining (by differing levels and public Marilyn Roddy Victoria DeFreese Becky Duncan Massey teachers). schools must educate each DeFreese: I went to child. I and my children at- students who are failing. failure, for instance pre-1, an incubator for good ideas, Johnson Bible College, and tended public schools. We’ve got to get more kids pre-6 and pre-9. and I believe a child should I don’t believe in the liberal to graduation. I like transibe connected to families Roddy: We want to enDeFreese: I don’t behance opportunities for tional grades at the point of lieve Knox County Schools is until 3rd grade. (DeFreese ideology of TEA.

Not a dime’s worth of difference? By Sandra Clark There are stark differences among the women in the Republican Primary for state Senate from District 6. Just listen carefully. Marilyn Roddy, Victoria DeFreese and Becky Massey spoke to the Fountain City Business and Professional Association last week to a full house. Here are notes about public education:

Brown hopes successor keeps police chief The biggest decision Daniel Brown has had to make since he was sworn in as Knoxville’s mayor last January came just a few weeks later when Police Chief Sterling Owen resigned.

Betty Bean Mayor Daniel Brown and Fountain City Town Hall board memThat’s what Brown told ber Barbara Ray. Photo by B. Bean members of Fountain City Town Hall last week when cellent people apply, and the he was guest speaker at their top four are all very able.” Brown, who is also the sitSeptember meeting. He said Sterling’s resignation stated a ting 6th District City Council representative, said he’s stayclear reason – to play golf. “I assume, and hope, ing out of the mayor’s race that the next mayor would – “But I do have a favorite, keep the (new) chief (David which I won’t tell.” He said he never, ever Rausch), who has done an excellent job. We had some ex- expected to become mayor

of his hometown, but that’s where he finds himself since his City Council colleagues elected him interim mayor after Bill Haslam got elected governor. “Growing up, I never thought about being mayor. But things happen and you never know what is in your future,” he said. “When the dust settled, I was left standing.” Recently married to his longtime sweetheart, Cathy Ann Smith, Brown says he’s searched the historical record and has not found another mayor who got married while in office. Otherwise, he says he has very purposefully tried to keep from making any major changes. “I have not had to lay off anybody or raise taxes, while we have continued to provide all the basic services,” he said, adding that he didn’t think it would have been appropriate to replace any department heads.

“I believe it’s good to keep things on a sound footing and not to have any major upheaval.” He’s proud of the way that city employees have responded to the weather emergencies created by this year’s series of damaging storms, and he’s enthusiastic about the new curbside recycling program that begins in October. He’s also a big booster of the redevelopment dis-

tricts that have been created on Cumberland and Magnolia Avenues, North Central Avenue and the South Knox Waterfront. “For the last three years, the city has been offering the same level of services with static or shrinking budgets. Thanks to responsible budgeting and cooperation between the administration and city council, city government has been able to avoid

cutting back on services. I am confident we will be OK.” Brown ended his talk with a plea for civility. “One of biggest challenges before us is to have respect for civility and open dialogue. Those of us in public office have the job of resolving many of these issues, and that job can be made a lot more difficult by the tone of the dialogue during the debate.”

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A-6 • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

PULL UP A CHAIR … | Jake Mabe

‘Find out next week …’ Film buff looks back at classic movie serials

Y

ou could get in for anywhere from 9 to 15 cents. You often were treated to a double feature, usually a B-western, sometimes a two-reel short like the “Three Stooges,” and, often, a cliffhanger serial. Don Calhoun spent many a Saturday during his childhood at one of five theaters that were then located in downtown Kingsport, where he grew up, usually in the three that catered to the films he liked. One of them, the Center, would show a kiddie program, usually with a serial, a cartoon and a B-western, and even give you a piece of cake if it was your birthday, all for 15 cents. The bus station was located next to the theater, so Don and his brother would usually hitch a ride on the bus into town on Saturday mornings from their home out in the country. Often, they’d get a Krystal or Blue Circle hamburger for a dime and maybe buy a Sporting News. “We were poor as church mice, but my brother and I usually had something going. We trapped, sold ginseng, dried out herbs. Our dad would rent us a small tobacco plot, so we’d have a little more money to spend.” Sometimes Don and his brother would go to the Gem, which would often show two B-westerns, usually from the late 1930s to 1950s, as well as a two-reel comedy. Admission was 9 cents. Other times they might run over to the Realto. “The Realto was my favorite. They’d show a serial chapter, a Bwestern, like a Rocky Lane or a Monte Hale, and sometimes even a third booking like “1,001 Thrills,” a Sherlock Holmes or a Boston Blackie or the color Ali Babas.”

Don Calhoun shows a close up of the Better Little Book (formerly known as the Big Little Books) of the classic Republic serial “Dick Tracy Returns.”

Calhoun kept his love for these classic films, particularly B-westerns and movie serials, and began collecting both memorabilia and films as an adult. He can remember being overjoyed when author Alan G. Barbour came out with two books on the genres in the early 1970s, “The Thrill of it All” and “Days of Thrill and Adventure,” well before the days of home video. Since the 1980s, Calhoun has served, on and off, as a producer and co-host of Marshal Andy’s popular “Riders of the Silver Screen,” which airs classic B-westerns and movie serials. The program began on the old WKCH Channel 43 and now airs on local PBS affiliate WKOP (Channel 15) at 10:30 a.m. Saturdays. Calhoun will offer tidbits about the serials and movies and often display a lobby card or a poster or a comic book, something tied to the film and/or the serial. When we sat down to talk about movie serials recently, Calhoun wanted to make one thing clear up front. “I’m not an expert on serials. I just really enjoy them.” But, he

