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Wanderer. issue one

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TEL AVIV "AND SO WITH THE SUNSHINE... I HAD THAT FAMILIAR CONVICTON THAT LIFE WAS BEGINNING OVER AGAIN WITH THE SUMMER" F. SCOTT FITZGERALD

MALIBU VARANASI PUGLIA

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contents

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12 AROUND THE WORLD IN 6 FLAVOURS

42 LITERARY MOMENTS, 5 HOTELS

16 SWEET KALE OF MINE

52 THE COLOUR OF ADVENTURE

20 THE OM DIARIES

56 FOREVER YOURS

22 HOLLYWOOD TRAVELS

62 A VEGGIE DELIGHT

24 WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

64 THE ROSE AMONG THE THORNS

32 MAKING CALIFORNIAN WAVES

68 INDIA, INDIA

34 TREND TROTTER

82 MINIMALISTIC LUXURY

36 THE WEEKEND CLUB

88 ON THE ROAD

38 CHEAT SHEET: MIDDLE EAST

92 YOUR ITINERARY

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Editor's Travel Diary There is a woman, she plans her own route through life, moving forward without a backward glance in pursuit of her dreams. She’s the happiest when in motion, with the summer sun beating down on her freckled skin. She travels the coastal highways by road or takes a private yacht and whether the journey takes her to a retreat in the peaceful entity of the ocean or the cool vines of bougainvillea, the exhilaration of escape is what she savours the most. Wanderer welcomes you to a decade of uninhibited travel journalism, one that’s stylish, aspirational and often hilarious. The pages of issue one are packed with ideas for summer that will make you want to take planes to destinations unknown, and do things out of your comfort zone; be it a yoga retreat in western India or a strenuous hike up Santorini’s volcanic cliffs. These intimate journalistic encounters with cities of character and wit will be an ongoing theme for Wanderer, but right now we’re all about summer and its sun-kissed glory. As for you… Wanderer has its sight set on every modern woman who has given #SoloTravel a thought, and it’s here to help you pack your bags so you can leave on that adventure. The cynical voices who call us single female travellers ‘brave’ can take a backseat, because the pages of this publication are here to champion their optimism, intellect and ingenuity. Our generation’s pragmatic stories need to be told, without anyone doubting our intelligence and desire to get lost amongst the winding streets of a city. So, here’s to a season that epitomises wanderlust, festivities and unforgettable memories -- all infused within the hues of Greek blue and Californian coral. I’m certain you will have a celebratory summer of inexcusable tan lines on a seemingly endless stretch of powdered golden sand and take comfort in the isolation of those quiet moments at dusk. Shitika Anand, Editor-in-Chief

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Contributors BECKY WICKS WRITER, ENGLAND

XIAOHAN "ASHKA" SHEN STREET STYLE PHOTOGRAPHER, AUSTRALIA KATIE GOSS WRITER, AUSTRALIA

RAKESH VIJAYAN PHOTOGRAPHER, INDIA

Lives in Brisbane, but has her heart in the Northern Hemisphere, Katie has written 'The colour of adventure' for this issue.

Rakesh is a 9-6 banker in Chennai during the working week and a candid photographer on the weekends. He’s captured the 'India, India' photo essay.

WHAT DOES SUMMER MEAN TO YOU?

WHAT DOES SUMMER MEAN TO YOU?

Summer means Christmas, lots of seafood, air-con and beach time with the girls.

The entire year. In India, we know nothing but summer.

ONE CITY YOU CAN GO OVER AND OVER TO AND NEVER TIRE OF IT?

'Trend Trotter’ of this issue, Ashka lives in Sydney and has had her work featured in Vogue Australia, ELLE Korea, and Nylon Japan.

ONE CITY THAT'S ON TOP OF YOUR LIST TO PHOTOGRAPH? Barcelona

New York! The beauty is in the vibe. You can wear anything and be anyone. Plus that view from Top of the Rock!

LIZ CARRIGAN DESIGNER, ENGLAND

Becky is curently working on the third book in the Starstruck Series (a trilogy of new adult novels that focus on the consequences of fame) while sipping organic juices (or triple-shot coffees) in Bali.

AARON WEINMAN WRITER, HONG KONG

WHAT DOES SUMME MEAN TO YOU? Hot sun, cold beer and my friends - the people who know everything about me and still like me. ONE DESTINATION WHERE YOU’VE HAD THE BEST SOLO ADVENTURES? An Aussie at heart, Liz is still getting used to calling London her new ‘home’. Her creative vision can be seen on every page of this issue.

Cartagena in Colombia. I felt like a rainbow fell on me. I went for 3 days and ended up staying 3 weeks.

Aaron is a Hong Kong-based finance journalist who has an unexplainable interest in the MENA region. He’s penned 'The rose among the thorns'.

WHAT DOES SUMMER MEAN TO YOU? Long warm days, morning swims, lazy lunches and sultry nights. Perfection! ONE CITY WHERE THE STREET STYLE NEVER DISAPPOINTS YOU? New York! It’s like a big buffet of styles and I can pick whatever I feel like shooting, depending on my mood.

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WHAT DOES SUMMER MEAN TO YOU?

WHAT DOES SUMMER MEAN TO YOU?

Drinks on the deck, and living life outside. In two words: the beach!

It’s the beacon of happiness. People smile and the day is seized, all while the sun shines down on us.

ONE CITY YOU CAN GO OVER AND OVER TO AND NEVER GET TIRED OF ITS BEAUTY?

NEXT TRAVEL DESTINATION? Tokyo

Istanbul. I could never tire of seeing the moon shine over the Bosphorus.

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The Team P U B L I S H E R & E D I T O R- I N - C H I E F SHITIKA ANAND

ART DIRECTOR LIZ CARRIGAN

CO N T R I B U T O R S JORDI HUISMAN JOSKE SIMMELINK A S H W AT I V I P I N SHARON GREEN RAKESH VIJAYAN K AT I E G O S S FIONA MACDONALD AISHWARYA RAO BECKY WICKS AARON WEINMAN YADIRA GALARZA V I S H A K H A C H E TA N ANGELA EISENTRAGER

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AROUND THE WORLD

FLORENCE, ITALY

LONDON, ENGLAND

When you’re in the city that’s the birthplace of gelato, you really cannot go wrong with finding the best gelateria in the region. Italians should be credited for creating this party-in-the-mouth treat, specifically Florence, because even a small gelateria off the beaten path will have the freshest, most real tasting gelati. Italians don’t believe in preservatives, artificial flavourings or letting you walk past without complimenting your looks. Enjoy this luscious city with a generous and decadent scoop of bacio and nutella gelati.

Two leather-gloved hands aren’t enough when you have an umbrella, an iPhone, an Oyster card, a copy of the free newspaper and a double cone of gelato to carry. No matter how bad the frostbite situation of your fingers is, it’s truly impossible to survive this eternally-overcast city without a sugary consumption of ice-cream. As much as the English love their cream tea and biscuit moments, a fragola sorbet with freshly crushed English strawberries is the real ice-breaker here. Pun intended.

£1.35 per scoop

£3.90 per scoop

IN 6 FLAVOURS An adult’s bribery tool and a child’s idea of heaven, this sub-zero treat pleases the palette, caters to a nasty brain freeze and is impressively capable of making an Instagram photo look like an award-winning frame. Summer without ice-cream is an offensive thought; irrespective of whether you’re travelling to a tropical destination or stuck in your rainy hometown. There’s always time for a cone, no matter what part of the world you’re in.

WORDS: SHITIKA ANAND PHOTOS: LUCY CROSBIE

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THESSALONIKI, GREECE PARIS, FRANCE

ZADAR, CROATIA

TOKYO, JAPAN

What’s not to love about ice-cream when a George Michael look-alike, circa 1989, gives you endless little taster spoons filled with creamy goodness? The hospitable ice-cream parlours in this northern town of the country stay true to the Greek stereotype, but it’s the subtle infusion of salepi (orchid root) in the traditional flavours that really hits all the right chords on the palette. Go to any local street vendor and ask for a combination of oreo cookie and coconut cream; it'll melt your heart.

