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GOVERNMENT/POLITICS A4 | OUR COLUMNISTS A6 | BUSINESS A7 | YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS A11

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VOL. 50, NO. 36

SEPTEMBER 5, 2011

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A Lion in winter So long, J.D. Powell honors J.D. Jett See Greg Householder, page 3

Shannon Carey Ends her run as our columnist for Moms 101. She’s afraid her kid will find out what she’s been writing! See story on page 11

Sandra Clark Writes about Superintendent Dr. Jim McIntyre ... his contract extension and his strategic compensation plan, APEX. See story on page 5

FEATURED COLUMNIST JAKE MABE

Ten years ago... Jake recalls his first trip to New York, 10 days before 9/11, and visiting Ground Zero five months later. See page 6

By Greg Householder On Aug. 27, the Powell Lions Club celebrated its 60th anniversary. Edd Miller has been there every step of the way. Miller is the only active charter member left from the original 43 who started the club in 1951. After serving in the infantry in the Army and seeing action in the Battle of the Bulge in World War II, Miller married a Powell native and moved to Powell in 1948. “It was a very small community,” Miller recollects. “Back then there were one or two grocery stores and the post office was in the corner of the old Groner Grocery.” Groner Grocery, like most businesses in Powell at the time, was located near the railroad station. According to Miller, not much was located on Clinton Highway in those days. “Weigel’s was known as Broadacres Dairy back then. Yes, Powell was rather small,” he adds. For a small community, Miller says that there was a lot of interest in forming the Lions Club. After all, 43 men got it started. Most area Lions Clubs would love to see 43 folks in attendance today. The tradition of the Powell Horse Show started the next year according to Miller.

Edd Miller accepts recognition of his years of service as a charter member of the Powell Lions Club from Lions District 12-N Gov. Chuck Bailey at the club’s 60th anniversary dinner. Photo by Jake Mabe “Our first show was held on the high school football field,” says Miller. He chuckles – “I doubt that would be possible today.” Miller tells of the legendary Cas Walker having one of his show horses in the inaugural show. Later, the Powell Lions sponsored a donkey basket-

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4509 Doris Circle 37918 (865) 922-4136 news@ShopperNewsNow.com ads@ShopperNewsNow.com EDITOR Larry Van Guilder lvgknox@mindspring.com ADVERTISING SALES Patty Fecco fecco@ShopperNewsNow.com Darlene Hutchison hutchisond@ ShopperNewsNow.com Shopper-News is a member of KNS Media Group, published weekly at 4509 Doris Circle, Knoxville, TN, and distributed to 8,314 homes in Powell.

Just as the new school year begins, County Mayor Tim Burchett celebrates his first year in office. What “marks” has the mayor earned since last September? Geography: Burchett may be the most peripatetic mayor in Knox County history. His community conferences regularly take him around the county on listening tours. He has been criticized for sometimes forgetting that the city of Knoxville is part of the county, at least during budget preparation, and some would say he’s more familiar with Carter than Farragut. But those are largely political issues rather than intellectual shortcomings. C+ Math: A good teacher is essential to excelling in this subject. John Troyer is a first rate financial guru, and Troyer guided the mayor through an inaugural budget that included a plan to shave the county’s debt by $100 million over five years. Give the mayor a B. Communication Skills: The mayor excels in one-on-one situations. He’s personable and given to plain talk. Early on there was some serious miscommunication about the severance package deal former Mayor Mike

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ball game at the high school gym – another event Miller thinks would be impossible to hold in this day and age. A promotional company provided the donkeys and the players, all from the community, rode them while playing basketball. Sometime later, the Lions bought property behind the

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Tim Burchett File Photo Ragsdale engineered for three departing senior staff members. That faux pas hurt Burchett’s credibility out of the gate and lowers his grade to a C. Civics: This is a tough one. The mayor’s stand on Carter Elementary School is not one you would expect a veteran politician to take. Investing loads of political capital in a project to help one community when other parts of the county need help could come back to haunt the mayor in a few years. But Burchett will tell you he has a soft spot for the underdog, and while that may not be characteristic of an ambitious politician, it isn’t a trait to be scorned. BIt’s only fair to ask the mayor for his take on his

first year in office. We posed several questions. Q: Would you do anything differently? A: “I never even think about stuff that way. … Lots of times it’s not how you start but how you finish.” Q: What’s the most surprising thing you’ve learned since taking office? A: “I really didn’t have that many surprises.” Burchett added he had to be careful not to get too insulated from his constituents. Q: What’s been your greatest challenge? A: “This Carter thing has been a real challenge. … We’ve had so many roadblocks. … But I don’t have time to sit and feel sorry for myself.” Q; What’s the most enjoyable aspect of the job? A: “I enjoy just getting out and meeting folks. (When you’re talking to someone) right then, that’s the most important thing in that person’s life.” Burchett gave himself a “solid C” for his first year in office and said he tries to do “a little better every day.” He said he spends time every morning in his office thinking and praying about the work ahead. Despite the challenges, he confesses his life could be worse: “Nearly every day is gravy on all-biscuit wheels.”

circus. It rained and the Lions had to lay down boards to keep circus-goers from swamping out. The Lions later sold the property to the county for expansion of the elementary school. Miller doesn’t remember exactly when the current location of the club’s clubTo page A-2

Mercy announces name change The pending acquisition of Mercy Health Partners by Health Management Associates comes with some name changes. Immediately following the anticipated October closing, Mercy will become Tennova Healthcare. Six area Mercy hospitals will also acquire new names. Mercy Medical Center North in Powell will become North Knoxville Medical Center. In a written release, Mercy explained Tennova’s origins. The first part of the name relates to the system’s Tennessee roots. “Nova” is derived from the Latin “novare,” to make new. Mercy Medical Center West employees gathered in the hospital cafeteria last Thursday to hear administrator Jeff Potter make the formal an-

nouncement. Potter told the Shopper-News that details remain to be worked out, but he does not anticipate any job losses. “We expect an expansion of services,” Potter said, “and it could happen pretty quickly.” Other planned facility name changes include: ■ Mercy Medical Center at St. Mary’s: Physicians Regional Medical Center ■ Mercy Medical Center West: Turkey Creek Medical Center ■ St. Mary’s Jefferson Memorial Hospital: Jefferson Memorial Hospital ■ Baptist Hospital of Cocke County: Newport Medical Center ■ St. Mary’s Medical Center of Campbell County: Lafollette Medical Center – Larry Van Guilder

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elementary school. According to Miller, this was low-lying flood-prone land. The Lions moved the horse show to that location and many current Powell Lions remember being asked to help present ribbons and such while going to the elementary school. Miller tells of one year when the Lions sponsored a

Burchett gets a ‘solid C’ By Larry Van Guilder

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A-2 • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

A Lion in winter From page A-1

house was purchased but he does recall that today’s clubhouse was under construction at the time as a home. The Lions had to go in and tear out the studs of some of the interior rooms to make it the spacious meeting space it is today. The Powell community of the 1940s and 1950s centered around the railroad station. Miller said that one

of the members of the Lions owned a farm near where the Powell Place shopping center is today at Emory Road and Clinton Highway. During those days, Clinton Highway was mainly a thoroughfare to Clinton and the new war plant in Ronnie Qualls is recognized by president Traci Crow for being a faithful member who has not missed a meeting since 1985. Oak Ridge. So for Edd Miller, the Lions’ 60th birthday party held a lot of memories.