Don Calhoun shows off some of his movie serials memorabilia at his home. Calhoun provides trivia and other tidbits for the B-westerns and classic serials shown on Marshal Andy’s “Riders of the Silver Screen” at 10:30 a.m. Saturdays on WKOP-TV (PBS) in Knoxville. Photos by Jake Mabe knows more about them than anybody you’re likely to meet. Calhoun says that movie serials began in 1913, the year after the first full-length motion pictures were produced. The early serials often featured women in peril. One of the first was called “The Perils of Pauline.” The “catch” of the serials is the (sometimes literal) cliffhanger in which the hero is left in some precarious situation and the audience would have to come back to the theater the following week to discover the character’s fate. The early serials ran anywhere from 10 to 20 chapters (Calhoun says one ran 119 episodes!), but later, when serials reached their peak in the late 1930s and early 1940s, 15 chapters

were the norm, with the first chapter usually being the longest. As the serials hit their stride, they would feature everything from westerns like “Zorro” and “The Adventures of Jesse James” to comic book heroes like Superman and Captain Marvel to detective and adventure stories like Dick Tracy and the Canadian Mounties. The “Dick Tracy” serials starring Ralph Byrd are some of the most

popular ever produced. Calhoun says a majority of serial buffs consider “Dick Tracy vs. Crime Inc.” to be the best of the series, although he prefers “Dick Tracy Returns.” Virtually all film historians agree that Republic Pictures produced the best serials. “Why are Republic serials better?” Calhoun asks. “It’s not the stars. They had good scripts, yes, but it’s the production itself. They’d do miniatures (small model sets) up on a hill or by the water with a real sky behind them. They had the best stuntmen in the business and the cinematography was excellent.” “Riders of the Silver Screen” is currently airing an enjoyable serial, “S.O.S. Coast Guard,” starring Ralph “Dick Tracy” Byrd and Bela Lugosi. After it wraps, Calhoun says the plan is to begin showing serials produced after 1944, which were shortened in length due to rising production costs. Doing so, he says, will give Calhoun and Marshal Andy Smalls more time to chat about the films, air a B-western following the serial and also allow time at the end for Andy’s musical segments. One thing about it, though. Calhoun says you have you put yourself in a certain frame of mind to really appreciate the classic serials of yesteryear. “They were made for kids. They weren’t made for adults. Watch them from the standpoint that you’re in that era. People weren’t jaded; it was a good versus evil theme, kind of like watching B-westerns. Don’t expect the technology of today.” But expect to be entertained, perhaps even expect to be returned to those Saturday silver screens of yesterday, if you lived through it. Before long, you’ll get sucked in, waiting in anticipation to find out what happens next week, just as it was meant to be. Jake Mabe is a movie nut born about 40 years too late. Call him at 922-4136 or email JakeMabe1@aol. com. Visit him online at jakemabe.blogspot.com, on Facebook or at Twitter.com/HallsguyJake.

“Riders of the Silver Screen” airs B-westerns, usually preceded by a classic film serial, at 10:30 a.m. Saturdays on WKOP-TV Channel 15 (PBS) in Knoxville. For more information about classic serials, visit www.rareserials.com. To find out about ongoing efforts to restore classic serials, visit www.serialsquadron.com.

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POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • A-7

MILESTONES

More we and less me

VanOver, Mabe to wed Sams celebrates 80 years The Rev. Bob H. Sams celebrated his 80th birthday in August with family and friends. Sams and his wife, Sylvia, have two sons, Tim and Tony Sams of Cleveland, Tenn., and a daughter, Becky Sams, of Gibbs. Grandchildren are Lindsey Sams of Gibbs and Brandy and Bryan Sams of Cleveland.

Birthdays Maddox Wilson Cordeiro celebrated his sixth birthday Aug. 3, with a big party at Monkey Joe’s in Atlanta and a second party at his grandparents’ house. Maddox is the son of Ashley Wilson and Keith Cordeiro. Grandparents are Kim and Jon Lewis of Atlanta and Vicki and Steve Wilson of Powell. Greatgrandmothers are Gloria Sise of Powell and Terri Cordeiro of McDonough, Ga. Gracie Gregory turned 6 on Sept. 15. She is the daughter of Rob and Michelle Gregory. She has a younger brother, Chase. Grandparents are Gloria Gregory, Pat Sisson and Bob Gregory. She is a 1st grader at BrickeyMcCloud Elementary.

Jennifer Denise VanOver and Gregory Jacob “Jake� Mabe will be married 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, at the Museum of Appalachia. Jennifer is the daughter of Betty Webb of Oak Ridge. She holds three associate degrees from Roane State Community College and a bachelor’s degree in organizational management from Tusculum College. She is employed as an information technology applications analyst/physician informatics representative with Covenant Health. Jake is the son of Gail and Mike McConkey and Larry and Kim Mabe, all of Halls. He holds a bachelor’s degree in history from UT and is a columnist/features editor with Shopper-News. After a honeymoon trip to Hawaii, the couple will be at home in Halls.

Veterans open house upcoming All veterans are invited to an open house sponsored by American Legion Post 212, Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Tri-County Veterans Honor Guard and the American Legion Auxiliary from 1-5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8, at 140 Veteran St., Maynardville. Entertainment and refreshments will be provided. This is an opportunity for veterans and family to meet each other or join these organizations. No alcohol allowed on the premises.

In electronic newsletters, Jerry Holloway says there ain’t no Vol like an old Vol. Holloway, Tennessee right tackle in 1968, just out the line from famous guard Charley Rosenfelder and famous center Chip Kell, enjoys the daunting challenge of keeping lettermen and friends informed about each other. Focal points are health and welfare reports and requests for prayers. That’s right, even big, tough former football players know when they are in trouble. Holloway memos generate awesome results. You should have seen the outpouring of love when Hal Wantland was dying. Old pass-catcher Johnny Mills said he could feel the prayers when he was flat on his back from a heart attack. Richmond Flowers expressed gratitude for encouraging support when he faced prostate crisis. Former coach Charley Coffey led the prayer circle at Ron Jarvis’ home when

ETTAC webinar rescheduled Initially scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 15, the East Tennessee Technology Access Center has moved its nationwide webinar about online employment applications and website accessibility to Tuesday, Sept. 27. It will be held from 1:30 to 3 p.m. in ETTAC’s office at 116 Childress St. The webinar will teach participants how to make their online applications fully accessible to people with disabilities. The program is free but registration is required. Info: 219-0130.

Exhibit of Gombert and Beene Tennessee Valley Unitarian Unversalist Church, 2931 Kingston Pike, will host an exhibit of works by artists Carl Gombert and Ricky Beene through September.