When the consumption of strawberry crêpes and hourly head-turns towards the glistening Eiffel Tower start to feel like a routine, find refuge in Martine Lambert’s parlour on rue Cler. Back in 1975, madame Lambert dared to open her first ice-cream shop in a region where eating on the streets and wearing bermuda shorts was frowned upon. Today, you’d find Normandy lait cru (unpasteurised milk) and crème fraîche in most recipes, however, if a fruity ice appeals more, then expect a niche and intense variety of fresh fruit sorbet to cuddle your cone.

As repulsive as sprinkling green tea powder onto sweet ice-cream sounds, in actuality it’s delicious, healthy and a Japanese tradition. Rumour has it that when the former emperor of Japan was ill, a Ginza tea seller presented matcha ice-cream to the palace, and it cured all his ailments. Umm, OK. Matcha is powdered green tea, made only once a year from soft budding leaves, and Japanese ice-cream parlours love adding it to their most popular flavours. Just a little sprinkle, and you’ll forget why you questioned it all along.

£1.20 per scoop

£3.25 per scoop

Despite having Italy as its friendly neighbour, Croatians pride on having an ice-cream shop at every street corner in Zadar. There’s no hesitation when you’re given a generous swirl of ice, milk and sugar. Especially if you ask for anything lavender. Unlike Provence, the lavender fields in this country aren’t its main attraction, and are actually kept under the radar (especially during peak tourist season). But don’t fret for not being able to Instagram the disciplined rows of violet buds, because you’ll be eating its fragrant frozen variety that actually tastes just as healing as it sounds.

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79p per scoop

£4 per scoop

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SWEET KALE

OF MINE ...

PHOTOS: SIMMS + HUIS TWO DUTCH PHOTOGRAPHERS TAKE UP THE CHALLENGE TO CREATE HOME-COOKED MEALS WHEN ON THE ROAD. NO HAUTE CUISINE, THE FOOD HERE IS ONLY MADE WITH FRESH INGREDIENTS AND LOVE.

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ABOVE : CUCUMBER-INFUSED WATER FOR A REFRESHING SUMMER CLEANSE. BESIDE : LIFE'S LITTLE PLEASURES ARE IN EATING CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER AND BANANA ON SOURDOUGH.

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THE OM DIARIES

WORDS: TIJANA JAKSIC

and dinner scored rave reviews, making second helpings all too and don’ts. She wrote: “Take salads and sprouted beans, avoid common, and probably the reason I left no lighter. Unrolling refrigerated food including water, do not drink milk at night, my yoga mat on day three and unfolding my scrawled-on sheet eat lots of ginger, get up before sunrise, don’t take naps in the of diagrams showing the postures, the feeling was surreal. A afternoon, meditate and exercise regularly." shala full of people. Our mixed energies buzzing. While the students progressed at different rates, Petri moved around Also, to my delight, she recommended a traditional ayurvedic the room to adjust the poses to be deeper, stronger. At first I whole body massage. That turned out to be a complete herbwas put off by all the bodies infused oil bath sliminess moving out of sync, but slowly "THIS DEEP BREATHING TECHNIQUE ACTUALLY verging on heaven. But while I learnt to focus inwards: on FELT GOOD AS AIR FOUND PARTS WITHIN MY it’s easy to forget the world and each breath, each movement. LUNGS LONG STARVED OF OXYGEN." whittle away time without ever Each morning that followed, leaving the retreat, exactly like our bodies worked harder and harder, the temperature inside how some guests prefer, but Purple Valley is also a perfect base the room growing hotter as each day came upon us, rays of from which to roam and explore nearby. sun piercing the windows in beams of shifting light. We finished the session flat on our backs relaxing in savasana With just days left on my slice of heaven, it was hard to believe pose. I emerged exhausted yet refreshed, calm yet buzzing nearly two weeks had passed. On the last day I pushed myself with energy. A traditional medicine native to India, ayurveda’s harder than ever before stretching, reaching, twisting further. central philosophy is that illness stems from an imbalance of And then I realised: for days not a single thought had entered the body’s three vital energies, or doshas. Visiting the ayurvedic my mind from the moment I unrolled my yoga mat within doctor on day seven, I was diagnosed as a kapha-vata body type, the shala walls. Bending down to touch my toes, my eyes met walking out with a concoction of herbs and a long list of dos another’s. But I was the only one in the room.

PHOTOS: DENNIS YANG from deep, deep within each hot and sweaty body bending and stretching on their mats.

GOA MAY BE A STATE OF POPULAR CHOICE FOR HIPSTERS AND SUN-WORSHIPPERS, BUT SERIOUS YOGA FANATICS CAN ALSO FIND SOLITUDE AMIDST THE MADNESS OF THIS COASTAL LAND.

Soon enough, I was doing it. Beads of sweat swelled and rolled down my chin to my lips to give me a salty taste before breakfast. Bent in half at the hips with feet apart and now looking between my legs, I remained determined not to lose focus as my eyes met another’s, both now paused in unavoidably awkward positions. Despite looking each other square in the eyes, body parts sticking into the air at unfamiliar angles, there was no acknowledgement of this situation. Arriving at Purple Valley Yoga Centre on day one, in the sunkissed state of Goa on India’s west coast, I had no idea what was ahead of me. The birthplace of yoga, India has long been a popular choice for yoga fanatics. I ambled up to the yoga shala, a complete beginner, yoga mat rolled and tucked under my arm. Pushing through the grand wooden doors hailing from Rajasthan in Northern India, a state renowned for its art, intricately carved temples and rich royals of previous ages, all I could hear was this loud, labouring breathing sound. It rasped

“Calm and even breath means calm and even mind,” said Petri Raisanen, our instructor, insisting that breathing was the most important element. Despite all the noise, this deep breathing technique, called ujjayi, actually felt good as air found parts within my lungs long starved of oxygen. Petri went on to guide me and one other beginner through each pose. Four days a week we attended various afternoon sessions, from posture correction to energy healing and technique. That day at breakfast the rest of the group, all more experienced, were delighted to hear of our progress as we tucked into a scrumptious feast of tropical fruits, porridge, homemade breads and nuts. From the outset it was clear the amazing yogi food was far from tofu scramble, thanks to the team of dedicated chefs including a raw food chef who gets seaweed shipped all the way from her mother in Japan. All vegetarian and often vegan, the intensely delicious dishes served for lunch

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Midnight in Paris (2011) “Paris is most beautiful in the rain.” Woody Allen’s nostalgic vision of the city in this period film made us all dream of what the city of love would have been in the ‘20s. Costume designer Sonia Grande gave a contemporary twist to a unique narrative when she created Marion Cotillard’s romantic threads for the reminiscent era.

HOLLLLYWOOD TRAVELS When it comes to storytelling in cinema, you’d often find an uncredited character that would take a leap over every lead in the story and be the real star. This character is unpaid, unrehearsed and most honest in its execution of reel vs real life, yet given the least importance. This character is the city. The backdrop of each cinematic glory. The voice of every story. The city that takes the entire weight of a narrative on its shoulders and paints a literal picture for its viewers.

From Russia With Love (1963) Bond girls from the ‘60s didn’t just sunbake in two-pieces, but they also put on their sharp Chanel skirt-suits and plotted an assassination ploy. Daniela Bianchi’s perfect blow dry and kitten heels meant business, especially when she was jetting around Istanbul’s azure water to retrieve a Soviet encryption device with Bond.

Roman Holiday (1953) A European princess escapes her official duties for one lighthearted day in the ruins of Rome in this feature film, and thereby, making every American eager to experience the intimacy of travelling afar. Set against classic backdrops, Audrey Hepburn’s easygoing, yet confident post-war wardrobe added another leaf of charm to this holiday book.