Powell Lions celebrate 60th anniversary

Noweta Garden Club The Noweta Garden Club will meet Tuesday, Sept. 6, at the UT Trial Gardens to view the Beall Family Rose Garden. Meet at Powell Church on Emory Road at 9:30 a.m. to carpool. Info: Suzanne Sweat,938-7333.

The Powell Lions Club celebrated its 60th anniversary Aug. 27 with a dinner and program at the clubhouse on Old Clinton Pike. The club was chartered on Aug. 27, 1951. Several longtime members and charter member Edgar “Edd” Miller were recognized. Jake Mabe filled in for a honeymooning Greg Householder and took some snapshots.

Heiskell seniors plan ‘Big Orange’ Thursday Senior will meet at 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 8, at the Heiskell Community Center, 9420 Heiskell Road. The group will be celebrating all things orange so wear your orange to celebrate the “Big Orange” and Pat Summitt. Speakers will be Jenny Mason from Ageless Grace and Rachel Byrge who will speak on couponing. A spaghetti lunch from Louis’ will be provided by County Commissioner R. Larry Smith. Deadline for the fall bus trip payments will be Sept. 8. Pictures taken from last month’s meeting will be available for pickup this month. Bring a dessert and a friend. Info: Janice White at 548-0326.

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Cherie Meece receives a recognition gift during the ceremony. Photos by Jake Mabe

Past 12-N District Gov. Bill McDonald and Lusa, a feature Leader Dog, enjoy the festivities during the Powell Lions Club’s 60th anniversary Aug. 27.

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The Carpetbag Theatre and Theater of War Productions will present “Theater of War” 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8, at Knoxville Botanical Gardens and Arboretum, 2743 Wimpole Ave. “Theater of War” is a public health project that presents readings of ancient Greek plays, Sophocles’ “Ajax” and “Philoctetes,” as a catalyst for town hall discussions about the chal-

John Black receives a gift from president Traci Crow for being the club’s “resident cook.”

lenges faced by service men and women, veterans, their families, caregivers and communities. Admission is free. Reservations are required. Info: 544-0447.

‘Duels and Desserts’ The Wild Thyme Players’ stage combat training program Shake, Rattle and Role will present “Duels and Desserts,” a combat exhibition and bake sale fundraiser 6:30 p.m. Friday,

Sept. 9, at Candoro Marble Company in South Knoxville. Students of the program will demonstrate various fighting styles, weapons and unarmed stage combat. A reception will kick things off. Admission is free but donations are appreciated. All proceeds will go toward The Wild Thyme Players and the Candoro Arts and Heritage Center. Info: Call 325-9877 or email director@ wildthymeplayers.org.

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POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • A-3

Remembering J.D. Jett Powell icon laid to rest last Friday

J.D. Jett picks up his Powell High School Hall of Fame induction hardware from Kathy Bryant and Cindy Scott last April.

“Back up, get back, boys. Back behind the line, now.”

Greg Householder

The view of Hurricane Irene from our balcony as she roared past Myrtle Beach, S.C., on Aug. 26.

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The First Baptist Church of Powell and Fountain City motorcycle ministry rides again Saturday, Sept. 10. The group will meet at 8 a.m. in the parking lot across Ewing Road from the Youth Worship Center on the Powell campus. Kickstands up at 8:30. After a quick breakfast at Bojangle’s in Powell, the group will take the interstate to Black Mountain, N.C., for a trip to the Chimney Rock and Lake Lure area. All bikers are welcome and riders should bring breakfast, gas and lunch money. Anyone wishing to visit Chimney Rock state park should bring $12 per person for admission to for many years and loved Association. helping young people. He He has coached, refer- the park. The plan is to return to served his country in the eed and served as the diArmy. He was a scoutmas- rector for the Powell Junior Powell around 5 p.m. ter for Troop 154, Powell. Pro basketball program. So if you’re looking for a He was past president of He was a board member of great ride, come on out and the Powell High Alumni Heiskell Volunteer Fire De- join us on Saturday. You

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As I mentioned a few weeks ago, during the week of Aug. 20-27 I was able to spend some time with my new bride at Myrtle Beach, S.C. We arrived on Aug. 20 just in time to start hearing the hype about the approaching storm called Irene. By early in the week the storm prognosticators had put Myrtle Beach safely outside the “cone” but they were still predicting rain on Friday. Which worked out pretty well – I usually get sunburned in the first couple of days of a visit to the beach and as the week winds down, I spend my time in the sand covered by a beach umbrella and other cover. So knowing that Friday would be “shopping day” was fine with me since I was pretty much toasted and over the beach by then. So off we go to the boardwalk to buy souvenirs and such. I was surprised that the natives were concerned about the coming storm – Boardwalk Bill’s was closed because of the storm and the Gay Dolphin had its windows boarded up. We later went for dinner in Murrells Inlet down the coast and arrived back at the hotel in time to watch the hurricane pass from our balcony. End result? Some high winds, enough to blow some potted plants over around the pool, pounding surf and a bit of rain. But we survived.

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NOTES ■ Powell Lions Club meets 7 p.m. each first and third Thursday at 7142 Old Clinton Pike. ■ Free flu shots will be given during the 17th annual Free Flu Shot Saturday 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 24, at Halls High School while supplies last. Anyone age 4 and older is eligible. Donations benefit the Empty Stocking Fund. Info: www.knox news.com/charities.

Exhibit of Gombert and Beene Tennessee Valley Unitarian Unversalist Church, 2931 Kingston Pike, will host an exhibit of works by artists Carl Gombert and Ricky Beene through September.

Brock McGuire Band The Brock McGuire Band will perform Irish music 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9, at the Laurel Theater. Tickets are $14. Tickets are available at the door or at www.knoxtix. com. Info: 523-7521.

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I bet J.D. Jett said those words a hundred times every Friday night on the sideline at Powell Panther football games. His mission was to keep eager Panthers behind the designated line for players and thus avoiding a penalty. He always did it with a smile on his face and the players always respectfully backed up when asked. We lost J.D. last week. I didn’t know it, but apparently J.D.’s cancer that had been in remission had come back. I’m sorry I missed the Austin-East game Aug. 26, because I heard that he was at his post on the sideline keeping the Panthers straight. On Sunday night he apparently took a turn for the worst and went to Mercy North where we lost him last Tuesday night. J.D. leaves behind his wife, Johnnie Rodgers Jett; daughters and sonsin-law: Vivian McFalls and Dale, Jill Browning and Steve, Christy Lago and Pete, and Mitzi Osborne and Geoff; sons and daughters-in-law: Donnie Jett and Donna, and Craig Jett and Katy; and a whole bunch of grandkids and great-grandkids, brothers and sisters and in-laws, not to mention a huge number of friends and admirers in the Powell community. J.D. Jett was a pillar in Powell. He worked for more than four decades for the Weigels and built a lot of the homes in Broadacres and

Photos by Greg Householder

partment. He was named the 1983 Powell Business and Professional Association Man of the Year. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by the East Tennessee Chapter National Football Foundation and Hall of Fame in 2009 for his contribution to amateur athletics. In 2011, he was inducted into the Powell High School’s Hall of Fame. OK. I’ll confess. I borrowed the previous three paragraphs from J.D.’s obituary because frankly, I couldn’t have written it better myself. Godspeed, J.D. We’re really going to miss you.