Marvin West

Hammerhead was running out of time. Joan Cronan, as interim vice chancellor responsible for UT athletics and other things, attended the Jarvis funeral and was warmed by the Volunteer family togetherness. She assembled her staff the next morning and said this is how all Tennessee athletics should be, more we and less me. There are inspiring stories of how Steve Kiner, Elliott Gammage, Jerry Cooley and a host of old Volunteers and other friends have kept Walter Chadwick functional for the decades since his terrible auto accident. They take Walter to lunch each Wednesday. They help him collect and sell aluminum

cans. Former coach Bill Battle gave generously to install a chair lift in Walter’s condo. Holloway and former receiver Mike Price, associates at Oliver Smith Realty and Auction, keep up with as many old Vols as possible. Price, a natural conversationalist, is point man for incoming information. For example, he stays in close contact with Bubba Wyche, quarterback who helped shock Alabama in ’67. Bubba has vertebra issues, a blood disorder, breathing problems and pain, lots of pain. He is too tough to give up. Old Vol Robbie Franklin monitors Stan Mitchell, fullback in the mid-60s, now in a nursing home in Sparta. Mike LaSorsa, end and captain in ’61, is in failing health. Hundreds of us are vitally concerned. Richard Pickens, all-SEC fullback in the late ’60s, is just learning that “we will always care.� Jim McDonald, teammate at Young

High and UT, was guide as Richard returned to Knoxville from his previous life in Spartanburg. Pickens has been diagnosed with short-term memory problems. He no longer drives. Some think concussions may be the root of his ailment. Former captain Dick Williams discovered that Pickens needed a special chair for comfortable TV viewing. You get to guess how many chair offers came tumbling in. At one of the prayer meetings, former line coach Ray Trail raised a question: Do you think modern players will get together in years to come the way you guys do now? Trail answered his own question. He doesn’t think so. He thinks he sees more football individuals and less football togetherness. The loss of athletic dorms might be relevant. There is hope. Derek Dooley’s Vol for Life concept might be the glue that holds younger groups together. We’ll see. Marvin West invites reader response. His address is westwest6@netzero.com.

‘Bluzin’ in the Valley 2011’ is Saturday The first-ever “Bluzin’ in the Valley 2011� will be held Saturday, Sept. 24, at the Raccoon Valley Festival grounds at 265 Patt Lane in Powell. This is not the same event as the Raccoon Valley Bluegrass Festival normally held in October. The Raccoon Valley Bluegrass Festival has been canceled for this year. Acts such as E.G. Kight, Lightin’Charlie and the Upsetters, Slow Blind Hill, the E.G. Kight, “The Georgia SongWhitewater Bluegrass Band, bird,� will perform at “Bluzin’ the Austin Crum Band and in the Valley 2011.� Photo submitother special surprise guests ted

will perform. There will be blues, gospel and bluegrass music and plenty of food and fun. Gates open at 10:30 a.m. and the music runs from 11:15 a.m. to 11 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the gate. Proceeds benefit the Joy of Music School. “Bluzin’ in the Valley 2011� is sponsored by Drive 4 Life Academy and Country Inns and Suites. Info: www. bluzininthevalley.com/ or 389-5833.

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A-8 • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

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Trees I have known Let the heavens be glad, and let the earth rejoice, let the sea roar, and all that fills it; let the field exult, and everything in it. Then shall all the trees of the forest sing for joy before the Lord. … (Psalm 96: 11-13a NRSV) I claim several trees that don’t actually belong to me. Not, as I think about it, that any tree really belongs to me. I somehow think that trees are a little like people; they belong to themselves. However, there are trees, and then there are my trees. Some trees are very special to me, for various reasons, and regardless of whose property they are on, I think of them as mine. The house where I grew up has always been surrounded by enormous oaks, but there was a maple tree in the front yard that was the first of “my” trees. My tree had a lowslung, sturdy branch, just the right height for climbing, and just the right size for sitting on. It also had another branch: a smaller branch that grew right above the big one, and which functioned much like the safety bar on a roller coaster. My tree stood near the front corner of the property, and so was private, not readily visible to my family inside the house. That tree became my private retreat. I read most of “Little Women” there, as well as many other books. I climbed there, and thought, and prayed, and cried, and pretended, and dreamed and wondered. I was saddened not too long ago to drive by that house and see that “my” tree had been cut down. It appeared to have been damaged, maybe in one of the windstorms of the spring, and, when I saw it, it was lying on the ground, in great chunks. The next time I passed the house, it was gone altogether. But there are other trees that I have never climbed, never touched. They are also “my” trees. I love them like old friends because of their grace, beauty and steadfast presence.

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Lynn Hutton One is a tree on the road I drive to work every day. I am not sure what kind it is because in the summer it is quite unremarkable, and I don’t notice it at all, so I haven’t analyzed its leaves. But in the winter, during a snowfall, its leaning trunk catches and holds the snow on its north side. The trunk is crooked, and the snow, following the line of the tree, looks like a lightning bolt, zigzagging from sky to earth. There is another tree that I love in all seasons. It is an enormous sycamore that stands in a small vale about a block off my route. I have to look carefully, and am glad when the traffic light turns red and stops my progress there, allowing me to savor the tree’s angular, spreading branches. Its white bark gleams in all seasons: stark as bones in the winter, shining like a candle in the spring, showing like a glimpse of lace when the tree is in full summer leaf and shimmering softly through the wide yellow leaves in the fall. I give thanks for my friends, “my” trees. I remember, I remember, The fir trees dark and high; I used to think their slender tops Were close against the sky: It was a childish ignorance, But now ’tis little joy To know I’m farther off from heaven Than when I was a boy. (“I Remember, I Remember,” Thomas Hood)

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Community services ■ Beaver Ridge UMC, 7753 Oak Ridge Highway, takes orders for Angel Food Ministries by phone or in person the Saturday before each distribution. The distribution of the food is usually the third Saturday of each month from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Info: 228-9299 or the church office, 690-0160. ■ Beaver Ridge UMC Food Pantry hands out food to local families in need 1-2 p.m. every Monday and 7-8 p.m. every first Monday. Donations and volunteers are welcome. Info: 690-1060 or www.beaverridgeumc.com. ■ Cross Roads Presbyterian hosts the Halls Welfare Ministry food pantry from 6-8 p.m. each second Tuesday and from 9-11 a.m. each fourth Saturday. ■ Knoxville Free Food Market, 4625 Mill Branch Lane (across from Tractor Supply in Halls), distributes free food 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the third Saturday of the month. Info: 566-1265.