If it wasn’t for the yellow cab from which a Givenchy-clad Audrey Hepburn emerged with a croissant and coffee in hand, we’d never know that the protagonist in Breakfast in Tiffany’s was not Holly Golightly, but in fact, it was New York City. Sure we watch movies for our favourite actors or their enthralling storylines, but how often do we walk into the cinema knowing that the real narrators of the script will be streets and hidden alleyways projected through poetic cinematography.

Crossroads (2002) Epitomising cool millennial fashion, this American teenage flick wasn’t just the highlight of Britney Spears’ (short-lived) onscreen career, but was also increasingly beneficial for American roadtripping industry. The rom-com made every teenage girl want to invest in waist belts, hoop earrings and a yellow convertible car for cross-country adventures.

WORDS: SHITIKA ANAND

That Man From Rio (1964) When the French and Italian gang up to do a spoof on James Bond, they take the entire cast and crew to the jungles of the Amazon and then solve life-threatening mysteries. Add French silhouettes, Chanel pearls and a perfect chignon to the mix and you have yourself a winning script. - 22 -

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Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) The hotheaded heroine of Ang Lee’s martial arts extravaganza dashes back and forth across China without any indication of how unlogistic all that travel might be. Perhaps the luxurious silk kimonos she wore during her sojourn made the tedious journey a little characteristic and a lot more memorable.


where the wild things are

A NARRATIVE OF A JOURNEY THOUGH EAST AFRICA’S MOST BELOVED RESERVES. WORDS AND PHOTOS: ASHWATI VIPIN

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Rushing past the orange street lights on Hyderabad’s deserted Outer Ring Road on a rainy August night, I realised my African dream was about to come true. As I looked out the taxi window through the spattering of raindrops, I envisioned all the sights that would welcome me. I was on my way to the most unstaged, unmonitored land with nothing for miles but an open field reserved for the wild. You enter their land as guests and they play exquisite hosts. I couldn't wait. As my plane descended, I looked through the clearing of the overcast Kenyan sky, and gaped at the vast expanse of Nairobi National Park. With Coldplay humming Midnight in my ears, it was an almost spiritual realisation that I really was in Africa! With several ‘game drives’ (a term used for when you set off on a safari in an open-roof, but protected jeep) planned for this twoweek adventure, my DLSR, Instagram feed and I were prepared to enter head on into this holiday. No high heels, no curling irons and no couture gowns here, this trip was about to see the non-glamourous side of travelling.

THE FIRST GAME DRIVE

A six-hour drive from Nairobi, the Oltukai Lodge at Amboseli National Park, was the first safari destination. Nestled in the shadow of the mighty Mount Kilimanjaro, lay the vast expanses of the savannah grass; Amboseli had already made its mark. The beauty of the savannah is in its simplicity. There's nothing but clear skies, the green grass, the animals and you. As I headed off on our first safari, we spotted a mob of zebra and wildebeest transfixed in one direction. My guide, David, informed that this happened when a cat was in the vicinity. I

peeled my eyes and spied five earth-hued spotted cheetahs camouflaged in the grass. These were young cats, chasing the herbivores for fun. Like you do. Around 20 vehicles had gathered in the area, making it very difficult for the cheetahs to cross the path. While eco-tourism needs to find a fine balance between rewarding tourists and avoiding disturbance to the animals’ natural habitat, I witnessed an upsetting breach of this balance. As fascinating as this flirtation between the prey and predator was, we decided to leave the spot in the hope that the rest would follow. We drove along numerous hyenas, elephant, zebra and wildebeest herds, all peering at us inquisitively. It was easy to be distracted by the overdose of uninhibited animals, but the breathtaking savannah sunsets had their own special place amidst all the wildlife. Mount Kilimanjaro and its snowcapped peak stood tall and proud and the savannah imitated a watercolour painting, with hues of orange and yellow bursting through the sky. The setting sun also brought with it a silence that was so unlike the usual action-packed wild. I was back in my room, fixating on the adventurous day I'd had, but as the night set in, I heard a water buffalo at the watering hole nearby, along with the faint sound of zebra whinnying into the night. A little part of me was terrified, as I popped out for a stroll, because there was such little separating me from the wild. But I was amazed at the sheer rawness of it all. In the wild, life is stripped from its materialistic comforts and it all comes down to survival of the fittest, the oxymoron of which really kicks in when tourists book luxury villas to witness this from. Exactly like I had.

MASAI MARA MAGIC

On the way to our Mara home, as we crossed the river, the stench of decaying flesh overpowered the riverbank. The water was filled with bodies of the wildebeest that couldn’t make it across and the scavenging birds had taken advantage of this scenario with zero sympathy. This gruesome reminder of the fragility of life in the wild was certainly not the way I’d hoped to start The Masai Mara National Reserve journey. But it was the silhouette of the animals and the trees, the dramatic skies, the crisp breeze and the silence of the vast wilderness that was immensely meditative. When you set off on an African safari, making a list of animals you want to spot (and photograph, in my case!) comes nothing - 26 -

Wrinkles don't matter: The age of a giraffe can be calculated from its spots; the darker the spots, the older the giraffe.

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out of surprise. I had seen all members of the Big Five (lion, leopard, elephant, buffalo and rhino), but the lion. And on my first day out on Mara lands, that moment was met. Sitting atop a rock in all their grandeur was a pride of lions, soaking the piercing rays of the sun. Unfazed by the amazed eyes around them, or the sounds of shutters from the camera lenses, this creature is the king of the jungle for good reason.

Another setting for a kill was screaming for attention from a distance: a lone acacia tree in the middle of the landscape, on one side of which was a group of wildebeest and on the other, a lone antelope, all facing the tree. It was apparent that there was a big cat in the area. Shaking with excitement, the entire jeep thought we were about to witness a kill. I pulled my weapon out, and on peering through my camera lens, I spotted the predator, the mighty cheetah. We waited long enough for the cat to hunt for its dinner, so we could have ours in the luxuries of our hotel, but the wildebeest had luck on their side. The cheetah leaped away from sight as the raindrops did a celebratory dance on behalf of the implausibility of wildebeest.

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Despite the rain beating down on the rugged terrain, the car in front of us spotted a male and female lion having a heated mating moment. Lions mate only once a year and do it for six days without eating or hunting. This dedicated pair carried out their mating dance unperturbed by the live viewers around them. And so came my last night in this unspoilt haven. I took a stroll outside, late into the night, shivering in the chilly breeze but warm in my heart from the fortnight I had spent in the territory of these creatures. The scores of stars and wisps of the galaxy in the night sky reassured that despite all the craziness in the world, there's a slice of unconventional paradise around us. We just need to chase it. The moments from this whirlwind of an adventure are captured in my camera, but more permanently in my heart. Never had I realised prior to this trip, the endearment of the unpredictable, unedited and raw disposition of the wild. It may make you wait but when it rewards you, it’s with the most unfamiliar rush of happiness. Wild Africa isn’t just a holiday, it’s an experience. That night, I bid the starry savannah goodbye, knowing that the wild had gone back into the wild, and my time was up as well.

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The best time to visit Kenya is during the dry season - January to March and July to October. The latter is also the time of annual migration for wildebeest and zebra.

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MAKING CALIFORNIAN WAVES WORDS: ELIZABETH SCHWYZER

PHOTOS: NICOLAS RISCH

famous, and continues to draw surfers from near and far, each hoping to secure a pocket of the Pacific for themselves.

FOLLOW THE RUGGEDLY HANDSOME SURFERS TO DISCOVER THE BIGGEST BEACH SCENE OF THE WEST COAST.

