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GOVERNMENT/POLITICS A4-5 | OUR COLUMNISTS A6-7 | YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS A10-11 | BUSINESS A9 | HEALTH & LIFESTYLES SECTION B

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halls / fountain city

VOL. 51, NO. 4

JANUARY 23, 2012

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Fountain restored at FC Lake By Dr. Jim Tumblin Mark

Bundles of love County donates to Love Kitchen See page A-6

NEIGHBORHOOD BUZZ

Fielden to retire Halls resident Donna Fielden is retiring from West High. Read Betty Bean’s story online at www.ShopperNewsNow. com/. Click on Bearden edition, page 8.

FEATURED COLUMNIST MARVIN WEST

Blood sport Marvin looks at the rough and tumble world of football recruiting. See page A-6

Smithson’s Eastwood Workers restore the fountain. Landscaping Company has restored the fountain in Fountain City Lake. Erosion under the fountain and general deterioration of the stone work surrounding it required extensive Smithson repair. The restoration required the addition of another level of stone to the pedestal and repairs to the lower level which had eroded a cavity nearly a foot deep. Renewed plumbing and electrical controls were also necessary. The project required a team working for more than a week and cost $35,000. While the Fountain City Lions Club is seeking grants to assist with the funding, the support of Fountain City citizens is necessary to provide the matching The restored fountain at Fountain City funds. Donations Lake represents the first major reworkare encouraged ing of the stone work, plumbing and and are tax deductMcMillan electrical connections since the last maible (501c3). Conjor restoration in 1985-86. Photos submitted tributions should be mailed to the Fountain City Lions Club, P.O. Box 5276, Knoxville, TN 37928. Dick McMillan is the current president stone walls was last accomplished in the fall of 1985 and spring of 1986 unof the Fountain City Lions Club. The lake was drained and a major der the aegis of the Fountain City Lirestoration of the fountain and the To page A-2

Gentry-Griffey wins at BZA; vote is 4-0 Residents will challenge crematory at City Council By Betty Bean

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4509 Doris Circle 37918 (865) 922-4136 news@ShopperNewsNow.com ads@ShopperNewsNow.com EDITOR Sandra Clark sclark@aol.com ADVERTISING SALES Patty Fecco fecco@ShopperNewsNow.com Brandi Davis davisb@ShopperNewsNow.com Shopper-News is a member of KNS Media Group, published weekly at 4509 Doris Circle, Knoxville, TN, and distributed to 27,825 homes in Halls, Gibbs and Fountain City.

TITAN A SELF-STORAGE

Gentry-Griffey manager Eric Botts, left, and co-owner Jim Clayton listen to city BZA deliberations. Photo by Betty Bean

Minutes after the Board of Zoning Appeals turned down the appeal of Gentry-Griffey Funeral Home’s permit to add a crematory to their building, the Community Awareness Network was passing the hat to raise $100 to take their challenge to City Council. It took less than a minute. The zoning board voted 4-0 to deny the appeal, which

charged that former city building official Gary Norman’s decision to grant the building permit was arbitrary and capricious. CAN has 15 days to appeal the denial. Building official Tom Reynolds said Norman (who has since resigned and moved out of state) and his staff approved the permit for the city’s only crematory after researching definitions and determining that a crematory is an accessory use to a funeral home – secondary in area, extent and purpose to the principal use.

“A stand-alone crematory wouldn’t meet code,” Reynolds said. Nan Scott, chief spokesperson for CAN, cited sections of the city code that limit related uses, such as distillation of bones and incineration of organic matter, to I-4 Industrial zones. Gentry-Griffey, located on the hill above Fountain City Lake, is zoned O-1. This, Scott said, supports Rose Mortuary CEO Kent Marcum’s written statement To page A-3

Bonuses and billboards at County Commission By Sandra Clark Expect fireworks from Commissioners R. Larry Smith, Richard Briggs and Tony Norman at today’s County Commission meeting, which gets underway at 2 p.m. and is viewable on Comcast Channel 12. Smith wants discussion of the county’s certification process and bonus policies. He’s hammered the bonus payments by Trustee John Duncan before certification work was complete, leading to Duncan’s decision to pay back part of the bonuses while referring to Smith as “grandstanding.” Briggs wants to extend the county’s moratorium on electronic billboards, draw-

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ing opposition from the billboard industry and support from Scenic Knoxville. Norman wants to strip the Briggs Amendment off the Hillside and Ridgetop Protection Plan. Less controversial but no less important are: appointment of 27 citizens to a Charter Review Committee and approval of a $15.5 million contract with Rouse Construction to build a new elementary school at Northshore Town Center.

Billboards David Jernigan, a vice president of Lamar Advertising, and Russell Amanns of Outdoor Displays Inc.,

Russ Amanns and David Jernigan

Photos by S. Clark

spoke against Briggs’s pro- tions at last week’s Composed billboard restric- mission workshop.

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“Hundreds of businesses rely on billboards,” said Jernigan. “As the county grows, we want to grow. We support the current ordinance, prior to the moratorium.” Commissioner Sam McKenzie Joyce Feld called the blinky billboards, “effective for you but extremely dangerous” for motorists. Joyce Feld, president of Scenic Knoxville, called electronic billboards “weapons of mass distraction” and To page A-5


community From page A-1 vestment group in 1890. Robert A. McGinnis’ book, “Tidbits of the Past: 1892-1895, Vol. III (2011),” cites the newspaper account that pinpoints the date of the impounding of the lake (Knoxville Tribune, April 8, 1894): When (Col. Woodward’s) Fountain City Land Company says it is going to do anything, it generally does. The latest scheme devised by this company in order to make its property more attractive and a popular resort for pleasure seekers, is the large lake now being excavated near the famous Fountain City grove. The lake will be triangular in shape (later amended to heart-shaped) and cover an acre and a half of ground. … The course of the spring in the park has been changed and the water will be furnished by the mammoth spring next to the post office. This spring will be rocked up several feet so as to not be covered by the lake. … The banks are to be beautifully ornamented with shrubbery and it will be enclosed by a fence. … Engineer Phillips has charge of the work and Messrs. Rule and Kindell have the contract for the dirt work and masonry. They will excavate about six feet and the water will stand about four feet. … The contract price for the lake is $5,000 besides the many other improvements to be made. By June 1, 1894, a romantic heart-shaped lake was complete with a white gravel walking path surrounding it. White picket fences and gaslights completed a dream attraction for its time.

Tuesday at Beaver Brook Country Club. Lunch is $10. Halls Business & Pro- Info: Shannon Carey, 9224136 or Shannon@ fessional Association ShopperNewsNow.com/. meets at noon each third

HALLS NOTES

Tradition continues at Midway Barber Shop Halls has changed a bit since L.B. Harrell started cutting hair at Midway Barber Shop in July 1963.

Fountain restored ons Club. Some of the funds were provided by the state and federal governments. The park and the lake property are two parts of a single deed and were once connected by a wide walkway. After an attempt to create a residential subdivision on the park property in 1924, a lawsuit was filed to maintain them for public use with Dr. H.E. Goetz as plaintiff and John W. Green as counsel. The suit made its way through the Chancery Court and the Appeals Court. A landmark final decision by the Tennessee Supreme Court in 1926 held that the park and lake would remain “on loan” to the citizens of Fountain City as long as they are properly maintained. The Fountain City Park Commission supervises the two plats and, for several years, the Fountain City Lions Club has assumed responsibility for their upkeep and improvement. Until the 1890s, there was only a marshy swamp between Park Place (the Woodward-Williams Mansion) and the park property with its massive spring and stately oak trees. Col. J.C. Woodward (1841-1913), owner of the Fountain Head Hotel and the Knoxville and Fountain City Land Company, had a vision that included a beautiful lake, and he had the wherewithal to implement his vision. He contracted with Felix G. Phillips (1853-1938), a prominent local civil engineer and three-term Knox County engineer. Phillips had designed the 5.25-mile Fountain Head Railway (The Dummy Line) for another in-

A-2 • JANUARY 23, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

Jake Mabe He can remember seeing tin cans in gullies beside streets that now boast $300,000 homes. Back then, he charged $1 for a haircut and worked from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shop was first located in the old shopping center across the street from its current location on Doris Circle. L.B. managed it for legendary Fountain City barber Ray Wallace and bought it after seven years. Some of the equipment in the store today was brought over from Wallace’s Fountain City shop. L.B. bought and remodeled the house in which the current shop is located in 1984. L.B. was raised in Tazewell but came to Knoxville to go to barbering school and ended up staying. “Back then in Tazewell they were getting 50 cents for a haircut. Here they were getting $1 or $1.25. So I stayed.” L.B. also served as pastor at Highland View Baptist Church for 26 years. That’s where he met his sweetheart, Diane. He still sees customers who began coming to the barber shop in the 1960s and says he’s cut hair for three generations now. Fathers brought their sons who now bring their sons. L.B. has sold the shop to Brian DeBusk, a Central High graduate who has worked there for eight years. None of Brian’s relatives were professional barbers, although his great-grandfather did cut his

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L.B. Harrell, Brian DeBusk and Clay Smith share a laugh while Brent DeBusk (seated) gets a haircut at Midway Barber Shop. L.B., who has cut hair in Halls since 1963, has sold the shop to Brian DeBusk, but still works three days a week. Photo submitted sons’ hair at home because he couldn’t afford to pay for haircuts. Plus, Brian says he always remembered what his grandfather once told him: “Never in my whole life have I ever seen a barber go hungry.” And, as things often go in this smaller than it looks world, Brian already knew Clay Smith, who has cut hair in the shop since 1982, from Brian’s days bagging groceries at the old Fountain City Kroger. “It really was a dream,” Brian says, about owning his own shop. “I’m still getting used to it. It’s a big change emotionally but I’m very grateful for the opportunity and that L.B. trusted me enough to sell it to me and still work here three days a week. L.B.’s still the man, that’s for sure.” Brian says L.B. taught him a good technique on cutting a flattop and also gave him and his wife, Danielle, good advice when they were starting out as newlyweds.

FOUNTAIN CITY NOTES

fice and provided security at Halls High for dances and ball games, “going back to when Dink Adams was football coach.” He also holds a pick-and-grin jam session about 7 every Friday night in the winter. Waiting for a haircut last Thursday morning was Dennis Hinkle, loyal customer since ’92. He used to live in Fountain City but now makes the drive to Halls from Straw Plains to get a hair cut. “It’s worth it, though,” Dennis says. “I think L.B. was charging $5 when I first started coming here.” “Now it’s double the price and double the bull,” Brian joked. “But it is amazing how generous and loyal our customers are.” Midway Barber Shop is located at 4017 Doris Circle. A haircut costs $10 and the phone number is 922-8181. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Call Jake Mabe at 922-4136 or email JakeMabe1@aol.com.

