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GOVERNMENT/POLITICS A4-5 | OUR COLUMNISTS A6-7 | YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS A9 | BUSINESS A11 | HEALTH & LIFESTYLES SECTION B

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halls / fountain city

VOL. 51, NO. 2

JANUARY 9, 2012

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Random Acts sets 10,000th delivery

The Battle of Black Oak Ridge Halls beats Central in boys hoops. See page A-9

Happy trails Saying so long to Shopper-News editor Larry Van Guilder See Jake Mabe’s story on page A-3

FEATURED COLUMNIST DR. BOB COLLIER

Standing out in a crowd Cranes find safe haven in Hiwassee See page A-6

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Susan Campbell, Robyn Townsend and board member Amanda Dill of Random floral gifts are then taken to individuals in hospitals, nursing homes and hosActs of Flowers deliver free bouquets to residents at Elmcroft last week. Flow- pice care centers. This week (Jan. 10) the group will make its 10,000th delivery ers and vases are donated from weddings, memorial services, florists, grocery to Physicians Regional Medical Center (formerly St. Mary’s). Photo by T. Edwards of stores, churches and special events to be rearranged into new bouquets. These TEPHOTOS.com

Great year planned for Halls B&P By Jake Mabe 2012 is shaping up to be a big year for the Halls B&P. Shopper-News general manager Shannon Carey, who is the B&P president for 2012, says the organization is gearing up to celebrate its 60th anniversary. “We’re inviting past presidents and past Halls men and women of the year to come to our meetings and be recognized,” Carey says. “If you know any, get them in touch with me (922-4136 or Shannon@ ShopperNew sNow.c om). Right now they are going to be recognized through-

out the year, but we are in the planning stages for an after hours event which will probably be held in the spring at which we’ll recognize these folks.” Carey says the B&P is looking for volunteers. “You don’t have to be on the board to serve on or chair a committee.” Committees include the annual prayer breakfast on Good Friday (which Kathy Duggan is chairing this year), as well as the Partners in Education event that takes breakfast to the faculty and staff at all Halls schools and Halls feeder

mas Parade, both of which are in December. “We had a great parade (Dec. 3) but we do need help to keep that going.” Other standing committees include the website committee (www.hallsbusiness. com), the programming committee and the membership committee. Carey says that in lieu of the old litter commitShopper-News general man- tee, Knox County Sheriff Jimager Shannon Carey is the my “J.J.” Jones has agreed to Halls B&P president for 2012. continue to mow the medians through Halls this year using Photo by S. Clark the inmate crews. A big goal this year is elementary schools in August, the Christmas ban- to continue to recruit new quet and the Halls Christ- members.

“We have a great time. I think when people hear ‘Halls B&P,’ they get the wrong idea. We are not a networking group. We are business leaders who care about the community. Networking happens in that context. Our main focus is to promote Halls businesses and help the community. “The money we raise goes straight back into the community when it’s needed. For example, when Second Harvest Food Bank flooded last year, we were able to give them a donation, which

sions are appealable to City Council, and then to Chancery Court. One basis for the challenge is the city’s denial of a permit at Highland Memorial Funeral Home in Bearden, which was leased by Rose Mortuary, owner of the former Mann Chapel in Bearden as well as its main funeral home on Broadway. Rose president Kent Marcum confirmed that the city nixed a request to relocate and renovate a small, singlebay existing crematory from a work area in the cemetery to Highland Memorial’s main building on Kingston Pike. “It was there when we got there, and we operated it for several years. The equipment got old and we looked into getting a permit to move it, but the city said it had to

be in an industrial zone,” Marcum said. “So we just shut it down.” A group of funeral directors then started East Tennessee Cremation Services in Blount County, Marcum said, and the cooperative arrangement works well. He said he would not consider adding a crematorium to the Broadway funeral home, which is surrounded by the revitalized Old North Knoxville and Fourth & Gill neighborhoods. “I’m not going to try and stick one in a neighborhood.” Community Awareness Network spokesperson Nan Scott said that she and others plan to attend this week’s MPC meeting and will present research they have done on the issue of locating crematoria.

To page A-3

TELL US!

news@ShopperNewsNow.com ads@ShopperNewsNow.com EDITOR Larry Van Guilder lvgknox@mindspring.com ADVERTISING SALES Patty Fecco fecco@ShopperNewsNow.com Brandi Davis davisb@ShopperNewsNow.com Shopper-News is a member of KNS Media Group, published weekly at 4509 Doris Circle, Knoxville, TN, and distributed to 27,825 homes in Halls, Gibbs and Fountain City.

try-Griffey Funeral Home, By Betty Bean Last August, Evergreen applied for a permit to build a Corporation, owner of Gen- new, on-site crematorium. A city building official approved the request as a permissible accessory use, and construction began in the fall. In October, GentryGriffey general manager Eric Botts visited Fountain City Town Hall to say the crematorium would be safe, odorless and wouldn’t cause traffic problems. He did not meet with a friendly reception. City Council member Nan Scott conducts the or- Nick Della Volpe objected to ganizational meeting of the the lack of public notice and Fountain City Community requested that the MetroAwareness Network. politan Planning Commis-

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sion study crematoria permitting regulations. That meeting is scheduled for 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 10, in the City County Building’s Small Assembly Room. The Fountain City Community Awareness Network, a group of homeowners and business owners who oppose the crematorium, filed an appeal of the Gentry-Griffey permit with the Knoxville Board of Zoning Appeals, alleging the permitting decision was arbitrary and capricious. The challenge will be heard at the BZA’s regular meeting at 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19, also in the Small Assembly Room. BZA deci-

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A-2 • JANUARY 9, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

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HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 9, 2012 • A-3

Happy trails, Larry The New Year is a time of new beginnings. Thus it is for us at the Shopper. Our longtime colleague Larry Van Guilder is leaving us. He’s taken a job as an accountant for Knox County Trustee John Duncan. He’ll be missed. Larry showed up on our doorstep back in 2005. He’d left the corporate world behind to chase his dream of becoming a writer. Some might think making a career change in your 50s is a bit akin to Don Quixote tilting windmills. But Larry

cessful community newspaper reporter must do. He soon graduated to the county government beat. Jake That went together like peas Mabe and carrots. He won a slew of awards and broke several scoops. When I got sick in May 2010, Larry stepped up to the editor’s desk and was a natural. After running his humor didn’t look back. But, more than all of this, columns for a few months, we quickly decided Larry we’ll miss Larry because he was an untapped resource. was that rare and wonderful He was soon hustling out in commodity: a true friend. Powell and Karns, going to Reporters are supposed to Friday night football games, be cynical and cruel. Larry doing all the things a suc- has a heart of gold.

Jake Mabe, Larry Van Guilder and Emily Schoen rehearse in October 2009. File photo

He and I early on discovered we share a passion for American history. We’d even had a couple of the same professors at UT despite our age difference. Oftentimes, our “news conferences” would eventually evolve into a book review or historical lecture. One day – I don’t even remember now how this happened – we also discovered that Larry has a sweet and soaring tenor voice. Sandra Clark recruited Larry, Emily Schoen and me to sing at a Halls Has It! Day in 2007. It worked out well enough that we did it again at the Fountain City Art Center’s Arta-palooza in October 2009. Somebody even slapped us with a name – The Word Herders. Get it? I’ve always hated the word goodbye, so I’ll use a French phrase instead, Larry. Au revoir. We’ll see you again. Meanwhile, things head onward and upward here at the Shopper. Sandra’s already got a ton of ideas for 2012. Ruth and I will still be out there swapping stories about your friends and neighbors. If you find yourself driving on Doris Circle one weekday afternoon, pop on by here. I’d love to sit a spell and say hello.

Halls Toy Drive

Great year planned for B&P From page A-1 also helped the food pantries in Halls and Corryton.” Carey says the monthly meetings, which are held at noon the third Tuesday of the month at Beaver Brook, always feature good, relevant speakers. “We have candidates for office and local officials. Sometimes it’s fun, sometimes it’s serious, but it’s all relevant. “And we have a really great board, representatives from Halls businesses, people you know, your

friends and neighbors, doing good stuff.” First vice president is Pam Jordan, second vice president is Bob Crye, secretary is Jerry Parkerson, treasurer is David Buckner and board members include: Marvin Hammond, Brandon Burton, Ted Hatfield, Ernie Joyner, Karen Hurley, Bobby Horner, Sue Walker and Sandy Cates. Yearly dues are $35. Carey is a 1995 Halls High graduate who earned a degree in writing/communications from Maryville College “What is Good About Our Educational System? What Next?”.

HALLS NOTES ■ Halls Business & Professional Association meets at noon each third Tuesday at Beaver Brook Country Club. Lunch is $10. Info: Shannon Carey, 922-4136 or Shannon@ ShopperNewsNow.com/.

FOUNTAIN CITY ■ Fontinalis Club will meet Thursday, Jan. 12, at Central Baptist Church of Fountain City, 5364 N. Broadway. The board of directors will meet at 9:30 a.m.; coffee at 10; club meeting at 10:30. Speaker Betty Sue Sparks will discuss

■ Fountain City Business and Professional Association meets at noon each second Wednesday at Central Baptist Church of Fountain City. Lunch is $10, first come, first served. The Jan. 11 speaker will be Marshall Wilkins, franchise owner of Chick-fil-A. Info: www. fountaincitybusiness.com/.

in 1999. She and her husband, Zachary, have a son, Daniel, who is 3. Carey has worked at the Shopper-News since 2005. She says one of the things that makes Halls special is the continuity. “I can’t remember when there wasn’t Bob Johnson Insurance, or Hunter’s Deli or Halls Cleaners or Mynatt’s Furniture. You don’t see that everywhere. You don’t get that continuity. But you have it here in Halls.”

Attention: Fulton Alumni The Fulton Alumni Association is gathering information for a directory. Deadline for submissions is Jan. 10. Info: Visit www. fultonfalcons.com or call Ray Abbas, 607-3074.

Harold’s Tours to host presentation Harold’s Tours will host a pot luck dinner 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14, at the Halls Senior Center on Crippen Road. Bring a covered dish and hear about tours planned for 2012.

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Tennessee Children’s Hospital, Cross Roads Presbyterian Church, Walgreens, Halls Senior Center, Halls Senior Center Quilters, Smith and Associates Heating/Cooling and Geothermal, Halls Cleaners, Halls Auto Parts, Anna’s Angels (on Sutherland Ave.), and students and staff at Halls Elementary, Middle and High schools. “Numerous individuals within this list gave unselfishly and in various ways. Also, several families in the

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community called asking to help by sponsoring children or families. This year 119 children received toys and 40 bikes were given, as were 12 boxes of coats and 130 food baskets. “In addition, 76 children came to sit on Santa’s lap and pick out a gift to wrap for their moms and dads at the Children’s Secret Santa. Thank you Martha Arnold Charnay for providing this special ‘shopping’ treat to the children in Halls!

