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IN THIS ISSUE

Spoleto

Came to Sequoyah Elementary School and reporter Sara Barrett was there to view the students’ artwork. See Sara’s pictures on page A-10

High style in The District Members of The District in Bearden teamed up to present a fabulous, unique fashion show during Knoxville Fashion Week on March 2 at Bennett Galleries.

See Shannon’s story on page A-11

‘Your Day’ Bearden-area church leaders developed workshops in nutrition and legal issues for Spanish-speakers, then presented them along with 17 dozen cupcakes at “Tu Dia” or Your Day.

See Sandra’s pictures on page A-2

A puzzlement Why did Joe Jarret resign as Knox County Law Director after losing the GOP primary to Bud Armstrong? Why did Armstrong turn down the opportunity to be appointed to the position, which would allow him to advise the committee that’s going to recommend changes to the county charter under which he will be operating?

See Bean’s story on page A-4

Index Coffee Break Wendy Smith Government/Politics Marvin West Jim Tumblin Faith Schools Business Health/Lifestyles

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10512 Lexington Dr., Ste. 500 37932 (865) 218-WEST (9378) news@ShopperNewsNow.com ads@ShopperNewsNow.com EDITOR Sandra Clark sclark426@aol.com ADVERTISING SALES Darlene Hacker hackerd@ShopperNewsNow.com Debbie Moss mossd@ShopperNewsNow.com Shopper-News is a member of KNS Media Group, published weekly at 10512 Lexington Drive, Suite 500, Knoxville, TN, and distributed to 24,267 homes in Bearden.

The lost gold of Bearden By Wendy Smith It’s a question that’s intrigued Howard Claiborne since he came across a handwritten history of Bearden. What really happened to Jim Miller’s gold? According to the three-page document, Irish immigrant James Miller came to Knox County from Virginia, where he was a trader. In the late 1700s, he purchased a 1,840-acre tract that ran along the river from Sequoyah Hills to Lyons Bend, and sprawled as far north as Kingston Pike. He was a bachelor,, and according to the brief history, he had a “keg” of gold hidden on his estate, and the he circumstances of his death were ere “mysterious.” Claiborne has hiss own theory. “I say he was murdered.” The written history camee to Claiborne from his aunt, Mild Mildred dred Claiborne, who was the last livl ing member of hiss father’s gen genneration. He had never heard d the story of the lost gold befo before ore his aunt showed him the docudocu ument a few yearss ago. She gott it from her aunt, Edith Johnson, who procured red it while researching the history of Bearden for a school hool project. Claiborne imagines agines i the th treasure was a tightly-held secret. “If you had a keg of gold,, oadcast it,” he h you wouldn’t broadcast ss, he wond ders says. Nonetheless, wonders if thugs learned of the stash and tortured Miller until he turned turneed it over.

There’s no way to know the location of Miller’s house, but the document describes the area’s earliest homes: “Each of these families named are the first settlers here, most of Irish or of Irish descent. They all built two-story log houses, with rock foundations and rock chimneys, large fireplaces where they kept their home warm with good old wood fires.” Claiborne, who is 87, can only remember two such log cabins in the Bearden area. One was near the intersection of Lyons y View Pike and North th hsho ore D rivve,, a nd d Northshore Drive, and the other was o nL onass Dri ivee. on Lonas Drive. While thee document document is is unun nsigned, he thinks th hink s hee kno hin ows who wh ho knows wrote it. Ba ann nnon n Go ore, w ho w as Bannon Gore, who was kno n as a known lo c a l

historian, was a lifelong member of Erin Presbyterian Church, where Claiborne now attends. He never knew Bannon, whose full name was Mary Bannon Reynolds Gore. She was born in 1876 and was the daughter of Maj. Robert Reynolds, who built Knollwood, the home that still stands at the top of Bearden Hill. Bannon would have been a likely source of historical information for Edith Johnson, he thinks. Bannon would have been acquainted with Beatrice Gray, who q a lso o attended atteendeed Erin Pre also Presbyterian. Gra ay wa ay as a relative relative of Ja Gray was James Miller, who ose property pr wa divided whose was am mong g his his heirs heirs after his h mysteamong rio ous demise, demise, and she owned a dem rious homee a crross Kingston Pike P home across from K nollwood until un u Knollwood her death in the 1950s. 119 She was Bearden’s Bearrd first postma as postmaster, says Claiborne, and Claibor rn of a greatt friend f his. He iis a walking encyclopedia a of local history histo ory himself. Because so m ma many of the area’ area’ss original settlers settle ers were Irish, it i was first called Erin, Er E a romantic name n for the Emerald Emerald Isle. The name had to b bee changed when the railroa railroad ad came

Howard Claiborne reads a written history of Bearden that tells the tale of an Irish immigrant who lost a keg of gold. Photo by Wendy Smith

through, along with the first post office, because it was already spoken for by a larger town in upper Middle Tennessee, he says. The area was called Crippen for a time before being named after Marcus DeLafayette Bearden (1830-1885), who served as Knoxville mayor and a Tennessee state legislator. Claiborne’s middle name may be Bearden (he’s named after Marcus’s grandson), but even he can only guess what happened to Bearden’s missing treasure. “That gold was never found.”

Retiring on a high note Little bit of history back in family fold

Principal Martha Hill to leave Sequoyah

By Suzanne Foree Neal

By Anne Hart It’s difficult to imagine anyone more enthusiastic about their life’s work than longtime Knox County educator Martha Hill. The dynamic Hill, who has been principal at Sequoyah Elementary for 13 years, spoke to West Knox Rotarians last week and announced her retirement from the Knox County school system at the same time. Sequoyah School will likely never be the same, and Hill will no doubt be missed throughout the system. “It has been a privilege to lead and to work with the parents, the children and the staff,” Hill said. “It is a truly wonderful school.” Hill is known for personally greeting her students (and their parents) by name every morning as the children are dropped off at school and sending them off in the same manner in the afternoon. She spends little time in her office and a lot of time visiting classrooms and working on projects that benefit the students and the school. “Leadership starts early,” Hill said, “and parents and educators make a huge difference.” She said she learned the importance of education at an early age from the example set by two grandfathers who served on the Campbell County school board. Hill said Sequoyah is extremely fortunate that it has been able to raise $800,000 for its founda-

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Martha Hill tion. “That will let us do things the school system can’t do, like add computers and other technology and additional personnel.” Under Hill’s direction, the school has consistently been recognized for its students’ high academic performance, and Hill was quick to thank the Rotarians for their program which annually donates a dictionary to every 3rd grader in a Knox County school. Hill is a native of Lafollette and noted that she grew up knowing Rotarian Sam Balloff, also a native of Lafollette, and his family. Her brother is Lansden Hill, owner of Lafollette’s Pyro Shows, which stages the fireworks for Knoxville’s annual Boomsday celebration and for major events worldwide. Hill was complimentary of Superintendent Dr. Jim McIntyre, calling him “a visionary and a phenomenal leader.”

Bill Johns likes going to estate sales but never imagined the priceless treasure he would find buried at the bottom of an old tool box bought for $20. An avid collector of old tools and outdoor equipment, Johns is on several email lists for estate sales. “Now they put pictures up online,” he says. “I saw the photos of the old hunting and fishing equipment and tools. I happened to be off and went, not knowing whose estate sale it was.” Seven Seas Estate Sales in Lenoir City conducted the sale that piqued Johns’ interest. Johns bought several tool boxes and some hunting and fishing gear. Once home, he stashed his new treasures in the garage. When most people were thinking about ringing in 2012, Johns was examining his finds. “I pulled out all the treasures and immediately toward the bottom of the box I recognized a dog tag of the World War II generation,” he recalls. “I’ve been around the military all my life. My father was in the military after WWII. I got on the Internet and did some simple research.” He found an obituary for

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Thomas Alexander Graves, the name on the dog tag. That’s when Johns discovered the extensive military career of the owner. “He was of the generation of my grandparents and my wife, Margaret’s, grandparents,” says Johns, 41. “We understand the battles of WWII very much. Mr. Graves was a decorated and very brave soldier.” Finding the dog tag “was a surprise; very honorable and likewise very chilling. You hardly ever see dog tags of this generation. They have already been passed to family.” Graves, born April 4, 1918, was a pharmacist mate 1st Class and participated in the Normandy Invasion at Utah Beach, the Pacific Theater and the liberation of the Philippines. He later worked for the Veterans Administration for 34 years. “He was a remarkable man,” Johns says, “and neighbors said he was also a master vegetable gardener.” With the help of Will Kidd of Seven Seas, Johns tracked down Graves’ grandson, Kenneth Graves of Nashville, and return the tag. Johns says the younger Graves was appreciative and a little puzzled as to why his grandfather left the dog tag in the tool box.

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A-2 • MARCH 19, 2012 • BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS

Rector to sign copies of new book Local author Joe Rector will sign copies of his new book, “No Right Field for My Son,” 5-7 p.m. Tuesday, March 27, at Double Dogs in Hardin Valley. His previous book is “Baseball Boys.”

Keep on doggin’ Spring weather brought a steady line of customers to Dave’s Dog House # 2, located at 7409 Middlebrook Pike across from Shannondale Health Care. Pictured are the Bampfields: Ava, 4; Jaxon, 7; and Rivers, 3, who live “up the road” and were heading to a picnic in the park with their ‘dogs.’ Top dog is David B. Forsythe, not pictured, who got his start peddling hot dogs in front of Lowe’s. Photo by S. Clark

Anna Garlington and Joyce Wyatt joke with the “Your Day” signs at the workshop for Hispanic women held at Christian Ministries, an outreach of Central Baptist Church Bearden. “We’ve been working on this since last May,” said Garlington. “It’s a way to bring the two communities together.” Workshops in Spanish included legal issues and nutrition.

COMMUNITY CLUBS ■ Knoxville Writers Group will meet 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, March 28, at Naples Italian Restaurant, 5500 Kingston Pike. Published author Grant E. Fetters will discuss “Struggles of Marking the First Book.” Allinclusive lunch is $12. RSVP by Monday, March 26, by calling 983-3740. ■ The West Knox Toastmaster Club meets 6:30 p.m. each Thursday at Middlebrook Pike UMC, 7324 Middlebrook Pike. Now accepting new members. Info: Ken Roberts, 680-3443.

REUNIONS ■ Annual Woodhill Reunion will be held at 6 p.m. Saturday, April 14, at Old Pleasant Gap Fellowship Hall. Bring a covered dish. Info: Phyllis Summers, 922-2884, or Betty Effler, 982-0174. ■ Gibbs High School Class of 1972 will hold its 40th Class Covered-Dish Reunion 5-9 p.m. Saturday, April 14, in the fellowship hall at Christ UMC, 7535 Maynardville Highway. Info: Linda Harrell Tunstall, 986-4565 or tunstalllinda@aol.com.

Photos by S. Clark

■ Halls High School Class of 1952 will hold its 60th reunion in conjunction with the yearly alumni banquet Saturday, April 28, at the Halls High School cafeteria. Info: Judson Palmer, 9227651 or 712-3099.