Party at the art center

■ Fountain City Business and Professional Association meets at noon each second Wednesday at Central Baptist Church of Fountain City. Lunch is $10. Info: Beth Wade, 971-1971, ext. 372, or bwade@ utfcu.org/. ■ Open Door Book Review meets Thursday, Jan. 26, at the Fountain City Branch Library. Local teacher and writer Pamela Schoenewaldt will review her recent book “When We Were Strangers,” a histori-

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“He said, ‘Kids your age drive me crazy. You all want to start out in a house that it took your parents 25 years to get.’ ” Brian says he took that to heart and bought a more affordable home. The advice helped him be in a good financial position to buy the barber shop. Asked whether Brian is a worthy successor, L.B. joked, “You don’t want to write down what I think!” “That’s business as usual there,” Brian said with a smile. “We crack and joke with one another and have a good time.” Brian says the barbers and the customers talk football and politics and solve the world’s problems. He joked when introducing Clay that “he’s a staunch Democrat.” Clay was quick to tell me that he’s supporting Newt Gingrich in the Republican presidential primary this year. He also said he worked for several years for the Knox County Sheriff’s Of-

The Fountain City Art Center will host a ’50sthemed dance 6 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11. Dressing up in the style of the 1950’s is highly encouraged. Broadway Sound’s “Broadway Swing” will provide live music. Dinner will include a “soda shop” menu of pulled pork sandwiches, cole slaw, Cokes in glass bottles, dessert and more. Holland Rowe will be taking photos in a “soda shop” setting for $10 a sheet. Tickets are $30 and seating is limited. All proceeds will benefit the Fountain City Art Center. Info: 357-2787 or email fcartcenter@knology.net. cal novel of the immigration experience of a young Italian girl who travels to America in

the 1880s. Coffee and conversation begin at 10 a.m. and the lecture begins at 10:30.

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HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 23, 2012 • A-3

Gentry-Griffey at BZA

Ordinance chafes jewelers, gold dealers

From page A-1 that city officials told him not to bother asking when Rose, which was leasing the Highland Memorial mortuary building in Bearden more than a decade ago, wanted to add a crematory. Marcum says he was told that such uses are permissible only in I-4 industrial zones. City attorney Angela Rauber said she has found no evidence that Rose Mortuary ever applied for a permit to build a crematory. Marcum, however, said he investigated the possibility of building a crematorium and decided not to apply for a permit when he was told it had to be in an industrial zone. Instead, he and other local funeral directors founded East Tennessee Cremation Services. Scott also cited concerns about emissions, particularly from vaporized mercury, as well as traffic issues on Cedar Lane and Broadway. “Is it worth the risk of changing the fabric of our community?� she asked. “Every single land use change has an impact.� Attorney Arthur Seymour Jr., who cited legal precedent to support his case, represented Gentry-Griffey, which is now owned by a corporation called Evergreen whose principals are Jim Clayton, Richard Ray and Tim Williams. “The disposition of dead human bodies includes the right of a funeral establishment to operate a crematory. That’s the last word from the appellate courts,� he said. Seymour further asserted that since Gentry-Griffey has a valid permit and has spent more than $300,000 of the budgeted $371,000 on the

crematory, it now has a “vested right� to the addition. Zoologist Steve Pendleton, who opposes the permit, cautioned the board about mercury, which he says is cumulative in effect and heavier than water. It would sink to the bottom of Fountain City Lake, where will convert to methyl mercury, “which is forever. We don’t want that in our duck pond where children fish.� Botts said the state-ofthe-art crematory will burn incredibly clean and that he has invited county inspectors to witness every phase of its installation and use over the next few weeks. BZA chair Clifford Beach said the vested right argument didn’t figure into his decision. Board member Robyn McAdoo said she is concerned about technical issues “that we have no way of assessing. Our ordinance probably ought to be updated to include this. I for one, don’t feel safe one way or the other making a call on whether the mercury in the air is safe or not.� Note: Markus and Erin Chady, new Gibbs Drive residents who were characterized in the Shopper-News as opposing the crematory, say they do not, in fact, oppose it, but have concerns about the neighborhood being stigmatized. “We remain concerned and look forward to learning more from experts who are qualified to inform us and our neighbors. We are particularly interested in other types of permits for incineration which may put the crematorium in context,� he said.

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By Betty Bean Police Chief David Rausch says the city’s new Second Hand Goods Ordinance gives his department an additional – and much needed – way to fight the No. 1 crime in Knoxville – theft. “We had 12,101 reported thefts last year. Out of 20,000 overall crimes, 16,000-plus were property crimes. This is a huge piece of the criminal activity in this community and I have a responsibility to address that. It impacts more families than any other crime in our city. A lot of victims are being made over theft issues and thieves have got to have somewhere to unload it,� Rausch told a group of store owners who will be affected by the ordinance. Thieves target items like electronics, jewelry, coins, precious metals and tools. The new ordinance requires merchants who buy them for resale to register, be fingerprinted and pay a $50 fee for a new business license. They must also photograph and hold the merchandise for 30 days and keep records of the used items on file for two years. Fountain City jeweler Mark Enix and West K nox v ille gold dealer Bill Kitts were among several dozen business owners who attended a Bill Kitts community meeting last week to discuss the issue with Rausch and his Knoxville Police Department staff. They said they plan to comply with the law, but also say government overreaching won’t solve the problem. “We already do 90 percent of all that, and if it’s as easy

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as they say it is, I don’t mind doing it,� said Enix, owner of Fountain City Jewelry. “But I have an issue with why we have to have another application. It feels like Big Brother coming over and saying ‘Hey, we need more money.’ I really think we need to be grandfathered in. When the criminals realize what’s happening, they’ll just take it to the flea markets, and that’s fine with me. I don’t want to buy stolen stuff.� Kitts, owner of Westside Coins & Collectibles on Kingston Pike and Knoxville Coin, Gold and Silver on North Broadway, buys and sells precious metals, including gold and silver bullion. He works on a small percentage margin in a volatile market and says the new ordinance puts him at a commercial disadvantage. He worries that being forced to hold onto bullion for 30 days could also have the unintended consequence of inviting theft. “People have a right to sell their gold and silver, and we have very few problems with thieves. I might have one or two or three instances a year, and I buy a lot. Usually, it’s where somebody stole from their family. “I support the spirit of the law and want to protect the public, but this makes me less competitive in the marketplace,� Kitts said.

Police Chief David Rausch talks with Fountain City Jewelry owner Mark Enix. Photos by Betty Bean “Before, we only had to hold the bullion for seven days. I’ve missed a few deals in the past week or two because I have to hold it. This means there’s a lot more risk involved and I know this ordinance is going to affect my business somewhat. To what extent, I don’t know. But it ain’t gonna help me.� Both Kitts and Enix, as well as numerous other busi-

ness owners who attended the meeting, had an additional complaint – the new requirements give pawnshops, which under state law are not subject to such city ordinances and are only required to hold goods for 20 days before putting them out for resale, a competitive advantage. “All we are asking for is a level playing field,� Enix said.

Underwood sets community meetings Conley Underwood, candidate for school board from the 8th District, has set a series of neighborhood events to which everyone is invited. The election is March 6 with early voting starting Feb. 15. Underwood’s events are: Thursday, Jan. 26, 5-8 p.m. at Gibbs Ruritan Club; Wednesday, Feb 1, 5-7 p.m. at Corryton Community Center; Thursday, Feb 2, 5-8 p.m.at Carter Senior Center; Thursday, Feb 9, 5-8 p.m. at New Harvest Park. Underwood

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government City Council must lead on Lakeshore A-4 • JANUARY 23, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

State officials (i.e. Gov. Bill Haslam and Mental Health Commissioner Doug Varney) say two things up front about closing Lakeshore Mental Health Institute: 1. It’s not a done deal. 2. It’s not about the money. And while hardly anybody will admit it on the record, nobody with a lick of sense believes them. It is a done deal. It is about the money. That’s why City Council’s State Reps. Harry Brooks (left) and Bill Dunn talk with school board vice chair Indya Kincannon following Thursday’s State 8-1 vote last week to table a of the Schools address. Brooks, Dunn and Rep. Ryan Haynes white paper regarding the closing of Lakeshore makes drove in from Nashville to attend the session. Photo by S. Clark little sense. The report was prepared by the Mayor’s Council on Disability Issues. And the council’s rejection of it sent a signal that local government is not willing to take a strong, proactive stand to ensure fair treatment for one of the most vulnerable segments of society, the mentally ill. McIntyre typically bridgBy Sandra Clark Council also ignored a Superintendent Dr. Jim es the disparate calls for host of ancillary issues such McIntyre said Knox County reforms from the business community and the status Schools can do better. We’re proud of our steady, quo seekers in the education solid academic progress, ... establishment. But he usubut we have unacceptable ally leans toward reform. His predecessor, Charles achievement gaps. We can Lindsey, came to town and do better.” McIntyre’s address immediately joined the Thursday at Gresham Mid- Knox County Education Asdle School was well-received sociation, the teachers’ barMayor Madeline Rogero by a full house. He received gaining unit. McIntyre dissed the attended her first U.S. Cona standing ovation, surely a first in the history of Knox KCEA by refusing to give ference of Mayors meeting time off to its president, as a member this past week County Schools. and spent Wednesday early At least it was the first Sherry Morgan, this year. evening at the White House Morgan said Monday time a superintendent ever with President Obama. stood to explain the dis- she’s finally achieved the Clarksville Mayor Kim Mctrict’s performance or lack time off to work on KCEA Millan was also in Washingof same. Board chair Thom- matters (the group reimton. She grew up in South as Deakins wanted the “state burses her salary but she Knoxville. Rogero will be of the schools” address. “We does not lose benefits or seactive in the Women’s Mayare at a defining moment in niority). ors Association, too. public education,” Deakins McIntyre’s goals: Rogero was chosen to said. He recalled a time, not ■ More instructional chair the city Pension long ago, when “a Tennes- time Board at its Jan. 12 meetsee high school diploma had ■ Consistent, high pering to replace former City little value.” He cited the forming magnet schools Council member Barbara Knox County school board’s ■ Enhanced professional Pelot whose term had exhiring of McIntyre in 2008, pired. This places Rogero the adoption of a five-year development, including more lead teachers and in charge as she should be. strategic plan in 2009 and instructional coaches It also gives her owneradoption of the national ship of proposed pension ■ Supplementary techCommon Core standards in changes needed to make 2010. “We now have rigor- nology in the classrooms, the system financially soland ous standards and are movvent. It makes it likely for ■ Expanded perforing toward quality instrucher to attend all Pension tion,” he said. mance pay.