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Jeanie Sager reports on this year’s Halls Toy Drive. “A huge thank you to everyone in the community who made it a Merry Christmas for those in need this year,” Sager writes. “Many businesses and organizations gave toys, time, money and in-kind donations. These include: Shopper-News, Halls Commercial Bank, Regal Entertainment, Salem Baptist Church, Halls Crossroads Women’s League, East

Kirby celebrates 104th birthday Evelyn Kirby celebrated her 104th birthday on Dec. 30 surrounded by friends and family. Kirby is a 1925 graduate of Central High School and was honored at the Tennessee Theatre during the school’s 100th anniversary celebration. Pictured with Kirby are her cousin Margie Maples and friend Dr. Jim Tumblin. Also in attendance at the party were Kirby’s cousin Loretta Burroughs, cousin Kathleen Frey and niece Doris Kirby Vineyard. Photo by Ruth White

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government

What you don’t know

can hurt you

Last week I had the privilege of speaking to a group of senior adults at Grace Lutheran Church. The audience members were attentive and inquisitive, and I thoroughly enjoyed the time I spent with them. Because my time with the Shopper-News is coming to a close, some wanted to know what would become of Mr. Answer Man, that pundit of all things political with a heart of gold lurking behind a barbed pen. Right now I can only say that while Mr. Answer Man will soon be gone from these pages, he will not be forgotten – especially by this writer, because he still owes me a sawbuck. (Mr. Answer Man should stop betting on the Tennessee Titans.) Had Mr. Answer Man been on the scene last week, there’s no doubt he would have been saddened by one thing that occurred. When asked how many knew their County Commission or City Council representatives, no more than a half dozen folks raised their hands. About the same number knew the commission or council district they lived in. Keep in mind these are mature, intelligent local residents, some of whom clearly expressed their dissatisfaction with government in general, particularly at the federal and state levels. But apparently most have forgotten the time honored maxim that all politics is local, and it doesn’t get any more local than the lawmaker in your backyard. “Lawmaker” is not a word to be casually dismissed. Month in and month out, the Knox County Commission, the Knoxville City Council and the Farragut Board of Mayor and Aldermen consider measures that in many cases become ordinances – new laws on the books. Every new law restricts individual freedom in some way, an aspect usually overlooked until one’s own behavior is circumscribed by the law. In fairness, outside of purely political club meetings, I’d guess that most audiences at social or church gatherings would probably respond about like the folks at Grace Lutheran if asked who represents them on their local legislative bodies. Most don’t know, and if you don’t know, your voice will probably go unheard when commissioners and council members deliberate. Other voices are coming through loud and clear, however. It’s a sure bet that attorneys representing special interests know which lawmakers to talk to, and the wishes of those interests don’t necessarily mesh with the common weal. You may not think much of your local government forking over millions in abated property taxes to help a developer build another strip mall, but that developer knows the telephone number and email address of every representative who’ll vote on the request. You may know nothing about it until the morning the first 100-year-old oak comes crashing down across the street from your home. Get to know your commissioner or your council representative. Check the county and city websites regularly (www.knoxcounty.org and www.ci.knoxville.tn.us) for the County Commission and City Council agendas. Be one of the “99 percent” whose voice is heard. What you don’t know can hurt you. Contact Larry Van Guilder at lvgknox@mindspring.com.

Check out updates on all your favorite articles throughout the week at

www.ShopperNewsNow.com

A-4 • JANUARY 9, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

Greenways advocates pin hopes on Rogero So what’s the deal with greenways? At the recent Greenways Coalition meeting, Knoxville’s two most prominent greenways supporters talked about the future. Both Donna Young and Will Skelton said they believe the new mayor will be more pro-active about greenways than was the last mayor. (Note, they meant Bill Haslam, not interim Mayor Daniel Brown.) A couple of weeks later, Skelton, the most influential citizen greenways activist since the days when Victor Ashe kick-started the movement by increasing the greenways stock from 3 miles to more than 30 miles, told a reporter that he is hopeful that Mayor Madeline Rogero will “… get the greenway program started again,” and predicted that this will happen. So what’s the deal? The city’s website says Knoxville has around 50 miles of paved greenways plus another 15 or so miles of unpaved trails in its inventory. So did Haslam, who is well known as a runner/biker, somehow drop the ball? Donna Young, who pushed the cause with nearmessianic zeal during her 16 years as city greenways

Betty Bean coordinator, is a recent retiree, but joins Skelton as a citizen advocate. She says she will be watching with great interest to see who her replacement will be. (Mayoral advisor Bill Lyons says Rogero will be moving on this appointment very soon). Here’s the deal with Haslam, from Young’s point of view. His greenways philosophy was too conservative because he wanted projects funded upfront. Toward the end of the Ashe adminisration, Young said the city was moving toward writing a requirement for 5 miles of greenway to be included in annual road contracts. “That was Victor’s initiative, and I just don’t think it was ever brought up again. I thought it was one of the most creative things ever, but it never happened. It would have changed the structure of how we did things. I’m always thinking if you’ve got a plan, somebody will be along to fund it,” she said. Preplanning is important, Young added. “The reason

Donna Young sells daffodils for Knox Green. File photo by S. Clark we got Papermill Bluff (the greenway that runs parallel to I-40, behind the Pilot corporate headquarters at Weisgarber Road) for free is because we had a plan. It was shovel-ready and eligible for that Obama stimulus money.” Young, like Rogero, has a background in planning. She thinks the new mayor’s views will more in line with her own than were Haslam’s. “You inspire somebody with a plan. If you don’t do the plan, you can’t get the

funding. Haslam preferred to have everything fully funded first. The difference going forward will be that Madeline will have a more visionary attitude,” she said. And what’s she hearing about her replacement? Not a thing, Young said, but she trusts Rogero to make a good choice: “The most important thing about the job is to find somebody who loves to do the work. Sixteen years is the longest I ever had a job.”

Republicans scramble for new House seats The upcoming Legislature will redraw state and congressional legislative districts. State Rep. Ryan Haynes, who is the new vice chair of the State and Local Government Committee and is close to House Speaker Beth Harwell, will play an active role in the design of districts both locally and statewide. Hayes is a comer within the Legislature. Farragut is fortunate to have him as their representative due to his energy and integrity. His own district will become smaller as all districts need to equivalent in population size. Knox County will have seven whole districts and will lose Jefferson County’s Frank Niceley as a state representative. The new House district without an incumbent will be located in northwest Knox County in the Solway and Karns area. That will trigger a free for all as numerous Republicans will see the primary winner prevailing in November. Rep. Joe Armstrong’s district will take on more people, including some of those Democrats now in

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the Harry Tindell district. Tindell’s district will then take on new precincts including Sequoyah, Deane Hill Recreation Center and Rocky Hill. The district will become decidedly Republican. Tindell is a knowledgeable lawmaker who is low key and almost invisible in Knoxville. He may retire if the district is lopsidedly Republican to avoid defeat in November. There is surely going to be a Republican primary there whether Tindell runs or not. Already being mentioned are County Commissioner Ed Shouse (who has sought the seat previously); former City Council members Rob Frost and Marilyn Roddy (Roddy and Frost are not close); Republican activist Ruthie Kuhlmann; former school board chair Dan Murphy; Vice Mayor Nick Pavlis (if the new district includes his South

Knoxville precinct); attorney Greg Hall; former city public affairs director Craig Griffith (chair of GOP committee at Deane Hill); Marsha Grieve (wife of Council member Duane Grieve); and Jim Bletner, Sequoyah Hills neighborhood leader who has run previously. County Commissioner Jeff Ownby is mentioned too as he is making opposition to closing Lakeshore Mental Health Institute his signature issue. Former Vice Mayor Joe Bailey told me he would not run. UT law student Alexander Waters (son of well known John and Beth Waters) is being urged to consider it but has declined to date. He is candidate for delegate in the Republican Presidential Primary for Jon Huntsman. Roddy has just come off a losing state Senate race and will need to make her next campaign a winning one to avoid being considered a perennial candidate. She was weak in her home precinct of Sequoyah in the state Senate contest. On election day, Roddy tied Becky Massey in Sequoyah 219 to 219.

■ Rob Frost is applying to be City Council attorney and would not run if he is chosen for that position. He was openly for Massey over Roddy and active for Marshall Stair for Council. Pavlis and Bailey were for Massey, too, in the recent GOP senate primary. Pay and duties for new council attorney have not been determined. ■ Chip Berry, campaign manager for Madeline Rogero, will work for her at city hall but uncertain in precisely what role. He has a very pleasant manner and makes friends easily. He comes from the nonprofit world. ■ Marshall Stair spent much of the Sunday (Dec. 18) after his swearing in delivering poinsettias to numerous supporters across the city. This trait of thanking key supporters will hold him in good stead in future endeavors. Knoxville florists are no doubt pleased as well. ■ The new Knoxville City Council meets for the second time at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 10.

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HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 9, 2012 • A-5

Run, Harry, run Next week, state Rep. Harry Tindell will announce whether or not he will run for re-election. He’s promised a decision by Jan. 19. We hope he runs.

Sandra Clark Tindell has represented District 13, a North Knox city district, since 1990. But this year he will face a radically different district and a small herd of opponents. Republicans control both House and Senate during redistricting. Democrats, beware. Tindell’s district has shed Democratic voters into Rep. Joe Armstrong’s 15th District, and the 13th is being stretched to the Sevier County line. It’s also gaining Sequoyah Hills, Deane Hill and Rocky Hill. Yikes! People with business in Nashville aren’t eager to see Tindell leave. Register of Deeds Sherry Witt says Knox County could not have a better legislator. “Harry sees the big picture and has learned to work with both parties. He just doesn’t have a partisan attitude. I’m 100 percent Republican, and I’ve always worked well with Harry. He’s strong in Nashville and that’s what we need.” County Mayor Tim Burchett, a fiscal conservative who served with Tindell in the House, agrees: “There’s one person I went to in the House who knew more about the budget than anybody else and that was Harry Tindell. He’s the go-to man on the House

Harry Tindell File photo by B. Bean side like Randy McNally on the Senate side. “Harry understands where the money comes from and where it’s going. He understands the importance of our bond rating and is very knowledgeable. He’s easygoing, and when everybody else was being emotional, he was always calm and level headed. He never got caught up in all the games, and he didn’t look for publicity. “You’ve got your show ponies and your workhorses, and Harry is a workhorse.” Former state Sen. Jamie Woodson, now president and CEO of the State Collaborative on Reforming Education, says she couldn’t have said it better. She also has some experience with redistricting. As a junior House member in 2002, she was forced to run for re-election in a district that got stretched all the way to White Pine. She prevailed and says Tindell would have a chance to do so as well. “Harry was a very thoughtful colleague and is respected on both sides of the aisle as a leader on many issues,” Woodson said. She recalls his work during the planning phases of the lottery scholarship program and says he was an

invaluable member of the team. “We had to build a program from the ground up, assuring that we protected the fiscal stability of the state while building in transparency. Harry was very engaged in constructing that balance between best business practices and the transparency that is needed in government. He is a very thoughtful legislator and his work with the budget and on the finance committee has been significant.” Tindell has a plan for deciding whether to run. He will look at how the new district has changed from the old and the political makeup of the new district. He will also assess “my ability to devote the necessary time and resources to a campaign in the new district. “Once we pass a plan, I will make a quick decision.” We hope he runs. His record of service is strong and voters always benefit from a choice. Knox County’s legislative delegation runs the gamut from thoughtful and wise to nuttier than a bowl of almond crunch. Tindell falls toward the Downtown Knoxville from “across the river” at the new Urban Wilderness Photo by Jack Rose smart side.