Tu Dia es maravilloso

Bass tournament The 19th Herman Gettelfinger Bass Tournament will be held Saturday, April 7, on Fort Loudoun Lake beginning at the Tellico Canal ramp. The ease off will be at safe light. Registration fee is $200 per boat (two-man team) and includes lunch. Back for this year’s tournament is the “Duck Hunt,” where 25 rubber ducks will be released into parts of the lake and prizes will be given to any participant who fi nds one of them. Grand prize is $10,000, and all proceeds will benefit the Helen Ross McNabb Center. Info: 329-9030.

Reggie McKinney brings a tray of cupcakes for the Tu Dia wrap up. In all, organizers brought 17 dozen cupcakes for the daylong event which reached almost 200 Hispanic women.

BEARDEN NOTES ■ Downtown Speakers Club meets 11:45 a.m. every Monday at TVA West Towers, 9th floor, room 225. Currently accepting new members. Info: Jerry Adams, 202-0304. ■ UT Toastmasters Club meets noon every Tuesday at the Knoxville Convention Center on Henley Street in room 218. Currently accepting new members. Info: Sara Martin, 603-4756. ■ West Knox Lions Club meets 7 p.m. each first and third Monday at Shoney’s on Lovell Road. ■ West Knoxville Kiwanis Club meets 5:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Shoney’s on Walker Springs Road.

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BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS • MARCH 19, 2012 • A-3

Juanita Davis-Braswell, Lynn Redmon and Barbara Rasmussen discuss concerns at the monthly Community Forum, which is held at 11:30 a.m. on second Tuesdays at the Bearden Branch library. Representatives from across the county share news from neighborhoods, and city and county government officials are typically in attendance. DavisBraswell and Rasmussen, who are Deane Hill Alliance members, brought up concerns about new development on Deane Hill Drive.

Campolo to speak at Second Pres Knoxville Jewish Day School student Sarah Perez, center, enjoys a new basketball pad installed by John Cass at the school’s playground. She is joined by Cass, Principal Jennifer Dancu, and classmate Jacob Hale. Photos by Wendy Smith

Smoothing the path for Sarah There are only 29 students in grades Kindergarten through 5th at the Knoxville Jewish Day School (KJDS) in Downtown West. Only four are in 5th grade, and one of those was having trouble getting to the playground until John Cass, a former “storm chaser,� heard her story.

Wendy Smith

Sarah Perez was in a car accident five days after summer vacation began last May. She was paralyzed, and doctors didn’t think she’d be able to breathe on her own. But after spending six weeks at Shriners Hospital in Chicago last summer, she is remarkably independent. She easily maneuvers her wheelchair and takes lessons at Center Stage Dance and Cheer. Cass, of CJP Construction, is a roofer who arrived in town after last spring’s storms. He’d already decided to put down roots in East Tennessee when he replaced KJDS principal Jennifer Dancu’s roof. They talked about Cass’s daughter, who is a teacher, and about Dan-

cu’s students. She told him about Sarah and her struggle to get to the playground, which is between the shopping center and Gleason Drive. Cass said he’d be willing to help out. When he visited the school, he asked Sarah if the trek to the playground scared her, and she said it did. The path was steep, and the wheelchair got stuck in the mulch. So he flattened it with a Bobcat, which worked well – until the first rain, which washed the path out. “I didn’t want to leave it like that,� says Cass. So he installed a concrete sidewalk at no charge. Then there was a new problem. “She got down there and couldn’t do anything.� There were swings, a jungle gym, and soccer goals at either end of a bumpy field, but not much for a child in a wheelchair. So Cass installed a basketball pad, with an adjustable basketball goal. But Cass saw another problem. He didn’t want to leave out the other students. So he graded a large, level soccer field which will be sodded in about two weeks. Sarah is amazed at Cass’s generosity. “I was so happy when I heard about it, and kind of shocked. It’s such a small school.� The staff calls Cass’s

contribution a “mitzvah,� which is Hebrew for an act of kindness. The term is unfamiliar to him. The school is like a second family for Sarah. Her parents considered putting her in school in Chicago to be near Shriners, but Dancu and Miriam Esther Wilhelm, head of KJDS, begged her parents to let her stay in the familiar setting. The new playground is one more way the KJDS family can support her. “The school doesn’t have a lot of money, so the fact that John came is a big help,� says Dancu. The school is also helping Sarah raise funds to attend Project Walk spinal cord injury recovery center in Atlanta. Staff and students have raised $5,600 of the $32,000 treatment price by selling jewelry and hosting a Zumbathon, and a team from KJDS, including Sarah, will participate in the Covenant Health Knoxville Marathon 5K. She’s faced many challenges this year, including a move to a more accessible house. But her positive attitude is obvious. “It’s all worth it because I have my life.� To donate to the Chabad Emergency Fund, care of Sarah Perez: 560-9922

By Wendy Smith Nationally-known speaker Tony Campolo will speak at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 14, and

at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. on Sunday, April 15, at Second Presbyterian Church, 2829 Kingston Pike. His topic will be the relationship between the Christian faith and the American political environment.

Campolo’s presentations are part of the church’s inaugural Lowell Giffen Lecture Series. Giffen, a former member, believed that Christians have the responsibility to stand up for the oppressed.

Young poets Student winners of the Nora Johnson Cantrell statewide youth poetry contest received awards recently at Ossoli Circle. The winners’ poems will compete in the GFWC Smoky Mountain District, and those winners will progress to the state level. Pictured are: (front) Anna Huff, Chloe Johnson, Parker Knott, Lauren Wise; (second row) Tori Schrubb; (third row) Shauna Neely, Emma Yambert, Ruthie Steele, Chloe Correll; (back) Liana Head, Aaron Waldrupe and Thomas Hyde. Not pictured are Helen Babb, Shanya Tate and Lalita Thompson. Photo submitted

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A-4 • MARCH 19, 2012 • BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS

Joe Jarret

It’s a puzzlement Armstrong won’t take job he just won Why did Joe Jarret resign as Knox County Law Director after losing the GOP primary to Bud Armstrong?

Betty Bean

Why did Armstrong turn down the opportunity to be appointed to the position, which would allow him to advise the committee that’s going to recommend changes to the county charter under which he will be operating? At first blush, Jarret looks like a sore loser who decided to show his opponent up for his lack of experience and credentials. (Armstrong got his law degree in 2008 from Nashville School of Law, a night school which isn’t American Bar Associationaccredited.) Make him look like the dog that chased the school bus and didn’t know what to do when he caught it. But Jarret says that’s not so, and Armstrong isn’t saying anything beyond what’s in his rather puzzling press release about needing time to wind his practice down and consulting the finest legal minds in East Tennessee to avoid the appearance of a conflict of interests. The whole thing would be hard to explain to anyone who’s not From Here, as we say, because explaining starts with the fact that Knox County is essentially a one-party operation and most local races are decided in the Republican primary, making the August general election nothing more than a legal formality. One of the worst byproducts of the system comes into play when an incumbent officeholder loses in the primary. Horror stories

abound about retaliation, absentee-management and malaise among the staff. Historically, interregnums breed mischief, and a lot can happen between March and September. Jarret, whose major political liability is that he’s not From Here, knows those difficulties first hand. He was hired on as chief deputy by former law director Bill Lockett, who resigned in 2010 after pleading guilty to felony theft for stealing more than $60,000 from his former law firm. Jarret did the law director’s job for an assistant’s pay for almost a year while Lockett twisted in the wind. After the resignation, County Commission appointed him to serve out the balance of Lockett’s term. When asked why he’d give up half a year’s salary, Jarrett had a ready answer: “I’ve done all I can do for this office and it’s time for me to move on. For me to sit here and draw a paycheck just because I can isn’t right,” Jarret said. “I just presumed (Armstrong) would be knocking my door down because of how important this (charter revision) is, and since he claimed to be an expert in the charter and in Tennessee law, I thought he’d be anxious to do this.” Jarret recalled that Armstrong regularly told audiences at campaign events that he had put his practice on hold to knock on doors, making the claim that he’s too busy “specious at best.” “His claim that he can’t just abandon his clients is equally without merit, due to the fact that section 3.08 of the charter permits him to dispose of cases while in the county’s employ,” Jarret said. Armstrong, meanwhile, says he’ll see us in September as packs of hungry lawyers line up to apply for the temporary job. Contact Betty Bean at bbeanster@aol. com/.

Donations for churches Knox County Sheriff Jimmy “J.J.” Jones, Mayor Tim Burchett, Alan Jones and the Rev. Stephen Steele at a ceremony Thursday during which Jones and Burchett each donated $250 from campaign funds to the Concord AME Zion Church and a second $250 to the Original Church of God. Both churches were vandalized with windows broken, as reported in a Shopper-News story by Betty Bean on Feb. 27. Pastors for the Concord AME Zion Church are the Rev. Elaine Steele and the Rev. Stephen Steele. Alan Jones is the pastor of the Original Church of God. The Rev. Elaine Steele said, “We’ve received an outpouring from the community of donations and well wishing through the media. We’re very, very thankful. It truly would have been a stuggle had we not received the help.” The windows were replaced last week. Fourteen of 16 were broken. Photo by T Edwards of TEPHOTOS.com

Qualifying deadline April 5 for state primaries Perhaps the most intriguWith a sigh of relief, most folks thought incessant ing candidate is the blueeyed Bo Pierce, longtime electioneering was over. director of the Knox County Wrong! Housing Authority, expert on the late Cas Walker, and eager participant in Andy Griffith Show reprisals. Bo has never run for ofSandra fice. He emailed the picture Clark at right with a note: “Barney is running. Win with Fife!” There’s a long time to fl esh out the issues and find Next up are the state and out who all the candidates federal primaries for the are, but for now, Bo Pierce is House and Senate. U.S. Rep. in the room and running for John Duncan Jr. has drawn the House. some no-name foes. Others who have picked Gloria Johnson, who’s up petitions for District 89 never seen a ballot she are Democrat Shelley S. doesn’t want to be on, has Breeding and Republicans picked up a petition to run Roger Kane and Joey Mcfor the District 13 seat be- Culley. ing vacated by Rep. Harry Tindell. Upcoming The qualifying deadline Knox County Repubis noon Thursday, April lican Party will host its 5. Already several people Lincoln Day Dinner at 6:30 have picked up and even rep.m. Saturday, March 31, at turned qualifying petitions. Rothchild Catering Center, The usual suspects will 8807 Kingston Pike.Dinprobably win without much ner will be served at 6:30 sweat: Rep. Joe Armstrong, p.m. and the program will Democrat, District 15; Rep. follow at 7:30. Knox County Bill Dunn, Republican, Dis- Sheriff Jimmy “J.J.” Jones trict 16; Rep. Steve Hall, and Knox County Register Republican, District 18; and of Deeds Sherry Witt are Rep. Harry Brooks, Repub- co-chairs. U.S. Sen. Bob lican, District 19. Corker will speak. Tickets The fun will start, are $30. Info: Suzanne or though, in the newly creat- Jo, 689-4671. ed District 89 – over in the Knox County ComKarns and Hardin Valley mission will vacate the City area – where four people al- County Building for its ready have picked up a peti- March 19 workshop, meettion and others are rumored ing instead at the Farragut Town Hall. to be interested.

William “Bo” Pierce has figured out what he wants to be when he grows up – a state legislator. He’s a candidate in the Republican Primary for Knox County’s new 89th district seat.