government

A-4 • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

Mayor is boxed in on Carter Let’s be clear. This take on the Carter school issue has nothing to do with whether building a new school or renovating the old one is the best choice. The topic is the cold calculus of politics. Mayor Tim Burchett’s push to build a new elementary school for Carter has puzzled observers outside that community from the beginning. It’s been billed as the fulfillment of a promise made well before Burchett took office. The mayor, for reasons he best understands, undertook to make good the pledge of a predecessor. It’s worth noting the “pledge” was made before the economy fell off a cliff. It was made before Burchett decided to trim the county’s debt by $100 million over five years. It was made before the county passed the decade mark without a property tax increase. And it was made before the mayor decided the only way to fund a new school for one community was to sell assets that presumably belong to and benefit the entire county. It was also made in the face of undeniable evidence that many of the county’s schools are in dire need. Selling off county assets may raise the $14-$16 million dollars needed to build the new Carter school, but what does the mayor do for an encore when other communities come calling? Burchett’s plan for Carter is ad hoc, a self-limiting strategy. Let’s consider the crux of the mayor’s dilemma. By a wide margin, those other communities outstrip Carter in two areas of interest to any officeholder who seeks reelection: voters and money. Recently, in an off the record conversation, a current county official who has held elected office for some time confessed to being baffled. Why would the mayor expend so much political capital on an issue that – at best – is of no interest to the majority of Knox County residents? Burchett’s sympathy for the children and parents in the community seems genuine, but sympathy hasn’t carried an election recently. This official agreed that a Burchett opponent in 2014 might use Carter as a cudgel if a new school is built at the expense of renovating other deteriorating schools. It’s a numbers game, and the mayor’s supporters on Carter will be outnumbered. The Devon Group’s sudden about face brought the problem into sharp relief. The school board fi xed a deadline of Oct. 17 for all plans to be in place in order to move forward. But that deadline was based on the Devon Group’s proposal, and school board counsel Michael Kelly has opined that the board can rescind its approval. Now to the cold political calculation. The Carter community needs relief; the mayor will need votes. From the latter perspective, the best political outcome for Burchett is to bring the proposal back to the school board and have it rejected. The mayor can say he gave it his best, but the school board stymied him. To those who say this makes pawns of the children and parents in Carter, welcome to reality. Contact Larry Van Guilder at lvgknox@mindspring.com.

Corryton community welcomes Roddy Corryton community member Mary Louise Davis chats with 6th District Senate candidate Marilyn Roddy during a hot dog supper at the Corryton Senior Center. Photo by Ruth White

Home, sweet home at Minvilla

Victor Ashe

outright, but she could fall a few votes short of the 50 percent plus one she needs. It is unlikely that Hultquist will do better than fourth. However, his public appearances and debate participation have generally been respectably presented. He knows the issues and has given a real position on several. His appearance at the

hosted a reunion of former campaign aides, administration officials and friends in Nashville in July. Attending from Knoxville were Betty Sterchi, former state Rep. Tom Jensen and wife Carolyn, former Gov. of American Samoa Frank Barnett and wife Carolyn, as well as former Knoxville Journal reporter Ralph Griffith, and Dunn’s Commissioner of Finance Lewis Donelson, now 94, from Memphis. Dunn is in remarkably good health as is his wife, Betty, and living in Nashville. He is chairing the Mitt Romney for President campaign in Tennessee. Mayor Brown: Mayor Daniel Brown got married Aug. 27 and became the first

Knoxville mayor in more than a century to marry while in office. Knoxville also now has a new first lady, his wife, Cathy, after going almost eight months without a first lady. When my wife, Joan, was first lady, she used to say it was “work for two and pay for one.” She also did an incredibly good job, even if I say so. Barbara Pelot: If you have been wondering why there have not been photos of former Council member Barbara Pelot in the Shopper at Long’s Drug Store the last few weeks, it is because she has been ill which included a hospital stay. Best wishes to her for a full recovery and getting back to Long’s for coffee.

Betty Bean “Surviving,” he says, thinking back to Christmas Eve 2009 in Kingsport when he was so desperate for a place to get out of the cold that he went out and got himself arrested. Earlier that year, he’d walked all the way there from Atlanta to stay with relatives after his 20-year job with a carnival faded away. By the holidays, relationships had gone sour, and he found himself out on the street again. “I got arrested for disorderly conduct just to have three hots and a cot inside a warm building,” Moore said. “I got a measly 15 days with time served.” In September 2010, Moore, 41, drifted on down to Knoxville. A member of the cross-country team when he was in high school back in Indiana, he says

Thomas Jackson (at left) is a frequent visitor to his friend John Moore’s apartment in Minvilla Manor. Photo by Betty Bean

walking long distances isn’t difficult for him, plus he’d been here before. “I like a town that has nice people,” he said. He pays $32 per month for a tiny one-bedroom apartment on the Fifth Avenue side of the Minvilla complex that he keeps immaculately clean. He makes $100 a month setting up the sound system at All-Souls Church, picks up some pocket change selling “The Amplifier,” a homeless newspaper published by Redeeming Hope Ministries, and is hoping to pick

Hultquist lags as election nears This Wednesday (Sept. 7) voters will start the first round in determining Knoxville’s leadership for the next four years. If past practice is a guide, half of those who vote in the Sept. 27 primary will do so in early voting. On the ballot are: mayor, city judge and four City Council seats. Two of the five candidates for mayor are former council members, Ivan Harmon and Joe Hultquist. This is Harmon’s second run for mayor. In 1995, he won 36 percent of the vote. Harmon (or Mark Padgett) might be in a runoff election with Madeline Rogero. She is close to winning it

up a little more cleaning up around Minvilla. His walls are decorated with his artwork, which he’s been able to work on since he got a place of his own. His friend Thomas Jackson is still working on finding a place to live. Jackson, who is from northern Michigan, was a truck driver before the economy tanked. Like Moore, he’s ended up in Knoxville after a difficult cross-country journey that included stops in Odessa, Texas, and Oneida, Tenn. His legal difficulties have

to do with getting thrown in jail over delinquent child support payments, which were as much as $500 per month when he was making good money. Recently, he’s acquired a part-time job working for a tree-cutting service. “It’s not like I’m completely without a job. I’ll just walk up to the foreman and say ‘Hey, can you guys use any help?’ I’ve got to pay that back child support, so I’m going to try and live down here for a while and see how it goes.” Moore and Jackson met at a Lost Sheep Ministries giveaway “under the bridge” and discovered that they had a lot in common. Jackson loves visiting Moore at Minvilla but wouldn’t want to live there himself because permanent supportive housing is too restrictive. (Residents must put visitors’ names on an approved list and visitors must surrender a picture ID to get in.) He and his case manager are working on finding a place of his own before the weather turns cold.

What was John Moore doing before he got his apartment in Minvilla Manor?