McIntyre challenges community, gets standing ‘O’

a workable transition plan and to allow that working group to become the nucleus of a collaborative effort to improve mental health services and delivery. Another newbie, Finbarr Saunders, made a motion to accept the 58-page CODI document, but failed to get a second after Council member Brenda Palmer said she was worried about the “implications” of the white paper and made the motion to table it, which means that a separate vote will be required to bring it back up for consideration. (Later, she said that having it presented in resolution form was a big source of her heartburn.) Duane Grieve, who represents the 2nd District where what’s left of Lakeshore resides, seconded the motion and said he shares Palmer’s concerns that approval of the CODI report would be interpreted as an endorsement of its recommenda-

Betty Bean as fair treatment for Lakeshore employees, historic preservation and looking out for city taxpayers who already feel put upon by a burgeoning homeless population. In a gutsy move, newbie member Mark Campen cast the only dissenting vote. The CODI document recommended that city government support the closure of Lakeshore, but only if the resulting savings are reinvested in community-based services and if it undertakes its own study of potential costs to the city and how the closure will affect Knoxville residents. The report also advocated a working group to collaborate with the state to develop

tions, despite Law Director Charles Swanson’s observation that many past councils have routinely approved and accepted such documents without repercussion. Nick Della Volpe observed that the governor and the commissioner can promise that funding will follow the patients, but it will be up to the legislatures of the future to honor those promises – and therefore nobody can make long-term guarantees. Nick Pavlis recommended waiting to see what the Legislature of the present decides to do. Wait for the Legislature to act? Lakeshore is closing June 30. Five months out is not too soon to make a plan, which is what CODI has stepped up and done. If City Council members don’t like CODI’s plan, they should get together and make a better one. And inform the Legislature what Knoxville wants. The clock is ticking.

Rogero replaces Pelot as Pension Board chair

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Board meetings. The pension study task force chaired by Bob Cross continues to meet at KCDC with few in attendance. It is unclear if it will make any substantive proposals for change in the city plan despite rising costs to the city treasury. Mayor Rogero has to add $13 million for pension shortfalls in her first city budget this May. In 2013, she will need to add at least $14.6 million more. The issue seems to have been forgotten.

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HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 23, 2012 • A-5

County Commission

Meet Judge Steve Sword The first thing you must know about the young attorney who replaced Criminal Court Judge Richard Baumgartner is that he’s not Richard Baumgartner. Steve Sword was appointed by Gov. Bill Haslam from a list of three lawyers recommended by the Judicial Selection Commission. The former prosecutor and graduate of UT College of Law said he was thinking about running for district attorney when the judge’s job became open following the resignation of Baumgartner. Attorney General Randy Nichols is not expected to seek re-election. Sword said Knox County needed a judge “to restore trust and to be a servant to the community.” He spoke last week to the Halls Republican Club. “Now that people want to hear what I’ve got to say, I can’t say anything,” he joked. Sword said there’s no way to instill perfect justice, but “most of the time the jury gets it right.” Perhaps from his experience as a prosecutor, Sword is mindful of getting a case to trial quickly. While all judges work hard, he said defense attorneys often try to delay trials, particularly when their clients are out on bail. Every day of delay is another day they are not convicted felons. And attorneys usually have several balls in the air at once. They grab the ones that are about to hit the floor first. No lawyer works on a case until it’s within three weeks of trial, he said. “I will set deadlines. You will not get a trial date until the defendant says he

From page A-1

melted when Briggs offered an amendment that proponents said neutered the plan. Briggs says he just wants to be clear that a developer can “defend before an electRidgetop ed body” if the development Norman wants recon- plan differs from the regulasideration of the Briggs tions coming from the HillAmendment when the Hill- side and Ridgetop Protecside and Ridgetop Protec- tion Plan. Norman has been lobbytion Plan is voted on today. Norman, the primary spon- ing his colleagues in sunsor of the ordinance, met shined meetings, but it will opposition from builders, be hard for him to secure Realtors and the Knoxville six votes to strip the Briggs Chamber. That opposition Amendment. “litter on a stick.” And Briggs said he has a “personal hangup” with the number of “adult entertainment and strip joint” billboards around the county.

Carl Tindell. Tindell’s term has expired, but County Mayor Tim Burchett has not selected a replacement. Miller may have to resign because he’s moved out of county. The lawyers are checking.

Sandra Clark

won’t accept a plea bargain. I’ll tell the defendant what the penalties will be if convicted, and then set a trial date. I won’t accept a plea on (high level) felonies on trial day,” Sword said. “And I’ll give you a trial within two months.” In October, Sword’s second month on the bench, the three divisions of Criminal Court closed 200 felony cases. Sword closed 108 of them. The three divisions collected $78,000 in fines and fees. Of that, Sword collected $32,000. The young man loves the job and plans to work hard. He promises not to embarrass the county. He graduated from UT law school and King College in Bristol. He’s a captain in the U.S. Army Reserve and is active at Fellowship Evangelical Free Church. He and his wife, Alice, have two daughters.

PBA regroups, sort of Mayors come and go, but the Knoxville-Knox County Public Building Authority rolls on. Meeting to reorganize last week, the group re-elected its officers: Billy Stokes, chair; Winston Frazier, vice chair; George Prosser, secretary. Those three plus Scott Davis and Keena Ogle make up the executive committee. Other members are Tierney Bates, Lewis Cosby, Jennifer Holder, Dr. Rocio Huet, Chip Miller and F.

Leaks abound And we’re not talking Judge Steve Sword about those employees in the Trustee’s Office who keep calling R. Larry Smith. No, these leaks are falling on the desk of Dr. Bill Lyons, deputy to Mayor Madeline Rogero. PBA chief Dale Smith said he decided to use rappellers to wash windows PBA chair Billy Stokes at the City County Building. That meant the railing for scaffolds could be torn down. But the railing was “embedded in the membrane roof” and punched a hole, said Smith. “It leaked on Dr. Lyons.” PBA got a half million dollars insurance settlement for hail damage to re- Tim Howell place the roof so all’s well.

Senior Citizens Home Assistance seeks county aid Tim Howell said Knox County has a ways to go toward fulfilling a commitment made by former Mayor Mike Ragsdale toward building the agency’s new facility. Speaking at County Commission’s workshop last week, Howell said Ragsdale promised a $3 million challenge grant to Senior Citizens Home Assistance and the group has “done what we said,” raising more than $5 million. Knox County has paid $2.4 million, leaving a $556,000 balance. Commissioners told him to meet with Mayor Tim Burchett to seek help in the county’s 2013 budget.

‘I’m here! Yes!’ Becky Massey hit the wrong button on her first state Senate vote. The panel on each legislator’s desk offers three choices: green for yes, red for no and blue for present (no vote). When the speaker called for a roll call of members, 32 senators hit blue and Massey hit green. The colors flashed on the wall for everyone to see. And now Massey is getting some digs from her colleagues. Cortney Piper, Democratic Party rep on “This Week in Tennessee,” will speak to the District 6 Democratic Club at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24, at the Karns MIddle School library. Info: Janice Spoone.

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A-6 • JANUARY 23, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

Bundles of love

Love Kitchen founders Helen Ashe and Ellen Turner shower County Mayor Tim Burchett with hugs during a recent visit. Photo by Ruth White

in barrels and carried in boxes packed with nonperishable food items, the sisters squealed with delight and could not quit thanking everyone for their donations. “They are national treasures,” Burchett said of Ashe and Turner. “They are very honorable people.” Ashe and Turner are on a continuous mission to feed the homeless, helpless, homebound and hungry people in Knoxville. Through the donations they are able to help even more people. It is something that the pair truly enjoys. If you have never been to the Love Kitchen, stop by, sign up to volunteer and receive one of the best hugs in town.

Ruth White

K

nox County Mayor Tim Burchett stopped by the Love Kitchen last week to see founders Helen Ashe and Ellen Turner and to drop off a special delivery thanks to The Holiday Festival of Lights at The Cove at Concord Park. As the mayor walked through the kitchen doors to greet the twins, he received as much in hugs and smiles as he brought to the kitchen. Ashe and Turner chatted up a storm with the mayor and piled on hug after hug

prior to the presentation. Thanks to the generosity of Knoxvillians, the Love Kitchen was presented with more than $2,500 in cash and nearly 2,500 pounds of food. The festival is a free event presented by the Parks and Recreation Department. Visitors were encouraged to donate food items needed by the Love Kitchen to continue providing meals and emergency food packages to families in need. As workers for the Parks and Recreation Department wheeled

Recruiting is a blood sport TALES OF TENNESSEE | Marvin West

R

ecruiting is the life’s blood of college athletics. In that race for fame and fortune, blood is spilled. Hearts are broken. Plans are shattered. Commitments become flexible or meaningless. Persuading the best prep players to say yes on national signing day (next week) has far-reaching impact – as in winning big games, doing bank commercials and receiving large salaries plus bowl bonuses. The flip side is losing and getting stuck with a stack of orange pants. As important as fundamentals, strategy and execution are, securing talent is far more significant.

There is an old saying that you can’t win the Derby with a donkey. Applied to recruiting, that means you better recognize the difference between thoroughbreds and plow horses. Precise evaluation (and mindreading) is a start. Next comes salesmanship. Following yes is the task of maintaining agreements as coaches switch jobs. Sometimes there is unscrupulous bombardment. Tennessee coaches would never do such a dastardly thing but some coaches lie. They tell prospects and girlfriends and grandmothers

what they think they want to hear. Come to our place and take a large leap toward greatness. You are the best we have ever seen. We’ll care for you under all circumstances. We have fabulous facilities and a great support system. Your education is guaranteed. Just sign here. Based on Vol for Life prerequisites, most Tennessee recruits are not bandits or thieves. Alas, young players may make promises they do not keep. Sometimes they make promises they have no intention of keeping. Sometimes they just change their minds. Daily, hourly, minute by minute.

Indeed, hearts are broken and spirits are crushed. Weeks, months, even years invested in relationship building go to waste in an instant. Recruiting is bloody mean on both sides. Coaches tell big, fast Frankie that he is the man of their All-American dreams, the only middle linebacker on the recruiting board. Frankie says “cool” and count me in. Committed! Those same coaches conclude, after careful video study, that Charley, in another township, is bigger and faster than Frank, meaner, too, with genuine linebacker hair on his chest. The same sales pitch is delivered. Charley swallows a huge helping and pledges allegiance. Frankie eventually realizes something is seriously wrong, no more happy calls or witty texting. Silent message? He should consider other opportunities, he doesn’t exactly fit the new and better plan. But there was a commitment. Oh? Pressure peaks on both sides

when coaches must pry a committed athlete from rival clutches. Adults contribute to juvenile delinquency. They suggest it. Encourage it. Demand it. Rewards far outweigh risks. It doesn’t matter what you told that other coach. This is a better deal – for both of us. Some coaches, fighting for their professional lives, chose survival over integrity. Then, there is the NCAA moat, one-year scholarships, 25 max, renewable at the coach’s option, 85 total, impossible calculations, public relations nightmare. Coaches can exchange people against the big number by creating vacancies. There are induced transfers and occasional medical discharges and the almost always available violation of team rules. Privacy laws conveniently prevent explanation. Sadly, the majority motto this time of year is do whatever it takes, just win, baby. If you spill a little blood, we’ll mop. Marvin West invites reader response. His address is westwest6@netzero.com.