GOSSIP AND LIES ■ Ruth White went to the roof of Powell Middle School last week to photograph a bunch of kids forming “pi” or 3.14 in the yard. She posted her fears on Facebook which led to this exchange: ■ Jake Mabe: You need your trusted assistant who usually stands at the bottom of the ladder and holds your feet ... But my all-time favorite: “Go down and get a picture of some homeless guy under the bridge. Keep the engine running.” ■ Shannon Carey: You forgot, “Get a picture from the middle of the intersection, but try not to get hit.” ■ Sandra Clark’s response: Hey, I didn’t mention that John Evans was spreading ‘zoo doo’ until AFTER you walked around in it for the best shot.” ■ Debbie Raticoff Moss: “LOL. Never a dull moment at the Shopper-News!” ■ Pellissippi State has purchased the old Phillips Consumer Electronics headquarters on Strawberry Plains Pike. The college bought the 32.6-acre property with a 223,000-square-foot building for $10 million. Look for Pellissippi to train workers for jobs such as we once had at ... Phillips. ■ WIVK fired operations manager Mike Hammond and popular evening DJ Jack Ryan. Who’s next? The frog?

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Moxley retreats Work done at KTSC Cynthia Moxley, well known, high powered Knoxville public relations guru, has completed her work for the Knoxville Tourism and Sports Corporation. Her firm handled damage control during the Gloria Ray resignation. Kim Davis handles media for the corporation now. Meanwhile, KTSC is working on how to structure its search for a replacement for Ray as well as filling several vacancies on the current board. With Mayor Tim Burchett’s urging, the county has an audit underway on KTSC which could reveal more inappropriate expenditures from the Ray days and may underscore need for more reform. The next KTSC meeting is 8 a.m. Tuesday, March 27, at its headquarters in the Gloria Ray Building on Gay Street. It is open to the public. It will be months before a new person is chosen to replace Ray. You can count on a different pay package this time with full discussion at the board meeting where the decision will be made. It truly seems to be a new day at KTSC, but the final answer will lie with the new CEO decision and the process by which it happens. Mitt Romney won Hawaii and American Samoa but lost Alabama and Mississippi the same day to Rick Santorum, which gave him major bragging rights. However, when it comes to delegates, Romney was actually ahead with 42 for Romney, 38 for Santorum and 23 for Gingrich. It is hard to see how Romney loses the GOP

Victor Ashe

nomination at this stage despite the success which Santorum is having. It does guarantee that the primary process continues to late spring or summer. Will Santorum and Gingrich backers rally to Romney in November? For one of the few times, Tennessee was a battleground state even if briefly. The presidential primary here saw strong activity by all four Republican candidates which is one reason the primary was created by the Legislature in 1972. Tennessee will not be a battleground state in November with the president unlikely to carry the state. Greenways co-ordinator Donna Young retired from her position with the city last fall, and her successor still has not been chosen. But, don’t be alarmed, as Mayor Madeline Rogero’s spokesperson Jesse Mayshark assures me an announcement is not far off. Seventeen persons applied for the job and five were interviewed by the Recreation Department. Former City Council member Charlie Thomas was not among those applying despite reports that he might apply. Whoever is hired has lots of work and advocacy to maintain the level of activity and enthusiasm which Donna Young displayed daily. However, with Mayor Rogero’s

pledge to make Knoxville a green city, the new person should have support at the highest level. One obvious goal will be to add new miles of greenways each year as well as planting trees on city property to keep current with those which die annually or were destroyed by storms. Rogero attended Young’s retirement party at Ijams while she was still a candidate, which shows her personal high regard for Young as well as her support for an active greenways program. Former Gov. Winfield Dunn contacted me recently after reading my column on my lunch with Bill Jenkins. Dunn gently pointed out my error in saying that Jenkins was the only Dunn cabinet member still living. As Mark Twain (paraphrase) once said, reports of the demise of several others are premature. Still around and well are Ted Welch and Jerry Adams, both former finance commissioners; Lee Smith, deputy to the governor; Jane Hardaway, former personnel commissioner; Pat Choate, former economic and development commissioner; and Richard Treadway, former mental health commissioner; as well three top aides: Ralph Griffith, former press secretary; Leonard Bradley, former policy aide; and Knoxvillian Frank Barnett, former aide and later governor of American Samoa. Glad all are still with us after service which started 41 years ago in 1971 when Dunn became the first Republican governor in 40 years. He paved the way for three more GOP governors afterward, including Knoxville’s own Bill Haslam.

Tyler Bray remake I do believe public relations people are creating a new and better Tyler Bray.

Marvin West

His recent trip to Newport to visit Brandon Williams was a stroke of genius. Well, a small stroke. No, I don’t think it was Tyler’s idea to check on the 5th grader who was chewed up last summer by a pit bulldog. It didn’t just happen that reporters and photographers picked that day to visit Bridgeport Elementary School. It was scripted. It was good. Tyler and Brandon needed that. Tyler may have needed it more than Brandon. Maybe you have noticed a difference of opinion about Tyler Bray. Some think he is less than committed to Tennessee football. His record is confusing. He has enough natural talent to riddle Montana and Buffalo but the team he leads has not beaten the big boys. No, not one. Critics see immaturity. They have a list. They have not forgiven that lackadaisical performance in the Kentucky disaster. Outgoing seniors were fussy. It was rumored that Tyler wasn’t interested in another second-rate bowl game. There are now whispers of academic problems. Others see Tyler Bray as the brightest spot in two losing seasons. As Tennessee rises from rags to riches this fall, or at least returns to respectability, Tyler will

be a national story, maybe an All-American. There are encouraging reports of rededication. Some worry that he will leave early for the NFL. Without knowing for sure what he is, if I were Jim Chaney coaching Tyler Bray, he and I would watch the first installment of the Leaders series, the terrific DVD from the magicians at the Vol Network. When Heath Shuler says “being a Tennessee quarterback changes your life forever,” I would push the pause button and we’d talk roots. Back in boyhood, Shuler’s dad told him how great was Condredge Holloway as a Tennessee quarterback. The Artful Dodger, gutty guy, made seemingly impossible plays. It was Holloway who came out of the hospital X-ray room and hurried back to the arena to rejoin the fight against UCLA. And when Heath made it to Neyland Stadium, there was Condredge, staying after practice to help the newcomer improve his skills. With the DVD running again, there is old Vol Dewey Warren, the original Swamp Rat, saying “a lot of kids would give anything to play quarterback at Tennessee.” Dewey played as if it mattered. To complete a pass, he would stand tall against any rush and take whatever hit was coming. He was tough and clutch. And there on the Leaders DVD is Pat Ryan saying “a lot of great quarterbacks have come through here and just being a part of that is special.” So said Peyton Manning.

Tyler Bray

“My dad tutored me on Tennessee history.” Archie could tie it all together, from Warren to Bubba Wyche to old roommate Bobby Scott to Jim Maxwell to Condredge to Randy Wallace to Jimmy Streater. He may have missed Steve Alatorre but not Alan Cockrell or Tony Robinson or Jeff Francis or Andy Kelly. “I saw Andy win a Sugar Bowl in New Orleans,” said Peyton. The most famous quarterback knows where he fits in the chronology – Shuler to Manning to Tee Martin to Casey Clausen to Eric Ainge to Jonathan Crompton. “There is a great history of Tennessee quarterbacks,” said Manning. “I am proud to be a part. When young people ask, I tell them that if they get a chance to play quarterback at Tennessee, to jump at it. There is nothing like it.” Thanks, Tyler, for giving the kid some time. Did you get all that about being a Tennessee quarterback? Marvin West invites reader reaction. His address is westwest6@netzero. com.

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A-6 • MARCH 19, 2012 • BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS

‘The Watch-Dog of the County Treasury’ HISTORY AND MYSTERIES | Dr. Jim Tumblin

Alfred Buffat (1840-1908) Alfred Buffat, son of Pierre Francois and Sylvia Tauxe Buffat, was born in Aigle, Canton of Vaud, Switzerland, on Dec. 8, 1840, but moved with his parents to Knox County in 1849. Pierre bought 300 acres near Spring Place (off Loves Creek Road). Always industrious, he farmed the land and, by 1861, had constructed a large grist mill on the property which would eventually prove to be quite profitable. Alfred was the eldest of the nine Buffat children, of whom the five youngest were born in Knox County. He attended the public schools and supplemented his education by independent study of arithmetic, grammar, history, philosophy and chemistry. His father placed him in charge of the mill during his teen years. He was 21 when the Civil War began and desired to enlist in the Confederate Army. However, the military authorities considered the mill to be a vital resource to the community and he was exempted. During the Confederate occupation (1861-1863), Buffat’s flour and meal were impressed for the army, the flour at 20 cents a pound (Confederate money). At one point, Gen. Joe Wheeler’s cavalry seized a considerable amount of local wheat and brought it to the mill to be ground. In late 1863, after the Siege of Knoxville and occupation by the Union, Buffat was paid 14 cents per pound for flour and one dollar a peck for meal. The mill survived the war in modest financial condition, and, when the war ended in April 1865, Alfred was taken into partnership with his father. On Sept. 14, 1865, Alfred Buffat married Elisa Bolli (1842-1925). Her father, C. Edouard Bolli, was born in Paris, France, and her

mother, Elise Porta Bolli in Lausanne, Switzerland. Edouard went to Pernambuco (now Recife), Brazil, as a young man, where he engaged in the wholesale dry goods business. Later, he was named Swiss Consul to Brazil. In 1853, when his health failed, he decided to come to Tennessee, where his sister-in-law and her husband, Cecile and Theodore Chavannes, were already living. Edouard Bolli, Elisa’s father, bought a 265-acre farm six miles out Clinton Pike. He died after only six months in Knoxville, leaving her mother to raise their five children and an adopted niece and nephew. A cousin came and helped with the farming for two years but afterward the boys and the hired hands planted and harvested the crops. Elisa was the third of the five children and was 21 years old when Gen. Ambrose Burnside’s Union troops arrived in Knoxville on Sept. 1, 1863. David Babelay’s thorough history of the Swiss families in Knox County, “They Trusted and Were Delivered” (1988), contains Elisa’s interesting journal kept before and during the Civil War titled, “Some recollections of my childhood days and incidents in my life during the Civil War.” Indicating her sentiments about the conflict, she wrote this in her journal on Sept. 1, 1863: Yesterday was the first of September. Long shall it be remembered among us! It was the day when we beheld for the first time our most dreaded foes, the Yankees! So long expected throughout East Tennessee! We were all in our rooms resting as the day was warm when sister Adele called us to the window. There was a cloud of dust on the road; presently we saw small troop of cavalry riding by at full speed. We remained breathless, what could it be? Was it the enemy?