Legacy Parks sets 2012 goals By Sandra Clark Turn up your hearing aid to learn a new vocabulary in 2012. Words like: ■ Urban Wilderness ■ Battlefield Loop ■ Sawdust Trail Carol Evans, executive director of Legacy Parks Foundation, says her group has raised nearly $3 million in five years to acquire 300 acres of new park land and protect another 1,000 acres of forest and farms.

As 2011 wound down, the final parcels to complete the Civil War forts trail were acquired, through efforts of the Aslan Foundation. “All three forts are protected,” said Evans. Fort Dickerson already is a city park. Dickerson, along with Fort Higley, Fort Stanley and Fort Armstrong comprise the “Battlefield Loop,” where Legacy Parks hopes to help build 30 miles of trail on which to walk, hike and bicycle in South Knox-

ville, just across the Tennessee River from downtown. “What fun. You go for a hike and run into a Civil War fort,” said Evans. It’s important to have the historic parts of the Battlefield Loop interpreted. Signage is huge. “The Community Design Center has looked at the Loop and we know (a trail) is quite doable,” said Evans. “We don’t know whether it will be paved or sawdust.”

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A-6 • JANUARY 9, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

Standing out

Second crane from the left is the immature whooping crane. Photos by Bob Collier

in a crowd The black and white crane is the rare hooded crane from Asia.

NATURE NOTES | Dr. Bob Collier

A

year ago, my December column titled “Cranes for Supper?” addressed the plans by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency to create an open season on sandhill cranes in southeast Tennessee. On the brink of extinction, there were only 30 breeding pairs of the eastern population of sandhills left, back in the 1930s. Federal protection, wildlife refuges and wetland management led to a remarkable rebound in their numbers. They reproduce slowly, starting at ages 5-7, and have only one chick per year; only a percentage of those survive to adulthood. In spite of that, over the last five years we have averaged around 20,000 sandhill cranes wintering yearly down at the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge in Meigs County. Reflecting what a large majority of East Tennesseans thought, the Tennessee Ornithological Society had taken the position that “the fall arrival and overwintering of tens of thousands of sandhill cranes in Tennessee should be celebrated as a wildlife spectacle and a watchable wildlife opportunity.” In January of 2011, after extensive public input showing 72 percent of responses opposed to shooting the cranes to 28 percent in favor, the TWRA decided to delay the decision on the matter for two years, citing “insufficient data.” My column and other writers and opinions agreed that some areas of our country do indeed consider the cranes to be a wildlife spectacle, encourage and publicize watching the birds, and rake in millions

of tourist dollars in the process. I have a “Crane Watch” brochure from Kearny, Neb., with ads for motels, inns, restaurants and other opportunities for tourists to spend their money as they enjoy seeing the sky filled with as many as 500,000 sandhill cranes arriving along the Platte River in March and April. And another concern about shooting at the big majestic birds was that someone would mistakenly shoot one of the endangered whooping cranes that often fly along with the sandhills. After all, people and cows get shot every year, and they look a lot less like deer than the whoopers look like sandhills. Well, the thoughts of all those issues of last year came rushing back this last Monday, when we had the amazing good fortune to take part in a real, rare, wildlife event. Here is the story: On Dec. 3 a couple of knowledgeable women from the Crane Foundation stopped by the Hiwassee Refuge to admire the 10,000 sandhill cranes arriving for the winter. And among the crowd of huge, tall gray birds they spotted someone different. Hanging out with all the other cranes, this one was a bit shorter and had a slaty-gray body, black wings, tail and legs, and a striking white head and neck. The ladies called their headquarters in Wisconsin for backup, and the stranger was quickly confirmed to be a very rare bird from Asia, a hooded crane. Just like gossip in a neighborhood, the word swept through the birding community with the speed of an iPod, and peo-

There are more than 10,000 sandhill cranes at the refuge.

ple began showing up from all over the country to see the bird. We thought we’d give it a try on the way home from Christmas at our son’s home in north Alabama. Thanks to immobile traffic on I-26 south of Chattanooga, we didn’t arrive at Hiwassee Refuge till 4:15 the afternoon of the 26th. There stood 20 or 30 eager birders with scopes and cameras, including birder and author Stephen Lyn Bales from Ijams Nature Center, and birders from Maine, Oregon, Missouri and Florida. After a while, a bald eagle flew across the scene, stirring things up a bit. And as the hundreds of cranes settled down again, the lady from Missouri, eye glued to her scope, announced “there’s our bird!” Out it walked, a black-and-white figure in a crowd of gray. And we all stood and stared at a creature that had flown over the bogs of Siberia, standing in a field in Tennessee. It’s the kind of happening that birders love to sit back and recount for

months and years afterward. Hooded cranes nest in a remote area of Russia north of Mongolia, in a cool, wet, northern world of peat bogs and stunted larch trees. The species was first described in 1834, but because they breed in such a remote area, the first hooded crane nest wasn’t discovered until 1974, 140 years later! They are best known from their usual wintering grounds, where some 3,000 of them stay on the Japanese island of Kyushu, feeding in harvested grain fields and rice paddies. And how rare is our Hiwassee bird? It may be the first one of its kind ever recorded in North America. A hooded crane was seen 18 months ago in Idaho; another last spring in Nebraska; and now, here. If it’s the same bird, it’s the first. In the unlikely event that there are three different ones on tour, then it’s the third. Either way, very rare and very exciting, for the birders and for the crane refuge in East Tennessee. The hooded crane is here because

all those other cranes are here, safe to just hang out and do their thing. We saw an immature whooping crane hanging out at the refuge as well, hopefully to grow to adulthood and add one more chance for us to keep that species on the Earth. A wildlife spectacle, and watchable wildlife opportunity, indeed. And people have come from 27 states and Canada, so far, to share it, and maybe like what else they see here in East Tennessee. The 21st annual Crane Festival at the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge will be Jan. 14-15 this year, with headquarters at the Birchwood School. The Refuge is off Route 60, about 20 miles northwest of Cleveland, or about 10 miles south of Dayton, near the old Blythe Ferry. Their website is www.tncranefestival. org. If you’ve never seen several thousand of something hanging out together at one time, you should go on down and see how nature was really intended to look. You might see the rare crane.

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faith

HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 9, 2012 • A-7

Winter comes

time of year. The holiday celebrations are over (although I celebrate all 12 days of Christmas!), and our part of the world is cold. As long as the earth endures, ■ Longstreet-Zollicoffer It is easy to feel sad or deSeedtime and harvest, cold and heat, Camp #87 Sons of Confedpressed. But when it snows, erate Veterans will host the Summer and winter, day and night, there are joys to be found: Lee-Jackson Dinner Saturday, Shall not cease. fires to be tended, books to Jan. 28, at The Foundry on the (Genesis 8: 22 NRSV) be read, bread to be baked, World’s Fair Site. Doors open letters to be written. at 6 p.m. with a buffet dinner You who are born of the hills, served at 7. Tickets are $30 There are seasons of the ($15 children 12 and under). Hill-bred, lover of hills, heart as well. The turning of Period dress or business attire the year seems a good time Though the world may not treat you aright, is suggested. Nora Brooks will to take stock: to reassess Though your soul be aweary with ills: present the life story of T.J. where you are, and what This will you know above other men, “Stonewall” Jackson while in goals need to be adjusted; In the hills you will find your peace again. the persona of Anna Morrison to be honest with yourself Jackson (Jackson’s widow). (“The Hill-born,” Maxwell Burt) about what you need to Reservations are required and keep and what really has to seating is limited. Deadline to go (whether it be a grudge Like the Wise Men, I RSVP is Wednesday, Jan. 25. or a dream or a plan, or in went home a different way Mail payments to Lee-Jackson my case, a stack of papers); the other night. Dinner, SCV Camp #87, P.O. Cross to begin – instead of just Box 943, Knoxville, TN 37901. There is a particular Currents thinking about beginning – ■ The West Knox Toastmaster curve where I can see ahead Lynn whatever it is that you have on the road and gauge the Club meets 6:30 p.m. each Hutton been putting off. Thursday at Middlebrook traffic jam which may or Pike UMC, 7324 Middlebrook To be able to see the may not exist at the crossPike. Now accepting new beauty of winter is an act of roads. On this particular members. Info: Ken Roberts, night, I could see a line of kitchen table to look out a discernment. To take hold of 680-3443. red brake lights, and so I window, and there was what the opportunity of a new beturned onto a side road, appeared to be a haze, which ginning – a New Year – is an ■ The Scottish Society of Knoxville will celebrate the which takes me up onto the I realized was snow, flying act of courage. To find peace 253rd birthday of Scottish ridge. The view of the val- sideways. It didn’t last long, and contentment in the cold poet and lyricist Robert ley and the ridges off to the but my heart skipped a beat, and snow of winter is an act Burns on Saturday, Jan. 21, of faith. just as it did when I was in the west is always beautiful. at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. 6th grade and saw the fi rst Today is a gift from God. But on this night, winter Entertainment will include Enjoy it, use it, celebrate it, had settled in to my hills and snowflake of the season. bagpipes and local Celtic I consider myself fortu- live it. meadow. There was a red group Red Haired Mary. Bill sunset, and leaning against nate that I live in a place that And may your winter be Landry will serve as master it were trees wearing black is blessed with four seasons. cold and bracing; may your of ceremonies. Tickets are lace. A planet provided the I love each of them, in their house be warm and snug; $42 ($40 members). Payment necessary diamond sparkle, distinct dress. Call me fickle, may your hearth be bright must be received by Wednesand the whole world was but I think whatever season and blazing; may your family day, Jan. 18. Make checks payable to Scottish Society beautiful in her winter eve- is next is surely the most be well and happy; may your of Knoxville and mail them to delightful. Except autumn, heart be contented and lovning clothes. P.O. Box 50411, Knoxville, TN On a recent afternoon, I which is always my favorite. ing; and may your soul be at 37950. Info: Brenda, 691-3892 peace in the hands of God. This can be a difficult turned from my work at my

COMMUNITY CLUBS

or Ron, 947-3394.

Renfro to speak at KFL Carolyn Renfro will be the guest speaker for the Knoxville Fellowship Luncheon at noon Tuesday, Jan. 10. Carolyn Renfro The KFL is a group of Christian men and women who meet weekly at the Golden Corral in Powell.