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HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 23, 2012 • A-7 result of just plain bad luck. In others, they are having a hard time because they have made bad decisions. (Who hasn’t, at one time or another?) And in still others, their troubles are caused by not acting: by not doing that thing – small or large – which might begin to turn the situation around. CROSS CURRENTS | Lynn Hutton Linus, that philosopher of the Peanuts gang, explained it to Lucy this way: “Hoping Why do you want the day of the Lord? to goodness is not theologiIt is darkness, not light; cally sound.” as if someone fled from a lion, That was his final word and was met by a bear; on the subject. He did not or went into the house and rested a hand against go on to explain what works the wall, and was bitten by a snake. better than “hoping to good(Amos 5: 18-20 NRSV) ness.” Oh, Lord, you delivered Daniel from the lion’s den; I have carried that line You delivered Jonah from the belly of the whale, in my head for decades. and then, What Linus (and his creator The Hebrew children from the fiery furnace, Charles Schulz) meant by it, I can’t say with certainty. So the Good Book do declare. But I have spent no little Oh, Lord, Lord, if you can’t help me, time considering what it For goodness’ sake, don’t you help that bear. means to me. (“The Preacher and the Bear,” First and foremost, to me lyrics by Joe Arizona) at least, it means that my t matters how we act. How I spend part of my work- effort is required. I can’t we exercise judgment. ing life dealing with folks sit down and hope that God How we pray. And how we who are struggling. In some will fi x, disentangle, put to hope. cases, their struggle is the rights, or mend whatever

Hoping to goodness

I

faith

messes I have gotten myself into. I can’t just hope that God will provide a living for me, or a future, or a dream. I can (and do) hope that God will give me a level playing field, like the preacher in the old song quoted above: “Oh, Lord, Barbara Herrell will Lord, if you can’t help me, be the guest speaker for goodness’ sake, don’t for the Knoxville Felyou help that bear!” lowship Luncheon at I can (and do) expect that noon Tuesday, Jan. God will be with me and 24. The KFL is a group guide me (if I am willing to of Christian men and be led). I also believe that women who meet God expects me to think on weekly at the Golden Barbara Herrell Photo submitted my own account – to use the Corral in Powell. sense God gave me. I can (and do) expect that ■ New Covenant Fellowship God will forgive me when I Church, 6828 Central Avenue mess up (for which I am imPike, will hold Pilates class 5:45 mensely grateful), because p.m. each Monday for $5. Info: the psalmist sings that “… Community 689-7001. as far as the east is from the Services west, so far he removes our Women’s programs ■ Cross Roads Presbyterian transgressions from us.” hosts the Halls Welfare Ministry ■ Knoxville Day Women’s (Psalm 103:12) Aglow Lighthouse will hold a food pantry 6-8 p.m. each And I can (and do) expect 12-week Bible study 9:30 a.m. second Tuesday and 9-11 a.m. to noon beginning Thursday, that at the last, God will each fourth Saturday. Jan. 26, at New Covenant Felopen His everlasting arms ■ Knoxville Free Food Market, lowship Church, 6828 Central and receive me into His em4625 Mill Branch Lane (across Ave. Pike. The subject is “Search brace. Which is, of course, from Tractor Supply in Halls), for Worth and Identity” based distributes free food 10 a.m. to hoping to goodness.

Herrell to speak at KFL

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on the book “The Search for Significance” by Robert McGee, led by Beth Arnurius. Cost is $20. Info: Diane Shelby, 687-3687, or Beth Arnurius, 584-8352.

1 p.m. the third Saturday of the month. Info: 566-1265. ■ New Hope Baptist Church

A caring collective By Cindy Taylor Substance abuse in Union County has been at the top of everyone’s radar for the past two years. Many organizations in the city and county have lent their services, and individuals have volunteered their time to get the word out and draw support for program implementation. Enter iCARe Coalition Union County. ICARe is the Initiative for Community and Adolescent Resilience engaging Union County. This group has spent two years in building a foundation of love and caring for teens that is based on trust and understanding. Their ultimate goal is to develop a strategy for combating the underage and binge drinking problem in Union County. Implemented by chair Eddie Graham, coordinator Lanelle Mulkey and counselor Greg Schmid in 2010 through a $50,000 Developing Coalition state grant, iCARe Union County Coalition is affiliated with Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws (EUDL). Susan Dillingham has worked with Union County at the state level and was instrumental in writing the grant. “Our first goal was to let people know that there is a problem,” said Graham who is the coordinator for school health for the Union

Eddie Graham, Lanelle Mulkey and Greg Schmid of iCARe Union County Photo by C. Taylor County school system. “Our numbers have come through a survey we did at the high school on binge and underage drinking.” Much from that survey will startle people, especially parents who think they know their children. Among Union County High School students, more than 60 percent claimed to have used alcohol. Right at 40 percent said they had used alcohol in the past 30 days. More than 31 percent said they had participated in binge drinking in the two weeks prior to the survey, and 27 percent claimed they had actually been drunk or high while in class during school hours. Surprisingly, 80 percent felt it was unlikely they would be caught by law enforcement while drinking

or using drugs. More than 70 percent have best friends who use alcohol, and more than 65 percent said alcohol is easily available to them in Union County. Almost 90 percent of the students feel they have no connection or bond with the adults in their home. More than 72 percent are close to or know an adult who they have seen drunk in the past year. More than 44 percent perceive little risk or harm from alcohol use, and more than 33 percent perceive little harm or risk in binge drinking. More than 15 percent feel they have their parents’ approval to use alcohol, and more than 20 percent have no clear-cut rules in their families about alcohol use.

These are frightening distributes food from its food numbers. pantry to local families in need While many agencies at6-8 p.m. every third Thursday. Info: 688-5330. tempt to change those involved in drug and alcohol abuse, ICARe operates on the Fundraisers hope that change will follow and sales as teens get to know those ■ Highways and By-Ways involved in the coalition and Ministry will hold a fundraiser realize they are not being dinner and silent auction 5 to judged, but truly loved. 8:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3, at St. While it is important to John’s Lutheran Church, 544 Broadway in the fellowship reach teens to help them hall. All proceeds will be used kick habits of drug and alin the organization’s homecohol abuse, it is equally less ministry to help anyone important to help parents in need. Info: Penny Carson, understand the role they 973-0504. play in their children’s lives. Music services Union County coordi■ Hansard Chapel UMC, Highnator Lanelle Mulkey is a way 33 North at the Knox and mother and pastor’s wife Union County line will host a who became involved in benefit singing for the Holston iCARe because of her love Home for Children at 6 p.m. for teenagers. Sunday, Jan. 29. Special guests The New Union will perform. Mulkey is the only paid Info: 992-8363. member of the coalition and handles the day-to-day opRec programs erations. ■ Beaver Ridge UMC, 7753 Oak She has worked around Ridge Highway, will have a beand with teenagers much of ginner yoga class 6-7 p.m. Monher life and is familiar with days in the family life center. what they deal with between Cost is $10 per class or $40 for peer pressures and society five classes. Bring a mat, towel today. and water. Info: Dena Bower, Greg Schmid has been a 567-7615 or email denabower@ youth pastor and currently comcast.net. works for the YMCA in Halls. Schmid became involved with iCARe because of his background and history with alcohol abuse. He supervises a recovery program for teens who are alcoholics or drug addicts called Life Hurts, God Heals. He walks participants through an eight-step plan to recovery.

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Youth programs ■ First Lutheran School, 1207 N. Broadway, will hold an open house 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 2, for parents of children in grades pre-k through 8th. A special kindergarten roundup session will be held 7 to 7:30 p.m. The school features small classes and before and after school care programs. Tuition assistance is also available. Info: 524-0308.

Jan. 12, 1968 - Jan. 23, 2005

Every time the family gets together and it’s you we can not see, our hearts are filled with sadness, thinking how it used to be. To some you may be forgotten, to others a part of the past, to us who loved and lost you, your memories will always last. For the happiness you gave us, no one will ever know. It broke our hearts to lose you, but you did not go alone, for part of us went with you the day God called you home.

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A-8 • JANUARY 23, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

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HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 23, 2012 • A-9

News from Rural/Metro

CPR saves lives By Rob Webb CardiopulmonaryResuscitation, or CPR, can mean the difference between life and death for cardiac arrest patients. Webb But sadly, an alarming majority of Americans are afraid to administer CPR because they don’t know how. Cardiac arrests are more common than you think, and 80 percent of them occur at home. So the life you save with CPR could likely be someone you love. Effective bystander CPR provided immediately after a sudden cardiac arrest can

‘Steel Magnolias’ in rehearsal Truvy Jones (Mindy Barrett) works on Shelby Eatenton-Lacherie (Jessica Dugger) as M’Lynn Eatenton (Barbara Robertson) listens to Ouiser Boudreaux (Bonnie Pendleton) during last week’s rehearsal of the Powell Playhouse’s production of “Steel Magnolias.” The play will be presented Feb. 23-25 at the Jubilee Banquet Facility. The production will offer a “dinner and a play” format with dinner of chicken, two vegetables, salad, bread, a drink and cobbler. The “dinner and play” tickets are $25 per person.

Tickets for the play only are $10. Dinner will be 6 to 7:30 p.m. and the play will begin at 7:30. Tickets for the “dinner and play” must be purchased by Feb. 17 and will make great Valentine’s Day presents. There will be a matinee performance at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26. There will be no dinner served for the matinee and tickets are $5 for seniors and $10 for everyone else. Tickets may be purchased from Mona Napier at 947-7428 or 256-7428 or email monanapier@comcast. net. Photo by Greg Householder

double or triple a victim’s chance of survival and significantly reduce the chance of long-term disability from the incident. When someone experiences cardiac arrest, the heart stops pumping. The oxygen carried by blood is critical to vital body functions, so every second counts. In a cardiac emergency, the most important thing is to keep blood flowing. That is why Rural/Metro, the American Heart Association and other emergency service providers are encouraging everyone to learn Hands-Only CPR. It is an easy, effective way to keep oxygenated blood flowing until emergency personnel arrive. You can do Hands-Only CPR in three easy steps:

■ Imagine a line connecting the armpits of the victim. Place your hands one on top of the other in the center of that imaginary line. ■ Each push/compression should be hard; about two inches deep. ■ Push fast; around 100 compressions per minute. Imagine the beat of the Bee Gees song “Staying Alive.” You don’t have to be a trained professional to help save a life. Everyone can learn Hands-Only CPR – and everyone should. You never know when a little knowledge can save someone you love. Rural/Metro provides public and professional CPR training and Advanced Cardiac Life Support education through the American Heart Association. Info: Rural/Metro at 573-5779 or ruralmetrosouth.com.