Alfred Buffat (1840-1908) and Elisa Bolli Buffat (1842-1925). He was a prosperous miller, school director and member of the County Court, and was known as the “Watch-Dog of the County Treasury.” Elisa kept a detailed journal during the Civil War. Photos courtesy C.M. McClung Historical Collection

The Buffat Mill, located at Spring Place on Loves Creek Road, operated from 1861 to 1926, when it was demolished. Following the Siege and the Battle of Fort Sanders on Nov. 29, 1863, Elisa’s entry of Dec. 5 indicated how desperate conditions had become with the scarcity of food and absence of law and order: Alas, has it come to this? The troops are leaving (Gen. Longstreet’s Confederate Army) and we are left in the hands of the tyrants. Oh, why did they come? They were all so confident of taking Knoxville, but after skirmishing every day, they see it is useless, and leave. What a triumph for our enemies, who are well fortified and expecting reinforcements daily. Things are a great deal worse than before. After the war, the young married couple moved into the home of Alfred’s parents. The Buffat Milling Co. prospered and became one of the largest in the county and Alfred and Elisa were able to build their own four-room frame house near the mill. With their infant son, they moved into the house in 1868 and,

by 1880, they had built a second story. The nine-room house now accommodated the eight children who would eventually bless the union. In 1882, Alfred was elected a school director for the 2nd District and held the office for six years. After only a year he was convinced that the schools needed a better system of management and a set of rules for governing. He made a careful study and proposed a plan to establish a graded school system and to select textbooks for the different grades. The graded system was soon adopted throughout the county. He was elected a Justice of the Peace in 1894 and became a member of the Knox County Quarterly Court, where he served for 12 years. Squire Buffat became known as “The Watch-Dog of the County Treasury” and, through his honesty and integrity, he guarded the county finances against graft and extravagance. He was then elected trustee and, after serving ably for

two years, he ran for a second term as an independent but was defeated. Alfred, a faithful member and elder of Spring Place Presbyterian Church, died suddenly of a heart attack on Sept. 4, 1908, at age 67. Judge H.H. Ingersoll wrote this tribute: The death of A. Buffat is a great public loss. He was the personification of peaceful patriotism and illustrated well how it is sweet and graceful to live for one’s country. He incarnated the maxim that a public office is a public trust, and in the clouds of defeat he held aloft this banner. His last appeal to the people of Knox County was “If you won’t have me, don’t reject my principle.” Elisa remained in her Spring Place home for another 16 years and died there on Feb. 26, 1925, at age 82. Alfred and Elisa are buried in Spring Place Presbyterian Church Cemetery. In April 1926, the Buffat Mill was dismantled and Loves Creek Road was built directly across the property. Author’s Note. Thanks to David Babelay, who has passed away, and the C.M. McClung Historical Collection for assistance with the text and the photographs.

THE SECOND ANNUAL

S

pringtime is here! Warmer weather, fragrant blooming trees, and perennial flowers signal the start of this wonderful season with Easter not far behind. To celebrate this season, Bobby Todd is hosting the second annual “Spring Sip and See” on Friday and Saturday, March 23 & 24 from 10 to 5 daily in Historic Downtown Sweetwater. Bobby and Todd have just returned from another gift and antique market, and the store is stocked full with wonderful spring merchandise for your soul, home, and garden. After an incredibly busy holiday season, Bobby Todd has again transformed…..this time into a springtime shopper’s dream, just in time to freshen up your home. Unique home accessories, whimsical Easter decorations, classic outdoor statuary, and colorful scarves are just a sample of the items you will see. Also just in is a shipment of antique furniture and accessories that blend in seamlessly with the new pieces, just like they will in your own home. Bobby and Todd have been traveling to numerous antique markets and auctions to find unique treasures at incredible prices. Value is just as important as the look at Bobby Todd. To add even more fun to the “Spring Sip and See,” please wear your favorite spring hat or Easter bonnet to receive 10% off all regular non-sale merchandise purchased on Friday and Saturday only. All customers wearing Spring hats or Easter bonnets will also have the opportunity to enter our “Best Spring/Easter Hat” contest with the winner receiving a $100.00 Bobby Todd gift certificate. Bellini’s and Southern peach tea will be served along with Sweetwater Valley Cheese and sweet treats. Be sure to sample the drinks, register to win wonderful door prizes and look for many sale items throughout the store. We hope you make the Bobby Todd “Spring Sip and See” a part of your springtime tradition. Please feel free to bring your spouse and friends….and by all means, don’t forget your hats! If you like Christmas time at Bobby Todd, you are going to love the fresh look at Bobby Todd for spring.

Friday and Saturday March 23 & 24 10am - 5pm Sip Bellinis and Peach Tea while seeing all our new spring arrivals!

Wear your favorite spring or EASTER hat for

all regular, non-sale items.

The winner of the Best Hat contest receives a $100 Bobby Todd Gift Certificate! www.bobbytoddantiques.com

305 North Main Street • Downtown Sweetwater, Tennessee • Open Monday - Saturday 10-5


BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS • MARCH 19, 2012 • A-7

Let freedom float Balloons float skyward at Grace Baptist Church as everyone yells, “freedom.” This was a surprise demonstration Pastor Ron Stewart used to symbolize freedom gained with the release from emotional baggage that keeps people from fulfilling their God-given purpose. “Wave goodbye to whatever’s been holding you back,” he said. Musician Jeff Davis sang “Amazing Grace, My Chains are Gone” as everyone watched the balloons disappear. Photos by T. Edwards of TEPHOTOS.com

“You look beautiful,” I agreed, although, truth be told, it was her smile and her excitement that made her beautiful, far beyond the haircut. “Thank you, thank you!” she said. Then she was out the door to show off her new look to everyone outside. I couldn’t help thinking of the one man out of 10 who came back to thank Jesus for healing him. Why? Because I have been working at the Refuge for almost two years, and – in my memory – only one other person has ever come back to thank us for helping. We are thanked, more often than not, when someone leaves the Refuge, but to make the effort to come back? I told this story to a colleague, who suggested I consider the Biblical story of the other nine, and why it is we assume they were just ingrates. Why didn’t they come back to thank Jesus? Why do so many of our neighbors not come back especially to thank us for our help? Hard to say. They may be grateful with all their hearts, but life beckons and they go on about their day. That is OK. They may not understand that, although we do what

Think about it On the way to Jerusalem Jesus was going through the region between Samaria and Galilee. As he entered a village, ten lepers approached him. Keeping their distance, they called out, saying, “Jesus, Master, have mercy on us!” When he saw them, he said to them, “Go and show yourselves to the priests.” And as they went, they were made clean. Then one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, praising God with a loud voice. He prostrated himself at Jesus’ feet and thanked him. And he was a Samaritan. (Luke 17: 11-16 NRSV) I never thought I would say that I knew how Jesus felt in any given circumstance, but … well, just let me tell you the story. I was working the Refuge desk one day. One of our neighbors (of the feminine persuasion), who is experiencing homelessness, came in and asked for a haircut voucher. Her hair was thick and long and seemed to have a mind of its own. Because we have a mutually beneficial agreement with a beauty school in town – we provide heads for their students to practice on, and our neighbors get free haircuts – I wrote a haircut voucher, called the beauty school to make sure they had an opening

Lynn Hutton

CROSS CURRENTS and sent her on her way. The desk was busy as usual, and I thought no more about it. A couple of hours later, she returned, smiling and sporting a new haircut. It wasn’t drastically different from her previous look, but it was shorter and shaped. “Look at me!” she exclaimed. “Look what they did! I feel beautiful!!! I feel beautiful!!!”

Cones Cupboard

Pastor Ron Stewart looks at the freedom balloon before releasing it.

WORSHIP NOTES

we do because we want to help and not for their gratitude, still, it is lovely to be thanked. For someone to go out of Community her way, to share her joy, Services to let some of her exuber- ■ Concord United Methodist ance spill over onto me was Church’s Caregiver Support a blessing in itself! She felt Group, affiliated with Alzheimbeautiful! I wonder: did er’s Tennessee Inc., meets 10 to Jesus feel blessed by the 11:30 a.m. each first Tuesday in one who thanked him? He Room 226 at the church, 11020 must have, because the Roane Drive. Anyone in the community who gives care to story made it into the Gosan elderly individual is invited. pel of Luke. Refreshments. Info: 675-2835. Oh, and one other thing: the man who came back to thank Jesus was a Samari- Rec programs tan – a foreigner, an outcast ■ Beaver Ridge UMC, 7753 among the Jews, someone Oak Ridge Highway, holds a with less than no standing beginner yoga class Mondays in the community. from 6-7 p.m. upstairs in the Makes you think, family life center. Cost is $10 doesn’t it? per class or $40 for five classes.

Bring a mat, towel and water. Info: Dena Bower, 567-7615 or email denabower@comcast. net.

Special Services ■ Grace Baptist Church, 7171 Oak Ridge Highway, will welcome evangelist Tim Lee and Christian comedian Tim Hawkins at 7 p.m. Friday, April 13. Tickets are $19 in advance, $25 at the door. VIP tickets are $49. Info: www.timhwakins. net.

Youth ■ Farragut Presbyterian Church Mother’s Day Out program and preschool registration is open for the 2012-2013 school year. Info: Beth Hallman, 671-4616 or email bhallman@tds.net.

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A-8 • MARCH 19, 2012 • BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS

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BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS • MARCH 19, 2012 • A-9

Freedom Rider visits Bearden By Wendy Smith Ernest “Rip” Patton, who participated in lunch counter sit-ins and was a Freedom Rider during the civil rights movement, encouraged social studies students at Bearden High School to consider how they might use technology like social media to impact future generations. “When we had sit-ins, we sat down so you could be able to stand up,” he said. “What are you going to do? What kind of legacy are you going to leave?” Patton, who lives in Nashville, was in his junior year at Tennessee State University on May 4, 1961, when 13 students, seven black and six white, boarded two interstate buses in Washington, D.C., to test laws against segregation in the Deep South. They called themselves Freedom Riders. “They thought it would be simple,” he said. They were wrong. Ten days into the trip, one bus was burned in Anniston, Ala., and the group on the other was beaten by a mob of Ku Klux Klan members in Birmingham, Ala. When it looked like that might be the end of the trip, students at Tennessee State stood up to take their place. Patton was already ex-

perienced with nonviolent protest in Nashville. During sit-ins, he explained, the seats at a lunch counter were filled with a group of black and white protesters. When the group was arrested, another would be waiting to take its place. The goal was to fill the jails and make it hard on the city. He volunteered to be a Freedom Rider, and like the others, signed a will. The first busload of Tennessee State students arrived in Birmingham on May 17. They were arrested and taken back to Tennessee, where they were dropped off at the state line. On May 20, the second group arrived in Montgomery. They were attacked by an angry mob. Patton was among the third group of Nashville Freedom Riders. He was arrested in Jackson, Miss., and served 42 days in jail. The group dealt with incarceration in Parchman Prison by singing, he said, which soothed the soul and made the enemy mad. Singing was also a way for members of the group to communicate, since they were separated at the prison. While the guards weren’t allowed to hit prisoners, they did punish them for singing by taking their mattresses, turning up the heat and adding laxatives to

Rip Patton tells Bearden High School students about his participation in the 1961 Freedom Rides. History teacher Tammy Smith is on the left. Photo by Wendy Smith their food. But the Freedom Riders continued to sing and entertained themselves by playing chess with pieces they made from wet toilet paper, he said. One student asked if Patton was afraid during the trip. “I was not afraid because I was taught not to be

afraid. I was also taught to sing with a group, and most of all, to pray.” At the end of the movement, the segregation signs in the South started coming down. That was the first unambiguous victory in the civil rights movement, Patton said. It was also the first time he understood

SCHOOL NOTES ■ An open house will be held at Greenway School 2-4 p.m. Sunday, April 1. Grades 6-8 are now enrolling for fall. ■ A student art show will be held for Rocky Hill Elementary at DaVinci’s Pizzeria,

that there were fair-minded white people. In 2008, the Tennessee State students who were expelled for participating in the Freedom Rides received honorary doctorates. The 50th anniversary of the event was observed last year, and Patton was one of several participants who ap-

peared on “The Oprah Winfrey Show” in conjunction with the celebration. UT student Jayanni Webster was one of 40 students from across the nation who participated in a recreation of the famous ride. She joined Patton at Bearden. “We still need you people to get involved,” she said.