Y

Those looking to join the throngs will need a set of wheels – preferably four, if you’ve got a board in tow. If you’re approaching Malibu from the north, you’ll head along Highway 1, which meanders through inland valleys before popping out at Point Mugu. It’s worth a quick stop at the side of the road to savour the ocean breeze, and admire the way the rocky land spills into turquoise waters, but keep heading south – Malibu awaits. The road follows the wavering line of the coast, and though it’s tempting to gaze out to sea, you’ll want to keep your eyes on the road. The next thirty miles are dotted with popular beaches and hiking trails leading up into the coastal canyons. It’s not hard to spot the favourites – the highway will be lined with parked cars. You’ll know you’re getting close to the centre of it all when you pass a giant sand dune across from the ocean that rises hundreds of feet above the road, dwarfing the children who clamber up its

ou know you’re nearing Malibu when a motorcycle veers by with a surfboard strapped to its side. Tucked at the far western edge of Los Angeles County, where the rolling hills meet the Pacific Ocean, Malibu is the epicentre of California's surf culture. This picturesque stretch of coastline has long sported some of the best surf in the continental United States, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that Malibu gained international fame. With the release of the 1959 film Gidget starring Sandra Dee, the world came to know Malibu as an idyllic beach town where hard-bodied surfers and wholesome, sun-tanned beach babes frolicked in the sand and rode the waves. In the years since then, Malibu has become a luxury destination for Hollywood celebrities and visitors from around the world. At the same time, the region remains home to some of the original surfers who made it - 32 -

flank. Around a few more corners, you’ll come to County Line “This break is nicknamed kooky line,” she admits, adding, “There Beach, the northernmost Malibu surf spot, and a great spot for are a lot of kooks out there who don’t know what they’re doing”. soaking up some California surf culture. Directly across from Yet she often spends her breaks out on her board, and says she the beach is Neptune’s Net, a roadside seafood eatery and market can always find a spot to herself. Certainly, the crowds lining the that serves as a pit stop for the biker crowd. The busy parking sand in their beach chairs, coolers by their sides, are unfazed by lot sports everything from cherry red Ferraris to rusted out VW whatever drama might be unfolding on the water. I decide to buses with surf racks, as well as a join them, and sink my toes into small army of motorcycles, from “PART OF THE JOY OF SURFING IS THAT IT’S A the warm sand. A flock of pelicans souped-up sports bikes to classic SPECTATOR SPORT – THE BEST SURFERS ON THIS glide past, their long beaks and cruisers. This is the place to pause BREAK ARE LIKE DANCERS, SWINGING AND DIPPING giant wingspan lending them for a pitcher of beer and a basket ACROSS THE FACE OF THE WAVES.” prehistoric grace. Part of the joy of of fries. Ageing, leather-faced surfing is that it’s a spectator sport surfers stand looking down at the break, emitting the occasional – the best surfers on this break are like dancers, swinging and holler at a good set, while extended families gather nearby dipping across the face of the waves. Even on land, they’re objects to chat and drink. Dripping wetsuits line the guardrail, and of curiosity; I watch a surfer with dreadlocks hanging down to seagulls hover overhead, surfing the air currents and looking his knees lope across the wet sand, slowly heading for the less for scraps of food. Though veteran surfers tend to prefer other populated point at the west end of the beach. beaches, the length of the break at County Line accommodates a good-sized crowd. But whether you’re a veteran surfer or a newcomer to the sport, an avid spectator, or an out-of-town visitor looking to soak up When I visit on a Saturday afternoon in July, I spot nearly a some Southern California surf culture, Malibu remains a sacred hundred surfers in the water. At the east end of the beach, a spot. It’s a place where many cultures meet over their shared love female lifeguard stands watch at the base of her tower. “I want of the ocean. All you need is a set of wheels to get you there, a people to come down and enjoy a day at the beach,” Savannah surfboard if you’re so inclined, and maybe a beach blanket. chirps. Surfers are notoriously territorial, and can be intolerant of beginners. I ask her whether that’s a problem at this beach. - 33 -


TREND TROTTER

LONDON

JOHANNESBURG

STREET STYLE PHOTOGRAPHER XIAOHAN "ASHKA" SHEN LENSES THE ACTION AROUND THE WORLD’S FAVOURITE FASHION CITIES AND DOCUMENTS EVERY STEREOTYPE ASSOCIATED WITH THEM.

GLITTERED ANDROGYNE ON THE STREETS OF KENSINGTON

MILAN: WHEN THE ACCESSORY GAME SPEAKS LOUDER THAN THE THREADS

PARIS

SYDNEY

SKIRTING THE ISSUE OF FLATTERING CURVES

CHIC SHADES OF GREY WITH A SIDE OF GIGGLES

DENIM DAYS WITH FRINGE BENEFITS NEW YORK: AN UNAPOLOGETIC RAINBOW STATEMENT WITH HAIR TO MATCH

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the

weekend club

BOTTOMLESS FLUTES OF MIMOSAS WITH EGGS OF YOUR CHOICE; BRUNCHING IN NEW YORK CITY IS AN INSTITUTION THAT MUSTN’T BE MISSED WORDS AND PHOTOS: KRIS SETO

S

omething magical happens in New York City on weekends. It begins at around 11 a.m. for the ambitious early birds, and blends into the late afternoon, fuelled by Bellinis, Eggs Benedict, and browned wholegrain toast with apple butter on the side. Breakfast doesn’t really exist on weekends in the city. It has been replaced by the pursuit of the perfect brunch, with a holy cross section of breakfast fare; eggs, bacon, pancakes, waffles and French toast take centre stage to bask in the glorious prime time spotlight they always deserved. Every culture has its own sacred food ritual - the Spanish have their postprandial siesta, the Cantonese have dim sum, while the English have their Sunday roasts - for New Yorkers, this is our precious portmanteau with its own unique secrets. The most basic rules are these; eat breakfast foods at lunchtime, drink copious amounts of bottomless mimosas when available, and be merry (always easier with said mimosas). It’s an experience and an event, a combination of a leisurely day off, and an occasion to get together and catch up, and a recovery programme to help nurse hangovers from the night before. It's the sweetest of meals. What is it exactly that draws New Yorkers to the amorphous breakfast-slashlunch hour? Could it be that brunch is an act of rebellion? For most of our lives, mealtimes have been dictated to us. We eat a specific range of foods served at specific time slots precisely three times a day. If the right kind of food isn’t available to us at the right time, we cry until it is. For New Yorkers, the anxious, angsty teenagers that we are, brunch is our chance to break the rules. It gives us permission to throw away the mundane routine of our ninetill-seven workdays by eating breakfast at three in the afternoon without apology, drinking during the day without judgement, and turning a simple meal into a long, drawn out affair without regard to real-life responsibilities. We are adults now, is what we are saying, we do what we want, when we want, and if that means enjoying ricotta pancakes with a side of rosemary fingerling potatoes, a little later than normal, then we’re going to do it. In contrast, for some, it seems brunch represents a return to innocence and an escape from adulthood. It’s a special time to nourish an inner child who has been repeatedly neglected, discouraged, and beaten down by societal expectations and norms. Brunch can act as a time portal of sorts, both in its ability to return us to simpler times, as well as being effective in blurring our own perception of time passing. The comforting tastes of the foods we enjoyed as children unleash our purest self, allowing it to come out and eat, drink and play freely. In short, at brunch, one returns to an uninhibited state of wonder. For others of course, it’s a much simpler equation with brunch adding up to great food, good friends, and an excuse for daytime drinking. In order to decide which theory works best for you, why not call some friends, sit and eat food that will take a few hours to digest.

Fool’s drink: There is no actual ‘recipe’ for a mimosa: just take orange juice and champagne (or sparkling wine) and pour them together until the colour seems right. - 36 -

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DRINKING AND CLUBBING Although Islamic law prohibits alcohol, some Muslim countries are fairly accommodating to tourists who wish to drink and dance – it’s just a case of noting which city it’s most acceptable to do this in. Agadir in Morocco, for example, comes to life at night with locals and tourists, but drinking in the Medina should be off your radar unless you’re doing it indoors. Likewise, clubbing in Istanbul is far more convenient, livelier and safer than the older towns. The same goes for Dubai; you can experience a brilliant few nights in Downtown, but don’t even contemplate drinking on the streets at 3am, in more discreet areas such as Ajman.