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Powell Playhouse sets ‘Steel Magnolia’ cast By Greg Householder The Powell Playhouse has selected the cast for the group’s late February production of “Steel Magnolias.” Playing Truvy Jones will be Mindy Barrett; playing Annelle Dupuy-Desot will be Christine Perkins. M’Lynn Eatenton will be played by Barbara Robertson. Shelby Eatenton-Latcherie will be Katie Dake and Jessica Dugger. Clairee Belcher will be played by Renee Denney. Ouiser Boudreaux will be played by Bonny Pend-

leton with Phyllis Harnek as understudy. The play will be presented Feb. 23-25 at the Jubilee Banquet Facility. The production will offer a “dinner and a play” format with dinner of chicken, two vegetables, salad, bread, a drink and cobbler pie. The “dinner and play” tickets are $25 per person. Tickets for the play only are $10. Dinner will be from 6 to 7:30 p.m. with the play beginning at 7:30. Tickets for the “dinner and play” must be pur-

chased by Feb. 17 and will make great Valentine’s Day presents. Tickets may be purchased from Mona Napier at 947-7428, 256-7428 or monanapier@comcast.net/. There will be a matinee performance 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26. There will be no dinner served for the matinee and tickets are $5 for seniors and $10 for everyone else. A makeup performance has been scheduled for Feb. 27 should one of the nonmatinee performances be canceled because of weather.

■ Knoxville Writers Guild will sponsor a workshop taught by best selling author Cyn Mobley on writing query letters. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 28, at the Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave. Cost is $75. Class size is limited. Info: www.knoxvillewritersguild. org.

Community Services ■ Cross Roads Presbyterian hosts the Halls Welfare Ministry food pantry 6-8 p.m. each second Tuesday and 9-11 a.m. each fourth Saturday. ■ Dante Church of God will distribute Boxes of Blessings (food) 9 a.m. to noon or until boxes are gone Saturday, Jan. 14. Everyone is invited. You must be present to receive a box of food and only one box is allowed per household. Info: 689-4829. ■ Glenwood Baptist Church of Powell will host a Life Line Screening event Monday, Jan. 23. It will be sponsored by the University Medical Center. Preregistration is required. Info: Call 1-800-324-1851 or visit www.lifelinescreening. com/community-partners. ■ Knoxville Free Food Market, 4625 Mill Branch Lane (across from Tractor Supply in Halls), distributes free food 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the third Saturday of the month. Info: 566-1265. ■ New Hope Baptist Church distributes food from its food pantry to local families in need 6-8 p.m. every third Thursday. Info: 688-5330.

Music services ■ New Beverly Baptist Church, 3320 New Beverly Church Road, will host agospel singing 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15, featuring the New Calvary Echoes. There will be no charge. Love offering will be taken. The Rev. Eddie Sawyer, pastor. Info: 546-0001 or www.newbeverly.org.

Rec programs ■ Beaver Ridge UMC, 7753 Oak Ridge Highway, will have a beginner yoga class 6-7 Mondays upstairs in the family life center. Cost is $10 per class or $40 for five classes. Bring a mat, towel and water. Info: Dena Bower, 567-7615 or email denabower@comcast.net. ■ New Covenant Fellowship Church, 6828 Central Avenue Pike, will hold Pilates class 5:45 p.m. each Monday for $5. Info: 689-7001.

Senior programs ■ First Lutheran Church senior group 55 Alive, 1207 North Broadway, will meet noon Thursday, Jan. 12, in the meeting room to hear guest speaker and world traveler Marilyn Wing speak on “Around the World in a Bottle of Sand.” A hot lunch will be served for $6. Wing will bring 80 samples of sand from her travels, as well as a bottle of sand for each guest from “the world’s most beautiful beach.” Reservations required. Info: 524-0366.

Special services ■ Shepherd of the Hills Baptist Church now offers an Internet prayer line. Anytime you have a prayer or concern, call the line and leave a message. Someone will be praying about the request with you within 24 hours. Prayer line: 484-4066.

Workshops and classes ■ Fairview Baptist Church, 7424 Fairview Road off East Emory Road, hosts a Celebrate Recovery program 7-9 p.m. Thursdays. ■ New Hope Baptist Church, 7602 Bud Hawkins Road in Corryton, hosts Celebrate Recovery adult and youth classes 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 12-step class 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Info: 688-5330. ■ Dayspring Church, 901 Callahan Drive, Suite 109, will offer Divorce Care classes from 6:30 to 8 p.m. on Mondays. There is no charge for the 13-week program and child care will be provided. Info: 242-3995

Youth programs ■ First Lutheran School, 1207 North Broadway, will hold an open house 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 2, for parents of children in grades pre-k through 8th. A special kindergarten roundup session will be held 7 to 7:30 p.m. The school features small classes and before and after school care programs. Tuition assistance is also available. Info: 524-0308.

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Joe Jarret to speak to Heiskell seniors The Heiskell Community Center at 9420 Heiskell Road will hold its monthly seniors meeting from 10 a.m. to Jarret 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 12. The speaker will be Knox County Law Director Joe Jarret. The topic is “International Travel in the Post 9/11 World: Safety Tips for Seniors.” Lunch will be beef stew, cole slaw and cornbread. Bingo at 1 p.m. Seniors are asked to bring a dessert and a friend. Info: Janice White, 548-0326.

■ The Sierra Club/Harvey Broome Group will meet 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 10, at Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church, 2931 Kingston Pike. Guest speaker Lyn Bales will discuss the book “Ghost Birds.” Refreshments will be served.

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A-8 • JANUARY 9, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

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HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 9, 2012 • A-9

SCHOOL NOTES Copper Ridge ■ PTO meeting in the library 3 p.m. Monday, Jan. 9; Family movie night Friday, Jan. 13; Grandparents Day for kindergarten and 1st grade Friday, Jan. 20; Book Fair Jan. 20-27; Book Fair family night Tuesday, Jan. 24.

Nature’s Way ■ Open house will be held 4-6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19, for all families interested in applying to preschool through 8th grade. Info: 689-8976, email natureswaymontessori@comcast. net or visit www.natureswaymontessori.com.

SPORTS NOTES Gibbs students learn sign language

■ Rec Baseball Sign-ups: Halls Community Park spring rec league baseball, 4U-14U sign-up times are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. each Saturday in January; Saturday, Feb. 4, and Saturday, Feb. 11. Info: www.hcpark.org.

Students from the Tennessee School for the Deaf came to Gibbs language. Pictured are: Reiko Pearson, assistant director of Voices Elementary preschool classrooms to read stories and to sing a to Hands Karin Robertson, Katie Wilson, Erin Woolfork, director of few songs. The students also taught the students some basic sign Voices to Hands Deetra Moore and Ethan Swafford. Photo submitted

Ryley Kirby paints Callie Corum’s face during one of the booths at the Corryton Elementary carnival. Students of all grade levels worked on 10 essential math skills for two months and earned levels of different activities as they mastered the skills. The students were invited to a day of fun in the gym with games and prizes and snacks.

Halls wins Battle of Black Oak Ridge Central High’s Sabian Smith defends as Halls High’s Stetson Moore moves down court during basketball action last week. The Halls boys defeated Central 68-51 at Central. Prior to the boys game, the Halls girls defeated the Central girls 44-30. Photo by Ruth White

Corryton Elementary student Madeline Adkins tries her hand at a ring toss game during the school math carnival.

Halls swim team excels at meet The Halls High swim team competed at the first Ray Bussard Swim Meet with many swimmers finishing in the top 10. Team winners were Destinee Jones, Kyla Cox, Ashley Durham and Heather Morelock in the girls 200 medley relay and Holten Wyatt, Bo Bales, Quinn Smith and Will Duncan in the boys 200 medley relay. Winners in the women’s 400-yard freestyle relay included Ashley Durham, Madisen Campbell, Kyla Cox and Kara Seaman. The men’s 400-yard freestyle relay team of Ryan Lovvorn, Will Duncan, Brett Loveday and Quinn Smith took the top spot. Individual winners included: Ashley Durham, women’s 200-yard IM, 100-yard butterfly and 500yard freestyle; Quinn Smith, men’s 200-yard IM, 100-yard butterfly and 500-yard freestyle. Holten Wyatt finished in the top 10 in the 50-yard freestyle and the 100-yard backstroke. Team members Holten Wyatt, Ashley Durham and Quinn Smith qualified for state competition. The Halls Middle School swim team also attended the meet and brought home several first place honors. In the 200-yard medley relay, winners were Jessica Foster, Charli Boles, Christin McAllister and Lindsay Corum. Owen Sanders took first place in the 100-yard IM, 50-yard butterfly and 100-yard freestyle. Charli Boles brought home first in 50-yard breast stroke and the team of Ethan Sanders, Logan Smith, Will Hunse and Owen Sanders won the 200-yard freestyle relay.

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Carnival fun at Corryton Elementary Gibbs High School students Elizabeth Longmire, Caroline Longmire and Makena Maggard returned to Corryton Elementary to help out during the carnival in honor of students who passed 10 essential math skills. Photos by Ruth White

ABANDONED VEHICLES The owners and/or lienholders of the following vehicles are hereby notified of their rights to pay all charges and reclaim said vehicles being held at the storage facility below. Failure to reclaim these vehicles by Jan. 20 will be deemed a waiver of all rights, title and consent to dispose of said vehicles.

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A-10 • JANUARY 9, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

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HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 9, 2012 • A-11

Old Vol R.A. Dickey is different This correction in The New York Times offers two clues about what is an R.A. Dickey: “Extra Bases baseball notebook last Sunday misidentified, in some editions, the origin of the name Orcrist the Goblin Cleaver, which Mets pitcher R.A. Dickey gave one of his bats. “Orcrist was not, as Dickey had said, the name of the sword used by Bilbo Baggins in the Misty Mountains in “The Hobbit�; Orcrist was the sword used by the dwarf Thorin Oakenshield.� 1. What that tells us is the former scholar-athlete at the University of Tennessee honors his bats with exotic names. 2. Dickey got his mythology all tangled up. Everybody knows Bilbo Baggins’ sword was called Sting. Robert Alan Dickey, 37, born-again Christian, ex-Vol, English lit major, 3.52 grade

Marvin West

point average, husband, father of three, knuckleball pitcher, author, adventurer, “Star Wars� nerd, avid reader, budding cyclist and mountain-climber, is one versatile, quirky dude. And that is just the capsule description of this very talented, humorous and decent man. Even as we speak, Dickey is attempting to climb Mount Kilimanjaro to raise funds and awareness for two of his 17 favorite causes. Assuming he gets back alive, he will be inducted into the Tennessee baseball hall of fame and honored at the Thurman Munson

awards dinner in New York for baseball success and philanthropic works. Dickey does good deeds. He helps operate Honoring the Father Ministries which provides medical supplies, powdered milk and baseball equipment to the poor in Latin America. He visits schools and hospitals. Because Dickey understood the situation, the Mets picked him on 9/11/11 to present an American flag to a remarkable soldier who returned from war in Afghanistan. Before the baseball opener, Dickey’s memoirs, “Wherever I Wind Up,� are due out. The book supposedly has enough stuff to become a movie. R.A. Dickey on the mound has more fierce competitiveness than fastball. Maybe you have seen his intense expressions on TV. Off the mound, he is calm, peaceful, polite. Few in baseball are as articulate. None have clubhouse lockers loaded with heavier reading material. Dickey can also communicate in numbers. From his midseason 2010 call-up through the end of 2011, he pitched 383 innings with a 3.08 ERA. Roy Halladay,

Jered Weaver and Justin Verlander were better. C.C. Sabathia was not. There are other numbers: After long laboring at toonear-minimum pay, he has a guaranteed contract worth more than $4 million. His goal is to be baseball’s best bargain. OK, if you really must know, his career record is 41-50. Dickey, no relation to Doug, was great at Tennessee and won two games in the 1996 Olympics but missed the early money. Texas drafted him in the first round and agreed to $850,000 as a signing bonus. In the standard physical exam, the Rangers discovered his right elbow was missing the infamous Tommy John ligament. R.A. had no idea he had been born handicapped. He took a terrible pay cut – to $75,000. For most of thereafter, he wandered on the fringes. He is finally famous. And still refined. And even more interesting. The knuckleball fits his personality. Alas, he is not as funny quirky as he might be if left-handed. Marvin West invites reader reaction. His address is westwest6@netzero.com.