August KUB board meeting was designed to take advantage of unhappiness with KUB in general as well as specific rate increases, tree cutting practices, structure, response time to power outrage restoration and a perception by some that KUB is heavy handed. Hultquist’s remarks can be found at www. joehultquist.com/. Joe is the first candidate for mayor to try to make KUB the centerpiece of his campaign. The others have ignored KUB even though it is an issue for some citizens. Hultquist scored a coup of sorts when

one KUB commissioner verbally attacked him after the meeting by terming his remarks “offensive” which got Hultquist prominent mention in the News Sentinel. Hultquist would abolish the KUB board and merge the utility back into a city department. It is hard to see how this resolves the four KUB issues Hultquist raises. The city does not have a good track record in managing utilities. Dunn Reunion: Former Gov. Winfield Dunn, who left office 36 years ago as Tennessee’s first Republican governor in 50 years,


POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • A-5 McIntyre has concern about teachers scoring “at expectations” not being considered for tenure, but said he’s been assured by people in the state Department of Education that “over time we will see more and more teachers move to (levels) 4 and 5.” McIntyre also said he expects principals to “play it straight” with evaluations,

Calling Mayor Burchett! Shannondale School is next with problems

KCS maintenance workers were at Shannondale School last Friday, tearing out and replacing the floor in three classrooms (one portable building). “We discovered water intrusion in the subfloor,” said Superintendent Dr. Jim McIntyre’s chief of staff Russ Oaks.

school at Carter Elementary. KCS school board will meet twice this week: 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6, work session on first floor, Andrew Johnson Building; 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7, regular meeting, main assembly room, City County Building. Both sessions are broadcast live on Comcast Cable Channel 10, AT&T U-verse Channel 99 and streamed live at www.knoxcschools.org/. Carter: School board special counsel Michael Kelley advised his clients there’s no need for the Carter School proposal to come back to the board if county commissioners approve an agreement with the second place bidder, Partners Development, by Oct. 17. My, how utterly inconvenient for those commissioners who were counting on the school board to kill the project. Walk to school: Get out those running shoes. Wednesday, Oct. 5, is National Walk to School Day.

Hardin Valley Academy government teacher Gina Feldblum is interviewed by WUOT’s Christine Jessel folDr. Jim McIntyre talks to teach- lowing the forum at Bearden. ers at Bearden High School. Photos by S. Clark

non’s summary of his evaluations. Buttry is a partisan Republican, but so are Mike Sandra McMillan, Thomas Deakins Clark and a couple of others. McIntyre has support from Gov. Bill Haslam and his administration, and he helped write Students at the small much of the current “reform.” Fountain City area school McIntyre has worked well were moved into the gym, acwith the Knoxville Chamber, cording to a parent who said, and no one can call them lib“All of our 5th graders are in eral. portables.” So what would Buttry Oaks expected the work have McIntyre do? She talked to be finished on Friday. “We about the cost of implementreplaced a 12 x 24 subsection. Buttry’s dilemma ing his strategic plan, but as It should be finished today,” School board member someone pointed out, those he said. “We may work on Cindy Buttry seems to enjoy costs are spread across the the art and music rooms later being on the short end of an KCS budget. Leadership de(this week), but that won’t be 8-1 vote. She did it twice last mands followers. Buttry has as intrusive.” week, both on an extension none. If she can’t articulate Mayor Tim Burchett is of Superintendent Dr. Jim a clear alternative to McIntrying to sell county assets McIntyre’s contract and also tyre’s proposals she should to fund construction of a new on board chair Indya Kincan- just keep quiet. It would make

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■ Lamar Alexander is getting inducted into Vanderbilt Sports Hall of Fame. Who knew they had a category for piano. ■ Pity Cuonzo Martin. Bruce Pearl snagged a local job and isn’t leaving after all. He hovers like a giant cloud over Martin.

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Hardin Valley Academy teacher Gina Feldblum asked ■ Tim Burchett deserves better marks than his self-named McIntyre point-blank if he “solid C.” Burchett is not a personally supports the three crook, he’s not phony, and major changes in compensahe’s paying down county tion and tenure implemented debt rather than pushing us by state law this year. further into the red. What’s On two he was unequivonot to like? cal: “I absolutely support the ■ Jim McIntyre deserved the higher standards and the 8-1 affirmation he received teacher evaluations,” he said. last week from the school board. He’s incredibly smart “But I have some questions and works hard. His downside about (changes to) tenure.”

he can’t help: he’s not from around here. ■ Billy Stokes is proud of his support for Madeline Rogero. After our picture in last week’s paper, Stokes was attacked on a local blog … and called a “pole cat.” His response: “Apparently only three of your tens of readers bothered to post about your reference to me. All were anonymous. If I didn’t know you better, I might suspect that you posted them yourself. Anyway, thanks again for remembering me on your blog. It is indeed my honor to be criticized by the likes of you. We old polecats hate to be completely forgotten as we move forward in life.”

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A-6 • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

PULL UP A CHAIR … | Jake Mabe

Ten years ago… T

toward Times Square. Being the adventuresome Halls kids that we were, we ate at McDonald’s. Authentic New York cuisine, right? Never having been to a Broadway play before, we didn’t know exactly what to expect or when to arrive. So, we got to the Longacre Theatre about an hour and a half before show time. They didn’t let us in. Standing around outside with about 15 or 20 others, we passed the time by watching the people and the traffic go by. After awhile, up pulled an SUV with tinted windows. A tall, good-looking man who looked vaguely familiar got out of the car. “I know him from somewhere,” I told my two companions. “That’s Tom Selleck!” one of them said. “He just doesn’t have his mustache.”

In this June 23, 1999, file photo, an aerial view shows the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York. Since the 9/11 attacks that brought down the buildings in 2001, much has changed at skyscrapers around the country, but experts say obvious precautions still leave thousands of buildings vulnerable because the costs to retrofit existing structures may be too costly, and cities and states may be slow to adopt newer, tougher building codes for new construction like those recommended after the deadliest terror attack on U.S. soil. AP Photo/Ed Bailey, File

through my head. I was going to tell Selleck how much I admired him, how much I’d enjoyed his TV westerns, how I loved “Magnum” so much so that I had every episode on tape. I got up there to him, stuck out my hand, opened my mouth, smiled and couldn’t think of one word to say. Speechless. So, I just looked up at him, my mouth hanging open like an idiot. I managed to croak out, “Hello, Mr. Selleck.” Tom Selleck! “Magnum, p.i.” He shook my hand, nodded, waitMy hero! ed for me to get over my star-struck Selleck was gracious enough to state then finally turned to talk to stop and sign autographs or have the person beside me. So much for photos taken with everybody who my moment with Magnum. wanted one. (Naturally, we didn’t Just before the lights dimmed, I have a pen or a camera.) saw Phil Donahue making his way “You’re awesome!” somebody to some seats up front. I thought said. about going to say hello, but after “That’s sweet,” Selleck replied. my Selleck stupor, I stayed seated. A thousand thoughts floated Selleck was great in “A Thou-

sand Clowns.” He played the role Jason Robards made famous in the movie. I hated to admit it, but the young actor Nicholas King, who played the other main role in the story, was so good he stole the show, even from Magnum. The play ended as late afternoon shadows began to blanket the city. We made our way back to Grand Central, back to Connecticut, back to reality. The date was Sept. 1, 2001. You know what happened 10 days later. I went back to Manhattan the following February to pay my respects. We took the subway down to what used to be the World Trade Center on a cold and gray Tuesday afternoon. The sky was spitting snow like frozen teardrops. New York is a busy and loud city, full of cacophony – honking taxi cab horns, screeching brakes,

Call Jake Mabe at 922-4136 or email JakeMabe1@ aol.com. Visit him online at jakemabe.blogspot. com, on Facebook or at Twitter.com/HallsguyJake.