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The Rule High Beach Sisters enjoyed their annual beach trip, saying, “What happens at the beach stays at the beach!” Enjoying the trip are Irene Walker, Barbara Sutton, Betty Shelton, Geraldine DePew, Christine Henderlight, Sandy Stansberry, Nancy Loveday, Judy Buchanan, Doris Majors, Sandy Hill, Sharon Christopher and Glenda “Poochie” Bedwell. Photo submitted

COMMUNITY CLUBS ■ Longstreet-Zollicoffer Camp #87 Sons of Confederate Veterans will host the Lee-Jackson Dinner on Saturday, Jan. 28, at The Foundry on the World’s Fair Site. Doors open at 6 p.m. with a buffet dinner served at 7. Tickets are $30 ($15 children 12 and under). Period dress or business attire is suggested. Nora Brooks will present the life story of T.J. “Stonewall” Jackson while in the persona of Anna Morrison Jackson (Jackson’s widow). Reservations are required and seating is limited. RSVP by Wednesday, Jan. 25. Mail payments to Lee-Jackson Dinner, SCV Camp #87, P.O. Box 943, Knoxville, TN 37901.

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■ The West Knox Toastmaster Club meets 6:30 p.m. each Thursday at Middlebrook Pike UMC, 7324 Middlebrook Pike. Now accepting new members. Info: Ken Roberts, 680-3443. ■ Best selling author Cyn Mobley will teach a workshop on writing query letters 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 28, at the Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave. Cost is $75. Class size is limited. Sponsored by the Knoxville Writers Guild. Info: www. knoxvillewritersguild.org. ■ Knoxville Writers Guild will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 2, at the Laurel Theater. Irish novelist and playwright Glenn Meade will discuss his book “The Second Messiah.” A $2 donation will be requested at the door. Info: www.knoxvillewritersguild. org.

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A-10 • JANUARY 23, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

It was a big day for the Halls High golf program as three more golfers signed to play at the college level next year. Will Wright, Andrew Hall and Cody Johnson will all attend Walters State. Photo by Ruth White Walters State because of the campus and the opportunity to learn, grow ing Walters State College Hall averaged under par the and advance to playing at a By Ruth White Walters State will gain and improving on his sport entire season and advanced four-year college. Will Wright played two three great golfers next year under the coaching skill of to the state tournament for as Halls High seniors Andrew Bill Gardner. His father, the first time in his career. years on the Halls Middle Hall, Cody Johnson and Will George Hall, attended Wal- He looks forward to the School golf team and four ters State in 1975 and played opportunity to play at the years for Halls High. Wright Wright head to Morristown. Hall is a four-year golfer baseball under Gardner, so next level and showcase his knows that by attending Walters State, he can improve for Halls and played for the Hall family is familiar talent on the green. Cody Johnson has played his game under the coaching three years on the Halls with the strong work ethic Middle School team. He is and leadership of Gardner. on the Halls golf team for of Gardner and the program looking forward to attendDuring his senior year, three years. He selected that thrives at the school.

Three Halls golfers ink with Walters State

Campus cleanup underway at Halls By Jake Mabe

Carter dances in London parade Halls High School student Morgan Carter was honored to dance in the New Year’s Day parade in London, England. The school’s dance team attended UDA camp this summer and Carter was selected as an All-American based on skill, spirit and dancing ability. She was one of 1,000 Americans representing the United States at the parade. While in London, she was able to visit Windsor Castle, Buckingham Palace, St. Paul’s Cathedral and Big Ben. Photo submitted

Halls High principal Mark Duff says his campus is overdue for a culture change. It’s time to literally take out the trash. Duff, who often picks up trash during his lunch Duff hour, is organizing a student campaign to keep the campus clean. “I feel that we need to change our culture and I be-

lieve this is the first step,” Duff said in a letter sent home to parents. “This is our home. This is Halls. I have to believe that we care more.” A trash pickup will be a service project for Senior Projects. Duff says he’s also going to enlist help from the Student Government Association and promote the effort through announcements, posters and other in-school initiatives. “It’s going to be a studentdriven format,” Duff says. “I’m going to be organizing it and assigning the (work)

days. Everybody will get their hands dirty.” He says the school is looking into obtaining trash receptacles which could be placed around the campus. “They would be a sign that we’re dead-set committed to this. But I believe firmly that this is the students’ home and the students ought to lead this.” Duff says he was pleased with the school’s academic performance during the first semester. Students performed highly on Algebra I and II End of Course tests (EOCs), outscoring the second-place school in the latter by 15 percentage points. The school also performed well in English I (87 percent, third best in the county) and

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SCHOOL NOTES Copper Ridge ■ Book Fair through Jan. 27; Book Fair family night Tuesday, Jan. 24.

Halls High ■ Winter Formal is Saturday, Jan. 28. Writing assessment for 11th grade students is Tuesday, Feb. 7. Parent/teacher conferences are 4-6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23. Call 922-7757 for an appointment.

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English II (79 percent, fourth best) and the U.S. history department saw 99 percent of its students score proficient or advanced on the state EOC. He says the school is “shouldering through” the new state-mandated Tennessee Educator Acceleration Model (TEAM) evaluations. “It’s a good rubric,” Duff says. “The things it wants us to do as teachers are good. It will make us better teachers. But the bottom line is it is time consuming and it does take away from me being the kind of principal I want to be. We should have some 4s and 5s (the highest scores possible) on the evaluations and our TVAS (value-added) scores are good.”

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HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 23, 2012 • A-11

Hawkins signs with Walters State Central High senior Bradley Hawkins will continue his golf career in the fall when he attends Walters State College in Morristown. Hawkins (seated) is pictured at his signing with CHS coach Tony Patterson; (back) dad Dan Hawkins and mom Becky Hawkins. Walters State coach Bill Gardner is thrilled to have Hawkins as part of his team because of his good work ethic on the course. Coach Patterson called Hawkins the hardest working player he’s coached. “Brad loves golf so much and that is one reason he will be so successful.� Hawkins looks forward to working and growing as a player under Gardner and being part of a great golf team. Photo by Ruth White

CENTRAL HIGH NOTES

Sterchi introduces first Royalty Club members Sterchi Elementary students Lauren Cox and Mikayla Maldonado were named the first Royalty Club members. The club is a birth-to-Sterchi program and is a free parent education, family support program designed to provide information, activities and encouragement to families and their children from infancy until

their child enters kindergarten. Pictured are: teacher and T-shirt designer Erin Lilly, Stacey Cox with daughter/club member Lauren Cox, club member Mikayla Maldonado, Mikayla’s mom Leslie Marmorstein and brother Elijah Marmorstein, and club registrar Cindie Carden. Photo Submitted

Moore joins 1000 point club Halls High junior Stetson Moore entered an elite club during the Halls/Karns basketball game last week as he scored his 1000th point. Moore and the Red Devils defeated Karns 71-65 in a game that went to the final buzzer and was filled with nail-biting excitement. Photo by Ruth White

■ The PTSO will be hosting a fashion show on 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16, in the school auditorium. The fashion show will immediately follow Parent Night which will begin at 5 p.m. Students from all grades will be participating in the fashion show and all styles and types of clothing will be presented. Cost is $10 and includes a bowl of chili, drink and dessert. Tickets are available in the school office or at the door the night of the show. Info: Lisa McKenzie, 806-9963. All proceeds will go to the Central High School PTSO. ■ Central High School and Marco’s Pizza are teaming up to help support the PTSO through Central Night at Marcos Pizza. Starting this Friday, Jan. 27, every Friday thereafter will be Central Night. On Fridays, simply mention Central High School when placing your order and 15% of the proceeds will be donated to the Central High School PTSO. Marco’s telephone number is 688-5888 Hours are Monday -Thursday, 11a.m. to 11 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to midnight and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

www.ShopperNewsNow.com

Carden reaches 1500 points for Halls Halls High senior Sydney Carden scored her 1500th point during the Halls/Karns game last week. Halls easily defeated the Karns girl’s team at home. Carden scored her 1000th point for Halls on Jan. 29, 2011, at Anderson County High School. Photo by Tim Gangloff

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A-12 • JANUARY 23, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

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January 23, 2012

HEALTH & LIFESTYLES NEWS FROM FORT SANDERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

It’s flu time in Tennessee E

very year more than 200,000 Americans are hospitalized from complications due to inuenza. Inuenza is a viral infection that often causes high fever, muscle aches, headaches, severe fatigue, cough and runny nose for several days, although symptoms may sometimes linger for weeks. In most cases, this viral illness does not cause serious long-term health concerns, but for people in high risk groups, the u can be dangerous. “If you’re very young, very old or have a weak immune system, inuenza can be life threatening,â€? explains Elizabeth Hull, M.D., Medical Director of the Fort Sanders Regional Emergency Department. Inuenza viruses are spread from an infected person to a noninfected person by coughing and sneezing, or by getting the virus on your hands and then touching your nose or mouth. “Use common sense to help prevent contracting or spreading u,â€? says Dr. Hull. “Hand washing, covering your mouth when you cough and limiting your contact with others is so important.â€? Dr. Hulls says if you experience u-like symptoms, STAY HOME. “If you think you have the u, don’t go to work, don’t

A simple way to keep the flu away Your best defense against the u is to get immunized. Depending on your age, you can do that in one of two ways: ■ With a u shot, given with a needle. This form of the vaccine contains killed virus and is approved for people over the age of 6 months. ■ With a nasal-spray vaccine. This form contains live, weakened u viruses that cannot cause the u. This form is approved for healthy, nonpregnant people ages 2 to 49 years, except those who have diabetes, heart problems or chronic respiratory disorders, such as asthma. A u vaccination is most important for children 6 to 59 months, adults ages 50 and older, anyone with a chronic disease, anyone who lives in a nursing home or other long-term care site, health care workers and people who are in frequent contact with the elderly or chronically ill. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says children 6 months to 8 years old who were never immunized or received only one dose of vaccine in the previous year should get two full doses of vaccine, one month apart. Doctors also advise u shots for women who plan to be pregnant during u season. Flu shots are OK for breast-feeding mothers, the CDC says.

Who should not be vaccinated ?

Some people should not be vaccinated without ďŹ rst consulting a physician. They include: â–  People who have a severe allergy to chicken eggs. â–  People who have had a severe reaction to an inuenza vaccination in the past. â–  People who developed Guillain-BarrĂŠ syndrome (GBS) within six weeks of getting an inuenza vaccine previously. â–  Children less than 6 months of age (inuenza vaccine is not approved for use in this age group). â–  People who have a moderate or severe illness with a fever should wait to get vaccinated until their symptoms lessen. If you have questions about whether you should get a u vaccine, consult your health care provider.

go to school, don’t go to the mall and spread the virus further.â€? The incubation period for inuenza is one to four days, with an average of two days. Adults typically are infectious from the day before symptoms begin through ďŹ ve days after the symptoms appear. Children can be infectious for seven or more days, and young children can spread the virus for up to six days before they show signs of illness. People whose immune systems are severely weakened can remain infectious for weeks or months. In most cases, mild u cases can be treated at home without emergency intervention. “Drinking lots of uids and controlling fever can help treat the symptoms and keep you from getting dehydrated,â€? says Dr. Hull. However, people who are more at risk of developing complications from inuenza, such as the elderly, the very young and those with respiratory or chronic health conditions, should consult with their physician if they contract the u. The severity of inuenza varies from year to year. Flu season can begin as early as October and usually peaks in the winter months. For more information about influenza, call 865-673-FORT (3678).