Fall festivals ■ Bookwalter UMC , 4218 Central Avenue Pike, will have a fall festival 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1. There will be children’s activities, Petros and hot apple pies for lunch and vendors selling aprons, baked goods, candles and more. Info: 773-3380. ■ Clapps Chapel UMC Men’s Club will host its second annual Oktoberfest dinner and festival 4-7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24. Cost is $7 for adults and $3 for children 10 and under. Carryout orders will be available on request. Info: Ed Bardill, 922-4309. ■ Zion Hill Baptist Church, 289 Carden Gap Road in Heiskell, will have its fall festival 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24. Breakfast and lunch will be

served. There will also be a rummage sale, games, music an auction and more. Everyone is invited.

Fundraisers, sales ■ Beaver Ridge UMC , 7753 Oak Ridge Highway, will host its 10th annual murder mystery production “Murder in the Old Growth Forest” 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25. Admission is $20 Saturday, which includes dinner catered by Carrabba’s and $14 Sunday, which includes gourmet dessert. All proceeds go to the church for mission projects. Child care will be available at no cost. Info: 323-9321. ■ Bookwalter UMC , 4218 Central Avenue Pike, will participate in a communitywide yard sale 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22. Those interested in setting up should call 773-3380. It is free to participate. ■ Dante Baptist Church, 314 Brown Road, needs vendors for a craft fair Saturday, Oct. 8. Table rental is $20. Info: Vivian Baker, 938-1378. ■ Faith UMC , 1120 Dry Gap Pike, will host “Laugh All Night: An Evening of Comedy to Benefit Agape Outreach Homes” 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29. Comedians will include Marty Simpson, Jonnie W. and Renard Hirsch. Tickets are $10 or $35 for four. Info: http://www. agapeoutreachhomesonline. org/ ■ Faithway Baptist Church is seeking craft vendors for a fall show to be held Oct. 1. Info: Robin, 254-4605. ■ New Hope Baptist Church will hold a fundraiser festival 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, and is seeking various vendors. Crafters, rummage sellers, games and more are needed. Proceeds will go to offset medical bills for injuries Chris Mitchell sustained in a motorcycle accident. Info: Tammy, 604-7634. ■ New Liberty Baptist Church, 5901 Roberts Road in Corryton, will hold a Car, Truck and Motorcycle Show 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, rain or shine. Cost is $15 per vehicle. Registration begins at 9 a.m. Bring your own lawn chair.

faith Wilson to speak at KFL James “Jim” H. Wilson will be the guest speaker for the Knoxville Fellowship Luncheon at noon Tuesday, Sept. 20. The KFL is a group of Christian men and women who meet weekly at the Golden Corral in Powell.

Maryville College to host singing The first J. Bazzel Mull Memorial Gospel Singing will be held 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1, at the Clayton Center for the Arts in the Ronald and Lynda Nutt Theatre on the campus of Maryville College. The Primitive Quartet, The Singing Cookes, and Archie Watkins and Smoky Mountain Reunion (the original Inspirations) will appear. There will also be a special tribute to Mull. Tickets are $14 in advance and $16 at the door. There is a special price for church groups. Info/tickets: Charlie Lambert, 454-9025.

Family says thanks The Wilburn family would like to thank the community for all the donations and prayers given after the passing of Eddie Wilburn.

Homecomings ■ Broadway Baptist Church, 815 N. Broadway, Sunday, Oct. 9. Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m. and the worship service begins at 11. A covered dish lunch will follow. Info: 5242575. ■ Home Faith Baptist Church, 5139 Rouse Lane, will hold homecoming Sunday, Oct. 2. Sunday school is at 10 a.m., morning service at 11 a.m., Sunday evening service at 6 p.m. The Principles will be the guest singers. Info/directions: 323-4541 or 686-4796.

Music services ■ Fourth United Presbyterian Church, 1323 Broadway, will host a performance by Peruvian band Inca Son 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23. Tickets are $10 ($15 at the door). All proceeds benefit Casa de Sara. Info: 690-3323 or visit www.eventbrite.com/ event/2106014145/auto. ■ Faith UMC, 1120 Dry Gap Pike, will host Faithstock 2011 from 1-6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24. Admission is free and everyone is invited. Musical performers will include BRIM, Jon Do, HisVoice, Ron Sample and more. Lawn chairs and

blankets are welcomed. Concessions will be available. Info: visit www.faithstock.info. ■ Sharon Baptist Church, 7916 Pedigo Road, will host The Beelers 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25.

Special services ■ New Beverly Baptist Church, 3320 New Beverly Church Road, is hosting Sammy “Barney Fife” Sawyer and his Mayberry friends 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25. A love offering will be taken. Info: www.NewBeverly.org or 546-0001. ■ NKSDA Church , 6530 Fountain City Road, will host Fred Rogers of Native American Ministries at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 24. Info: 925-3154.

Youth programs ■ Beaver Ridge UMC, 7753 Oak Ridge Highway, youth program has several activities planned for the month including bowling, a youth retreat and helping out with the church’s mystery dinner theater. Everyone is invited to participate. Info: Jay Lifford, 690-1060 ext. 108, or email jay@beaverridgeumc.com.

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Loan rates applicable to new and used autos, trucks, boats, RVs, motorcycles, ATVs and farm equipment. Available to qualifying members for a limited time. Rate subject to change. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. Rate is based on Credit Union Managed Credit Program. No other discounts apply. Rate accurate as of 9/1/11. New money only.


A-10 • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

Mission on Statement: To improve the quality of life of all those God places ur path by building on our experiences of the past, pursuing our in our vision for the future and creating caring life-long relationships. OfďŹ ce is independently owned and operated.

Laura Bailey

947-9000

A Unique Boutique & Gifts

Come check out our selection of Wigs & Hairpieces

POWELL – 10 acres in private wooded setting w/creek. Several building sites. $109,900 or purchase a total of 37 acres with 2006 singlewide mobile home for $399,000. Powell Schools

Come visit us at our new location

The Silk Purse

116 Carr Street Knoxville, 37919

584-2221 www.acrossthecreektn.net

POWELL – All brick ranch 3BR/3.5BA w/office, bonus/4th BR & 3-car gar. Open entry, hdwd flrs, corner stack stone FP, 10' ceil, quartz tops & stainless appl. Mstr w/tray ceil, walk-in closet w/ access to laundry rm. Jack & Jill split BRs & office on main. Bonus or 4th BR up w/full BA. Enjoy the outdoors w/26x14 part covered back patio. Plenty of stg & upgrades $329,900 (747916)