3337 Sutherland Ave., until Friday, April 13. In celebration of Youth Art Month, one piece of artwork from each classroom will be on display.

Elementary to purchase supplies for the school. Labels can be dropped off in the silver collection box at the front of the school or can be mailed to: West Hills Elementary School, 409 Vanosdale Drive, Knoxville, TN 37909. Info: email Jill Schmudde at jschmudde@gmail.com.

■ Box Tops for Education from General Mills’ products and Labels for Education from Campbell’s products are being collected by West Hills

FISH DAY

It’s time to stock your pond!

Rocky Hill Elementary 5th graders Kate Basse, McKenzie Brooks, Larah McAfee and Diamond Davis practice with the new Frisbee golf equipment they helped raise money to purchase. Photo by S. Barrett

Wednesday, April 4 Clinton 12:00 p.m. - 12:45 p.m. Anderson Farmer’s Co-op Halls Crossroads 1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Knox Farmer’s Co-op Blaine 3:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Blaine Hardware Knoxville 4:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m. Knox Farmer’s Co-op

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By Sara Barrett Thanks to their own fundraising efforts, the students at Rocky Hill collected $1,644 to buy new gym equipment. And thanks to some great people in the community, they now have their new Frisbee golf course installed on the school grounds. Lakiea Chapman, physical education teacher at Rocky Hill, realized there was a lot of underbrush covering what would be

the perfect area for the kids to play. After Chapman made a call to Knox County Schools’ maintenance department, the area now looks like a community park. “They really went above and beyond,” said Chapman of the folks who cleared the land. To learn more about Frisbee golf and how to arrange the course, Chapman then talked to landscape architect Daniel Boutte′. Boutte′ works for

Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon but his real passion is Frisbee golf. “He donated his own time and invested so much energy into helping us,” said Chapman. Not only can the students play with the equipment during gym class and recess, but the Frisbee course is open anytime the kids want to play – which means they can bring their families on the weekends or after school.

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Corporate Bowl Thursday, April 12 | 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. & Friday, April 13 | 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Oak Ridge Bowling Center Wednesday, April 18 | 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Knoxville @ Strike & Spare

Learning about the wetlands As part of an art exhibit fundraiser for the West Valley Outdoor Classroom, students transformed their library into a mock wetland with more than 350 student-made wetland plant sculptures on display. More than 300 visitors attended the event. The students will also participate in a threeday service project in April, planting 1,000 wetland plants in the outdoor classroom. Photo submitted

Western Avenue Thursday, April 19 | 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. & Friday, April 20 | 4 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Maryville @ Crest Lanes Saturday, April 21 | 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

benefiting:

of East Tennessee


A-10 • MARCH 19, 2012 • BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS

‘Pose for a change’

Elizabeth Herrera models a Will Matthews models a white floral formal dress. Photos by tuxedo at the show. Justin Acuff

A good time was had by all at this year’s West High School fashion show, named “Pose for a Change.” Some 28 students participated, wearing fashions from Savvi Formalwear, The Gilded Gown, David’s Bridal and Deb Shops. Other contributors were Abloom Florist and Hat Man Company, a screen printing and embroidery firm. The student organization DECA also helped. Entertainment was by Bethany Horne, performing “Valerie” by Amy Winehouse; Blaine Coyle, performing “Everybody” by Ingrid Michaelson; and Katie Hill and Alex Ross, performing “Stand by Me” by Ben. E. King.

Fashions ranged from athletic wear to spring wear and formals. Student models included: Jaiyah Anderson, Taylor Bembury, Kadiza Brown, Dneisha Coward, Teona Dawson; Sofia Dyrendahl, Precious Holte, Shelby Johnson, Kathleen Karnes, Will Matthews; U’nique McNair, Eboni Moye, Michael Nichols, Terrell Perkins, Osmond Robinson; Miranda Radford, Brittni Rutledge, Ibrahim Teshome, Lalita Thompson, Shontia Thompson; Mason Sigmon, Shatava Smith, A’Darrius Sanders, Calvin Walker, Doneisha Wilburn; Mattie Wilkin, Ravona Willis and Zakiya Upshaw.

Calvin Walker models a black Kathleen Karnes models a pinstripe tuxedo during the pink dress with a split down West High School Pose for a the leg. Change Fashion Show.

‘Spoleto’ comes to Sequoyah Elementary

Kindergartener Kate Namey created this drawing of city buildings. The school was packed with Vicki Reid stands proudly next to her son, 5th grade student Austen, as he shows his African parents, students, teachers and members of the community who stopped by to see local art at mask artwork to godmother Jamie Baumgartner. The festival included an Italian dinner in the its finest. cafeteria, musical performances in the gym and artwork displayed throughout the building.

During Sequoyah Elementary School’s eighth annual Spoleto Arts Festival, 3-year-old Victor Nored (left) checks out ceramic creatures on a table while waiting for big brother Andy to perform with the a cappella group The Undertones. The festival is an opportunity for the school’s budding artists and entertainers to shine. It is named after a town in Italy that is known for its art and culture.

Kindergartener Madeline Weidenhamer sits on dad Matthew’s shoulders as she watches her classmates perform during “Spoleto.” Photos by S. Barrett

We’re looking for love! Taylor Taylor would make a great companion for an older person; someone who is home a lot and has time to show him love and patience – he is a little unsure of the humane race, in the past they have not been kind to him. It may take a while for him to warm up but once he does he will be a friend for life. Not good with small children. Taylor is about 4-years-old.

All donations are tax deductible. Heartland Golden Retriever Rescue is a 501(c)3 organization.

Hershey Bear A 4-year-old retriever mix, would make a wonderful partner for someone who likes the outdoors. He is a fun loving dog who would do best as the only dog; he is rather a clown. He would greatly benefit from attending obedience classes.

Can’t Adopt? Sponsor a foster! We are always looking for volunteers to help with transporting, socializing the dogs and foster parents to help us evaluate.

Ad space donated by

Connor Little man Connor, about 6-yearsold is a Golden mix. He enjoys playing with the other dogs in his foster home but is probably best suited as an only dog. He enjoys walking, and still needs to get a little weight off. He has come a long, long way since he first entered the program after surviving a Meth Lab explosion. Good with cats and children.


BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS • MARCH 19, 2012 • A-11

High style in the District Members of the District in Bearden teamed up to present a fabulous, unique fashion show during Knoxville Fashion Week on March 2 at Bennett Galleries.

Shannon Carey

Fashionistas were treated to food by Hard Knox Pizzeria, Naple’s, Sequoyah Grille and Nama. Models from Gage Model and Talent Agency sported fashions from Chic Bou-

Kelly Norris (standing) of Gallaher Spa MD applies Glo Minerals professional make-up for a model in the District in Bearden’s Knoxville Fashion Week show.

tique, P Kelly, Sole in the City and M.S. McClellan. Westwood Antique and Design Market even got in on the act with vintage clothing and a stunning custom wedding dress from 1942. But that’s not all. The evening was a true partnership of District members. All jewelry was designed by Margret Ellis and is available at Bennett Galleries. Gallaher Spa MD provided and applied the models’ Glo Minerals make-up. Twisted Scissors and Frank’s Barber Shop styled the models’ hair, and beall & thomas photography captured the moment on film.

This vintage wedding dress, presented by Westwood Antique and Design Market, was custom-designed in 1942 by H & S Pogue Co. of Cincinnati.

Info: www.districtinbearden.com.

M.S. McClellan presented fashions for both men and women for the District in Bearden’s Knoxville Fashion Week show. Some of the designers featured here are Samulesohn, High Cotton, New England Shirtings, Alton and Hickey Freeman.

Westwood Antique and Design Market pre- Models for Sole in the City present shoes by sented vintage fashions by Cameo for Town & Betty Muller and Stuart Weitzman and clothResort Shop and Molly Parnis Boutique, N.Y. ing from P Kelly. Photos submitted

Weigel’s hires Chris Ooten Weigel’s has hired Chris Ooten as its new director of real estate to expand Weigel’s retail footprint Chris Ooten through new store site acquisition, and the selling and leasing of companyowned property. “With a solid background in commercial development, Chris is poised to help expand and take Weigel’s to the next level,” said Bill Weigel. Ooten is a LEED Accredited Professional via the Green Building Certification Institute and in his new role he will

guide new site development, green building design, construction and maintenance solutions. His background includes 14 years with Schaad Companies in Knoxville where, as COO, he led completion of more than 1 million square feet of office and commercial projects. His background also includes three years with the Metropolitan Planning Commission of Knoxville and Knox County, and three years as project manager with local civil engineering and design firm Batson, Himes, Norvell and Poe. He is a graduate of East Tennessee State University with a bachelor’s degree in urban and regional planning.

JOB FAIR Staffmark & MAG USA

Wed, March 28 10 – 4!

have partnered together to hire exceptional people!

Self-motivated, loyal & passionate? Enjoy working with your hands in a fast-paced, team environment? Looking for a long-term career path?

If so, WE ARE LOOKING FOR YOU! Currently recruiting for qualified production techs with prior assembly experience! Apply in person at 9355 Kingston Pk, Knoxville, TN Or join us at MAG USA on Wednesday, March 28, 2012 from 10am – 4pm! 105 Matthew Warren Drive, Clinton, TN 37716 Call Staffmark for more details at 693-4047 or visit our website: www.staffmark.com Come join a winning team! EOE Exceptional People, Exemplary Results!

Models sport styles from P Kelly by Elan, Michael Stars, Ecru, Models show fashions from Chic Boutique by Glam and Knitted Finley, David Kahn and People Like Frank. Glove with shoes from Sole in the City.

Proceeds from donations go to provide scholarships to underprivileged children entering college.

ANNA’S ANGELS ANNA’S ANGELS Non-Profitt Thrift Thrift Store A ANonprofi Store

Do Your Spring Cleaning! DONATIONS NEEDED! We Need Donations... Furniture, dishes, (Household items,art, clothing, jewelry, linen and jewelry tools, and children’s appliances items) NOW!