Wash the germs away! Hands should be washed often – more frequently than most adults and children do. Because bacteria and other germs cannot be seen with the naked eye, they can be anywhere. At home or work, wash your hands often – and properly: Use soap when your hands are visibly soiled. Moisten hands with clean, warm running water and then apply soap. Rub hands vigorously together for at least 20 seconds – the time it takes to sing “Happy Birthdayâ€? twice. Make sure to wash all surfaces well, including your wrists, palms, backs of hands and ďŹ ngers. Clean and remove the dirt from under your ďŹ ngernails. Under running water, rinse your hands thoroughly to remove all soap. Dry your

hands with an air-dryer or a clean paper towel. Turn off the faucet with a paper towel. If soap and water are not available, an alcohol-based hand sanitizer can be used to clean your hands. When

using this type of product: â–  Apply the gel to the palm of one hand. â–  Rub your hands together. â–  Rub the product over all surfaces of your hands and ďŹ ngers until they are dry.

When should I wash my hands? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hand washing is especially important: â–  Before preparing food â–  Before eating â–  After using the restroom â–  After blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing

â–  After touching anything that may carry bacteria (raw foods, garbage, wounds, diapers, and animal waste) â–  When someone around you is ill â–  When hands are dirty

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B-2 • JANUARY 23, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

Sharing love one stitch at a time Quilters at the Halls Senior Center spend much of their time together giving to others. In the past two years, the group (sometimes consisting of two people, other times close to a dozen) has made 568 quilts that have been donated to Children’s Hospital for the pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

Ruth White

This lively group of women get together at the center every Thursday morning at 10 and chat, share stories and get busy making beautiful quilts. “We take donations, learn new techniques and are just happy to see new people stop by,” said quilter Iro Novak. Quilter Diana StockPrescott entered the craft room at the center this past

Joan Bunch, Lynn Lethcoe and Pat Muncey pin batting to a quilt front and prepare the piece for quilting. Thursday morning full of energy and arms filled with quilts. She had made 18 quilts for the Extreme Makeover project in Knoxville and

12 others for various projects in the past week. Next week at the center, the craft class will feature making felt hearts that make

Lynn Lethcoe watches as Diana Stock-Prescott demonstrates machine quilting at the Halls Senior Center. Photos by Ruth White

perfect home accents or quick Valentine’s Day gifts. Students need to bring felt squares, embroidery thread, sorize the hearts. The class needle and buttons to acces- will meet at 1 p.m. Thursday,

HABIT animals go to school I have mentioned the benefits of the HABIT program (Human Animal Bond in Tennessee) several times in this column, but last week I got to experience it for myself. Canine huskey Katja and her owner Karen Levy were visiting Susan Cobb’s class at Farragut Intermediate School, as they do every week. It is a very relaxed activity for the students as they read to Katja and spend one-on-one time with her. Students were sitting at the back door of the room next to the window, reading to Katja as she lay at

the children benefit more from one-on-one time. Levy went on to say the interaction with a HABIT Sara animal helps the children Barrett gain self-confidence and can improve their ability to relate to others (both humans and animals). Animals in the program have passed both a meditheir feet. She would wel- cal and behavioral test and come a hug or scratch be- are paired with trained volhind the ear anytime it was unteers who are evaluated regularly. offered. The human-animal duo According to Levy, when a HABIT animal visits a of Katja and Levy have classroom it usually inter- been visiting Cobb’s room acts with the students as a for about four years. In adgroup. But this is a special dition to Katja, there are education classroom and six other HABIT dogs that

Critter Tales

HALLS SENIOR CENTER Events for the week of Jan. 23: ■ Monday, Jan. 23: 9:30 a.m., Scrapbooking; 10 a.m., Pinochle, Bridge, Hand & Foot, Texas Hold ’Em Poker; 1 p.m., Rook and Mah Jongg; 1 p.m., SAIL exercise; 2:15 p.m., Social Dance class. ■ Tuesday, Jan. 24: 10 a.m., Canasta; 11 a.m., Exercise; 12:30 p.m., Austin Hankins spends some time with HABIT dog Katja who vis- Mexican Train dominoes; 2 its Susan Cobb’s class at Farragut Intermediate School weekly. p.m., Movie Time featuring Photo by S. Barrett “Flicka.” ■ Wednesday, Jan. If you have a question or comment for also visit the school. Sara, call the west office at 218-9378 or 25: 10 a.m., Bingo; 10 a.m., Info: www.vet.utk.edu/ email her at barretts@shoppernewsnow. Hand & Foot; 12:30 p.m., com. habit/. Bridge; 1 p.m., Rook; 1 p.m., SAIL exercise; 2:15 p.m., Yoga. ■ Thursday, Jan. 26: 10 a.m., Line dance class; 10 a.m., Pinochle; 10 a.m., Quilting; 11 a.m., Exercise; 1 p.m., Art class; 1 p.m., Craft Class: Hearts; 1:30 Mission Statement: To improve the quality of life of all those God places in our path by building on our p.m., Dominoes. experiences of the past, pursuing our vision for the future ■ Friday, Jan. 27: and creating caring life-long relationships. 9:30 a.m., Pilates; 10 We’re Sold on Knoxville! a.m., Euchre; 12:30 p.m., Office is independently owned and operated. Laura Bailey Mexican Train dominoes; 1 p.m., SAIL exercise; 1 p.m., Western Movie. Info: 922-0416. For a complete calendar of weekly events, call the Halls Senior Center or visit www. knoxseniors.org/seniors. FTN CITY – Well kept CORRYTON – Breathtaking 15+ acres w/creek and House Mountain views. 2-car attached garage & heated 35x27 2-car garage w/ shed. Very peaceful setting. $294,900 (785529)

Join Gary Loe Saturdays at 9:30 a.m. on MyVLT for the LoeDown on the Big Orange TipOff Club, in support of Vols & Lady Vols Basketball.

FTN CITY – 3BR/2.5BA w/ bonus or 4th BR. Featuring 9' ceilings and hdwd on main, arched doorways, Corian countertops, lg kit w/ extra JennAir cooktop builtin island, central vac, oversized 2-car gar, fenced yard & covered porch. $229,900 (784017)

HALLS – 3BR/2BA rancher in cul-de-sac. LR w/gas FP, covered back deck, level yard, master suite w/2 walkin closets & whirlpool tub. Updates: Roof 2010 & water heater 2008. $149,900 (779359)

custom built 3BR/2.5BA w/ bonus rm or 4th BR. Featuring: Crown molding throughout, 9' ceilings on main & 14' ceiling in mstr BR. lg eat-in kit open to family rm, 2-car gar, sec sys, gas water heater 2 yrs old. Plenty of storage w/floored attic w/walk-up stairs and stand-up crawl space. Reduced to $ 284,900 (781492)

HEALTH NOTES ■ Alzheimer’s caregiver support group meets 6-7 p.m. each third Thursday at Elmcroft Assisted Living and Memory Care in Halls. Light refreshments. RSVP appreciated. Info: 925-2668. ■ Alzheimer’s support group meets 6:30 p.m. each first Thursday at Beaver Creek Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 7225 Old Clinton Pike. Info: 938-7245.

FTN CITY – 3BR/2BA remodeled. Plumb, Elect & more. 26x9.6 covered front porch, wood floors, brick FP w/custom built-ins, kit w/tile and track lighting, unfnshd bsmt & 1-car gar/wrkshop. $159,900 (775489)

N KNOX – Shadow flr plan, the largest in subdivision. This 2BR/2BA w/2-car gar features: 19x14 courtyard, eat-in kit, LR/DR combo, mstr suite w/walk-in closet & window seat. $129,900 (779135)

2322 W. Emory Rd. • 947-9000 Ad space donated by

Jan. 26. Call the center to preregister, 922-0416.

1-800-237-5669 • www.knoxvillerealty.com

■ “An Introduction to the Alexander Technique” will be taught 10 a.m. to noon Friday, Feb. 10, at Lawson McGhee Library. Info: Lilly Sutton, 3877600 or visit www.lillysutton. com. ■ Cancer survivor support groups, Monday evenings and Tuesday mornings and Tuesday evenings, at the Wellness Community, 2230 Sutherland Ave. Support groups for cancer caregivers, Monday evenings. Cancer family bereavement group is Thursday evenings. Info: 546-4661. ■ Grief support groups at Fort Sanders Sevier Hospital 6 p.m. the first Thursday of each month; 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the Covenant Home Care Knoxville office; and 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at the Covenant Home Care Oak Ridge office. Registration is required. Info or to register: 541-4500.


HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 23, 2012 • B-3

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WEST, KARNS 3 BR, 2 BA, cent. H&A, appls., $560/mo. 865938-1653 CAIRN TERRIERS (TOTO), CKC, diff. colors, $375-$450. Condo Rentals 76 865-216-5770 ***Web ID# 920980*** HALLS AREA 2-STORY CANE CORSO Puppies, TOWNHOUSE CKC, Belmonte & 2 large BR/1.5BA Roman, champ. bldln. kitchen appls incl'd, $1,000. 865-247-8474 W/D conn. No pets, ***Web ID# 922508*** $550/mo + $550 damage dep. 1-yr lease. DACHSHUNDS, 254-9552, 388-3232 Mini., CKC reg., IRRESISTIBLE 3 BR For Valentines! $350 & up. 865-309-3626. condo for rent, 2 1/2 baths, near UT, Dachshunds Mini, Reg., $900/mo. Mike 916M & F, diff. colors, 474-9218, 865-357-8281 S&W, LH/SH, $250***Web ID# 918036*** $450. 865-216-5770 ***Web ID# 920970*** NEW CONDO WEST KNOXVILLE GOLDEN DOODLES, 5825 Metropolitan Way CKC, wormed, 1st & 2 BR , 2 B A , 1 2 0 4 s f , 2nd shots. Color 2 car garage, $850/mo. golden. M $350; F 1 yr lease. NO PETS. $400. 931-349-6417 Gary 865-548-1010 ***Web ID# 922348*** Doyle 865-254-9552

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MIN PIN PUPS, CKC reg., red, tails & S-10 2003, V6, declawed. blk & tan, CHEVY 4.3, AT, AC, PS, PB, $250. 865-382-6119. new tires, 136K mi, ***Web ID# 921553*** $3,900. 865-689-8362 Pekingese Puppies AKC, Get your Val- 4 Wheel Drive 258 entine! M & F. $400 ea. S & W 423-626-0303 GMC SIERRA 1500 HD, 2006, SLT, black, crew ROTTWEILER Pups, cab, leather, tow full blooded, 8 wks., pkg, loaded, exc. S&W, $200 each. cond, must see, Call 865-357-9910. $16,300. 865-386-4314 ***Web ID# 921231***