Cheat Sheet: Middle East

COVERING SKIN BUT KEEPING COOL How much skin you need to cover is completely dependent on which country and area you’re visiting, but as a general rule: no mini skirts, strappy or low-cut vests, see-through garments, crop tops and hot pants. Make sure you do your research into specific areas, cities and places before visiting. For example, it’s requested for all visitors to wear ‘respectable clothing’ (thighs covered, at least half of your arms unexposed and no low tops) in most malls in Dubai and Abu Dhabi. When wearing skin-tight jeans and leggings, your top will need to be long enough to cover your backside.

BEACHWEAR In the more liberal countries like Albania and Turkey, you needn’t worry about flaunting your bikini body on public beaches as most are filled with tourists doing the same. Always pack a one-piece, just in case you stumble across a small swimming pool. In stricter countries, ladies are still expected to have their arms and legs (if not, thighs at least) covered as a sign of respect. There are also women’s-only pools. A good way around this issue is to follow the crowd – if everyone else is covered, do the same.

INTERACTING WITH LOCALS WORDS: SHITIKA ANAND AND UNSAH MALIK

Travelling to a Muslim country can be overwhelming, especially keeping the current political turmoil in mind. But don’t let that enjoin you from experiencing a unique culture, religion and socioeconomic sodality.

People are likely to be polite and are generally happy to help and recommend places to make your experience all the more enjoyable. At the same token, it’s important to be well-informed on how others interact in the country. If you sense that there are too many men around you at any given moment, it’s because there are. Move elsewhere.

From clothing to market etiquettes, there are a number of factors you need to consider. Wanderer is here to help you plan this unique holiday of yours, without any hesitation or stress in mind. - 38 -

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SPEAKING THE LANGUAGE

INSTAGRAMMING RULE

Everyone loves a tourist who can understand and speak some Arabic. Here are the most common words used: When greeting someone else: As salamu alaikum wa rahmatullah wa barakatuhu (may the mercy, peace and blessings of Allah [God] be upon you). Thanking someone: ‘Jazakallahu’ (may Allah reward you with good). Showing appreciation: ‘Mashallah’ (this is like another way of saying ‘Wow’ or ‘Amazing’). When planning to do something: ‘Inshallah’ (as Allah wills).

Take as many photographs as you like, but make sure there are no women and children involved without permission. It’s considered very offensive in some countries. Also, take it easy with the selfies and photography in general. Rihanna once visited Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi and, even though covered up, was kicked out for her inappropriate posing.

NOT EATING PORK You will need to start accepting the fact that you won’t find pork in Muslim countries. There are things such as Halal sausages but they don’t quite taste the way you may want them to.

Smoking shisha is more of a tradition in Arab culture rather than a religion practice, and is done commonly during social gatherings. You will find cafés in Dubai, Algeria and Turkey full of both men and women smoking shisha and having a good time. In other countries, like Egypt, it’s more acceptable for men to do it openly as opposed to women. Do your research.

IS IT OK TO BE ALONE?

THE LAW

It’s recommended to travel with a male friend in strict Islamic countries. This is because Muslim women are not meant to travel without a mahram (blood-related male). In other countries, it’s better to travel with a group when you’re visiting busy places such as souks.

Put it this way: you’re not in Ibiza, so keep personal shenanigans, relationships, crazy drinking, smoking and foul language behind closed doors. However, don’t allow this to put you off from visiting the country of your choice – e.g. lashing may be an acceptable punishment according to some laws, but it does not mean you will be lashed (unless you plan on committing a crime.) Respect the country and its beliefs, and you’ll be just fine.

VISITING MOSQUES No matter what country you’re in, it’s considered disrespectful to not cover your hair and body when visiting a mosque. Both males and females should also take their shoes off before entering any prayer rooms. If you’re still unsure whether you’re abiding by the rules or not, most mosques will be happy to provide ladies with an abaya (an outer garment).

THE LEFT HAND RULE Muslim people do not eat with their left hand because it’s used to clean oneself after using the toilet, therefore perceived as unclean. You won’t get yourself into any trouble by not doing the same yourself, but it’s nice to keep it in mind out of respect.

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SMOKING SHISHA (HOOKAH)

VISITING DURING RAMADAN If you’re a complete foodie, avoid visiting Muslim countries during Ramadan. If you have to eat, then do so privately because authorities, for example in Dubai, can fine you for eating during fasting hours. Many countries like Malaysia will have no (or very few) restaurants and cafés open before it’s time to break your fast.

THE POLITICS There are many different views on Islam and Sharia law which you may or may not believe in, nonetheless it’s better to steer clear from this topic when conversing with locals – especially if you have deeply opposing views as this can be considered offensive.

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Iconic Santorini

Nikos Kazantzakis

Aether Boutique Stay

Bill Bryson

COCO-MAT Eco Residences

Constantine P. Cavafy

Rimondi Boutique Hotel

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Astarte Suites

Alain de Botton

WORDS: SHITIKA ANAND

Literary Moments

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Five Hotels

PHOTOS: PAUL THOMPSON

SHE SLIPPED ON HER BIKINI, BRUSHED BACK HER HAIR, STROLLED TO THE POOLSIDE WITH A BOOK IN HAND AND TRANSPORTED HERSELF TO A FICTIONAL WORLD WHERE THE GREEK SUMMER NEVER ENDED. - 43 -


“THIS IS TRUE HAPPINESS: TO HAVE NO AMBITION AND TO WORK LIKE A HORSE AS IF YOU HAD EVERY AMBITION. TO LIVE FAR FROM MEN, NOT TO NEED THEM AND YET TO LOVE THEM. TO HAVE THE STARS ABOVE, THE LAND TO YOUR LEFT AND THE SEA TO YOUR RIGHT AND TO REALIZE OF A SUDDEN THAT IN YOUR HEART, LIFE HAS ACCOMPLISHED ITS FINAL MIRACLE: IT HAS BECOME A FAIRY TALE.” ZORBA THE GREEK BY NIKOS KAZANTZAKIS

ICONIC SANTORINI, SANTORINI After 45 steep stairs and a few stumbles down them, I arrive at what looks like a postcard come to life. The sparkling whitewashed buildings are slowly dissolving into the azure Aegean sea below, and the vibrant hues of bougainvillea are acting as the perfect backdrop. The sun is sizzling down on this hot 36C day, so I’m told to step inside where the humidifier will be kinder to my hair. “I give up on my hair when I work in Santorini, it’s not worth it,” says my Alexis Papas-lookalike butler as he tucks his long locks behind his ears.

As stunning as the island of Santorini is, this little 22-room boutique hotel has all the charm to make you want to retreat in its vicinity and not leave the premises of this cave hideaway. I meander down the tiny sloping pathway (and more stairs) towards my room, and enter what really is - as the name suggests - iconic in every possible way. The ancient caves have been transformed into opulent, romantic rooms, all lending to their air of tranquility. Smooth curves, white, bright, dotted with rustic furniture; the room has little Greek touches that are beautifully cool, a blessing on this humid day.

Iconic Santorini is entirely carved into this highest point of the island, with its cliff-clinging views and lashings of white and blue everywhere. The sun-drenched terrace is overwhelmed with peripatetic sun worshipers who are recovering from last night’s Coronas; hangovers could have a much worse view though, this is a treat.