Call and we will pick up your items. ms. Call and we will pick up your items. le. All donations are tax deductible. All donations are tax deductible. Open Monday-Saturday 9-65

Open Monday-Saturday 9-6 851-9059 • 2808 Sutherland Ave. Ave e. 851-9059 • 2808 Sutherland Ave. www.annasangelstn.org


A-12 • MARCH 19, 2012 • BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS

You’re only minutes from your prescriptions at Food City Pharmacy. Fast, Friendly, Professional Service and Great Value. • Easy Prescription Transfers

• Diabetic Supplies – DME Accredited

• Most Insurance Plans Accepted

• Easy-Open Prescription Caps Available

• 90-Day Refill Option Available 116

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Norris

75 • Vaccinations – Flu, Tetanus and Shingles 61

9

4344 Maynardville Hwy. Maynardville, Tennessee

Most Medica Prescri re pti Drug Pla on Accepte ns d

61

680

61

144 33

170

170

330

654

71

441

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170 131

N

75

688

Halls Crossroads

331

11W 1 331

11E

4805 North Broadway Fountain City, Tennessee

KNOX

131

34

2712 Loves Creek Road Knoxville, Tennessee

331 685

170

ANDERSON

640 640

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679

Mascot

1

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687

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1199 Oak Ridge Turnpike Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Knoxville

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11W

40

168

655

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9

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681

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Oak Ridge 170 62

5801 Western Ave. 640 Knoxville, Tennessee 75

Karns

678

40

275

169

169

40

672

441

674

75

40 694

162 675

70

11

9

7510 Asheville Hwy. Knoxville, Tennessee

168

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158

11 70

131

70

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169

616

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1950 Western Ave. Knoxville, Tennessee

676

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4216 North Broadway Knoxville, Tennessee

275

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8905 Kingston Pike Knoxville, Tennessee

131

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11501 Hardin Valley Road 162 Knoxville, Tennessee

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9565 Middlebrook Pike Knoxville, Tennessee

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JEFFERSO

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3501 West EmoryPowell Road Powell, Tennessee

170

Blaine

7202 Maynardville Hwy. Halls, Tennessee

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131

131

33

61

331

5078 Clinton Hwy. Knoxville, Tennessee

Clinton

61

61

Plainview

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507 S. Charles Seviers Blvd. Clinton, Tennessee

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UNION

• $4 Prescriptions on 100’s of Generic Drugs 441 Value... Service... Over 70 Convenient 71 Convenience 170 Food City Pharmacy Locations. We accept VALUCARD PRESCRIPTION Express Scripts116 Ask any Food City Pharmacy Associate DISCOUNT CLUB www.foodcity.com Insurance about our Prescription Discount75Club. 33 Plans! 61 VISIT WWW.FOODCITY.COM FOR YOUR COMPLETE LIST OF FOOD CITY PHARMACY LOCATIONS. 9

O H I O

Luttrell

370

332

5941 Kingston Pike (Bearden Ctr.) Knoxville, Tennessee

129 115

168

33

284 Morrell Road Knoxville, Tennessee

7608 Mountain Grove Rd. Knoxville, Tennessee

71

441 168

682

30 locations in the greater Knoxville area! NOTE: NOT ALL LOCATIONS LISTED BELOW ARE PICTURED ON THE MAP

# 609 Food City Pharmacy

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2946 Winfield Dunn Pkwy., Kodak, TN (865) 933-4676

507 S. Charles Seivers Blvd., Clinton, TN (865) 457-5259

1950 Western Ave., Knoxville, TN (865) 525-6376

# 611 Food City Pharmacy

# 655 Food City Pharmacy

# 677 Food City Pharmacy

1219 E. Pkwy., Hwy. 321, Gatlinburg, TN (865) 430-9844

7510 Asheville Hwy., Knoxville, TN (865) 933-4635

5078 Clinton Hwy., Knoxville, TN (865) 689-8955

# 616 Food City Pharmacy

# 661 Food City Pharmacy

# 678 Food City Pharmacy

11501 Hardin Valley Road, Knoxville, TN (865) 692-5183

2221 Jacksboro Pike, LaFollette, TN (423) 566-2033

5801 Western Ave., Knoxville, TN (865) 584-0115

# 632 Food City Pharmacy

# 667 Food City Pharmacy

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2799 Hwy. 72 N., Loudon, TN (865) 458-5312

741 Dolly Parton Pkwy., Sevierville, TN (865) 908-5018

3501 West Emory Road, Powell, TN (865) 938-2838

# 634 Food City Pharmacy

# 672 Food City Pharmacy

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1130 S. Roane Street, Harriman, TN (865) 882-0117

9565 Middlebrook Pike, Knoxville, TN (865) 539-0580

4344 Maynardville Hwy., Maynardville, TN (865) 992-0534

# 642 Food City Pharmacy

# 673 Food City Pharmacy

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508 E. Tri-County Blvd., Oliver Springs, TN (865) 435-1187

4216 N. Broadway, Knoxville, TN (865) 686-1761

1199 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, TN (865) 483-2889

# 644 Food City Pharmacy

# 674 Food City Pharmacy

# 682 Food City Pharmacy

11503 Chapman Highway, Seymour, TN (865) 579-4728

5941 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN (865) 588-0972

7608 Mountain Grove Drive, Knoxville, TN (865) 573-5090

# 647 Food City Pharmacy

# 675 Food City Pharmacy

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2135 E. Broadway Ave., Maryville, TN (865) 981-4338

8905 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN (865) 694-1935

4805 N. Broadway, Fountain City, TN (865) 281-0286

# 650 Food City Pharmacy

# 687 Food City Pharmacy

300 Market Drive, Lenoir City, TN (865) 986-7032

2712 Loves Creek Road, Knoxville, TN (865) 633-5008

# 651 Food City Pharmacy

# 688 Food City Pharmacy

1610 W. Broadway Ave., Maryville, TN (865) 380-0110

7202 Maynardville Hwy., Halls, TN (865) 922-9683

# 653 Food City Pharmacy

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1000 Ladd Landing, Kingston, TN (865) 717-7085

284 Morrell Road, Knoxville, TN (865) 691-1153

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WE ACCEPT THOUSANDS OF INSURANCE PLANS!


B

March 19, 2012

HEALTH & LIFESTYLES NEWS FROM FORT SANDERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

Phyllis Ritter is celebrating 35 years of service at Fort Sanders Regional, while Danny Sherrod is honored for 25 years.

Evelyn Carter has completed Barbara Nicely is marking 40 46 years in the Radiology Carolyn Robertson and Kimberly Rhodes are each honored for years on staff at Fort Sanders. Department. 30 years of employment at the hospital.

Fort Sanders staff celebrates years of service Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center recently honored 275 employees who are celebrating an employment milestone with the hospital in 2012. Sixty-seven of the individuals have worked at the facility for 20 years or more. The honored staff members were treated to a special reception. Among the Fort Sanders employees recognized for their long tenure are: 50 years, J.C. Farmer of Plant Engineering; 46 years, Evelyn Carter of Radiology; 40 years, Barbara Nicely of Quality Management and Debra Ogle of the Laboratory; and 36 years, Sharon Cross, a Patricia Neal Rehabilitation Center Nurse Liaison. Ten Fort Sanders staff members honored for their 35 years of service are: Barbara Wolfe, Jerry Wolfe, Jerri Jones, Linda Perkins, Glenda Jolly, Debra Miller, Danny Cole, Phyllis Ritter, Nancy Cummings and Linda Walker. Belinda Shuler celebrated 31 years of employment at the hospital, while 12 others marked their 30th year at the facility. Thirtyyear employees include: Glenda Wallace, Anita Mynatt, Alice Houser, Elaine Steele, Kimberly

Rhodes, Marilyn Bryan, Cynthia Ledford, Robin Wilson, Judy Shults, Kimberly Morton, Alfred Kaye and Carolyn Robertson. Celebrating 26 years at Fort Sanders Regional are: Melinda Marashi, Patricia Cannon, Danny Sherrod and Darrell Garland. Employees honored for 25 years of service include: Margaret Kuberek, James Mead, Beverly Cook, Rhonda Minor, Cynthia Revels, Karen Ott, Susan Wilkerson, Sharon Mays, Mary Josvai, Clarence Ragan, Alama Lay, Donna McDonald, Karen Carroll, Amanda Donovan, Dallas Ward, Judy Hyder, John Behm, Jarrell McCann and Sharon Reed. Marking 20 years of service are: Eva Barker, Debra Hurst, Bobbi Dake, Tamela Peebles, Rebecca Harmon, Judy Hawk, Kimberly Poe, Constance Johnson, Pamela Drake, Kelly Johnson, Michele Lloyd, Michael Tracy, Ruthie Lafferty, Allen Owens, Mike Sliger and Sheri Webb. The honorees collectively have more than 4,100 years of work experience. Congratulations and thank you for your longtime dedication to our Fort Sanders Regional patients and their families!

Above, Nancy Cummings is celebrating 35 years at Fort Sanders, and Kathy Kidd is marking 10 years. Above right, honored for a service milestone are: Clarence Ragan (25 years), Kelly Johnson (20 years) and Mary Johnson (25 years).

Recognized for their years of service are: Tina Foster (15 years), Debbie Fox (15 years), Fred Young (15 years) and Debbie Miller (35 years).

Farmer marks half century with Fort Sanders Regional

Fort Sanders Facility Services staff held a reception celebrating J.C. Farmer’s 50th anniversary at Fort Sanders Regional.

J.C. Farmer has worked in the Plant Engineering Department at Fort Sanders Hospital since June of 1961.

Traveling to the moon, electronic mail and cell phones were far in the future when J.C. Farmer joined the staff of Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center (then, Fort Sanders Presbyterian Hospital) a half century ago. Since June of 1961, J.C. Farmer has been an important part of the Plant Engineering Department of Fort Sanders. With his talent for woodworking, Farmer has crafted countless doors and beautiful pieces of furniture in the hospital’s wood shop. During the 1982 World’s Fair,

Farmer also helped build a giant Fort Sanders display that was seen by thousands of fair visitors. Farmer came up with the idea of placing a lighted Christmas tree on the hospital’s roof to celebrate the holiday season. The rooftop Christmas tree tradition continues today and has been adopted by many other Knoxville businesses. Farmer is still on the job full time at Fort Sanders Regional and, at 80 years old, says he has no desire to retire any time soon. Thanks for a job well done!

NURSING EXCELLENCE Fort Sanders Regional salutes the nearly 1,500 nursing professionals who provide excellent care for our patients around the clock, every day of the year. Thank you!

0094 009 00 0 094 09 0 94 9 4--006 006 0 06 68

(865) 673-FORT fsregional.com


B-2 • MARCH 19, 2012 • SHOPPER-NEWS

Strang mini health fair A mini health fair attracted a crowd to the Strang Senior Center for a free lunch, mini massages, information and door-prize drawings.

Theresa Edwards

Bull’s-eye is looking for a family that will accept him on his terms. Photo by S. Barrett

Bull’s-eye needs a home

Seniors also experienced free health screenings from an audiologist, chiropractor and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. ■ The movie “The Help” will be shown at the Strang Center at noon Wednesday, March 21. Info: www.knoxcounty.org/seniors.

The Cat Clinic in West Knoxville is currently caring for Bull’s-eye, a cat that was rescued by a woman when he walked up to her on the street and cuddled up against her leg. He got his name from the markings on his fur.

Ardell Dietzler receives a bag from Alyssa Goddard of Independent Insurance Consultants who hosted the mini health expo at Strang Senior Center. Photos by T. Edwards of TEPHOTOS.com

Sara Barrett

Critter Tales At left, Bonnie Patel of Mary Kay gives away a door prize.

Now that he has been checked and deemed healthy by the veterinar-

ian, he is ready to find a permanent home. Although he would probably appreciate anyone interested in keeping him, Bull’s-eye has a unique personality and will fit best with a family who doesn’t crowd him and who lets him be social on his terms. He is a very sweet cat but one who doesn’t like to be pushed into doing things or being held a lot. This may change with the right family, but he does like to make his own decisions. Bull’s-eye has received a physical and vaccinations while at the Cat Clinic. He is neutered, has been dewormed and has tested negative for feline leukemia and FIV. Info: Cynthia or Brian at 531-2287.