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LAB PUPPIES WEST CONDO, 2 story, black & choc. CAMPERS WANTED 2BR, 2 full BA, W/D $200. We buy travel trailers, conn., walk in closet, 865-321-5275; 755-5755 5th Wheels, Motor appls., priv. patio. homes & Pop-Up Quiet, clean. $710/mo., Labradoodle Puppies. Campers. Will pay dep. req., 865-742-1882. No allergies or shedding. cash. 423-504-8036 WEST TOWN/CEDAR 8 wks, Shots UTD. $450. Sweetwater 423-337-0073 DUTCHMAN 26RLS, BLUFF, 3 BR, 3 Classic 2003, 29', big BA, loft rm & sun ***Web ID# 923566*** rm, 2 car gar., like MIN PIN puppies, 7 slide, slps 6, like new, $10,500. 606-269-2925 new cond $1295/mo wks., $250. Mom & ***Web ID# 923846*** Lease + dep. 865dad $200 ea. F Boxer 405-5908; 300-4591 avail. 865-356-0199

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HUSKY International Eagle FSBO: Beautiful 2006 SIBERIAN puppies, AKC reg., 2000, 430 Detroit, 3BR/2BA double-wide. shots & wormed. APU, about 300,000 Walk in closets, gas FP $200. 865-292-7605. mi on overhaul. w/logs installed. All $14,500. 865-310-3764 appls incl'd, + lots of lKENWORTH 2000 room, d-room furn, & Pet Services 144 w/525 Cummins front & back decks. engine, Great Machine. Home will have to be  $19,999 OBO. 865-719-2804 moved from property. PET GROOMING Asking $55,900 OBO. If Wait or drop off. Andersonville Pk, Halls interested call 712-7062. Sport Utility 261 925-3154  JEEP COMMANDER Trucking Opportunities 106 2010, 26k mi, asking Phone 865Free Pets 145 $19,200. 933-9676  MERCEDES ML500 CDL CLASS A truck 2002, 80K mi, great car driver. Immed opening. fax report, 2nd ownr, FT/PT. Call 9a-3p, M-F. ADOPT! $12,250. 865-566-7191 If you want to work, call Looking for a lost me at 992-1849. pet or a new one?  Imports 262 Visit YoungWilliams Animal HONDA ACCORD Center, the official General 109 2006, Champagne, shelter for the City 39k mi, exc. cond. of Knoxville & Knox #1 BEAUTY CO. AVON $12,900. 865-922-9013 County: 3201 DiReps Needed! Only MERCEDES 350E vision St. Knoxville. $10 to start! Call Marie 2008. Black, 4Matic. at 865-705-3949. knoxpets.org Black int. Excellent condition. 56,700 miles. $28,500. 865-588Part Time 123 FREE KITTENS: or- Asking ange, gray & black. 2391 or 865-368-3601. About 3 months old. If PART TIME nursery ^ interested call Jennifer worker position HALLS CHILDREN'S at 257-6708. available. St. Paul NISSAN LEAF 2011, CENTER now has UMC, 4014 Garden FREE all elec, assume openings for toddlers TO GOOD Dr. Child care exlease + dep. pd. 5 yrs old. We have exHOME: 2 ADORABLE perience and back865-924-9384 KITTENS, 11 weeks perienced, Christian, ground check reold. 1 female part Per- Toyota Camry 1998, 4 non-smoking staff who quired. For informasian, 1 b/w male. 705- dr, AT, AC, cruise, new tion, contact Ginny care for your child in a 3193 Mich./batt., exc mpg, small group. ReasonTurner at 742-4520. 122K mi, garaged, gray, able tuition includes 151 $3800. 865-982-5673 breakfast, lunch, Dogs 141 Farm Foods snacks and all program ZAVELS FAMILY Sports materials. Convenient 264 AMERICAN PIT FARMS 2012 CSA. location only 2 miles Bull Pups, beautiful Fresh local produce CORVETTE Z06 2002, from Wal-mart in Halls. markings, S&W, $75. assortment. Weekly silver/blk., 405 HP, Call 922-1516 for a perPOP. 614-634-5062. drop off. 10 wks. 1/2 59,700 mi. New rear sonal tour. ***Web ID# 922267*** bushel asst. $400, 20 tires, many extras wks. $600. Call Zack incl. Others avail. TINY TOTS Learning BOYKIN SPANIEL at 865-363-6202 or $21,500. 423-639-8263. PUPPIES. Born 1/6/12 Center, Corryton, now zzavels@comcast.net ***Web ID# 922373*** to proud BSS-reg'd enrolling all ages. All parents. 3 boys & 4 meals furnished, great girls, chocolate coats. Household Furn. 204 rates. Call 851-8379. Air Cond / Heating 301 Ready for pick-up 3/6/ 12. Tails have been Mattresses. Sealy, Cleaning 318 docked & dew claws Stearns & Foster, removed. First round Serta, Qn & King of shots will have been CHRISTIAN CLEANING administered. Cur- $399-$599. 865-947-2337 LADY SERVICE. Derently taking deposits, pendable, refs, Call pls call to discuss your 705-5943. specific questions/ Household Appliances 204a make a reservation for CLEANING BY TIFone of these beautiful FANY. Halls area, brown dogs! $450/ Weekly, references. males, $500/females. 925-2403 Call 865-661-7071.

Trucks

Real Estate Service 53

Homes

73 Manf’d Homes - Sale 85 Dogs

OFFICE SPACE, CEDAR BLUFF AREA Papermill Rd. near 3BR town home, 2BA, frplc, I-40, front parking, laundry rm, new carpet, 1 yr lease, will refurbish to $770 mo. $250 dep. suit. 2100 SF, 865-216-5736 or 694-8414. $1,800/mo. Warehouse space also NORTH KNOXVILLE avail. 865-938-4696 2BR, w/d conn, dw. Super-clean! No pets. flrs. $525/mo + Apts - Unfurnished 71 Hdwd dam dep, refs. 9227114 or 216-5732 3BR/2BA,1500 sq ft, no steps. 5 yrs old, 2-car gar, level yard. No Houses - Unfurnished 74 pets, no smoking. $985/mo. 567-4156 3BR, 2BA, 712 Liberty St., $750 mo. + dep. HALLS AREA 1/BR/1BA 1 year lease, stove, Kitchen w/appls, lg lfrig., DW, cent. rm/dining rm, lg yard. H&A, no pets, gar., Patio, private encall Sara, 633-9600. trance. Mature adults, no pets. Utils & cable 4 BR, 3 BA, 2 car incl'd. $650/mo + dep. gar., fenced yard, off 256-6100. Lovell Rd., Hardin Valley/Farragut Schls St. Mary's Area. 2 BR, Avail. Feb. 1. New carpet, C H/A, appls & paint/carpet. $1300/mo util. furn., $585 mo., judybriody@aol.com $250 dep. 423-504-2679 CLOSE TO UT, 5BR, 3BA, 3500 SF, $1495 mo. Apts - Furnished 72 GREAT W. Knox loc., 3BR w/bonus, 2 1/2 $1200. Both have WALBROOK STUDIOS BA, all appls. incl. W/D. 25 1-3 60 7 865-363-9190 $140 weekly. Discount ***Web ID# 923804*** avail. Util, TV, Ph, CORPORATE LEASE Stv, Refrig, Basic FOXDEN Cable. No Lse. Custom Built 08, 5400 sq. ft. 4 BR, 4.5 Baths Homes 40 Master BR & guest BR @ Main Level. Walk out Decks, Great for Entertaining. $4200/mo. Call Brackfield and Associates 691-8195

Pets

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Call 922-4136 to place your ad. Deadline is 3 p.m. THURSDAY for next Monday’s paper

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B-4 • JANUARY 23, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

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Life

A Shopper-News Special Section

Monday, January 23, 2012

Program offers hope for chronic conditions Improve your quality of life

Barbara Monty prepares materials for the upcoming â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living well with chronic conditionsâ&#x20AC;? workshop. Photo by Aaron Killian

By Aaron Killian

F

or those suffering with chronic health conditions, help is on the way. Starting this month, the Knoxville-Knox County Community Action Committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office on Aging will offer a program called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living well with chronic conditionsâ&#x20AC;? to improve the quality of life for those dealing with chronic health issues. Barbara Monty, director of the CAC Office on Aging, said she is excited to offer this program, which is designed for people with any kind of chronic illness from heart disease and diabetes to chronic pain and depression. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is an evidence-based program that was created by Stanford University in California and carefully researched to show that it does have a positive effect on people with chronic conditions,â&#x20AC;? Monty said. Monty added that Stanford University research has shown that those who successfully completed the program visited the emergency room, hospital, and doctors less after the program and reported that they felt better in general. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some of that is just feeling more in

control and able to cope,â&#x20AC;? Monty said. Although the Office on Aging primarily serves senior citizens, Monty said the program could be valuable to any adult with a chronic condition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We think this might be helpful for those

who are employed,â&#x20AC;? Monty said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for any age adults â&#x20AC;&#x201C; any adults and their caregivers. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very excited about this. A very high percentage of adults have a chronic condition, and a fairly large percentage of adults have more than one chronic condition diagnosed.â&#x20AC;?

Each workshop in the six-week series lasts two and a half hours, and session topics include managing pain and frustration, wise use of medications, how to communicate with physicians and family members about a condition, setting goals on how to better cope with a chronic condition, and much more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I first heard about it, I thought it was too good to be true,â&#x20AC;? Monty said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I have looked at the research, and I am convinced.â&#x20AC;? Monty said that training for the class was intense, requiring each prospective volunteer workshop leader to go through four days of coursework to become certified. The class is free, but registration is required. Materials for the class are being paid via a grant through the Office on Aging. The January session is full with the next session set to begin at 9 a.m. Saturday, March 17. Those interested in attending are encouraged to contact the Office on Aging at 524-2786. Monty plans to offer the workshop ten times per year, serving around 20 people per class. Monty added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We would love to have this program available to people as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting diagnosed with a new chronic condition so that they can avoid some of the same problems other people may have had to deal with for years without this program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really feel a commitment and obligation to make this available to as many people as possible.â&#x20AC;?

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entry-Griffey Funeral Chapel has been the premier North Knoxville Funeral Home since 1948. Whether you are in need of traditional funeral options or cremation, we can accommodate any need and any budget. We pride ourselves on providing high-level, professional service at a very economical value. We welcome the opportunity to talk with you about pre-arrangement, or to transfer your prearrangement from another funeral home. With a 64 year tradition for funeral and cremation services in the Knoxville, TN and surrounding areas, we are proud to serve your family and our community. We are here for you when you need us.

Please contact us with questions, for more information or to arrange a tour of our beautiful Fountain City funeral home. Gentry-Griffey Funeral Chapel and Cremation Services 5301 Fountain Road, Knoxville, TN 37918 (865) 689-4481 For a virtual tour of our facility and offerings, visit www.gentrygriffeyfuneralchapel.com.