POWELL – 3BR/3BA all brick condo. Open flr plan w/cathedral ceilings, 2BR/2BA on main, 3rd BR up could be bonus rm w/full BA. Sun rm 9 x 9.8 & 5.3x11.9 laundry rm. $197,500 (765610) COMMERCIAL LAND – 5.06 acres industrial (I-2) zoning. Convenient to I-40 at Rutledge Pike. Residential area across the street. $195,000 (764424)

POWELL – Great 2BR/2BA ranch pud. Private wooded setting w/12x30 covered screened porch w/ skylights, large open entry, LR w/ brick gas FP & bay window, eat-in kitchen, formal DR, mstr suite w/ lg walk-in closet & handicap equip 6' shower, 2-car gar w/access to back deck. Sale includes washer, dryer, desk in hall & fridge in gar. $149,900 (758300)

2322 W. Emory Rd. • www.knoxvillerealty.com

865-947-9000 • 1-800-237-5669

N.KNOX - Brick 3BR/2.5BA bsmt rancher. Great wooded & private corner lot w/mature trees. Convenient location to Clinton Hwy shopping & restaurants. Hdwd under carpet on main, mstr w/full BA & walk-in closet. 52' long 1-car carport great for boat stg or 2nd car. Basement rec rm w/brick FP & 23x12 wkshp/stg, laundry rm includes washer & dryer. Great deck off kit & covered front porch. Reduced to $139,900 (754198)

POWELL – Private wooded setting. All brick 3BR/2BA rancher w/ 2-car attached & 1-car detached gar/wkshp. Enjoy the yard without the work, HOA fees included lawn care. Vaulted ceilings in LR & kit, formal DR & 15.6x11 screened porch. Transferable home & pest control warranty. $244,900 (768752)

POWELL – Ridge Top View! This 3BR/2BA w/bonus loft area features: Mstr suite w/whirlpool tub & double vanity, walk-in closets, gas FP, vaulted great rm, 2-car gar w/ pull down attic storage. $169,900 (768871)

KARNS – 4BR/1.5BA bsmt rancher. This home features: 3BR on main & 4th BR, rec rm & half bath/laundry down. Fenced yard & 1-car gar. Many updates including: Laminate flooring, tile backsplash in kit, energy efficient heat pump, water heater, wired smoke detector & new lighting & plumbing fixtures. New 3-ton AC unit & exterior painted 6/2011. Reduced $118,900 (752919)

Every Friday & Saturday, 9am-6pm & Sunday, 10am-5pm Our community of merchants will be       of local produce, gourmet foods, collectibles, arts, crafts, antiques, unusual  

Friday, September 23 Saturday, September 24 Sunday, September, 25

THIS WEEKEND! Open since August of this year, the Public Market has had many thousands of visitors! It is time to         

The Public Market Outdoor Farmer’s Market will be Celebrating the Fall Season with special food presentations and a cornucopia of rich harvest from our local growers!

Live Music! Entertainment!

Outlet Drive

       entertainment, prizes, giveaways and activities for children! Something for the entire family! We’ll have a Pumpkin Patch, cornstalks, gourds, scarecrows and bales of hay for you to create your own harvest decorations! Demonstrations by local craftsmen and artists with a special focus on Antiques and Collectibles!

Special Events! New Restaurants! The Public Market is a modern thrift hunter’s paradise where bargains are discovered and new foods uncovered.

Call 865-671-5000 Follow us on Facebook @ Turkey Creek Public Market

TurkeyCreekPublicMarket.com

HUNDREDS OF UNIQUE MERCHANTS & FARMERS!


kids

POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • A-11

Panther D-Line shows depth Powell faces Karns Friday

SPORTS NOTES ■ Knox Silver Sox 9-year-olds baseball team needs players for fall and spring 2012. Competitive USSSA level. Info: 363-1483 or email silversoxbaseball@gmail.com.

By Greg Householder Replacing Steven Ross and Austin Benson, the bookend defensive ends who were responsible for much of Powell High School’s defensive success last year, is a daunting task for any coach. Panther head coach Matt Lowe is attacking the problem “by the numbers.” By that, he is running multiple players through the end positions. “Having multiple people play those positions gives us fresh legs and it gives us big defensive ends and fast defensive ends,” says Lowe. The Powell defensive front has had its share of injuries this year. Big Tony Foster has been out since the spring but is expected to return soon. The 6-0, 315-pound senior was the “youngster” on last year’s defensive front. Junior Cody Jett suffered a serious season ending injury in the first game at Rhea County. Seeing lots of action at defensive end are: senior Drake Owenby (6-2, 220 pounds), senior offensive lineman Koby Crisp (6-2, 255 pounds), senior Sinjin Myers (6-1, 185 pounds), senior Zach York (6-0, 180 pounds), senior Darrian Farmer (6-0, 210 pounds) and junior Shar-ron Moore (5-10, 215 pounds). In the center, seniors Wesley Sparks (5-10, 235 pounds) and Cory Headrick (6-1, 250 pounds) share snaps with sophomore Brady Scaff (6-2, 285 pounds). After drubbing Halls 42-0 in the Battle of Emory Road on Sept. 2, the

■ Knoxville Fury 12U baseball team needs players; tryouts for fall 2011 and spring 2012 travel. Info: James Jenkins, 237-1450. ■ Baseball tournament, Tee ball and 6U coach pitch and 8U-14U Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 24-25. Open to all. Info: 992-5504 or email hcpsports@msn.com. ■ Baseball tournament , Tee ball and 6U coach pitch and 8U-14U Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 1-2. Open to all. Info: 992-5504 or email hcpsports@msn.com. ■ KYS flag football , for boys and girls ages 4 to 14, September through October. Practice at Lakeshore Park on Lyons View and all games at Lakeshore on Sunday afternoons. Registration fee is $175. Info: 584-6403. ■ KYS fall baseball and softball, ages 4-12. Low-key, instructional program will run early September through mid-October. Games played Tuesdays and Thursdays at Lakeshore Park. Fees vary. Info: 584-6403.

Above: The depth of Powell’s defensive line is reflected in this group photo. Members are: (front) Brady Scalf, Shar-ron Moore, Josh Williams, Caleb Cagel, Austin Gordon, Austin Holder; (back) Zach York, Chris Easterday, Sinjin Meyers, Tony Foster, Wesley Sparks, Darrian Farmer, Koby Crisp, Drake Owenby and Cody Jett.