It’s also worth noting that the walls in every room are solid, soundproof rock. Perhaps I should go out and get my Alexis Papaslookalike to inspect my terrifically stylish room, or just share a glass of red over some grilled feta cheese. I’m sure he wouldn’t mind dropping his butler duties to create some fairytale magic in this iconic ambience for a hopeless romantic like me. Rooms starting £250

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“I SAT ON A TOILET WATCHING THE WATER RUN THINKING WHAT AN ODD THING

“HE HAD ONE OF THOSE RARE SMILES WITH A QUALITY OF

TOURISM IS. YOU FLY OFF TO A STRANGE LAND, EAGERLY ABANDONING ALL THE

ETERNAL REASSURANCE IN IT, THAT YOU MAY COME

COMFORTS OF HOME AND THEN EXPEND VAST QUANTITIES OF TIME AND MONEY IN A

ACROSS FOUR OR FIVE TIMES IN LIFE. IT FACED, OR SEEMED TO

LARGELY FUTILE EFFORT TO RECAPTURE THE COMFORTS YOU WOULDN’T HAVE LOST

FACE, THE WHOLE EXTERNAL WORLD FOR AN INSTANT AND THEN

IF YOU HADN’T LEFT HOME IN THE FIRST PLACE.”

CONCENTRATED ON YOU WITH AN IRRESISTIBLE PREJUDICE

NEITHER HERE NOR THERE BY BILL BRYSON

IN YOUR FAVOR. IT UNDERSTOOD YOU JUST AS FAR AS YOU WANTED TO BE UNDERSTOOD, BELIEVED IN YOU AS YOU WOULD LIKE TO BELIEVE IN YOURSELF, AND ASSURED YOU THAT IT HAD

AETHER BOUTIQUE STAY, MYKONOS “I have to warn you, it’s going to be one of the hottest days of summer today,” Athanasios tells me with a cheeky smile. His navy mini Cooper is taking me from the airport to his small but stylish accommodation. Appropriate mode of transport, I think. Aether Boutique Stay is 800 meters away from town center, but with an island this small, such distances are insignificant. We pull into the driveway of this five-room boutique hotel, and instantly, I feel a sense of warmth. Athanasios’ wife (and coowner of the property) welcomes me with a Greek coffee and a big hug. There are very few people who can hug the way she did; the kind that feels like the other person has gone through your soul and given it a massive piece of warm chocolate chip cookie. I left for this vacation knowing that I wouldn’t get the ‘homely’ feeling until I returned back to my home, to my people; but Aether Boutique Stay took the stereotyped Greek hospitality to another level of kindness.

personalised, all-organic breakfast in their own kitchen for all their guests -- the experience here is that special. Perched on a hill with sea view, Aether is the holiday home you always wanted to own, except you don’t have to do the dishes or run a load of washing here. Dominated by white and cobalt blue interiors, I’m forced to switch off. From the key to the miniature vase with a stem of fuchsia bougainvillea, every detail in my suite is humming a melody to me. They want to keep me here and spoil me with their little luxuries… but alas, I have an island to explore and a summer sunset to swoon over. But after the sun bids adieu (and I’ve had a satisfying level of alcohol in my system), I will come back to my homely paradise, lay on my Egyptian cotton sheets, and recapture every second spent here on this lustrous Full Moon night. Rooms starting £180

Relaunching a family business with a sweet taste of modern minimalism, Athina and Athanasios personally take charge of everything that goes on in this property. They even cook a

PRECISELY THE IMPRESSION OF YOU THAT, AT YOUR BEST, YOU HOPED TO CONVEY.” THE GREAT GATSBY BY F. SCOTT FITZGERALD

RIMONDI BOUTIQUE HOTEL, CRETE Branches of honeysuckle and creepers of bougainvillea surround me. The floral fragrance is intoxicating. The sun is about to go down, turning the sky into a painter’s messy colour palette, and coincidently, I’m reading the exact page where the sky lights up with fireworks at Jay Gatsby’s Long Island mansion in The Great Gatsby. With a location this opulent and services as luxurious, Rimondi Estate Hotel could very well tick off as something out of Fitzgerald’s literary fantasy. Located in the medieval town of Rethymnon on the island of Crete, this boutique hotel is made up of a refurbished small complex of buildings from the 15th century, giving every room an old world charm. It's getting increasingly difficult to recall much about the rooms and suites at the Rimondi Boutique Hotel. Though they are spacious and impeccably outfitted, their simple charms and clever touches are vastly overshadowed by the royally reconstructed courtyard and the serene spa complex. There's an unwritten dress code around here of white terry cloth bathrobe and slick wet hair. I’m surrounded by a row of languid guests either melting into the wooden planks of the sauna or towelwrapped in a chaise lounge parked in the relaxation area by the pool. Everyone here seems to have assumed that they belong to a nostalgic era, and will be taken care of by their individually allotted butlers. The gently smiling attendants walking around with their Greek charm are doing a pretty good job at it, so that’s an acceptable assumption. I just hope the spirit of F. Scott Fitzgerald is satisfied knowing that his Gatsby vision has come to life in this Grecian paradise. Rooms starting £290

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COCO-MAT ECO RESIDENCES, SERIFOS THIS ROOM, HOW FAMILIAR IT IS. THE COUCH WAS HERE, NEAR THE DOOR, A TURKISH CARPET IN FRONT OF IT. CLOSE BY, THE SHELF WITH TWO YELLOW VASES. ON THE RIGHT - NO, OPPOSITE - A WARDROBE WITH A MIRROR. IN THE MIDDLE THE TABLE WHERE HE WROTE, AND THE THREE BIG WICKER CHAIRS. BESIDE THE WINDOW THE BED WHERE WE MADE LOVE SO MANY TIMES. THEY MUST STILL BE AROUND SOMEWHERE, THOSE OLD THINGS. BESIDE THE WINDOW THE BED; THE AFTERNOON SUN USED TO TOUCH HALF OF IT. . . . ONE AFTERNOON AT FOUR O’CLOCK WE SEPARATED FOR A WEEK ONLY . . . AND THEN - THAT WEEK BECAME FOREVER. THE AFTERNOON SUN BY CONSTANTINE P. CAVAFY

I lay here on the crisp white sheets of the King-size bed, staring into the infinite blue of the Aegean Sea. There’s a big bowl of fresh-cut tropical fruits and a copy of The Collected Poems by C.P. Cavafy on the bedside table, posing as my companions for this part of my Grecian journey. The breeze tastes salty against my lips. Even the birds here are quiet; afraid they might befoul the peacefulness with their melodious chirps. So much serenity surrounds me, it almost feels like I could be the only one on the island of Serifos. The desaturated grayish blue shutters right beside my bed open out to the husky beads of sand on the private beach of Vagia. Cavafy penned The Afternoon Sun - 48 -

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in 1919, and yet it holds so much relevance to my time on this island. These stenciled floors and bare stonewalls have a strong sense of nostalgic familiarity to them, while the glisten in the ocean from the hot sun invites me to take a dip into its charming hue of shimmering blue. I somehow gather the will to stop daydreaming and step out of my traditional Cycladic house, only to find myself perched on a lounge chair in their contemporary bar, with my two companions. The summer never ends here. And it mustn’t. Rooms starting £210


ASTARTE SUITES, AKROTIRI

I'm woken up by an agitated ‘shhh!’ A gorgeous gay couple is having a discussion about whether they should have a mojito or a strawberry daiquiri. They are laughing about how ridiculous this argument is, but are also just as serious about making the right cocktail choice. Such petty life decisions are the only ones you have to make around here. However, I have no one deciding my alcoholic beverage for me, I can be as uninhibited and carefree as I want to be, because that’s what solo travelling is about.

“IT SEEMED AN ADVANTAGE TO BE TRAVELING ALONE. OUR RESPONSES TO THE WORLD ARE CRUCIALLY MOULDED BY WHOM WE ARE WITH, WE TEMPER OUR CURIOSITY TO FIT IN WITH THE EXPECTATIONS OF OTHERS...BEING CLOSELY OBSERVED BY A

Intimacy never crosses path with solidarity here; you can sit in the arms of your lover and eat a five-course Michelin-star meal at the edge of a cliff while watching the sun go down. Or, like me, pretend the 28C infinity pool is your lounge and watch Santorini’s submerged caldera view put on a show for you.