Marco Harris, student-athlete welfare coordinator for the UT men’s basketball team, grew up in an East St. Louis housing project with coach Cuonzo Martin. Harris says he owes his survival to his family and a teacher who served as a mentor. Photo by Wendy Smith

News from Office of Register Deeds

Commercial transfers fuel real estate market By Sherry Witt The calendar year of 2011 closed with a flurry of real estate activity in Knox County. For the month ending on Friday, Dec. 30, some 603 parcels changed hands, representing a property value of a whopping $249 million. That’s more than $100 million ahead of last December’s pace. The total also represents more than twice the value of the total property sold during November, when around Witt $105 million was transferred. While there was no appreciable increase in the number of residential properties sold, activity in the commercial sector was largely responsible for the surge. There was also a noticeable bump in the amount of money loaned against property. During December, real estate lending saw more than $433 million borrowed in Knox County. This number represented about $160 million more than the amount loaned during November. Leading the train of commercial deals was a transaction between Parkside Drive LLC and Hart TC 1-III LLC for property in the Turkey Creek complex. The sale brought more than $130 million. The largest mortgage transaction was for $94.5 million for financing the Turkey Creek sale. The second largest loan document recorded was for $38.3 million on the Proton Therapy Center. Initial analysis of the recording data from 2011 indicates that the year outpaced 2010 in terms of the total value of property sold. For the year 2011, the total value of property sold in the county was $1.87 billion, compared to $1.52 billion in 2010. Here’s hoping that we all enjoy a blessed, prosperous and happy New Year in 2012. Sherry Witt is Knox County Register of Deeds. Info: 215-2330 or sherry@ knoxrod.org/.

January is national mentoring month, and Knoxville Leadership Foundation will kick off its campaign to recruit 75 mentors in 75 days with “Breaking the Cycle,� 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19, at the Knoxville Museum of Art. Marco Harris will be the keynote speaker. The event is free and open to the public. Info: questions@klf.org or 524-2774.

From ‘the hole’ to the hardwood By Wendy Smith Marco Harris is the student-athlete welfare coordinator for the UT men’s basketball team. He checks attendance by showing up at players’ classes in a golf cart and has character-building meetings with the team every Sunday. He also teaches the players life skills, like how to tie a tie and balance a checkbook. He’s good at what he does because he’s passionate about helping kids. He knows how tough it is for young athletes to transition from high-school stardom to college and how important it is for them to be prepared for a life that most likely won’t include professional sports. “That ball will quit bouncing. After the fourth year, they’re out into the real world,� he says. He also knows what it’s like to navigate the road from an inner-city housing project to a successful career. Harris and his childhood friend coach Cuonzo Martin grew up together on the streets of East St. Louis, Ill. “I tell everybody I raised him, but he’d probably tell a different story,� he laughs. Without the love of his family, and the mentoring of a teacher, Harris thinks he might have ended up like most of his other friends – on drugs, in jail or dead. That’s why he’s willing to share his story to help recruit mentors for Amachi Knoxville, a Knoxville Leadership Foundation program that matches mentors with children whose

parents are in jail. Harris and Martin were raised in “the hole,� a nickname for the Norman E. Owens housing project. It was a neighborhood infested with gangs and drugs, yet Harris says he loves it, because it made him who he is today. He was the third child of a single mother, and, at one time, there were 13 family members sharing his threebedroom home. The neighborhood was like a village, he says, and if he did something wrong, he might get a spanking from Martin’s mom and another from his own mother when he got home. Like most of his peers, Harris eventually joined a gang. He made some mistakes, he says, but he didn’t want to let his family down, and that kept him out of serious trouble. He was also influenced by an art teacher, Homer Simmons, who took the time

to see the good in him. The teacher was one of only a few who were willing to tell Harris when he was wrong, in spite of the fact that he was a star on the Lincoln High School basketball team, which won three state titles in a row. Simmons also served as a role model for his students. “He had a house and a Benz, and he was doing everything legal.�

It took Harris years to fully realize Simmons’ impact on his life, but when he did, he gave his former teacher a call. “I’m very appreciative of what I have now,� he says. “If I could do it all again, I’d take the same path. I’ve learned to treat everybody the same and respect everybody.� Wendy Smith is Bearden community reporter for Shopper-News.

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A-12 • JANUARY 9, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

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January 9, 2012

HEALTH & LIFESTYLES NEWS FROM FORT SANDERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

Injured principal turns tragedy into triumph Knoxville elementary school principal Elisa Luna has launched a fundraising effort to support the Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center, where she is receiving outpatient therapy for a spinal cord injury. Luna was critically injured in a February 2010 shooting incident that left her wheelchair bound. She recently shared her amazing progress with local news media and invited the community to help others recover from similar traumatic injuries. “I want to give back to the Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center. They taught me to drive again and to push my body as far as I could,â€? explains Luna. “They gave me back my life and my independence.â€? Luna is working to raise funds for several pieces of high-tech equipment that could provide additional beneďŹ t to spinal cord injury patients, and others working to overcome debilitating conditions. The equipment being considered includes several new robotic and computerized devices designed to assist patients with movement patterns and facilitateneurologic recovery. SpeciďŹ cally, the equipment includes a robotic gait orthosis with treadmill, an arm exoskeleton orthosis with computerized real-time feedback and a lower extremity functional electrical stimulation device. Her

efforts are appreciated by those at the Center. “Elisa’s fundraising effort is an inspiring example of turning tragedy to triumph,â€? says Dr. Mary Dillon, director of Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center. “We appreciate her taking the initiative to lead this fundraising effort on our behalf.â€? Since the shooting, Luna has endured multiple surgeries and months of intense physical therapy. She says she was initially told she would never walk again, but, with the help of a Patricia Neal therapist, is now walking with leg braces. “I feel extremely fortunate to be where I am today, and I credit a lot of my recovery to the outstanding care delivered by Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center,â€? says Luna. “When I learned about specialized equipment that could beneďŹ t others facing struggles similar to mine, it seemed only natural to lead an initiative to bring that equipment to Patricia Neal.â€? Named for the late actress Patricia Neal, a Knoxville native and stroke survivor, the Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center is a 73-bed facility nationally recognized for its treatment of stroke, spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries, multiple trauma, orthopedics and other neurological conditions. Since its beginning in 1978, more than 30,000 inpatients have come to the Center to begin their recov-

Physical therapist Tricia Erpelding works with school principal Elisa Luna during a session at the Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center in Knoxville.

Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center director Dr. Mary Dillon joined shooting injury survivor Elisa Luna as she recently spoke with the media about her desire to raise funds to help other spinal cord patients.

ery. The Center treats approximately 1,000 patients annually. In addition, close to 100,000 people have received treatment in our 13

outpatient clinics located throughout East Tennessee. The Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center is a member of Covenant Health.

For more information about donating to the Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center, call 865-531-5210 or visit www.patneal.org.

BodyWorks schedule Corryton/Halls area: Corryton Community Center, 9331 Davis Drive â–  â–  â–  â– 

Mon/Wed., 8:45 to 9:45 a.m., Tone & Tighten Wed., 1:45 to 2:45 p.m., Yoga Tues/Thurs., 8:45 to 9:45 a.m., CardioMix Tues/Thurs., 10-11 a.m., Senior Cardio

Powell area: Sharon Baptist Church, off Pedigo Road

â–  Wed./Fri., 10:30 to 11:30 a.m., Baby on Board â–  Tues./Thurs., 9:30 to 10:30 a.m., Senior Cardio

Beaver Creek Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 7225 Old Clinton Pike

BodyWorks offers new classes, locations and “play toysâ€? will help ďŹ rm/ sculpt arms, legs, butts and guts. Partner Up – Join friends, siblings, or signiďŹ cant others – many exercises involve two people working together. Must be 12 or older.

Baby on Board – A class just for moms-to-be. Participants will walk and learn exercises that relieve aches/pains, increase stamina, and aid in delivery and beyond. Must have health care provider’s OK. Visit www.covenanthealth. com/bodyworks or call 865541-4500 for class schedule and convenient locations, or check out our newest locations.

West Knoxville Area: Ball Camp Baptist Church, 2412 Ball Camp Road

â–  Tues./Thurs., 6-7 p.m., CardioMix

Trinity United Methodist Church, 5613 Western Ave. â–  Tues./Thurs., 6-7 p.m., CardioMix

If your church or facility is interested in hosting a BodyWorks class, especially for after-work times, call 865-374-0457.

RESTORING ABILITIES. REBUILDING LIVES.          