Adopt Abbott at Young-Williams Meet Abbott, a 2-year-old male German shepherd mix available for adoption at the Young-Williams Animal Center. Abbott is at the main center at 3210 Division St. Hours are noon to 6 p.m. daily. Info: www.youngwilliams.org or 215-6599.

Dr. Jake Parrish of Victory Chiropractic and Wellness performs a nerve scan test on Tom Lemons. The test checks for nerve interference which can cause health problems.

Special Notices

IF YOU USED

YAZ/YAZMIN/ OCELLA BIRTH CONTROL PILLS or

NuvaRING VAGINAL RING CONTRACEPTIVE between 2001 & the present & suffered a stroke or heart attack or developed blood clots, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles Johnson. 1-800-535-5727

Adoption

NEWPORT. 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 story, approx 2 yrs old with 1568 +/- SF. 361 Woodson Dr. Asking $114,900 & owner will finance w/$5,750 dwn. Bill 877-488-5060, ext 323 WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN OWN! Seller Financing -$400 Down, $250 monthly. 3728 Lilac Ave., Knoxville, TN. 3 BR, 1 1/2 baths, only $26,485. 888-605-7474. www.USHomeLLC.com

21 South

ADOPT -- Looking To Adopt Your Baby Meet all your adoption needs with us. We'll provide never ending love, security & education for your child. All expenses paid. Rachel & Barry 1-866-304-6670 www.rachelandbarryadopt.com

Special Notices

40s

NEW CUSTOM HOME, 3 BR, 2 BA, cath. ceilings, frpl., W/I closets, tile & wood flooring, 2 car gar., split BR floor plan, brick/vnyl ext., 2012 SQ. FT. incl. gar., & more. 5 min. to schools, Boyd's Creek/Seymour area $169,900. 865-680-4631

15 Special Notices

15

TOWNFARRAGUT OF FARRAGUT BOARD OF 951273MASTER MAYOR AND ALDERMEN Ad Size 2 x 2.5 AGENDA bwMarch W 22, 2012 • WORKSHOP, 6:00 PM <ec> FY2013 CIP & Equipment Replacement BMA MEETING, 7:00 PM I. II. III. IV. V.

Joan Brink receives hearing information from audiologist Dr. Bobbie McCue with AccuQuest Hearing Centers. “Dementia and depression has been linked to untreated hearing loss according to a study by Johns Hopkins University,” McCue said. “We offer free comprehensive hearing evaluations in our office.“

15 For Sale By Owner 40a Condos- Townhouses 42 Houses - Unfurnished 74 Healthcare

DAV Chapter 24 has CHARMING BUNGALOW FREE RENTAL OF in Historic Fairmont Area on Powers St. POWER OR MANUAL WHEEL CHAIRS This home offers 3 available for any area bedrooms, 2 baths and disabled veteran. Also many updates. It looking for donations really is a must see of used wheelchairs for $139,000. Please (power only). Call 765call or email to schedule a visit, 8650510 for information. 607-4605 or stephens 7787@gmail.com

Silent Prayer, Pledge of Allegiance, Roll Call Approval of Agenda Mayor’s Report Citizens Forum Approval of Minutes A. February 23, 2012 VI. Business Items A. Approval of FY2012 Mid-Year Committee Appointments to the Economic Development Committee B. Report by the Farragut Business Alliance and presentation of its 2012 annual work program VII. Town Administrator’s Report VIII. Attorney’s Report

FTN CITY Special Pricing with 30 Day Close For info 865-898-4558

Cemetery Lots

49

CEMETERY LOTS. 4 in Lynnhurst Cemetery. $800 for 1; $1500 for 2; $2200 for 3; $3000 for all four. Call 865-661-1879.

110 Dogs

HANDYMAN SPECIAL

Condo Rentals

76

213 Utility Trailers 255 Cleaning

318 Roofing / Siding

352

HORSE TRAILER

Hardin Valley. 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA, cul-de-sac, fncd bkyard, 2 car gar, $1700. 865-806-9282 ***Web ID#950504 ***

I BUY HOUSES

141 Collectibles

German Shepherds, 100'S OF Matchbooks, CLEANING NETWORK AKC reg, ` black nice collection, $150 12 ft gooseneck, $1450. Wkly/ Bi-wkly/ Mo. female, 4 mos. old or best offer. 865Good refs! Free est. 865-250-1585. 865-622-1266 458-1934 ask for Ben 258-9199 or 257-7435. UTILITY TRAILERS, HOUSE CLEANING, GREAT PYRENEES STAR TREK -- STAR all sizes available. experienced, de6 wks. old, M&F, WARS COLLECTION. 865-986-5626. 55 pcs. $350. pendable, referUTD on shots, $150 smokeymountaintrailers.com Phone 865-705-7007 ences. Call 456-5290. firm. 865-376-6484

FARRAGUT/LENOIR CITY, 3BR, 2BA, full bsmnt/gar., appls., WD hookup, non smoking, $1100 + 1 mo. sec. + util. Bkgrnd. check. Call 865-680-0055. ***Web ID# 950722***

LINCOLN PARK, 460 Hiawassee Ave., 2BR, 1BA, WD conn. HIGHLAND MEM. CH&A, unfin. bsmnt, $2,100 ea; $7,800 for $650 mo. $650 dep. all 4. Mountain 865-659-4056. views. 865-386-1630 N.W. betwn Karns & 5 rms, 1 Real Estate Wanted 50 Powell, BA, bsmt, carpeted, C H/A, no pets, $600 mo., $500 DD. Avail. immed. 865-567-0867 Pay Cash, Take over payments. Repairs SOUTH KNOX 2/3 BR not a problem. Any 2 BA, conv. to UT & situation. 865-712-7045 downtown, $750 + dep. 865-938-3928 LM WE BUY HOUSES, any reason, any conWEST, BLUEGRASS, dition. 865-548-8267 3 BR, 2 full bths, 1 www.ttrei.com car gar., renovated throughout, large backyard, Investment Prop-Sale 61 private new appl, hardwood floors, no pets, no smoking, $950 mo. + $950 DD. 12 month Cheap, Cash, 865-712-7045 lease, ref. required. 865-310-0508 after 5 pm

Apts - Unfurnished 71

Garden Montessori School, 3225 Garden Drive, will hold a rummage sale 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 24, to benefit Young-Williams’ transport program to Salem, Mass., where there is a shortage of adoptable pets. Info: 688-6776.

MIN PIN PUPPIES CKC, 8 wks., M&F, $225, Pigeon Forge 865-740-5249 ***Web ID# 950102***

Free Pets

145

ADOPT! ^

Business For Sale 131

Looking for a lost pet or a new one? Visit YoungWilliams Animal Center, the official shelter for the City of Knoxville & Knox County: 3201 Division St. Knoxville. knoxpets.org

PICTURE FRAMING BUSINESS Large customer base. MOVING. FREE. Great location in a 10 mo. female Halls shopping center. Border Collie/Lab $10,000. 865-363-8460 Mix. Has shots. Crate trained. fence Dogs 141 Invisible trained. Housebroken. Smart, loves to American Bulldog pups, play, & wants to be born Feb. 4, NKC reg, your best friend. great bldln, socialized, 865-441-7907 $500. 865-456-2625 ***Web ID# 948730***

Sporting Goods 223 Vans GOLF CARTS Yamaha 1999 -- 2005. Gasoline carts. $1300$2100. 865-577-8172 or 865-250-1585 GOLF TAYLOR & Ping Irons & woods. Ping G10 $200. Phone 865-670-3980.

Boats Motors

232

CHAPARRAL 1994, 25' deck, Yamaha 2002 150 HPDI, Loadmaster tandem trlr., bimini, fish & depth & head, NADA $15,800, make offer. 865-546-7769. ***Web ID# 949988***

256

TOYOTA SIENNA XLE 2004, 138K mi., very good cond., new tires, CD/ DVD. $10,000 obo. 865-607-3320.

Trucks

257

FORD F350 2000 Super dual, 7.3 diesel, ext. cab., 2WD, 128K mi., gd tires, w/ extras. Beautiful truck! $14,200. Johnny, 865-988-8820.

4 Wheel Drive 258

SPRING CLEANING! Cleaning, windows & carpet clng. Homes & offices! Lic'd ins'd & bonded. Est & refs. 363-8207 or 809-8543

Flooring

330

CERAMIC TILE installation. Floors/ walls/ repairs. 32 yrs exp, exc work! John 9383328

Furniture Refinish. 331 DENNY'S FURNITURE REPAIR. Refinish, reglue, etc. 45 yrs exp! 922-6529 or 466-4221

DODGE RAM 2009, reg. cab, 4x4, show room cond. 1 owner, garaged, like new. 5K mi., Now $19,750, New $35,000, 865-705-8886. ***Web ID# 948639***

DENNY'S FURNITURE REPAIR. Refinish, reglue, etc. 45 yrs exp! 922-6529 or 466-4221

Antiques Classics 260

HAROLD'S GUTTER SERVICE. Will clean front & back $20 & up. Quality work, guaranteed. Call 288-0556.

G3 EAGLE 180, 2007 MUSTANG CONV., w/Yamaha F115 mtr 1964 1/2, completely & Bear custom trlr w/removable lock- restored, black with ing tongue, Minkota white top, $25,500. 86555TM, 2 Gar- 458-1934 ask for Ben Farmer’s Market 150 Edge min fish/DF, Minkota three bank batt. 261 charger, gar. kept, exc. Sport Utility GOOD GRASS HAY, cond., minimal use. 4x5 rolls in dry, $25 $17,500. 865-688-2005 each. 865-986-3160 or CHEVY SUBURBAN ***Web ID# 949266*** 548-0822. LT, 2005, 100K mi., loaded, 1 owner, gar. HAY, ROUND bales, SEA RAY 225, 1991, kept, great family car Bow Rider, deep V, 4x4, $10 per roll. $11,400. 865-207-2428 7.4 Bravo 1, tandem Call and leave mestrailer w/brakes, Landrover Discovery sage at 865-457-7725 runs great, $6900. 1995, 120k mi, white, Duncan Boat Dock, needs work. $3800/b.o. 865-588-5310 Lawn-Garden Equip. 190 599-6168.