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en years ago I took my first trip to New York City. That Saturday morning dawned bright and clear. It was a beautiful late summer day. Labor Day weekend. Not a cloud in the sky. You could just feel the chill of an early fall. We hopped a train near my high school friend Drew Weaver’s home in Branford, Conn., and set out for the big city. This was also my first time on an honest-to-God passenger train. Danged if the conductor didn’t come by for tickets wearing a spiffy uniform and a cool hat, just like in the movies! We arrived at Grand Central Station and followed the crowd up the stairs and out into Manhattan. I tried not to look like a tourist, but I couldn’t keep from gazing skyward. I’d never seen such a sight. This was a city. You know what they say. If you can make it there, you’ll make it anywhere. First things first, though. I made a beeline for the newsstand and bought a copy of The New York Times. (What can I say? My blood is filled with newsprint.) We had some time to kill before the matinee performance of Herb Gardner’s “A Thousand Clowns,” so we walked down to the Empire State Building. Up on the observation deck, I just knew I’d see Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr. So much for “An Affair to Remember.” Off we looked into lower Manhattan, gazing toward the grand ol’ Statue of Liberty, yes, but especially toward those magnificent twin towers. The World Trade Center. The center of the world’s financial market. “The Center of the World,” as one TV show put it. By lunchtime we made our way

barking yells from street vendors. But Ground Zero was silent. No traffic. No talk. It reminded me of the awkward silence one encounters while standing in a receiving line at a funeral. Workers were still uncovering remains. The Times listed each one in the paper. I think they found five people while we were there. You could still see the handpainted signs that families had left near the wreckage. “Have you seen me? Please call XXX,” one read underneath the photograph of somebody too young to die. Another sign was a little more to the point. “Osama: Kiss my ass.” I thought then that the world would change forever. I figured our national discourse would become nicer, calmer, more caring, more thoughtful. It didn’t. Ten years have rolled by and Sept. 11, 2001, seems but a memory, something in the history books. A high school teacher friend of mine says his 9th graders don’t even remember it. They were 4 years old. We lost friends, family members and acquaintances that day. Tony Karnes, who used to go to church at Clear Springs Baptist with me and my family years and years ago, was one. We can’t ever forget them. We can’t ever forget. “9/11, how can you possibly use it for good purpose?” asked former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo in a PBS special after the attacks. “Look, what this reminds you of is the importance of your own life, and making the most of it, because you can lose it in a flash. And if that’s all you learned from 9/11, if that’s all you remembered, that, my God, you could extinguish life so suddenly, so unexpectedly, and it could happen to me, and therefore I should think harder about the way I spend my life instead of just wasting it. “Now, it’s not going to teach you what to do with your life, but it will teach you to do with your life, and to do it more and quicker and better.” Words worth remembering, lest we forget.

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POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • A-7

Investment in success I am honored to be the 2011 Campaign Chair for United Way of Greater Knoxville. United Way’s goal is to create long-lasting changes by addressing problems’ underlying causes. It takes everyone in the community working together to create a brighter future. The work of the United Way is based on the belief that everyone deserves a quality education that leads to a stable job, enough income to support a family through retirement and good health. After 89 years of providing funding for many groups that serve children, the local United Way has changed the way it awards grants to agencies providing educational services. The new process, developed by the Community Engagement & Mobilization committee, chaired by

Pam Fansler er East Region n President,, First Tennessee see Bank

firstforward Dr. Randy Curnow of Summit Medical, allows new organizations to be funded by United Way while giving traditional partners the opportunity to expand. The competitive outcome-based process was designed to better align with goals; to encourage collaboration, innovation and inclusiveness; and to create permanent change in the community. Threeyear grants will be awarded to innovative programs that target Knox County Schools’ long term education goals and offer measurable outcomes.

The process has several phases. The first was to invite Letters of Intent. Following review of those, invitations for Requests for Investment will go to agencies identified as strong candidates. Oral hearings will follow review of documents and field trips to agencies. The board will vote on funding in March; funding begins in April. We all win when a child succeeds in school, when families are financially stable, when people are healthy. The changes in the educational grants program will pay dividends in next year’s classrooms as well as the next generation’s workplaces and neighborhoods. Ultimately, United Way isn’t about the number of individuals served or how many programs are funded, but how lives are changed and improved. Please join me in supporting United Way.

Home Federal dedicates 21st Habitat house Dale Keasling, Home Federal Bank president, and Debra Smith, executive vice president, along with Kelle Shultz, president/CEO of Knoxville Habitat for Humanity (right), congratulate Shelley Burgstiner (center) and daughter Riley on their new home in East Knoxville’s Silver Leaf subdivision. Burgstiner is an employee of Home Federal Bank, and the bank arranged to sponsor her home, its 21st Habitat house, following her acceptance into the Habitat program. Shelley just learned that Riley has juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. “Between work, doctor visits and classes for Habitat, my time is stretched pretty thin,� said Burgstiner, “but I wouldn’t have it any other way.� Photo submitted

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A-8 • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

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POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • A-9

Cross Roads Presbyterian to hold ‘Back to Church’ service By Jake Mabe The Rev. Robert Cook doesn’t like to talk about himself. He says his church, Cross Roads Presbyterian, is the story, not him. “It’s a treasure in the Halls community,” he says. Cook has served as the church’s pastor since Jan. 1, 2002. He also works as an education officer for the Knox County Sheriff’s Office. Originally from Scotland, he has been in the United States since 1988. He says that Cross Roads welcomed him and his family with open arms. “When we left Scotland to come to the U.S., all of my family was still in Scotland. The church has been an important part of our lives. If you’re looking for family, that’s what it’s all about.” Cook says that same focus is the church’s mission. “We want to make it a place where everybody is welcome. Just as you are. A place to start fresh and a place of new beginnings. My belief is that (judging others) is not my job.” The church will host a Back to Church service at 10:45 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 18. Cook says he hopes people come to church, whether it’s at Cross Roads or somewhere else and hopes that people, “find a place that you can call home.” Cook says that Cross Roads Presbyterian is “a small church that reaches out and touches a lot of people.” The Halls Food Pantry, which is supported by several churches and businesses in the area, is housed at the church. And Cross Roads also partners with Fountain City United Methodist Church to support Family Promise of Knoxville, a nonprofit organization that partners with area churches to help homeless people become self-sufficient. The church has also participated in Operation: Inasmuch, a community service and outreach program, in the past. “What amazes me is the number of church people involved (in Inasmuch). We probably had 30 or 40 people involved and percentage wise that’s probably half or two-thirds of our congregation. Percentage-wise, we have a lot of active people doing a lot of things.” Cook says the church is currently discussing a growth program. Depending on the results of its outreach efforts and the upcoming Back to Church event, that could mean building a new sanctuary. “But we’re still investigating what we might do.” Cook says the Back to Church service will be “a

Desert days Hear my cry, O God, From the end of the earth will I cry unto Thee, When my heart is overwhelmed: Lead me to the rock that is higher than I; For Thou hast been a shelter for me, And a strong tower from the enemy. I will trust in the covert of Thy wings. Alleluia. (Psalm 61: 1-3 KJV) I have it in me so much nearer home To scare myself with my own desert places. (“Desert Places,” Robert Frost)

The Rev. Robert Cook is pastor of Cross Roads Presbyterian Church in Halls, which is holding a special Back to Church Service at 10:45 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 18. Photo by Jake Mabe