■ KYS fall lacrosse, boys ages 9-14. Games will be held Monday nights at Lakeshore Park. The season will run early September to late October. Fees are $175. Info: 584-6403.

REUNIONS ■ Halls High School Class of 1991 will have its 20-year reunion 7 p.m. to midnight Saturday, Sept. 24, at the Marriott Hotel in downtown Knoxville. Info: email halls1991reunion@gmail.com. ■ Horace Maynard High School Class of 1981 will hold its 30-year reunion 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, at Hickory Star Resort. Info: Ginger Harmon Devault, 659-2768 or 992-4786. ■ USS Albany Association will hold its 22nd annual reunion Sunday through Friday, Oct. 9-14, at the Glenstone Lodge in Gatlinburg. The association is currently looking for shipmates who served on one of the USS Albany ships (CA123, CG10, SSN753). Info: Dick Desrochers, 603-594-9798, or www.ussalbany.org.

At left, the Powell starting three on the defensive line – Drake Owenby, Wesley Sparks and Sinjin Myers – get a jump ■ Zachary family reunion will start at 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. on the Halls offensive front. 24, at the homeplace, 1021 Zachary Ridge Road, Powder Springs.

Photos by Greg Householder

Panthers knocked off Oak Ridge 21-17 on Sept. 8 in a televised game at home. Last Friday Powell traveled to Anderson County. On Friday, Sept. 23, the Panthers will host Karns. The Beavers are off to a better than usual start this year and posted a record of 3-1 going into last Friday’s

game at Central. Karns opened the 2011 campaign on Aug. 19 with a 7-0 loss to South-Doyle. On Aug. 26 the Beavers downed Corbin, Ky., 2221 and drubbed Clinton 28-0 on Sept. 2. On Sept. 9 Karns clobbered Campbell County 35-0. Kickoff is at 7:30 p.m.

Come join the fun and bring a covered dish. Info: Mary, 992-8433, or Diane, 497-2372.

OPEN FOR LUNCH DAILY at 11 a.m. Check out the new menu! MONDAY

WEDNESDAY

Free Trivia, Pool Tourneys & $5 Pizzas

Karaoke & Cornhole

TUESDAY

All-you-can-eat Wings (4-9), Special Music by Roxie Randall

Free Roll Poker (6 & 9)

THURSDAY

SATURDAY

Greylan James Band (8-12)

FREE

Catch up with all your favorite columnists every Monday at www.ShopperNewsNow.com

New ride, new you.

FRIDAY

Live Music by Wendy Crowe and The High Cotton Band (8-12)

Monday Nigh t Trivia From 6 :30-8 :30 www.spicysnorth.com th 950 E. Emory Rd. • 947-6002

Looking to purchase a new vehicle or refinance your current loan? UTFCU is the right place for U.

Sunday, September 25 at 6:00 pm at Sharon Baptist Church • 7916 Pedigo Road • 938-7075 www.sharonbconline.com • www.TheBeelers.org LOVE OFFERING WILL BE RECEIVED

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This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. *APR - Annual Percentage Rate. Estimated monthly payment is $16.45 per $1,000. Vehicle model years 2008 & newer. Requires automatic payment and e-statements. Actual rate may be higher based on term, collateral, and other factors. Rates subject to change. For additional details, please speak to a Financial Consultant at 865-971-1971 or 800-264-1971.

Do you have Athlete’s Foot (Tinea Pedis) between your toes? If you have red, itchy, flaky skin between your toes you may have Athlete’s Foot. Give us a call to learn more about a study for an investigational medication for Athlete’s Foot. Qualifying participants age 12 or over receive an exam by a board certified dermatologist. No insurance necessary • Compensation for time and travel

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business

A-12 • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

Where to start when your hearing fades

PBPA Business Spotlight

Heiskell Community Center

By Sandra Clark

By Greg Householder The Heiskell Community Center does not have a long history. It was founded a mere eight years ago by then pastor of Heiskell United Methodist Church the Rev. Pat Bishop. But it sure has grown. Last Tuesday, Janice White of the Heiskell Community Center was the Business Spotlight for September at the Powell Business and Professional Associations’ monthly meeting. White told of the growth of the center’s largest program – the Heiskell Seniors. Starting in 2008 with 23 participants, it has grown to more than 150 on the roll and this month the center had 83 seniors enjoying a free lunch. The senior program provides a lunch and informational speakers each month for area seniors at no cost to them. The program also provides bingo in the afternoon. The center organizes trips for the seniors, the next one being a trip to Chattanooga for a ride on the Southern Belle riverboat. The center conducts sev-

Janice White of the Heiskell Community Center tells the PBPA about the center during Business Spotlight. Photo by Greg Householder

eral fundraisers throughout the year such as last Saturday’s Sock Hop. The Heiskell Community Center also provides a Thanksgiving Service for the community and includes a meal of turkey and ham with all the trimmings, free of charge, with area churches participating. This year’s service is scheduled for Nov. 17, the Thursday before Thanksgiving. The center has begun Ageless Grace sessions at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesdays and also has a sewing club.

North County Sector Plan update Tuesday, Sept. 20, at the Halls Senior Center and 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 26, at the Powell Branch Library. Everyone is invited. The North County Sector includes the Bull Run and Beaver Creek watersheds. Info: Mike Reynolds at 2152500.

MATRIX • BACK TO BASICS • KENRA • REDKEN KEN • PAUL MITCHELL

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It’s time for a review and update of the North County Sector Plan prepared by the Metropolitan Planning Commission and used to determine land use and improvements in the areas of Halls and Powell outside the city of Knoxville. MPC staff will host a public meeting at 5-7 p.m.

!