   

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Ready to get ďŹ t in 2012? Covenant Health BodyWorks offers safe, effective and fun workouts for adults of all ages and ďŹ tness levels. Participate in any class, any time or location â&#x20AC;&#x201C; no sign-up fees or contracts. Classes include cardio, strength, toning and mind/body, plus these new options for 2012: Flex â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lack of ďŹ&#x201A;exibility causing discomfort? This class focuses on helpful stretching techniques. Tone & Tighten â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Exercises

â&#x2013;  Mon/Wed/Fri., 8:45 to 9:45 a.m., Cardio Mix â&#x2013;  Mon/Wed/Fri., 10-11 a.m., Senior Cardio â&#x2013;  Tues/Thurs., 8:45 to 9:45 a.m., Yoga


B-2 • JANUARY 9, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

Riley sits at her dad’s office with her favorite office supplies: a cardboard box and a paint stick. Photo by S. Barrett

Hiler awards employee with Scooby snacks When folks walk into the automotive branch of Sherwin-Williams on Lexington Drive, not only will the shop’s No. 1 customer service representative greet them at the door, but she’ll also sit and roll over after shaking hands with both paws. Riley is the Labradorbeagle mix of store manager Ryan Hiler. Upon entering the store, you immediately see Riley bounding out from the warehouse, ears flapping and tail wagging ready

Sara Barrett

Critter Tales to greet you. Hiler rescued Riley from the pound in Murfreesboro about four years ago after hurricanes hit the area and

10 a.m., Canasta; 11 a.m., Exercise; Noon, Potluck Luncheon; 12:30 p.m., Mexican Train dominoes; 2 Events for the week of p.m., Movie Time featuring “Seabiscuit”; 2 p.m., Jan. 9: Caregiver support. ■ Monday, Jan. 9: ■ Wednesday, Jan. 11: 9:30 a.m., Scrapbooking; 10 a.m., Pinochle & Bridge, 10 a.m., Bingo; 10 a.m., Hand & Foot; 12:30 p.m., Bridge; Hand & Foot, Texas Hold 1 p.m., Rook; 1 p.m., SAIL ’Em Poker; 1 p.m., Rook & exercise; 2:15 p.m., Yoga. Mah Jongg; 1 p.m., SAIL exercise; 2:15 p.m., Social ■ Thursday, Jan. 12: Dance class. 10 a.m., Line dance class; ■ Tuesday, Jan. 10: 10 a.m., Pinochle; 10 a.m.,

HALLS SENIOR CENTER

destroyed the home Riley was living in with her previous family. “They wouldn’t allow pets at her family’s new apartment, so they had to give her up,” he said. Hiler just happened to be looking for a dog and stopped by the shelter. The rest is history. When asked what the other employees think about her, assistant manager Eddie Hines said “We all buy her treats. Everybody has to buy her biscuits ’cause she goes through ’em.” Apparently, she helps keep everyone busy during any downtime they may have. Riley’s favorite toys are cardboard boxes and the wooden sticks used to mix paint. “She also cleans every freight truck that comes in,” said Hiler. “She carries pieces of wood out of the trailers from the wooden flats. We’re not talking about small pieces, either. Two-by-fours … you name it.” The next time you see what appears to be a bunch of tough guys running a paint shop, just think about Riley and her friends at Sherwin-Williams. After playing in the warehouse and getting her picture taken for the paper, Riley ran to the door. “Do you need to go potty?” said Hiler, just like any good dad would. If you have a question or comment for Sara, call her at 218-9378 or email her at barretts@shoppernewsnow.com.

Quilting; 11 a.m., Exercise; 1 p.m., Art class; 1 p.m., Hiking Club; 1:30 p.m., Dominoes. ■ Friday, Jan. 13: 9:30 a.m., Pilates; 10 a.m., Euchre; 12:30 p.m., Mexican Train dominoes; 1 p.m., SAIL exercise; 1 p.m., Western Movie. ■ Info: 922-0416. For a complete calendar of events, call the Halls Senior Center or visit www.knoxseniors. org/seniors.

We need homes to call our own!

Where is Lucy Lou? Grieving dog owner holds onto hope By Betty Bean Nine days before Christmas, Jesi Goodman was getting ready to head up to Scott County to visit her mother. She dropped off her Irish wolfhound, Lucy Lou, at a friend’s home in Karns. Irish wolfhounds are the world’s tallest breed, and Lucy is just too big to fit comfortably in the back seat of Jesi’s car. What happened next has been a waking nightmare for Jesi, who has been confined to a wheelchair since she broke her back in a horrific car accident that killed her 5-year-old daughter, Julian, in April 2010. Lucy, who stands taller than Jesi’s wheelchair and weighs around 120 pounds, has been her constant companion and bodyguard as she has struggled to learn to walk again. “Lucy is just too big to transport in my car, so I left her with a friend, and they didn’t follow my instructions not to open the door without her leash on. Somebody opened the door and she darted out. She was wearing an orange Tennessee collar with a tag and she is microchipped,” Goodman said. “Lucy is my baby and my best friend. Lucy, who turned 3 last week, is blonde with black tips on her fur, shy with

Lucy Lou Goodman Photo by Betty Bean

strangers but warms up to women more easily than men and would probably be quick to befriend a child. “She follows every move I make,” Jesi said. “But she was really closer to my daughter than she was to me. She was very protective. She looked for Julian for a long time before she accepted that she wasn’t coming back. … Last year was my first Christmas without Julian, and now this was my first Christmas without both of them. I’m hoping that somebody has her and will understand how important she is to me.” Jesi got Lucy from a Middle Tennessee breeder – one of only two wolfhound breeders in the state – when Lucy was 8 weeks old. “That’s one of the things that worries me – that probably most people won’t even know what kind of dog she

Open call for ‘Connections’ The Fountain City Art Center is currently accepting submissions for its upcoming themed exhibit “Connections” to be on display Friday, Feb. 24, through Friday, March 23. The way the artists interpret the theme will be considered during the judging process. The entry fee for nonFCAC members is $20 per entry ($10 for members) with a limit of two entries per person. If your work is 36 inches square, submit only one entry. Works that have been submitted previously for other

exhibits may not be entered. Submissions will be accepted 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, and judging will take place Wednesday, Feb. 22. An opening reception will be held for the exhibit 6:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24. Awards will be announced at 7 p.m. Prizes will include $125 for Best of Show, $100 for first place, $75 for second place, $50 for third place and $25 for honorable mention.

Central High exhibit Also coming up at the The staff at YoungWilliams would like you to meet 2-year-old female dilute calico cat Sandy.She has wonderful litter box habits and incredible beauty but she is missing a home. Sandy is available for adoption at the main center at 3210 Division St. The “new” center at Young-Williams Animal Village is at 6400 Kingston Pike.Both facilities are open noon to 6 p.m. daily. If you don’t have time to drop by and take a look, visit www. young-williams.org to see photos of all of the center’s adoptables and call 215-6599 for more information about each pet.

This is Nick, a 2-year-old male terrier mix.

We were all rescued from area kill shelters right before Christmas and are now ready for our new homes!

is,” Jesi said. The house from which Lucy escaped is behind the Weigel’s on Oak Ridge Highway in Karns. She was last seen crossing Oak Ridge Highway on Dec. 18. Jesi has distributed flyers, checked the animal shelter and contacted everybody she knows, but hasn’t had any news of Lucy in weeks. She knows that a dog Lucy’s size can cover a lot of ground, so it’s difficult to know where to look for her. But she keeps on hoping. “She’s the highlight of my day, and keeps me happy when I’m in a down mood. And besides that, she’s my guard dog. It’s been really hard without her.” Jesi is offering a $500 reward for Lucy’s return, no questions asked. Info: jesigoodman@yahoo.com or 423-539-1578. art center is Central High School’s second annual National Art Honor Society Exhibit that will kick off with a reception 6:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13. Art Honor Society members and their instructors will be designing and distributing their own invitations, hanging their own show, bringing the food for the reception and providing judges for the artwork. Art Center hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. most Saturdays. The center is closed on Sundays and Mondays. Info: 357-2787, e-mail fcartcenter@knology.net or come by the center at 213 Hotel Ave.

Phone books for zoo admission Now through the end of January, bring in any outdated phone book to the Knoxville Zoo for recycling and you will receive one free admission ticket with the purchase of another. Since admission to the Knoxville Zoo is already half-price for Penguin Discount Days, you can get two tickets for half the price of one. Info: www.knoxville-zoo.com.

HealthSource to host blood drive HealthSource Chiropractic and Progressive Rehab, 9219 Middlebrook Pike will host a Medic Regional blood drive 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24. Donors will be offered a 19-point complimentary health screening. Info: www. HealthSourceofKnoxville. com.

SENIOR NOTES Saturday, January 14, 9am-3pm

This is Holly, a 3-year-old female ShihTzu/ Maltese mix. This is Cole, a 3-year-old male Miniature Poodle.

966.6597

Small Breed Rescue of East TN Space donated by Shopper-News.

www.sbret.com contact: Karen 966-6597 or Tyrine at 426-3955 email: rescue@sbret.com

Children's Clothes & Accessories • Jewelry Natural Soaps • Home Decor Items and Much More! If you love quality, handmade goods, you'll love Kitts Market! For more info e-mail us at kittsmarket@yahoo.com Kittsmarket.com

Find us on Facebook

AT KITTS CAFE • 4620 GREENWAY DR.

AARP driver safety classes For registration info about these and all other AARP driver safety classes, call Barbara Manis, 922-5648. ■ Noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Jan. 18-19, John T. O’Connor Senior Center, 611 Winona St. ■ 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Jan. 19-20, Farragut town hall, 11408 Municipal Drive.


HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS • JANUARY 9, 2012 • B-3 Auto

Action Ads

Furniture Reall Estate

Jobs

Service Guide

Pets

Garage Sales

Appliances

Homes Hom

I Saw it in the Shopper-News Action Ads!

FIND THE BEST DEALS IN TOWN IN THE SHOPPER-NEWS ACTION ADS Call 922-4136 to place your ad. Deadline is 3 p.m. THURSDAY for next Monday’s paper

Special Notices

15 For Sale By Owner 40a Acreage- Tracts 46 Houses - Unfurnished 74 Dogs

DAV Chapter 24 has FSBO, OAK RIDGE, FREE RENTAL OF OWNER FINANCING. POWER OR MANUAL 5BR/4.5BA, 2-car gar. WHEEL CHAIRS Call 482-7878 or 207available for any area 2482 for appointment. disabled veteran. Also looking for donations NEWPORT. 3 BR, 2 BA, of used wheelchairs 2 story, approx 2 yrs (power only). Call 765old with 1568 +/- SF. 0510 for information. 361 Woodson Dr. Asking $114,900 & will finance Homes 40 owner w/$5,750 dwn. Bill 877-488-5060, ext 323 SELL YOUR HOUSE IN 9 DAYS Sale or Rent, Tellico 865-365-8888 Village, 2700 sf, 4 br, www.TNHouseRelief.com 3 1/2 ba w/bonus, 2 car gar, $260K. 4 1/2% FHA loan. For Sale By Owner 40a assumable 865-388-5476 ***Web ID# 900489*** 2BR/1BA ON 2 acres at 5720 Old Tazewell Pk. Basement, heat/air, Farms & Land 45 well water. $64,900. Call 992-8657. FSBO 3BR/2BA. 1500 sq ft North Knox close to town. $142,900. Call 235-7444. FSBO IN BLAINE 2BR/1BA with living room & kit. Sits on 1.43 acres. 933-1274 or 898-1311.

Homes

FSBO. $129,900 2 yr old house & 44 acres located at 1245 Snake Hollow Road, Sneedville. House has 3 BR & 2 BA, total of 1,056 SF. Owner will finance with $7,000 down. Call Bill at 877-488-5060 ext 323.

40 Homes

40

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MCMAHAN, JASON 905579MASTER Ad Size 2 x 6.5 4c N <ec>

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JUST LISTED! 3BR. Over 1800 SF. Beautiful real hdwd flrs in FR & all BRs. Huge detached garage, grt lot backing up to Adair Park. Vacant and ready to move into. $119,900

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REDUCED! 5BR dream home on level corner lot w/beautiful in-grnd pool. Hdwd flrs on main & stairs. Quartz tops, den w/FP, lrg master w/jacuzzi. Almost everything is new. Must see inside. $259,900

All brick 3BR/2BA, 1300 SF corner lot close to I-75 and Emory Rd. Lrg FR & DR, 2 W/I closets in master, lrg sunroom. Priced to move fast at $109,900.