As is so often the case, I know this Psalm text because I sang it, long ago, in high school. Since then, I have played it as service music, directed a hand-selected chorale in it and hummed it to console myself during my own desert days. Alan Hovhaness’ setting of it is a haunting melody, in a minor key. I have often wondered what sort of tune David the shepherd boy sang with these words. I would wager it was minor, or even

little bit different than what we have done in the past. “We plan to share the journey of faith and introduce people to Jesus. They won’t see how wonderful we are, they’ll see how wonderful God is.” Cross Roads Presbyterian Church is located at 4329 East Emory Road at the in- Fundraisers tersection of Emory Road ■ Beaver Ridge UMC, 7753 Oak and Maynardville Highway Ridge Highway, will host its in front of the Halls Middle/ 10th annual murder mystery Halls High campus. Info: production “Murder in the 922-9412. Old Growth Forest” 6:30

CONDOLENCES ■ Mynatt Funeral Homes Inc. (922-9195 or 688-2331): Lou E. Adcock George Edwin Byer Mildred Carmichael Dorothea “Dottie” Collins Lois “Kate” Hutchison J. D. Jett Lewis Andrew Love Illa Mae Mahan Bennie Avory Whitaker Sr. ■ Stevens Mortuary (524-0331): Virginia Carr Dance James Albert Jenkins

p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25. Info: 323-9321. ■ Dante Church of God, 410 Dante School Road, needs crafters for its Fall Festival to be held Saturday, Sept. 17. Space rental is $25. Info: Lena Coker, 693-2688 or email lenacoker@yahoo.com. ■ Faith UMC, 1120 Dry Gap Pike, will host “Laugh All Night: An Evening of Comedy to Benefit Agape Outreach Homes” 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29. Tickets are $10 or $35 for four. Info: http://www. agapeoutreachhomesonline. org/

Cross Currents

Lynn Hutton more probably, modal. There are times in our lives that are straight out of the wilderness. Days when we are lost and directionless, days when the path is steep and rocky. There are days

Homecomings ■ Glenwood Baptist Church of Powell will celebrate homecoming Sunday, Sept. 18. Everyone is invited.

Special services ■ Shepherd of the Hills Baptist Church, 400 East Beaver Creek Drive, will host the Beth Moore “Living Proof Live” simulcast event 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10. Admission is free but seating is limited. Register by calling 484-4066 or emailing events@sothbchurch.org. ■ Powell Presbyterian Church, 2910 W. Emory Road, will start the series “Creation to Revelation: 52 Weeks Through the Bible” 11 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 11, at an outdoor service behind the church. A potluck lunch will follow the kickoff service.

when we wander in circles, and days when we sit down on the nearest ledge because we can go no farther. The desert serves as backdrop for some of the Bible’s greatest stories: Moses crossing the desert after being exiled from Egypt; the Israelites’ years of wandering in the Sinai Peninsula; Elijah fleeing the wrath of Jezebel to sit under a broom tree in the wilderness; John the Baptizer preaching scathing sermons in the wilderness of Judea; and Jesus fasting in the wilderness after his baptism. These stories are dramatic and vivid. The desert is an instrument used by God to sear and purify God’s own, whether they be nations or prophets or saviors. So to say that we have our own desert days may be overly dramatic. Still, there are times when the sand gets in our teeth, and the bread dries out before Accompanying Sunday School class and women’s Bible study also offered. Info: 938-8311 or visit www. powellpcusa.org.

we can spread the olive oil on it, and our eyes are too tired to continue searching the horizon for water. The aloneness is too much, and there are buzzards circling overhead. It is in those days when we learn who we really are, what kind of stuff we are made of and just how much we are good for. In the desert days, we discover exactly what we believe about God, and it may not be the stuff of Sunday school lessons. But it will be real, and it will be our own. I am persuaded that God does not cause our pain and trials. I believe with all my heart that God’s will is always toward health and wholeness. But when desert days come, God will not waste them. God will use them, if we will but allow it, to forge us into something – someone – who is usable, unique and utterly God’s own. 8, at Bearden Banquet Hall. RSVP by calling Connie at 693-298 or email dick3234@ bellsouth.net.

Women’s programs ■ Knoxville Christian Women’s Connection will host an “Extend a Hand Around the World” luncheon 10:45 a.m. Thursday, Sept.

■ Faith UMC, 1120 Dry Gap Pike, will host Ladies Night Out 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15. Door prizes will be given away. Free admission. Info: 688-1000 or visit www. faithseekers.org.

Allen to speak at KFL

Allen

Marshall Todd Allen will be the guest speaker for the Knoxville Fellowship Luncheon at noon Tuesday, Sept. 6. The KFL is a group of Christian men and women who meet weekly at the Golden Corral in Powell.

WORSHIP NOTES Community services ■ Dante Church of God will distribute Boxes of Blessings (food) 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 11. Info: 689-4829.

Call or come see us before you buy! 7600 Maynardville Hwy •

Buildings & Carports of all sizes. Log, metal and wood

922-4770

Tony(William Anthony) Karnes March 23, 1964 – September 11, 2001

Friday, Sept. 9 ~ 9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 ~ 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 1/2 OFF Monday, Sept. 12 ~ 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Tony, Loving you was easy, but losing you so soon was unbearably hard. You’ll always be in our hearts. World Trade Center 1 97th Floor

Brenda, Vicky, Gayle and John

Celebrate our 121st year of ministry with worship, fellowship and lunch!

Homecoming Celebration Sunday, Sept. 18 And meet our new pastor, Rev. Travis Henderson!

SQUARE DANCING Official Folk Dance of Tennessee BEGINNER’S CLASSES Starting Monday, Sept 12 • 7-9pm

CLAXTON COMMUNITY CENTER 1069 Edgemoor Rd, Clinton, TN (across from BP Station)

Gaylon Wilson Insurance Agency 5344 N. Broadway • Knoxville • 687-6871

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September’s Lessons

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Only $4 each after that For more information on joining us in a friendly, alcohol and drug-free environment, please call: Karen: (865) 363-1046 or Lloyd: (865) 257-2955 www.ClaxtonCountrySquares.web.OfficeLive.com


A-10 • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

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POWELL – Great 3BR/2BA rancher w/large level backyard. This home features: Formal dining rm, living rm, family rm off kitchen, laundry rm w/utility sink. Many updates including: Roof, carpet, bath remodel & much more. A must see. $169,900 (762749)

POWELL – Great 3BR/2.5BA w/bonus 2-story featuring: Hdwd floors in LR & DR, eat-in kitchen, 8x7.6 laundry rm, all bedrooms up, master suite w/ walk-in closet, master bath w/ whirlpool tub & shower. Great level fenced backyard. Sec sys & programmable Thermostat for 2 units. $169,900 (771693)

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NW KNOX – Need 4BR's? This home could be 3BR w/rec rm or 4th BR down w/full BA, LR, DR & eat-in kit. Oversized 29x22.4 1-car gar w/plenty of stg. Upstairs BA remodeled in 2010, Newer updates including roof, deck & windows. $109,900 (767666)

N.KNOX – This 3BR/2BA has separate living quarters all on 1 level, 2 driveways front and back, divided storage bldg. Very well kept & features: Screened porch 6x12, 2nd kit 11.6x13.5, 2nd LR 12x13.5. Many updates including paint, vinyl flooring, carpet & lighting. Roof 2006, gutters 2005. A duplex or great 2-family ranch home.$117,500 (771276)