KARNS AREA, 2 BR, 130 HAWTHORNE 2 1/2 BA, stove, refrig., DW, W/D Oaks Way, Powell, TN, AMERICAN COCKER conn, no pets. $850. 2BR, 2BA, 1 car gar. SPANIEL PUPS 865-691-8822; 660-3584 condo, all 1 level, $700 7 wks. old, $200. mo., $500 dep. No pets, Call 423-623-9881. no smking. 865-947-2655 ***Web ID# 946250*** BICHON FRISE pups, AKC, 2 males, CONDO/WEST, Colo8 wks. old, S&W, nies, 2 BR, 1.5 BA, SOUTH, 2 BR, 1 BA, $450. 865-982-1124. frpl, pool, tennis ***Web ID# 948829*** 1200SF, appls., priv. cts. View of Smoky $650/mo+dep, no pets/ Mtns. $795/mo. + CHIHUAHUA BABIES, smoking. 865-577-6289 deposit. NO PETS. bsmall males, UTD Available 3/17. 865shots, Registered. 216-8053 $250. 865-387-2859 Apts - Furnished 72 ***Web ID# 948915*** DR field & brush mower Motor Homes Middlebrook Pk Area 237 Imports 262 never used + extra Condos, 2BR, 2 BA, DACHSHUNDS, MINI WALBROOK STUDIOS New 42" mower deck, HOLIDAY RAMBLER 1 car gar, $775/mo. $775 puppies, CKC, $275 CHEVY CAMARO $3,000. 865-247-6755 25 1-3 60 7 NEPTUNE, 2006, & up. Solids, dap- ***Web ID# 951736*** 1969 conv. white/orange $140 weekly. Discount damage dep. No pets. 36 ft., D.P., all ples. 423-365-9591. Doyle 254-9552 int., show winner, restroavail. Util, TV, Ph, options, 29K mi., no mod, PERFECT! 350 ***Web ID# 951923*** Stv, Refrig, Basic omissions, $110,000 manual trans 5 spd. $70K, Cable. No Lse. Jewelry 202 (retails $139,000). Shepherd Trucking Opportunities 106 GERMAN Billy, 602-478-9000 - AZ. Puppies, AKC, 865-765-0700 ***Web ID# 949872*** 1 Male, 2 Females, Diamond Engagement Duplexes 73 DRIVERS: Getting $300. 865-296-2439 ring, .98 carats, white LEXUS LS430 2005, Home is Easier. ***Web ID# 951842*** 238 low mi., black, gold, appraised at Motorcycles Chromed out trucks AVAILABLE N.E. 2 $5700. 865-671-7468 $21,000. Phone 865w/APU’s. Chromed German Shepherd BR, 1 1/2 BA, newly 250-1585 HARLEY DAVIDSON out pay package! puppies, WHITE, 2F, decorated, appl., W/D 1977. $4200. 90% Drop & Hook. 5M, LARGE parents Misc. Items conn. Near shopping 203 Leave message CDL-A, 6mos Exp. on site, AKC, shots, & bus. $700/mo. + DD. Sports 264 865-984-5604. (888) 247- 4037 $400. 423-763-8526 865-689-5293; 438-4853 ***Web ID# 950035*** 52" BIG Screen RCA CORVETTE 1986 TV $300; 75 gal. fish WEDGEWOOD HILLS German Shepherd pups, Pace Car conv. 48K tank & oak stand $200; Autos Wanted 253 AT CEDAR BLUFF AKC, 3 M, 2 F, Euro. wedding dresses, new mi., all orig., yellow 2BR Townhouse, 2BA, frplc, laundry bldln, parents on & used, sz 2-22, $100 ea. I BUY junk cars and w/blk top. $11,900 obo. rm, new carpet, 1 yr lease, $730 mo, site, $400. 865-426-2623 trucks. 865.456.5249 Call 865-755-4729. Authentic name brand ***Web ID# 950077*** $250 dep. 865-216-5736 or 694-8414. purses. 865-687-4342. or 865.938.6915 ***Web ID# 950836***

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SHOPPER-NEWS • MARCH 19, 2012 • B-3

NEWS FROM PROVISION HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Physical therapy programs address health issues Lisa Wolf at DOWELL SPRINGS

Exciting changes at Provision Since we began helping people live healthier, happier lives a year-and-a-half ago, we have been part of the many exciting new things going on at the Provision Health Alliance Campus (PHA) at Dowell Springs. The PHA campus providers all share a common interest in developing new, innovative, comprehensive healthcare solutions that make major improvements in patient care and outcomes. Whether it is driving the latest research on radiopharmaceuticals that improve the diagnosis of cancer or helping people make lifestyle changes they never thought they could, we are excited to be a part of the healthcare solutions taking place on this campus. Because of that, we have decided to take on the Provision name. The Wellness Center at Dowell Spring is now Provision Health & Wellness, and though our name has changed, everything that enables us to help you live well is still the same. We look forward to continuing to serve you with effective programs and services aimed at helping you achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

By Aaron Killian Provision Physical Therapy, located within Provision Health and Wellness, encourages people to call and find out more about the many programs they offer to address various health issues: ■ The Neck and Back Pain progam focuses on individual, evidence-based, manual (hands-on) therapy directed at joint and soft tissue structures. This program incorporates Scientific Therapeutic Exercise Progressions (STEP) which target specific small muscles and allow for increased stability and tissue healing.

■ Provision’s Sports Injury Program focuses on joint and soft tissue pathology and the underlying biomechanical deficits that may be contributing to continued irritation. Provision therapists actively participate and compete in a multitude of sports, as this is one of their personal passions. ■ The Headache Program is directed at the underlying cause of the headaches due to tension, upper neck dysfunction, and postural problems. A comprehensive, evidence-based approach is taken, and multiple treatment modalities are ultimately useful in

Partnership is major asset at Provision For those experiencing aches and pains, Provision Physical Therapy along with Provision Health and Wellness may have just the solution. As members of Provision Health Alliance, these two entities offer personalized treatment from beginning to end. Physical therapists Dean Dean Douglass Douglass and Wes Franks examine the patient and develop a plan of care. They use a variety of treatment techniques that reduce pain, restore movement and function, and help prevent disability or further injury.

Douglass and Franks are certified Manual Therapists providing a specialized, hands-on form of practice that directly targets injured tissue and surrounding muscles and joints. They also provide advanced orthopaedic physical therapy. Provision Physical Therapy accepts most insurance plans Wes Franks and offers affordable self-pay rates. After completion of the therapy program, patients may continue to use the Health and Wellness facilities and participate in various classes for up to a month at no charge.

alleviating symptoms. ■ Post-Operative Rehabilitation Programs are specific to the surgery and administered under the referring physician’s guidance. All are directed at restoring pain-free movement, function and optimized return to activity. Education on the specific surgery and anatomy is paramount, as is understanding healing guidelines for both the protective phase and the return to activity phase of rehabilitation. ■ General Conditioning Programs are directed at improving func-

Provision Health and Wellness announces classes in March. ■ Healthy Eating Series: “Sugar Addictions” will be Monday, March 19 at 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. ■ Book Study Series: “Does This Clutter Make My Butt Look Fat?” is about the clutter around you and the clutter inside you that prevents you from living life to the fullest. It can affect every aspect of your life, including the numbers on the scale and your

tion after a medical event (surgery, cancer treatment, and specific disease related conditions). These programs focus on optimizing function through monitored exercise training. Cardiovascular function and patient mobility, for a required job or activity of daily living, are primary focus areas. Other programs are available to address arthritis, joint pain, post-cancer treatment, and more. For additional information on these or other programs with Provision Physical Therapy, please call 865-232-1415 or visit provisiontherapy.com.

relationship with food. Join us every Tuesday at noon for a six-week book study on a fun, practical and different approach to clearing out and cleaning up the spaces where you cook, eat and live. ■ “Weight Management and Hypothyroidism” will be Wednesday, March 21 at 5:30 p.m. and Thursday, March 22 at noon. ■ “To Be or Not To Be Gluten Free” will be Friday, March 23 at noon.

NUTRITION CLASSES: What is Really Making Us Fat? Sugar Addictions Hypothyroidism and Weight Management Diabetes Made Simple Does This Clutter Make My Butt Look Fat? (book study) For information on these and other classes, please call (865) 232-1414.

1400 Dowell Springs Blvd., Suite 100, Knoxville, TN 37909 (865) 232.1414 · livewellknoxville.com


B-4 • MARCH 19, 2012 • BEARDEN SHOPPER-NEWS

health & lifestyles NEWS FROM PARKWEST, WEST KNOXVILLE’S HEALTHCARE LEADER • TREATEDWELL.COM • 374-PARK

Parkwest dispatcher gives shirt off his back When Parkwest Medical Center dispatcher Eric Saye met a distraught woman near the hospital’s front entrance, he didn’t think twice about giving her the shirt off his back – literally. “I was taking a break and had decided to get a little exercise. So I walked up to the front entrance, and I noticed this lady kind of peeking into the gift shop,” Saye recounted. “As she turned, I noticed there was a distraught look on her face, like she’d lost her best friend. I asked if there was something I could help her with, and she said that she’d messed up, that she thought her husband wasn’t getting discharged until the next day and had taken her husband’s clothes home to wash them but now they were ready to discharge him and he didn’t have any clothes to put on.” Instinctively, Saye then did what he thought “anybody” would do – he offered her the shirt he was wearing.

“I had two shirts on, and I asked her if she thought he could fit into this shirt, and she said it looked a little small but it was worth a shot,” Saye said. “She was saying that she hated to take it, but I just told her, ‘Don’t worry about it. Just bring it back if you can.’ It was one of my favorite golfing shirts.” The next day, Saye got a call from the volunteers at the Information Desk, telling him that a lady had come by and dropped off a shirt for him. In addition to the shirt, she left a nice thank-you card.

Saye downplays his act of generosity, saying he’d “expect anybody would do the same for me.” What prompted Saye to act in such a generous manner? Two things, Saye said: (1) the Parkwest philosophy and (2) his upbringing. “As an employee of Parkwest, I know what our philosophy is,” he explained. “I try to live up to that standard and wanted to let her know that because I am ‘well treated’ by Parkwest I can pass it along and treat her well, that it makes me proud to be a member of Parkwest. That’s my understanding of our philosophy, and that was how my mama raised me.” When he received an email from Becky Boyd, volunteer services coordinator, recognizing his generosity, he forwarded it to his mother. “Mom said she was so proud of me,” said Saye. “I told her that I had two good teachers – Mom and Dad.”

Parkwest dispatcher Eric Saye received his favorite golf shirt back, along with a nice thank-you card.

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I have just spent the last week of 2011 in Parkwest MC, diagnosed with the worst news I’ve ever had to hear, multiple myeloma. The reason I want to write this letter is: from the doctors, nurses, janitors, receptionist, etc. – all in all, everyone that I have dealt with at Parkwest has been outstanding. I have had two surgeries and my husband has had surgeries there also. We have always had such excellent care and kindness. But this time around meant so much to me because I have never been this scared in my life. People like to write about their complaints and forget to let you all know all the right things that you all do. There were nurses that soothed me and helped me so much that I could not believe how great they were. My room number was 264 and the No. 1 nurse was named Addie. Unfortunately, I never got her last name. Nurses like her need an extra pat or five on the back. Her excellent care and concern is something I have never come close to ever experiencing. Nurses named Pam, Angie T., Hannah and Tina were also very good. I have had bad experiences in another hospital and had actually lost my faith in nurses, doctors and hospitals. But Parkwest has restored my faith that people that are supposed to help us in our times of need are still out there. I realize that it’s no coincidence that everything works that well and there has to be good management from above. I have a long road ahead of me with this cancer but have faith that my best interest will be looked out for at your facility. I hope that the nurses, especially Addie, know how much they did for me and my family. My husband and I have been married 34 years and they treated him and my children with the greatest kindness and respect. Thanks from the bottom of my heart. Unfortunately, I know I will be in and out of the hospital over a period of time, but I think I can bear it a little more because of the great care, kindness and respect p I have received there.

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Thank you, Elizabeth A. Neal Oakdale, TN

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Parkwest Medical Center remains on the forefront of diagnosing and treating disease with the most advanced technology available…those who entrust their healthcare to us demand nothing less. But technology alone isn’t enough to bring healing and comfort to patients and families. True healthcare begins with something less expensive, non-invasive and pain free. It’s called listening.

At Parkwest…listening is state-of-the-art.

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Bearden Shopper-News 031912  

A great community newspaper serving Bearden and the surrounding area

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