Jason McMahan

257-1332 • 922-4400 lolton123@aol.com

141 Farmer’s Market 150 Sport Utility

MUST SELL! 10.45 2 BR, 1 1/2 BA, Norris AUSTRALIAN ACRES. Old Hwy 33 & Dam area, no pets, SHEPHERDS, Mossie Ln, Maynardcredit ck, $650 dep. beautiful AKC Aussie ville. Part cleared, part $650/mo. 1 yr. lse. pups, champ. bldlns. wooded. $28,500. Call 865-494-7401 $675. Avail. 2/29/2012. Wayne 407-401-6536. Call 423-716-3887. 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA home ***Web ID# 915389*** off John Sevier near BASSET HOUND UT/downtown, stove, Cemetery Lots 49 frig., & W/D hookups. PUPS $850/mo. + dep. No reg., $200. 4 CEMETERY LOTS, 865-679-1308 pets. Credit check. Highland South, 865-385-2860 Garden of Gospels, Chihuahua puppies, 8 prime loc., priv. ownr. 5 MINUTES TO UT wks, reg., vet ckd, $4800. 865-573-5047. HOSPITAL, spacious dewormed, $200 cash. 865-247-4964 5BR, 3BA home, 2 extra lg. bonus rms, all ***Web ID# 916690*** appl. incl. W/D. Quiet, DOBERMAN PINCHER wooded lot, $1,495. pups, M & F, CKC, Amanda 865-363-9190 $425. Black & tan. ***Web ID# 916370*** Real Estate Wanted 50 865-206-8464 CLAXTON-Powell, 3BR ***Web ID# 915672*** 2 BA, spacious, WE BUY HOUSES, Pinscher any reason, any con- convenient, 1st/L/DD Doberman puppies, Champ. AKC, No pets. 865-748-3644 dition. 865-548-8267 tails docked & dew www.ttrei.com EAST, Off Cherry St. claws, 8 wks, blacks & Will accept KCDC, blues $400. 424-2302br, W/D, cent 2492 Robbins, TN Real Estate Service 53 New h/a, $490/mo. Call ENGLISH BULLDOG 865-360-2586. Prevent Foreclosure Puppies AKC, Free Report / Free Help E. DANDRIDGE, 3/2, ready! M & F, S & 865-365-8888 log, 1260 sf, 2 car gar W, $1800. 865-654-0004 PreventForeclosureKnoxville.com + w/shop, priv lake ***Web ID# 916443*** access, $950/mth + $950/DD. 865-850-4614 GERMAN Shepherd Puppies AKC, $400. Commercial Prop-Sale 60 NORTH, 3315 Fontana, Vet chked, parents all appls. in kitchen. on site. 865-322-6251 2 STORY brick build2BR, LR, level, ***Web ID# 916350*** ing 30x60', AC/heat, fenced, carport. sprinkler system, in Shepherds, Nice! $695. 414-7616. German center of Oak Ridge high quality, strong Lg. parking lot. 865- POWELL, nice 3 BR, European bloodline. 483-6311, 865-483-5552 2 BA, 1280 SF, acre 865-622-1266 lot, cent H&A, appls GOLDEN DOODLE Office Space - Rent 65 $580/mo. 938-1653 Pups, CKC reg, Gentle WEST KNOX, 11240 parents. S & W. 423Yarnell Rd., 4 BR, 349-0634; 423-956-1631 1 BA, near Turkey Creek Shopping, GREAT PYRENEES Karns & Hardin Pups, AKC, 5 M, 2 F. Parents on farm. Valley Schools, fenced in back Ready in 3 wks. $400. yard, no pets, new 865-603-0103, 603-0451. ***Web ID# 915346*** carpet, Section 8 accepted. $750/mo. $500 security. 865- LABRADOR PUPPIES, black, AKC Reg. 816-3974, 865-567-7495 Shots UTD, ready. $250. 423-620-1372 ***Web ID# 916051***

Condo Rentals

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LABS, CHOC., AKC, 3 M, 1 F, shots, wormed, big boned, $450. 865385-7148

261 Childcare

316 Flooring

Imports

Buildings for Sale 191

262

DENNY'S FURNITURE REPAIR. Refinish, reglue, etc. 45 yrs exp! 922-6529 or 466-4221

GORILLA LADDER, Sears 10" table saw, Delta 10" mitre saw, TOYOTA Camry XLE 8' step ladder, Mil2009, V6, silver, 49K waukee sawsall, Black mi, loaded, ex cond. & Decker workmate, $17,900. 865-898-5022 Scotch spreader, turkey fryer. Misc. other tools, 865-671-1504. Domestic 265

338

Landscaping

LANDSCAPING MGMT Design, install, mulch, small tree/shrub work, weeding, bed renewal, debri clean-up. Free estimates, 25 yrs exp! Mark Lusby 679-9848

^

Say:

KIMBALL CONSOLE PIANO, solid oak, $1,000 (paid $3,295). 865-233-2563; 675-4148

333

Guttering

HAROLD'S GUTTER SERVICE. Will clean front & back $20 & up. Quality work, guaranteed. Call 288-0556.

Toyota Camry LE 2003, white w/camel int. Great car! 198k mi. $4995. 423-744-0646

Music Instruments 198

Lawn Care

I SAW IT

339

in the

Household Furn. 204 Mattresses. Sealy, Stearns & Foster, Serta, Qn & King $399-$599. 865-947-2337

Dodge Durango 2000, 90k mi, some hail damage. $3750/bo. 865-256-9471

Auctions

FORD MUSTANG GT 2010, Loaded! Hail damage. Less than 3K mi. $23,500. 865-805-7236.

217

^ WOOD PLUMBING Lic'd, $35 flat hourly rate. No svc chgs!  service  repair  water heaters  installations Call 360-0406 www.woodplumbing. yolasite.com

HAMMERHEAD AUCTIONS. Oscar Merc. Grand Prix 2001, low mi, new tires, Martin, auctioneer. gar. kept, extra clean, TAL #6117, TFL $3900. 865-689-3045 5517. Every Tuesday night, 6:30 p.m., Northside Community Center, behind Air Cond / Heating 301 Washburn School. First auction Jan. 10. Free $'s and door prizes. 865-497-3076.

Campers

Remodeling

235

CAMPERS WANTED We buy travel trailers, 5th Wheels, Motor homes & Pop-Up Campers. Will pay cash. 423-504-8036

HALLS AREA 2-STORY ROTTWEILER PUPPIES, AKC, 7 weeks, 3 TOWNHOUSE Males, 2 Females. 2 large BR/1.5BA $800. 606-524-0085 kitchen appls incl'd, W/D conn. No pets, Terriers $550/mo + $550 dam- SCOTTISH AKC, M&F, 7 wks, age dep. 1-yr lease. ^ shots, wormed $375. 254-9552, 388-3232 HALLS OFFICES 423-562-0723 Singles $350/mo. WEST CONDO, 2 story, ***Web ID# 916852*** Call Steve at 6792BR, 2 full BA, W/D 3903. HUSKY conn., walk in closet, SIBERIAN puppies, AKC reg., appls., priv. patio. shots & wormed. clean. $710/mo., Apts - Unfurnished 71 Quiet, $350. 865-292-7605. dep. req., 865-742-1882. YORKIE PUPPIES, 3BR/2BA,1500 sq ft, no reg., shots/wormed steps. 5 yrs old, 2-car Manf’d Homes - Sale 85 M $250, F $350. 865gar, level yard. No 382-7781, 865-933-5894 pets, no smoking. I BUY OLDER $985/mo. 567-4156 MOBILE HOMES. 1990 up, any size OK. SOUTH, 2 BR, 1 BA, 865-384-5643 1200SF, appls., priv. $675/mo+dep, no pets/ YORKIES, AKC, smoking. 865-577-6289 Manf’d Homes - Rent 86 3 months old, females, $500 & up. 865-548-3940 2 BR, 1 full BA, Norris Apts - Furnished 72 Dam area, no pets, Yorkshire Terriers cr. ck. $495 dep. puppies, AKC, F, 1 yr. lease. WALBROOK STUDIOS $495/mo. S/W, will be tiny. 865-494-7401 $450. 865-659-3848 25 1-3 60 7 ***Web ID# 915179*** $140 weekly. Discount avail. Util, TV, Ph, Customer Service 102 Stv, Refrig, Basic Pet Services 144 Cable. No Lse. TELEMARKETER  Work from our office. Duplexes 73 Draw + Commission. PET GROOMING Wait or drop off. Call (865) 659-8419 CEDAR BLUFF AREA Andersonville Pk, Halls Fax (865) 992-2090 925-3154 3BR town home, 2BA, frplc,  laundry rm, new carpet, 1 yr lease, $770 mo. $250 dep. Trucking Opportunities 106 865-216-5736 or 694-8414. Free Pets 145

DUAL SPORT-2008 HONDA CRF230L 4410 miles, great shape, runs like a champ. ^ Kept indoors. Good set of knobbies on Alterations/Sewing 303 now w/extra set of ALTERATIONS street tires. $2550.00 BY FAITH rburkhart7@gmail.com Men women, children. Custom-tailored Autos Wanted 253 clothes for ladies of all sizes plus kids! Faith Koker 938-1041 Cash For Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. Fast Free Pickup. 865-556- Attorney 306 8956; 865-363-0318

FARRAGUT/NEAR TURKEY  CREEK 2BR, 1BA, laundry rm, CDL CLASS A truck family neighborhood, 1 yr lease, driver. Immed opening. $680 mo. $250 dam. dep. FT/PT. Call 9a-3p, M-F. 865-216-5736 OR 694-8414 If you want to work, call me at 992-1849. Halls & Inskip Areas 2 BR, 1 BA, completely  renovated, new every thing. Start $600 mo. Dogs 141 Call 865-924-4336

TOYOTA TRUCK, 1986, 4 cyl, standard shift, NO RUST. $2,995. 865-828-6405

Seeding, aerating, trimming, etc. Minor mower repairs. Reasonable, great refs! 679-1161 

Antiques Classics 260

Paving

Homes

40

TIMBERLAKE DEVELOPMENT SOUTHLAND GMAC 651894MASTER Ad Size 3 x 8.5 4c N EOW Barry Emerton <ec> Affiliate Broker

693-6961 www.BarryEmerton.com

ALASKAN MALAMUTE PUPS, AKC, $300. Full breeding runts. 865-394-1600 ***Web ID# 916459***

General

ADOPT! Looking for a lost pet or a new one? Visit YoungWilliams Animal Center, the official shelter for the City of Knoxville & Knox County: 3201 Division St. Knoxville. knoxpets.org

109 General

348

Furniture Refinish. 331

LEXUS LS430 2006, 48K mi., extra clean, loaded, new tires, Silver, $26,900. Call 865-679-4721. ***Web ID# 915075***

STEEL BUILDINGS Save on 2011 closeouts!! Ltd avail, 20x30, 30x40, etc. Save $$$, buy now for spring. Discounted shipping. LEXUS SC 430 2003 conv. 99K mi., New Display savings also! tires, exc. cond. 866-352-0469 $15,900. 865-235-3336.