Located at

UPPER R CUTS

3028 Staffordshire Blvd., Powell (in Broadacres Subdivision)

HAIR DESIGN “A CUT ABOVE THE REST”

Hours: Mon, Tues & Fri 9-5 Thurs 12-6 (later on Thurs by appt) Walk-ins Welcome

947-9737

MATRIX • BACK TO BASICS • KENRA • REDKEN • PAUL MITCHELL

In Dine

Some of us hear fine; others don’t quite understand the sounds we’re hearing; still others keep turning up the television and saying, “Huh?” Gary and Belinda Weaver of Weaver Hearing Aid Center noticed something interesting during recent “roundabout” tours by neighborhood groups in the Franklin Square shopping center. “Most people just don’t know where to start (when faced with hearing loss),” said Gary. “I told them: find somebody you trust, somebody you know. Find a professional who is knowledgeable about what they do.” Gary and Belinda work with individuals having hearing issues in a positive and encouraging way. They believe if the proper testing is done and the appropriate solution is applied, good results will follow. “We’re a personal service organization,” said Gary. “We will be upfront and explain what to expect from our testing.” Gary is a licensed hearing instrument specialist; Belinda is a nurse. “As lifelong Knoxvillians, we know the people who live here and we organize our services to help them. There is no high pressure and we like to follow up over the years.” Gary is part of the family that owned and operated Weaver Funeral Home. He and Belinda have owned Weaver Hearing Aid Center

Gary and Belinda Weaver of Weaver Hearing Aid Center. for 12 years. Each new patient interview is conducted without charge. It includes a personal lifestyle component to enable Gary to learn the specific needs of each person. “Every patient is different and is treated as an individual, receiving the time and attention necessary to achieve positive results,” he said. If Gary suspects a medical condition, he will refer to an ear, nose and throat specialist. He wants to provide hearing instruments to healthy people, not cover up symptoms that can cause problems later: “Cause no harm.” The second step is to schedule a full battery of audiomatic tests, using the same equipment used by audiologists. Gary will establish a baseline and follow his patients “through the years.” He says many people have an outdated image of hearing instruments.

WEAVER HEARING AID CENTER 9648 Kingston Pike, Suite 2 (Franklin Square) • 357-2650

R. Sage Kohler, an agent with State Farm Insurance in Powell, has earned the Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC) professional designation from The Kohler American College in Bryn Mawr, Pa. Candidates for the ChFC designation must complete a minimum of eight courses and 16 hours of supervised examinations. They must also fulfill stringent experience and ethics requirements. More than 45,000 individuals have been awarded the ChFC designation since its inception in 1982. As financial planning’s highest standard, the ChFC program prepares professionals to meet the advanced financial needs of individuals, professionals and small business owners. Kohler took over the local State Farm Agency after the passing of longtime Powell resident and business leader Andy Anderson last year. She is a member of the Powell Business and Professional Association and plans a run for president-elect of that organization for 2012. She is currently the committee chair of the PBPA’s Teen Driver Awareness Program. Additionally, Kohler teaches Junior Achievement at Powell High School and was a participating and funding agent of Thursday Night Rivalry football at the Oak Ridge game two weeks ago. She is a member of Business Networking International and a member of the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors.

BUSINESS NOTES

under the direction of Kellie Hickman-Phifer presents

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“Like televisions and telephones, hearing instruments have changed dramatically,” he says. New models pack more punch into less space, and the cost is dropping. Weaver Hearing recently added two new manufacturers with economy lines – full digital hearing aids but without the multifunctionality of models preferred by the younger set. “They’re not connected to your TV or cell phone, but they fit the lifestyle of those 60+.” Spoken like a true 50-something, Gary! Bottom line: If you’ve got a question, come in and ask Gary or Belinda. Their office is located in Franklin Square near Sullivan’s. It’s open five days a week, evenings and weekends by appointment. “We’re constantly looking for the best instruments,” said Gary. “This is what I do.”

Sage Kohler earns ChFC

■ Knoxville Area Urban League will hold a six-week Budget and Credit Workshop on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 7 p.m., starting Sept. 20. The workshop helps participants build and improve their credit to meet long-term goals, such as purchasing a home. Cost: $20 for a take-home workbook. Info: 524-5511. ■ Bill Reis is the vice president of Environment, Safety and Health at Y-12 National Security Complex. He has managed manufacturing, engineering and quality assurance organizations during his 29-year career at the site, most recently serving as vice president of program management. Reis is actively involved with community organizations including Second Harvest Food Bank, Ijams Nature Center, Tennessee Valley Corridor Foundation and East Tennessee Economic Council.

Bill Reis

Powell Place

Next to Food City

947-8699

New Full Food House City Tennessee Bank 25 W

W Emory Rd

3507 W Emory Rd Powell, TN 37849

Hours: M - Sat: 11am - 10pm Sun: 12pm - 9pm

Hwy 131

Teriyaki/Hibachi Available

Gas Station Clinton Hwy

US Cellular Stage at the Bijou Theatre Saturday, Sept 24th – 7:30pm Take a step back in time and enjoy an evening of 4-part, a cappella harmony sung in the barbershop style. Guest Performers: Pellissippi State Bluegrass Ensemble For more information call 766-5724 or visit http://www.ktownsound.org

Not combined with other offers.

Call or come see us before you buy!

Buildings & Carports of all sizes. Log, metal and wood

7600 Maynardville Hwy •

922-4770

POWELL SERVICE GUIDE Pruning • Logging Bush Hogging Stump Removal Tree Service Insured

Mays Paving Co.

Hankins

ROOFING

497-3797

FREE ESTIMATES LIFETIME Owner Operator EXPERIENCE Roger Hankins

Cooper’s Tree Service • Bucket Truck • Lot Cleaning • Brush Pick-up • Chipper • Insured • Large & Small Jobs

Blank’s Tree Work All Tree Care and Stump Removal Will beat any written estimate w/ comparable credentials! FULLY INSURED

924-7536 • FREE ESTIMATES

BREEDEN’S TREE SERVICE Over 30 yrs. experience Trimming, removal, stump grinding, brush chipper, aerial bucket truck. Licensed & insured • Free estimates!

219-9505

Mention this ad for $100 discount

RE-ROOFS • REPAIRS • METAL 24 Hr. Emergency Service Will work with your insurance company

Insured, licensed & bonded • Locally owned & operated 523-4206 or 789-8761

Driveways & Parking Lots 40 years experience

Member BBB since 2000 FREE ESTIMATES!

524-5888

Commercial/Residential, Licensed/Insured Serving North Knoxville 20 years

938-9848 • 924-4168

Spangler’s Lawncare Mowing, Trimming, Leaf Removal, Gutter Cleaning, Pressure Washing, etc.

Mike 922-5121 or 640-5351

Southeast

TERMITE AND PEST CONTROL

Honest, Reliable Service Since 1971

exthomesolutions.com

Green Feet Lawn Care

310-1960 Call

Cooper’s Budget Lawn Care Cheaper than the rest, but still the best. Aeration, mulching, mowing, trimming, fertilizing, overseeding, etc. Dependable, free estimates.

925-3700

SPROLES DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

DAVID HELTON PLUMBING CO.