COMPANION CAN INHIBIT US FROM OBSERVING OTHERS; WE BECOME TAKEN UP WITH ADJUSTING OURSELVES TO THE COMPANION’S QUESTIONS AND REMARKS, WE HAVE TO MAKE OURSELVES SEEM MORE NORMAL THAN IS GOOD FOR OUR CURIOSITY.”

Loneliness nudges me when I see a couple rubbing sunscreen on each other’s back, but that isn’t the protagonist of my time at Astarte Suites. Plus, if I did feel out-of-place in this romantic haven, I have the option to go back to my villa, sit in my private Swarovski-encrusted Jacuzzi and listen to Sinatra woo me over the Bose surround sound system.

THE ART OF TRAVEL BY ALAIN DE BOTTON

“In other words, hold my hands In other words – baby, kiss me.” Rooms starting £350

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T

here are some items that should always be packed for a getaway. For me, that realisation came as I was lying in the middle of the Australian desert, tucked into my sleeping bag, wearing an eye mask with the words bonjour imprinted across the front. It was the second night of my Red Centre tour and the sky was not only scattered with stars but also home to a full moon. A very bright full moon. I could hear the European backpackers snigger as their torches scanned over me on their way back from the bathroom block. I cringed at the idea of what I probably looked like; an exposed head surrounded by red soil, and words across my eyes welcoming them. It wasn’t until the pre-dawn wakeup call that I realised I was actually having the last laugh. While we rolled up our sleeping bags in the

THE COLOUR

dark, I overheard the words “bloody moon” and “I hardly slept”. I may have looked ridiculous wearing an eye mask in the desert but I was one of the most awake for our 6am hike up Uluru’s neighbouring Kings Canyon. Bonjour, indeed. Morning person or not, touring the Australian outback is an experience like no other. Also called the spiritual heart of Australia, the Red Centre is a destination where even the most well-heeled city girl can find her place in a pair of hiking boots. I had chosen a three-day adventure tour with Wayoutback Australian Safaris, a budget and time-friendly option utilising permanent campsites. If you’re the kind who doesn’t own a sleeping bag or know how to pitch a tent, this tour is for you. And much to the delight of my fellow female travellers, our tour guide strategically happened to be a young Australian male, fittingly blonde, tanned and

equipped with an Akubra hat. “I’m not only your guide, but also your driver, cook, medic, DJ and storyteller,” said Jamie in his clear ocker accent. While others crafted stereotypes, I engulfed in Jamie’s enthusiasm for the outback. Having no access to phones and spending four and a half hours in a mini bus with 20 other travellers, forced but pleasant conversations with each other was imminent. Some were hoping to encounter a poisonous snake, others were curious about the Indigenous culture, and the rest wanted to experience more than what the country’s metropolitan cities offered. As we reached the entrance to Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park we were provided with park passes, as this is Anangu land, meaning it’s of Aboriginal ownership and the culture runs strong here. To spend time here is to catch a glimpse of something very special, you begin to appreciate Uluru for what it truly is – a living culture. What Europeans might describe as geographical formations, the Anangu people see as “dreamtime” stories formed in the face of the rock. A five-thousand year old rock art stares back at you, not only retelling history, but also reminding us that Australia was never a young country.

LEAVE THE LUXURIES BEHIND AND EXPLORE THE HEART OF AUSTRALIA.

OF ADVENTURE WORDS: KATIE GOSS PHOTOS: DENNIS YOUNG - 52 -

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Out here, traditional Tjukurpa (laws) guide the Aboriginal people to keep the culture strong. “Don’t expect to see kangaroos jumping around the base, the Anangu people still hunt and live off the land,” Jamie informed us. So much red surrounded us: all signifying, power, love and ownership of a land that dates back thousands of years. Uluru had enthralled even the brattiest of brats amongst us, and with the best of intensions. Back in our campsite, the idea of sleeping under the stars excited me the most. Everyone sat around the bonfire, playing card games, girls plaiting each other’s hair and not one person was distracted by Facebook. It was like a dream dinner party, but one that came with ‘only in Australia’ warnings. Keeping the infamous reptile behaviour of this continent in mind, Jamie asked us to stay on the sand, look out for ant nests, not sleep under the trees and avoid those slithers and crawls imprinted on the red soil. Well yes, that’s the Australian way for you.

You might think sleeping without tents in sheer abandonment and isolation is an act of bravery. I disagree. What’s brave is committing to a visit to this land, because once you cross that hurdle (considering it’s very far away from the main cities of Australia), you’d be enchanted with its history and culture. All ghds and Chanel palettes will be erased from memory. Ever so often, I’m tempted to pull out my camera, upload the view before me with multiple hashtags. But this forceful detox from technology is just what every city girl needs. Placing our sleeping bags around the campfire on our last night, we roasted marshmallows on sticks and Jamie unmasked his inner musician. We ate marshmallows until we couldn’t take the sweetness anymore. We talked until we couldn’t see each other’s silhouette anymore. As I placed my eye mask to drift off under the shimmering sky, it felt like I was sleeping in my own bed, but with the entire outback before me to say bonjour to.

WHAT TO PACK FOR THE RED CENTRE SUNSCREEN THE SUN IS UNFORGIVABLY STRONG IN AUSTRALIA, EVEN ON OVERCAST DAYS, SO IF YOU’RE OUT EXPLORING NATURE MAKE SURE YOU’RE COVERED IN SPF 30+. WIDE BRIM HAT, COUNTRY ROAD LOOKS STYLISH AND PROTECTS YOUR FACE FROM THE SUN, A WINNING COMBINATION. CAMERA, OLYMPUS IPADS OR IPHONES SHOULD NOT BE TREATED AS REPLACEMENT CAMERAS IN THIS PART OF THE WORLD. A QUALITY TOUGH CAMERA IS THE IDEAL TECHNOLOGICAL COMPANION, BUT IF YOU TRUST YOURSELF WITH YOUR DSLR, THEN DO PACK IT. JUST REMEMBER YOU'RE HIKING FOR UP TO FOUR HOURS SO BE PREPARED TO CARRY IT. SUNGLASSES, RAY BAN THE SUN. THE GLARE. YOU NEED THESE. TOP, ASOS WITH RISK OF SOUNDING LIKE YOUR MOTHER, T-SHIRTS ARE BEST AS THEY COVER YOUR SHOULDERS. SHORTS, COUNTRY ROAD EASY, RELAXED AND VERY AUSSIE – YOU’LL BE HIKING AROUND HERE, SO COMFORT IS IMPORTANT.

PHOTO: KATIE GOSS

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Forever Yours

...

WORDS: SHITIKA ANAND

A postcard is a journey. A journey that starts in a claustrophobic letter box, goes through a bumpy mail van, then on a nauseating plane ride, and ends, ultimately, in the surprising palms of the receiver. What was a prominent mode of communication in the early 20th century has now become a forgotten art. Postcard writing requires a verbal concision that can rise to a level of eloquence: brief, quirky and sometimes heart-breaking glimpses into someone’s life, in addition to countless amusing and well-told anecdotes. Postcards were the original flag-bearer of slow communication and Wanderer is here to make you fall back in love with them.

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'ALAS! ALAS! IT'S TOO TRUE THAT I CANNOT LIVE LONGER WITHOUT YOU. I ONLY HOPE YOUR THOUGHTS RUN THE SAME WAY... O! JOY! IF THEY DID.... I WOULD BE AS HAPPY AS THE BIRDS IN MAY!'

'BRACE UP AND BE GAY. "IT" ISN'T LIKELY TO ENJOY MERRY COMPANY'

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'SWEET 20 & NEVER BEEN KISSED...'

'WEATHER IS GRAND. THE KIDDIES ARE SO HAPPY. WE ARE SO BURNT. WE COVER OURSELVES WITH COLD CREAM AT NIGHT.'