Shop Tools-Engines 194

330 Plumbing

CERAMIC TILE installation. Floors/ walls/ repairs. 32 yrs exp, exc work! John 9383328

JD 2320 2007 4WD ISUZU ASCENDER Tractor w/200 CX 2005, metallic blue, loader, 48 hrs., gar. 148k mi, leather, exc. kept. Incl. 48" bush car. $7495. 423-744-0646 hog & yard box. $14,000. 865-379-7716.

^ ^

Cleaning

DUTCHMAN 26RLS, Classic 2003, 29', big slide, slps 6, like new, $10,500. 606-269-2925 ***Web ID# 915829***

Motorcycles

Vans

238

256

HONDA ODYSSEY Touring 2006, gold, 98k mi, fully loaded, exc. cond. Asking $16,500. 865-789-5556 ***Web ID# 916866***

Trucks

ABC LAWN & SEALCOATING Comm/Res. Pine straw mulch, hedgetrimming, tree/ stump removal, gutters cleaned. 377-3819

318

GET STARTED ON SPRING CLEANING! Cleaning, window & carpet clng. Homes & offices! Lic'd ins'd & bonded. Est &           refs avail. Call 363-8207 BEELER'S LAWN or 809-8543. SERVICE Mowing, mulching, bed clean-up, aeration, over-seeding, trimming, fertilizNEED HOUSE CLEANing. Free est, reaING HELP? Call Mary. sonable! 925 -4595 Excellent refs. Affordable rates. 455-2174. 

Electrical VOL    

323

Shopper-News Action Ads

Elect ric

I ns tal l ati on Repair Maintenance Service Upgrades  Cab l e  P h on e L i n es S ma l l j o b s welco me. License d/Ins ured Ofc : 9 4 5 -3 05 4 Cell: 705-6357

922-4136

Licensed General Contractor Restoration, remodeling, additions, kitchens, bathrooms, decks, sunrooms, garages, etc. Residential & commercial, free estimates. 922-8804, Herman Love.

SPROLES DESIGN CONSTRUCTION *Repairs/additions *Garages/roofs/decks *Siding/paint/floors

938-4848 or 363-4848

Roofing / Siding

352

COOPER'S BUDGET LAWN CARE. Cheaper than the rest, but still the best. Aeration, mulching, mowing, trimming, fertilizing, overseeding, etc. Dependable, free estimates. 384-5039. 

FRED'S LAWN CARE

Excavating/Grading 326

257

351

CARPENTRY, VINYL windows, doors, siding, floor jacking & leveling, painting, plumbing, elec, bsmnt waterproofing, hvac repair, floor & attic insulation. 455-5042

345

CADILLAC COUPE DeVille 1972, exc. cond., gold w/brown inter. 865-622-0539

109 General

109

RESOURCE MFG/CLINTON 867704MASTER Ad Size 3 x 4 4c N class <ec>

^ ALL TYPES roofing, guaranteed to fix any leak. Special coating for metal roofs, slate, chimney repair. 455-5042

^

Tree Service

357

^

MPC M PC SSub-Division ub-Divisio of the Year! ffeaturing fe eat atur u in ingg

^

Cement / Concrete 315

Plumbing

348

WELDERS, ASSEMBLERS, MACHINE OPERATORS, QUALITY

Visit us e during Th f Parade O Homes CLUBHOUSE, LAKE & SWIMMING POOL AMENITIES: 20 acre Park, 8 acre Community Lake, Swimming Pool, Fishing Pier, Walking Trails, Tennis, Basketball, Playground, Picnic Shelters & Sidewalks.

Village at Timberlake

Starting in the $220s • Maintenance-Free Living • Open Floor Plan Design • Granite Kitchen Counters • Master on Main • Screen Porch, Stone Fireplace

Traditional Homes Starting in the $230s

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Starting in the $300s

Call Barry today! 607-3326 or BarryEmerton@BarryEmerton.com Search all listings @ BarryEmerton.com

OPEN HOUSE SAT & SUN 2-6 DIRECTIONS: I-75N to Emory Rd (Exit 112), (east) on Emory Rd - Go 3 miles; (L) Greenwell - Go 1 mile; (R) Crystal Point into Timberlake S/D; (R) Heron; (L) Harbor Cove; (R) Reflection Bay; (R) Shoregate Lane to model house on right.

Self-motivated, loyal & passionate? Looking for a long-term career path?

If so, Staffmark is looking for you! Now offering increased rates of pay to qualified candidates for the following 2nd shift positions: Inspection Machine Operating Expediting Warehouse

327

Firewood

329

FIREWOOD FOR SALE: oak, etc. $65/rick delivered, $55 if you pick up. Call 719-4762.

www.resourcemfg.com

have partnered together to hire exceptional people!

• Custom Stained Hardwoods on Main • Designer Kitchen – Granite Counters • Spa-like Master BA w/Tiled Shower • Elegant Trim & Millwork Package • Irrigation System & Sod

Fencing

^

UPRIGHT FENCING, all types, free estimates. Licensed & insured. When you want the job done right, call 689-1020.

Apply online at

Local manufacturers & Staffmark Custom Homes

^ Bobcat/Backhoe. Small dump truck. Small jobs welcome & appreciated! Call 688-4803 or 660-9645.

• High School Diploma or GED required • Drug Screen and Background check required • We offer Medical, Dental and Short Term Disability! • Pay up to $10/hr based on position • Paid holidays with hours met!

^

Domestic

265 Domestic

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MIKE DARDEN LICENSED PLUMBER 922-775 8

265 Domestic

265

^

RAY FORDXLT LLC4x4 16K miles, Extra c lean ............................. BREEDEN'S ’07 VARNER Ford Explorer 592090MASTER TREE Ad Size 3 x 4 SERVICE $25,930 4c N TFN Over 30 yrs. experience! <ec> ’05 Nissan Frontier King CAB 2wd 32K miles .................................................. Trimming, removal, stump grinding,

$18,630

brush chipper,

’05 SPECIALS Lincoln Navigator Ultimate, 4x4, Loaded,WEEK! 24K OF THE $33,150

'08 Ford Taurus X, SEL, leather, roof, quad, seats, loaded! R1188..........$18,900 miles.................. '10 Ford XLT, 12 passenger power , R1167 ..................$22,900 ’06 FordE-350 Escape 4x4, 15Kvan, milesall.................................................................. '10 Ford Mustang, convertible, leather, auto, winter savings!!!!, R1140 .....$21,900

$17,436

'11 Ford Fusion SE, auto, power seat, good miles , R1187 ...................$16,900 Price includes $399 dock fee. Plus tax, tag & title WAC. Dealer retains all rebates. Restrictions may apply. See dealer for details. Prices good through next week.

To apply, stop by our office: 9335 Kingston Pike, call 693-4047 or visit our website: www.staffmark.com

2026 N. Charles Seivers Blvd. • Clinton, TN 37716

Don’t let this opportunity pass you by! Come join a winning team! EOE

457-0704 or 1-800-579-4561

Dan Varner

www.rayvarner.com

Licensed & insured. Free estimates!

219-9505 KING TREE SERVICE • Full Service • Bucket Truck • Chipper • Climbers WINTER SPECIALS! 27 Years Experience Licensed • Insured

Call 454-7085

Save $$$! Ray Varner

aerial bucket truck.


B-4 • JANUARY 9, 2012 • HALLS/FOUNTAIN CITY SHOPPER-NEWS

Committed to Healthier Living in 2012? Tennova Health & Fitness Center’s Training for Life program can help you make the necessary changes to reach your personal wellness goals. Aaron Fields, the winner of the fall Training for Life

Aaron wasn’t the only one impressed by the results he

program, is a prime example of what participants can

showed after completing Training for Life. Aaron’s progress

accomplish when they commit themselves to a program

astounded his physician when he reviewed his lipid panel

like Training for Life. At 38, Aaron had been experiencing

and blood pressure results. Aaron was taking six pills every

constant chest pain and was prediabetic. His primary care

day, and his blood pressure was 140/90 before he started

physician referred him to a cardiologist. Both physicians

Training for Life. After completing the program, Aaron’s

warned Aaron that if he couldn’t lose between 30 and 40

blood pressure decreased to 96/60, and his physician was

pounds this year, his health could be in serious jeopardy.

able to take him off his blood pressure medication entirely.

Aaron tried to lose weight by taking diet pills and

Aaron also reported a decrease in his blood glucose,

participating in other exercise programs with little success,

triglycerides and liver enzymes.

and he was beginning to feel hopeless. He had nothing to lose—but weight—when his wife signed him up for Training for Life at Tennova Health & Fitness Center.

The next Training for Life session begins January 23, just in time to help you put your New Year’s resolution of a healthier lifestyle into action! Free informational sessions

Aaron nervously began Training for Life in November. To

are scheduled for Jan. 9 and 10 at noon and 6:00 p.m. Call

meet his weight loss goals, Aaron had to overcome his fear

Nicole at 859-7909 to RSVP for the information sessions or

of being heavy and being in the gym around fit people.

to sign up for the program. What are you WEIGHTING for?

Lori Meighan, Aaron’s trainer, encouraged him throughout the process and helped the program’s registered dietitian teach him how to make healthier food choices. Aaron cut his sodium intake in half and lost eight pounds during the same week. Along with the exercise and nutritional sessions included in the program, Aaron also credits a big part of his success to the program’s small group format. “Before, I was never able to motivate myself,” he said. “I had taken classes and walked out after 20 minutes. I could never break a sweat and didn’t know how to go about doing it myself.” As a result of his commitment to achieving his wellness goals, Aaron lost 39 pounds and more than 20 inches from his body measurements during the 12-week program. Aaron also reduced his body mass index, an important formula showing height-to-weight ratio, by almost 20 percent. “We spend so much money on diet pills and magazines,

TennovaHealthcare.com

and it doesn’t last,” Aaron said. “This really ingrains in your

865-859-7900

mind that you can do it. Training for Life has been over for a month, and I am still exercising. If I don’t exercise, I feel like

Located off Emory Road in Powell

I haven’t completed my day.”

Sanders Plumbing 922-917 5

$25 OFF

Any Plumbing Repair or Drain Service

Valid only with coupon. cou Not valid with other offers or prior service. Expires February 10, 2012

Sanders Plumbing “Like” us on

Proudly servicing Halls, Corryton, Fountain City, Powell and Knoxville for over 23 years strong! We’re better, faster, cleaner…we’re SANDERS PLUMBING!

922-9175 • www.sandersplumbingcompany.com

Safety or Comfort? Get Both with a Precision Tune-up, Professional Cleaning & Safety Inspection of your heating system. Your heating system should be professionally serviced every year. Gas leaks, dust build-up, and worn parts can present serious safety issues. Not to mention that a properly tuned system can be more efficient and provide safe, comfortable heat all winter long. Call us for safety and comfort.

(865)

693-1141

SAVE

$20.00!

15-Point Precision Tune-up, Professional Cleaning & Safety Inspection. Ensure safe, efficient operation of your heating system for only $79.95 at MK Russell & Abbott. Additional charge for additional heating systems. Offer expires January 31, 2012 Licensed Tennessee Contractor #55708


Halls Fountain City Shopper-News 010912