All Types of Residential & Commercial Plumbing

MASTER PLUMBER 40 Years Experience  Licensed & Bonded

922-8728  257-3193

CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATION

Concept to Completion Repairs thru Additions Garages • Roofing • Decks Siding • Painting Wood/Tile/Vinyl Floors

30 yrs. experience, excellent work

384-5039

938-4848 or 363-4848

Call John: 938-3328

HAROLD’S GGUTTER GU U SERVICE

endable Honest &SmDalelpjobs welcome

ALTERATIONS BY FAITH

Will clean front & back. $20 and up. Quality work guaranteed.

288-0556

Reasonable rates.

Experienced in carpentry, drywall, painting & plumbing

References available Dick Kerr 947-1445

Floors, Walls & Repairs

Candleridge Plaza Apartments 3405 Harrow Gate Ln. Powell, TN 37849

SENIOR HOUSING 62 years or older. Rent based on income. Large 1 bedroom apartments with balcony. Call 938-3394 for application.

A Volunteers of America Community Equal Housing Opportunity

For Men, Women & Children

To place an ad in this service guide call

Custom-tailored clothes for ladies of all sizes PLUS kids!

922-4136

Call Faith Koker • 938-1041


POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • A-13

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

International Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers paying on the spot for valuables this week in Alcoa and Knoxville

By David Morgan STAFF WRITER

Alcoa and Knoxville-area residents are in for a rare treat when the International Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers (IGSDB) host an event here, from September 20th - 24th. The company has identified this region as prime territory for purchasing your

While most people don’t have buckets of dental gold at their fingertips, they do have $750 worth of scrap gold scattered throughout their homes or mismatched earrings. In addition to scrap gold, fine jewelry and

precious metals—especially gold and silver. The IGSDB estimates that local residents have millions of dollars worth of valuables that they no longer need or want. That is where the IGSDB comes in—they specialize in buying those items from local sellers in the U.S., Canada and Europe. Items like gold coins, scrap gold, sterling silver

diamonds, coins are a big hit. Offers will be made on all coins dated 1970 and earlier—gold coins, silver, silver dollars, half dollars, quarters, nickels and dimes. Enright explains, “U.S. coins made before 1965 are worth more than their legal tender amount because they contain 90% silver. Rare dates and mint marks can make them even more valuable. We recently paid

and tea sets also diamond rings are in high demand right now, and IGSDB is purchasing massive quantities of them on behalf of their global network of collectors, dealers and refineries. Currently on an international tour, IGSDB has included Alcoa and Knoxville on its list of stops for this week. Residents are urged to mark their calendar for

$78,000 for an amazing coin collection. One couple brought in a rusty coffee can filled with silver coins, sawdust, and a dead spider. The can had been in the basement for years. We were happy to send them home with a check for more than $700!” Alcoa and Knoxville-area residents should start collecting their valuables now to bring to the free

this special opportunity to meet one-on-one with gold, silver and diamond specialists. Because of IGSDB’s low overhead, extensive

event, which runs Tuesday - Saturday. Deals will be made and money will be paid on the spot. Attendance is expected to be high, but no appointment is needed.

resources and massive volume, the company is often able to pay out more than other dealers and retailers. Many customers are surprised at how much they are offered for seemingly small amounts. “I had two bent herringbone necklaces, a class ring, and some

Enright encourages everyone to take advantage of this special opportunity to meet directly with specialists from the International Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers. He concludes, “It’s a great chance for people to cash in their old diamonds, jewelry, coins and scrap

outdated earrings that I brought to a show. I walked out with $425 in less than 15 minutes,” said a satisfied guest.

gold. This is a seller’s market, so don’t miss out!”

Providing an economic boost to each region it visits, the IGSDB projects to pay out $350,000 at each event—a testament to the high volume of items they purchase and the prime prices being paid. Offers are made based on rarity, numismatic value, condition and market value. Company spokesman Matthew Enright says, “We just paid $4,700 for a loose 1.25—carat diamond. Our mission is to pay local residents on the spot for sterling silverware, fine jewelry, coins and precious metals—especially silver and gold.” The company has seen a huge influx of gold lately. “Customers have been scrambling to cash into the record-high value of gold,” adds Enright. For those who are unsure if their items are genuine gold or silver, or simply costume, company will test it for free. “The best strategy is to bring all items to the show for a free evaluation from our specialists. It always amazes me how a small handful of gold and silver can turn into hundreds of dollars in just a few moments. We test, weigh, and buy items right on the spot,” Enright says. At a recent show, a small—town dentist had a nice pay day. “I have been collecting dental gold for years from patients who didn’t want their extracted teeth. It really added up—my check is for over $31,000!”

Other Items of Interest

COSTUME AND GOLD JEWELRY

SILVER

CHECK IT OUT! WHO

INTERNATIONAL GOLD, SILVER & DIAMOND BUYERS

WHAT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC TO

SELL THEIR GOLD, SILVER, DIAMONDS & TREASURES

GOLD COINS

WHERE ALCOA

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS 130 ASSOCIATES BLVD. DIRECTIONS: 865.981.9008 TUESDAY–FRIDAY 9AM–6PM SATURDAY 9AM–4PM

KNOXVILLE COMFORT INN & SUITES 208 MARKET PLACE LANE DIRECTIONS: 865.531.1900 TUESDAY–FRIDAY 9AM–6PM SATURDAY 9AM–4PM

WHEN SEPTEMBER 20TH - 24TH

WRIST & POCKET WATCHES

INFORMATION 217.787.7767

What We Buy:

MILITARY ITEMS

GOLD & SILVER

NO WAITING IN LINE

GOLD

IS TRADING AT ALL TIME HIGHS NOW IS THE TIME TO CASH IN!

ALL JEWELRY ACCEPTED

P a s s

P a s s

Bring this pass and beat the lines Don’t miss your chance of cashing in D at these Record High Gold & Silver Prices

E x p r e s s

E x p r e s s

“EXPRESS PASS”


A-14 • SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

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PER LB. FOR 3 LBS. OR MORE

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2

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2.99

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25

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• KNOXVILLE, TN - N. BROADWAY, MAYNARDVILLE HWY., HARDIN VALLEY RD., MIDDLEBROOK PIKE, KINGSTON PIKE, MORRELL RD. • POWELL, TN - 3501 EMORY RD.

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5.99

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1.49 WITH VALUCARD

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