POWELL – 3BR/2BA stone split foyer w/inground pool. This home features: level backyard w/wood fence, rec rm downstairs. $149,900 (770717)

POWELL – Country Setting! 2BR 2BA Ranch End Unit. This home features: 1-Car Garage w/ extra side parking, lots of common area great for children & pets. Eat-in kit w/pass through to LR w/gas FP. Many updates including: New paint, ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, water saver toilet in master, new kit sink & gar disposal, extra attic insulation & updated landscaping. $104,900 (763927)

Marlee Park Subdivison POWELL – Lots in Marlee Park feature: Private gated entrance with minimal traffic, quiet 2-street neighborhood w/large level lots. Amenities include a park with playground and walking trails. Lots starting at $45,000


kids

POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • A-11

Panther offensive line reloads Powell off to strong start By Greg Householder Last year, the Powell High School football offensive line was described as “senior ladened.” This year, not so much. The Panthers lost Austin Smith, Tyler Waters, James Ussery and Andy King to graduation. “It’s tough to replace kids, especially kids of the quality we had last year,” said Panther head coach Matt Lowe. “You just have to hope that some of those young guys learned from those before

Juniors Jacob Anderson (5-9, 215 pounds) and Michael Ashe (6-0, 235 pounds) rotate at right guard. Junior Anthony Rivera (6-1, 250 pounds) also sees action at right tackle. The Panthers are off to Members of the Powell Panther offensive line unit include: tackle Anthony Rivera, guard Jacob another strong start to folAnderson, center Adam Finger, guard Chris Easterday and tackle Koby Crisp. Not pictured are: low up last year’s undefeated regular season. On Aug. center Harrison Jones, guard Michael Ashe and tackle Xavier Walker. Photo by Greg Householder 19, Powell traveled to Rhea to carry you through the O-line this year are se- right tackle Xavier Walker County and avenged a 2008 first part of the season and niors Koby Crisp (6-2, 255 (5-8, 350 pounds). playoff loss 42-17. On Aug. get rid of some that ‘green’ pounds) at left tackle and Starting at center this 26 the Panthers entertained they have on them so they Chris Easterday (6-0, 275 year is junior Harrison Austin-East in the home can start performing at the pounds) at left guard. Both Jones (6-0, 190 pounds). same level as the kids that are two-year starters and Junior Adam Finger (5-10, were here before.” two-year lettermen. Shoring 350 pounds) is also getting Leading the Panther up the right side is senior reps at center.

Benedictions Never say goodbye because goodbye means going away and going away means forgetting. – From “Peter Pan” by J.M. Barrie

Zac and I are going on a trip soon, and our son, Daniel, will be staying with my parents. Daniel is already pumped about it, because Gran and Bear have a fun-filled weekend planned, complete with pony rides and a visit to a real fire station.

Shannon Carey

moms101 I asked Daniel this morning to tell me what he was going to do with Gran and Bear, and he recited the whole agenda with excitement. “You’re not even going to miss me, then, are you?” I said. Daniel looked at me for a moment, threw his arms around my neck and said, “No, Mommy. I miss you.” Well, gentle reader, I’m going to miss you, too. It’s been a wonderful, wacky journey. In this column each week for more than three years, I’ve covered every parenting jubilation, freak-out and goof, every burp, tooth and potty incident in Daniel’s first years.

I’m sorry to say, it’s time to bring the tale to a close. It’s not just that times are tough, and the Shopper is looking at ways to trim costs, one of those being paper. It’s also the very real concern that Daniel is getting to be old enough to know what I’m doing. Soon, he’ll be old enough to be embarrassed by it. I’m not writing an anonymous blog here. My name and face are right up there. The poor little guy is still going to have to endure some “I read all about your potty training” trauma, just like the Shopper’s Jake Mabe is still haunted by ghosts of Elvis performances past. I started writing this column in the winter of 2008. I was very pregnant, very idealistic and very scared. I wrote about “mom” issues, and once Daniel arrived, these columns became more and more about his life and mine. And, whenever I was sure I was just quacking into the void, one of you would see me and Daniel at the park or at the grocery story and talk about how much you enjoyed reading about him. From my heart, thank you. In the six years that I’ve been a professional journalist,

I’ve gotten more positive responses about this column than I have for anything else I’ve done. Just as Daniel has changed over the years, growing from an infant to a little man with opinions and personality, I’ve changed. We’ve worked on each other like a trickle of water works on a mountain. Over time, the trickle is a stream and its path is a valley. Daniel has taught me patience. He’s taught me to accept life as it comes. He’s taught me to let go of my plans. Most of all, he’s taught me about love. I can say with certainty that there’s no love on Earth like a mother’s love for her child. It’s even a little scary sometimes when I realize that there’s nothing I wouldn’t do for my son. It’s overpowering and humbling, like riding an ocean wave. While there were weeks when I thought I’d never come up with a column, I will miss this writing. I think the forced reflection made me a better, more

opener and downed the Roadrunners 28-7. Last Friday, Powell traveled to Halls. Results of Friday’s game were unavailable at press time. This Thursday, Sept. 8, Oak Ridge comes to Scarbro Stadium for a televised game. Kickoff is 7 p.m. Oak Ridge came into the season highly ranked but dropped the opener to unranked Farragut 28-21 at home. The Wildcats played Central last Friday.

thoughtful mother. If you’d like to keep up with me and my little family, feel free to make me a friend on Facebook (shannon.b.carey) or follow me on Twitter (@Shannon_Carey). Or, just stop by the Shopper office, and we’ll chat the old-fashioned way. Until then, farewell, and thanks for everything. Contact Shannon Carey at shannon@ ShopperNewsNow.com.

SEE YOU AT SPICYS!

MON - HAPPY LABOR DAY! CLOSED

THURS - All-You-Can-Eat

TUES - Free Roll Poker 6 & 9 WED - Karaoke & Corn Hole 8-midnight

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Hours: Mon-Fri 10am - 5pm • Sat 10am - 1pm

7537 Brickyard Rd, Powell • 865-859-9414 I-75N, Emory Rd. exit. Left on Emory, left on Brickyard at Bojangles

POWELL SERVICE GUIDE Pruning • Logging Bush Hogging Stump Removal Tree Service Insured

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BREEDEN’S TREE SERVICE

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524-5888

SPROLES DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

925-3700

DAVID HELTON PLUMBING CO.

Mike Leaf Removal, 922-5121 Gutter Cleaning, or Pressure Washing, 640-5351 etc.

Concept to Completion Repairs thru Additions Garages • Roofing • Decks Siding • Painting Wood/Tile/Vinyl Floors

938-4848 or 363-4848

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Cooper’s Budget Lawn Care

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Floors, Walls & Repairs

References available Dick Kerr 947-1445

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HAROLD’S GU GU GUTTER SERVICE

Mays Paving Co.

ALTERATIONS BY FAITH

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Driveways & Parking Lots 40 years experience

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Custom-tailored clothes for ladies of all sizes PLUS kids!

Machine Operators and MIG Welders needed! IMMEDIATE All Shifts available OPPORTUNITIES! Opportunity for OT High School Diploma or GED required Temp-to-hire opportunities Drug Screen and Background check required Medical, Dental and Short Term Disability! • Pay up to $10/hr based on position • Paid holidays with hours met! • We pay referral bonuses!