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MY-2 â&#x20AC;˘ JANUARY 23, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ SHOPPER-NEWS

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Volunteering offers seniors many benefits By Aaron Killian â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your greatest gift is yourself,â&#x20AC;? says Becky Hare, the program manager for the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program through the Community Action Committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office on Aging. Hare works with more than 500 retirees and seniors, providing volunteer opportunities throughout Knoxville and Knox County. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our mission is to help seniors find a wonderful volunteer opportunity,â&#x20AC;? Hare said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know that a lot of services cannot be completed by nonprofits without additional efforts. One way to achieve this is through the service of seniors.â&#x20AC;? Hare said senior volunteers make a huge impact

Marcia Sweet (right) reviews linking verbs with Susan Johansen during the GED class at the Ross Learning Center. Photo by Aaron Killian

on the community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;More Mobile Meals are served. More adults receive GEDs. More trails get cleared at Ijams Na-

ture Center,â&#x20AC;? Hare said of the Retirement and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP). Marcia Sweet is an

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Winter...

RSVP volunteer that Hare placed with the Ross Learning Center through Pellissippi State Community College. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel like I can share some of the information in a novel way to help learning rather than preach,â&#x20AC;? Sweet said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do creative things in the work. I want to share and see success.â&#x20AC;? Sweet works with groups of students studying for the GED test at the Ross Learning Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I use the philosophy of learn by teaching. If I have a group, I teach one item to the group. When I have a student who gets it, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have that student teach it to the group.â&#x20AC;? Bob Dawson with the Kiwanis Club of Norwood said he gets more out of

volunteering than he puts into it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like to see smiles on peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faces, and you never know what kind of volunteer project youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to see come up next,â&#x20AC;? Dawson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel like it helps me. I just enjoy doing it.â&#x20AC;? Dawson said that his Kiwanis Club has helped in various capacities throughout the community, including bell-ringing for the Salvation Army, assisting with meals on wheels, providing books to local schools, and even painting windows at a local church. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we can help, then weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll just jump right in. Our club is full of volunteers,â&#x20AC;? Dawson said. Dawson said working with a club like the Ki-

wanis Club of Norwood helps him focus his volunteer efforts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can start doing something, and when I ask for volunteers, I always get what I need and more,â&#x20AC;? Dawson said. Hare offers advice to anyone interested in getting involved with volunteering, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Try it... Once you start volunteering, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be hooked. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lesson to all of us. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try it, how are you going to know?â&#x20AC;? For more information on the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program through the Community Action Committee Office on Aging call 524-2786, and to get involved with the Kiwanis Club of Norwood, visit www. norwoodkiwanis.com.

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04-Day TN Ladies Basketball vs. Ole Miss & MS State .......Feb. 16 ........... $ 435 04-Day Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SEC Basketball Tournament Nashville ....Mar. 02........... $ 495 06-Day Spring Dixie/Natchez/New Orleans/Biloxi ........Mar. 25 ........... $ 895 05-Day Washington, DC Cherry Blossoms ..................Mar. 31 ........... $ 795 06-Day SC Coast/Savannah & Georgiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Golden Isles ........Apr. 02 .......... $ 995 10-Day Texas Big Bend National Park ..........................Apr. 13 ........... $1495 03-Day Norfolk International Tattoo .............................Apr. 26........... $ 425 07-Day Holland Tulip Fesitval/Mackinac Island ..........May 09.......... $1075 09-Day Canadian Tulip Festival .....................................May 16 .......... $1350 16-Day National Park Extravaganza (7 US National Parks) ....May 19 .......... $2550 16-Day California/Yosemite National Park/San Francisco ......May 26 .......... $2250 07-Day Niagara FallsNew York City ...............................June 11............ $1225

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SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 23, 2012 • MY-3

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Baby boomers: Don’t forget to care for your eyes as you age The ba baby by b boo boomer oom oo me g mer generation eneration k up an estimated i d 76 6 million illi makes people - roughly one-fourth of the U.S. population. This means that either you or someone you love is part of this aging group. According to Eye on the Boomer, a recent survey by the Ocular Nutrition Society, almost as many baby boomers say they worry about losing their vision as those that say they worry about having heart disease or cancer. What’s more, 78 percent of those surveyed ranked vision as the most important of the five senses. Yet, more than half of the survey respondents ages 4565 said they don’t typically have a recommended annual eye exam, and even fewer are aware of important nutrients that can play a key role in eye health. Experts recommend that disease prevention, including lifestyle modification, attention to dietary intake and vitamin supplementation must become

primary vision a greater focus off p rimary i visio ion n care. S Studies that di iindicate di h proper nutrition promotes healthy eyes, however many American diets are found to be deficient of the critical nutrients that help protect eye health. “If people are at risk for heart disease they typically make lifestyle modifications,” says Dr. Jeffrey Anshel, president of the Ocular Nutrition Society. “This survey found that people are as concerned about their eyes but do not know the simple steps they can incorporate into their daily lives to take care of them.”

Vitamin supplements can be used for your eyes, too While people take a variety of different supplements to support their health, vitamins specifically formulated to help protect the eyes are often not in the mix - and for many people, they should be. While more than half of those sur-

veye y d are taking tak ta king supplements to o veyed h i joints, j i b h protect their bones or heart health, only 18 percent say they take supplements to support their eye health. “As we grow older, the need for certain vitamins and nutrients to support the eye increases - the survey revealed low awareness of these essential nutrients,” says Anshel of nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids, lutein and zeaxanthin. He adds that there is a “need for greater education on the lifestyle modifications that baby boomers can incorporate into their daily lives, including proper nutrition, to help safeguard eye health as they age.” To help protect eye health as they age, Anshel recommends people aged 45-65 take the following steps: ■ Stop smoking, exercise regularly and wear sunglasses with UV protection ■ Make an annual appoint-

ment with an eye doctor falls in the diet, consider a vi■ Eat foods rich in eye healthy tamin supplement specificallynutrients, such as tuna or salmon formulated for eye health for omega-3s and spinach, kale To learn more about the Eye on the Boomer survey as well as eye health, please visit and broccoli containing lutein ocularnutritionsociety.org. and zeaxanthin – ARA ■ To help overcome short-

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MY-4 â&#x20AC;˘ JANUARY 23, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ SHOPPER-NEWS

NEWS FROM PARKVIEW SENIOR LIVING

Parkview offers security and peace of mind By Aaron Killian Life is good at Parkview Senior Living Community, just ask any of their residents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expecting this type of facility when I started looking,â&#x20AC;? Jeneal Wood said. Wood had researched and visited several senior living facilities in Tennessee before settling on Parkview because of its amenities. She moved from her home in Tullahoma near Nashville to come to Parkview. Wood loves the on-site movie theater, library, free transportation, and pool table. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have an activity room with a schedule, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great,â&#x20AC;? Wood said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you want to participate, you can. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to.â&#x20AC;? With all of these amenities, Wood still has her priorities, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a beauty shop, and every Wednesday, I go at nine oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock for my beautiďŹ cation.â&#x20AC;? LaVonne Knight, a resident of three years, loves the companionship she ďŹ nds at Parkview. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have company your own age, which is the number one thing you have here,â&#x20AC;? Knight said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having other people around you your own age is important.â&#x20AC;? Life before Parkview was different for Knight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I lived alone in my house for two years after my husband died,â&#x20AC;? Knight

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was very lonely.â&#x20AC;? Today, Knight exercises daily with her friend Hope Davis, and the two enjoy the activities the facility offers them on a daily basis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You just sign up in the activity room,â&#x20AC;? Knight said. Knightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite activity is Mighty Musical Monday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We go to the Tennessee Theatre the ďŹ rst Monday of every month and get to enjoy a show,â&#x20AC;? Knight said. Dana Jeffers, nephew of Parkview resident Murl Phillips, has been pleased with how the staff of Parkview has treated his aunt, who has Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Disease. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She was to the point at 89 where she could no longer live alone, and I knew it was going to be very difďŹ cult to ďŹ nd someone who could live with her and take care of her,â&#x20AC;? Jeffers said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I started looking at facilities for her to live. I looked at several, and out of the facilities I looked at, I was so impressed by Parkview.â&#x20AC;? Not only did the facilities impress Jeffers, but the staff did as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone there has been so kind and courteous,â&#x20AC;? Jeffers said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was just like she was a member of the family. They treat her so kindly.â&#x20AC;? Jeffers said that the care his aunt receives puts his mind at ease, knowing

LaVonne Knight, Hope Davis, Liz Baker and Jeneal Wood enjoy breakfast together at Parkview Senior Living Community.

Bessie Keller reads a magazine while Jeneal Wood (center) talks to Dotty Kosier with Elite Beauty Services at Parkview Senior Living Community. Photos by Aaron Killian

she is in a secure facility with staff who care. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very pleased with the facility. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m there almost daily,â&#x20AC;? Jeffers said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s necessary that they provide the service theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing. They go above and beyond what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re called to do.â&#x20AC;? The facility offers two meals per day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; continental breakfast and chef prepared dinners with hot breakfast served once per week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The food is excellent,â&#x20AC;? Jeffers said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve eaten there myself many times, so I sing their praises.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I told my wife, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;If anything happens to you, the ďŹ rst thing Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do is move down there myself because it would be a great place to live.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

Parkview Senior Living Two locations: West Knoxville

675-7050 Fountain City

687-0033 www.pvseniorliving.com

All-inclusive services and amenities at Parkview include: â&#x2013;  Two meals per day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; continental breakfast and chef-prepared dinners â&#x2013;  Hot breakfast served once per week â&#x2013;  In-house movie theater, gym, library, walking trails, beauty salon services â&#x2013;  Seasonal special events each month â&#x2013;  Weekly lunch outings â&#x2013;  Private living and dining room areas for family events and parties â&#x2013;  Transportation services â&#x2013;  Weekly housekeeping and laundry services â&#x2013;  Dogs under 25 pounds welcomed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; scheduled doggy play days â&#x2013;  Internet availability â&#x2013;  Management/security staff on duty 24 hours per day

ZUMBATHON IS COMING!

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an exhilarating, effective, easy-to-follow, Latin      â&#x201E;˘ thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s moving millions of people toward joy and health. Everyone is invited to this community-wide event 



  

     

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SUNDAY, FEB. 19 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 P.M.

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25

day of the event

Childcare will be available: $5.00/child Parents are encouraged to bring their children to participate in the ZumbaÂŽ demos and drop them off for child care prior to the ZumbathonÂŽ.

Parking: Free (at Locust Street garage). The doors will open at 1:15 for demos for different types of ZumbaÂŽ. Example: ZumbaÂŽ, Zumba ToneÂŽ and ZumbatomicÂŽ.

(865) 777-9622 ymcaknoxville.org


Halls Fountain City Shopper-News 012312