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KIMBERCLEAN Serving Powell & Knox. Co. for 20 yrs! Call for estimate. 584-3185

922-4136

HOUSE CLEANING Weekly, Bi-Weekly One-Time

Call Vivian 924-2579


A-12 • SEPTEMBER 5, 2011 • POWELL SHOPPER-NEWS

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK OR ON THE WEB AT FOODCITY.COM

MEGA SAVINGS EVENT

SAVE $5 INSTANTLY WHEN YOU BUY 10 PARTICIPATING ITEMS IN A SINGLE TRANSACTION USING YOUR VALUCARD!

HAVE A SAFE, FUN LABOR DAY ON MONDAY, SEPT. 5TH!

Customer responsible for Sales Tax on Sale Items. Limit 5 Deals Per Customer.

Food City Fresh 100% All Natural

Fryer Breast Tenders

KELLOGG’S

KELLOGG’S

Pop•Tarts

Raisin Bran

Family Pack, Per Lb.

Asst. Varieties, 12 Ct.

25.5 Oz.

SAVE AT LEAST .69 AFTER INSTANT REBATE

SAVE AT LEAST 1.79 AFTER INSTANT REBATE

SAVE AT LEAST 2.00 PER LB.

2.99

$ 99

1

WITH VALUCARD

FINAL COST

with card

BUY 10 ITEMS SAVE $5 INSTANTLY

2.49

2.99 WITH VALUCARD

FINAL COST

BUY 10 ITEMS SAVE $5 INSTANTLY

2.49

WHEN YOU BUY 10 PARTICIPATING ITEMS IN A SINGLE TRANSACTION WITH VALUCARD. CUSTOMER RESPONSIBLE FOR SALES TAX

WHEN YOU BUY 10 PARTICIPATING ITEMS IN A SINGLE TRANSACTION WITH VALUCARD. CUSTOMER RESPONSIBLE FOR SALES TAX

PARTICIPATING ITEM

PARTICIPATING ITEM

MAXWELL HOUSE

KELLOGG’S FROSTED MINI-WHEATS (18 OZ.) OR

100 Strawberries

Wake Up Roast

16 Oz.

34.5 Oz.

SAVE AT LEAST 1.00

SAVE AT LEAST 4.00 AFTER INSTANT REBATE

7.49

$ 99

1

WITH VALUCARD

FINAL COST

with card

BUY 10 ITEMS SAVE $5 INSTANTLY

6.99

Special K Asst. Varieties, 11.4-19.5 Oz. SAVE AT LEAST 1.00 AFTER INSTANT REBATE

3.29 WITH VALUCARD

FINAL COST

BUY 10 ITEMS SAVE $5 INSTANTLY

2.79

WHEN YOU BUY 10 PARTICIPATING ITEMS IN A SINGLE TRANSACTION WITH VALUCARD. CUSTOMER RESPONSIBLE FOR SALES TAX

WHEN YOU BUY 10 PARTICIPATING ITEMS IN A SINGLE TRANSACTION WITH VALUCARD. CUSTOMER RESPONSIBLE FOR SALES TAX

PARTICIPATING ITEM

PARTICIPATING ITEM

Baked Or Fried Chicken

NABISCO

NABISCO

without valucard regular price

Ritz Crackers

Chips Ahoy!

Asst. Varieties, 6.8-16 Oz.

Asst. Varieties, 9.5-15.25 Oz.

SAVE AT LEAST 1.00 AFTER INSTANT REBATE

SAVE AT LEAST 1.42 AFTER INSTANT REBATE

8 PIECE

EACH

$ 99

5

3.49 WITH VALUCARD

with card

FINAL COST

FOOD CLUB OR DOMINO

BUY 10 ITEMS SAVE $5 INSTANTLY

2.99

2.99 WITH VALUCARD

FINAL COST

BUY 10 ITEMS SAVE $5 INSTANTLY

2.49

WHEN YOU BUY 10 PARTICIPATING ITEMS IN A SINGLE TRANSACTION WITH VALUCARD. CUSTOMER RESPONSIBLE FOR SALES TAX

WHEN YOU BUY 10 PARTICIPATING ITEMS IN A SINGLE TRANSACTION WITH VALUCARD. CUSTOMER RESPONSIBLE FOR SALES TAX

PARTICIPATING ITEM

PARTICIPATING ITEM

KRAFT

KRAFT

Cool Whip

Velveeta Cheese

Sugar Limit 4

4 LB. save at least .89 each

$

2/ 5 for

Asst. Varieties, 8 Oz.

Asst. Varieties, 2 Lb.

SAVE AT LEAST .50 AFTER INSTANT REBATE

SAVE AT LEAST .50 AFTER INSTANT REBATE

1.49

with card

WITH VALUCARD

FINAL COST

BUY 10 ITEMS SAVE $5 INSTANTLY

.99

5.99 WITH VALUCARD

FINAL COST

BUY 10 ITEMS SAVE $5 INSTANTLY

5.49

WHEN YOU BUY 10 PARTICIPATING ITEMS IN A SINGLE TRANSACTION WITH VALUCARD. CUSTOMER RESPONSIBLE FOR SALES TAX

WHEN YOU BUY 10 PARTICIPATING ITEMS IN A SINGLE TRANSACTION WITH VALUCARD. CUSTOMER RESPONSIBLE FOR SALES TAX

PARTICIPATING ITEM

PARTICIPATING ITEM

BEER ITEMS AVAILABLE AT PARTICIPATING TENNESSEE FOOD CITY STORES ONLY.

Limit 4

Pepsi ASST. VARIETIES, 6 PK., 24 OZ. BTLS. SAVE AT LEAST 1.79 EACH

BUY 2, GET $2.00 OFF! FINAL COST...

4/ 10 $

ASST. VARIETIES, 24 PK., 12 OZ. CANS

for with card

Earn 1 point for each $1.00 purchased in grocery items.

1 POI NT

10 POINTS

with card

* When Purchased In Quantities Of 2. Limit 1 Per Transaction.

REWARDS

FUEL BUCKS SAVE 15¢ PER GALLON WHEN YOU SHOP AT FOOD CITY!

5

$ 99

Pepsi

150 POINTS EARNS YOU 15¢ PER GALLON ON A SINGLE FILL-UP.

Earn 10 bonus points for every $10 purchased in Food City brands.

50 POINTS

Earn 50 bonus points for each Food City Pharmacy prescription.*

13 99

$

1199

$

with card save at least 1.00

Corona

Bud Light Lime

EXTRA OR LIGHT, 12 PK., 12 OZ. BTLS.

12 PK., 12 OZ. BTLS.

BUD OR

13

$

97

with card save at least 2.02

Items and Prices are specifically intended to apply locally where issue originates. No sales to dealers or competitors. Quantity rights reserved. 2011 K-VA-T Food Stores, Inc. Food City is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Bud Light ASST. VARIETIES, 18 PK., 12 OZ. CANS

• KNOXVILLE, TN - N. BROADWAY, MAYNARDVILLE HWY., HARDIN VALLEY RD., MIDDLEBROOK PIKE, KINGSTON PIKE, MORRELL RD. • POWELL, TN - 3501 EMORY RD.

SALE DATES Sun., Sept. 4 Sat., Sept. 10, 2011

14 99

$

Heineken

REGULAR OR LIGHT 12 PK., 12 OZ. BTLS.

14 99

$

Samuel Adams ASST. VARIETIES, 12 PK., 12 OZ. BTLS.

Powell Shopper-News 090511  

A community newspaper serving Powell and the surrounding area

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