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A CONSCIOUS-FREE VEGAN FOOD JOURNEY ALONG THE COBBLED LANEWAYS OF GHENT. WORDS: SHARON GREEN PHOTOS: YASMIJN SOETE

A VEGGIE DELIGHT

VEGANISM IS A WAY OF LIVING, WHICH SEEKS TO EXCLUDE, AS FAR AS IS POSSIBLE, AND PRACTICABLE, ALL FORMS OF EXPLOITATION OF, AND CRUELTY TO, ANIMALS FOR FOOD, CLOTHING OR ANY OTHER PURPOSE.

W

hile most travellers would often choose romantic Bruges or Brussels for a Belgian holiday, Ghent could quite easily be considered the country’s best kept secret. Known for its medieval history and riverside architecture, Ghent is the largest city in the East Flanders province of Belgium. And much to the rest of the continent’s surprise, it’s also tagged as being the vegetarian capital of Europe. According to the Tourism Office of Flanders, Ghent has “the largest number of vegetarian restaurants per capita of all known cities” and serves more vegetarian meals than anywhere else in Belgium. To practice what they preach, the city celebrates Veggie Thursday as a way to encourage more people to eat vegetarian meals one day a week. The Veggie Thursday organisation cites a number of reasons to eat vegetarian at least one day per week, including improved health and diet, kindness to animals and a lowered carbon footprint. But if you don’t find yourself in Ghent on a Thursday, fear not, there are plenty of veggie eateries that will serve you a kale and peanut sauce quiche, much to your liking. The popularity of vegetarian options in Ghent has seen a growing vegan community emerge, with an increasing number

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of vegan restaurants and cafes contributing to the city’s vibrant food scene. Locals are known to queue for hours at De Frietketel (The Fryer) to get their hands on Ghent’s best fries. The eatery also offers a range of vegan snacks and be sure to try the highly requested stoofvleessaus (vegan ‘meat’ stew sauce) to dip your fries into. Komkommertijd (cucumber time) is a great option for a bigger meal. This buffet, all-you-can-eat restaurant serves only vegan food, including dessert, and tries to use as many organic and fairtrade products as possible. Another sign of vegan culture booming in Ghent is v|edge, a concept store that stocks a range of exclusively vegan products including food, clothing, shoes, books and more. Friends Rosalie Förster and Pieter Vanderwegen co-founded the business in late 2012, largely out of frustration as there was nothing like it in Ghent. “Veganism goes beyond just the food. It’s a lifestyle, not a fad or hype. It’s about the choices you make. We don’t want to make everyone vegan or only appeal to vegans, that’s not our goal. We just want to show people that there are very good alternatives available… we’re not going to stand here and preach to everyone who walks in,” said Förster. So whether you're a hardcore animal lover or just a casual vegetarian-for-a-day, there's something on every street corner to satisfy your vegan or conscious-living cravings.

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I

After Jews from across the globe arrived during Israel’s multiple Aliyas, Tel Aviv became home to a melting pot of cultures, united under the blue and white. Today, the Aliyas have spawned an open-minded culture with a vibrant fashion sense that combines east and west, impressing any affluent wanderer. With dry summers and mild winters, the city’s boutique visionaries keep things simple. Tel Avivians are well-illustrated in minimal designs, bright primary prints and whimsical pieces that combine practicality with style.

srael. A controversial strip of land that has been at the forefront of international affairs since its founding in 1947. As the world’s superpowers occupy themselves with matters in neighbouring Iran, Iraq and Syria – Israel’s cosmopolitan hub bustles with boutiques showcasing designs from budding young designers fresh from the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design (In Jerusalem) and the worldrenowned Shenkar College of Engineering and Design. Travelling to Tel Aviv, you’d be forgiven for thinking it’s a conservative town in an ultra-conservative Middle East. Whether you’re taking in the romantic vibes of Shabazi Street in Neve Tzedek or bar-hopping on Nachalat Binyamin you can’t help but fret at the sound of sirens warning the people to find shelter as another attack from Hamas or Hezbollah rains fire on this beautiful city. But for the locals of Tel Aviv, it’s just another day, the younger generation are mostly ambivalent to the political scuffles that tarnish Israel’s reputation around the world. In reality they yearn for an opportunity to show the world just what a creative place Tel Aviv has become.

Tel Aviv has been famous for producing fashion houses such as Gottex and Maskit. But during the technological boom, Tel Aviv’s sense of style took a backseat. This changed in 2011, when the first revival fashion week returned and acted as a harbinger for young designers eager to unleash the city’s style. Over the last three years the pedigree of Tel Aviv fashion has not disappointed.

THE ROSE AMONG THE THORNS

SURROUNDED BY NATIONS THAT WANT TO SEE IT WIPED OFF THE MAP, TEL AVIV PRESENTS ITSELF AS A MODERNDAY METROPOLIS RICH IN CULTURE AND HISTORY.

WORDS: AARON WEINMAN PHOTOS: REINHARDT KÖNIG

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DIZENGOFF AND FASHION Outside the eclectic nightlife, forward-thinking fashion and open-minded people, a trip to Israel’s cultural capital is nothing without taking in the sunset. Make yourself comfortable on the beach, keep your wide-eyed Tom Fords firmly placed across your eyes and gaze. A combination of all citrus-related colours is thrown into Tel Aviv’s burning sunset, an amalgamation of striking beauty amidst the calm against the Middle Eastern storm.

Opened in 1963, the Yitzhak Yashar-designed shopping mall, Hamashbir straddles Dizengoff Street with two towers connected by skywalks and underground passages, topped off with a residential skyscraper. Among the usual suspects of retail, it's here you can find the Fashion Designer’s Bazaar. Held every Friday, Israel’s up-and-coming designers showcase their collections, which is a must for any style-conscious traveller looking for versatility in their wardrobe beyond well-known high-street labels.

Tel Aviv stands tall as what the Middle East really should be: unified people, no Sunni, no Shia, but Israeli and Arab. Like Beirut of the ‘80s and Baghdad of the ‘70s, this cosmopolitan capital embraces the Tel Aviv-Yafo spirit – the love for life and relaxed energy.

Maintaining its position as a start-up centre, Tel Aviv has become a place where the fashion-conscious go to for ideas. Outside the Dizengoff Centre, popular boutiques include Banot, Frau Blau, Katomenta and Frida. Meanwhile, Kikar Hamedina will entice every designer-inkling you may have with Prada and Gucci layered between renowned Israeli designers.

BEYOND THE FASHION PINE While Tel Aviv is less than 70-years old, the land has been fought over for centuries, spawning a wealth of arguments from people of all different backgrounds. Never in life will a traveller witness first-hand, what the power of unity does to its people until they visit Tel Aviv. Take a walk along the Tel Aviv Promenade. In less than a mile of walking along the coastline you will notice the high translucent cheekbones and soft alabaster skin alongside jetblack-haired, deeply tanned people who live for the Israeli coast. Whether they are merchants or youth simply showing off their skills with a hulahoop, the diversity of Tel Aviv is on display along this promenade. Make time for a strong black coffee, in the vein of the famed Turkish brew. People-watch throughout the old Jaffa Port. And enjoy pita and hummus with a side of oil-drenched olives. Try and indulge in an Israeli breakfast: shakshouka (poached eggs in a sauce of tomatoes, chillies and peppers spiced with cumin).

Expensive living: As of 2014, Tel Aviv is the world's 18th most expensive city, according to Mercer's annual cost of living survey. - 66 -

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india, india WORDS AND PHOTOS: RAKESH VIJAYAN

The world’s largest democracy; home to 1.2 billion people; and a colourful expression on every corner: this photo album is dedicated to raw enunciations across the most colourful country. - 68 -

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st

reet photography and street portraiture are genres of photography that tell a story within a picture. I lean heavily towards the latter as I believe it’s a style which has the ability to truly connect with the subject, especially when done candidly. I was born in India - which also happens to be a photographer’s dream destination - there’s just so much to capture on the streets. The curiosity of gaining access into the lives of others and how they live, all by the means of a single ‘click’, is what makes me fall back in love with the lens, every single day. Photographers document life; we freeze a moment in time. Every moment I’ve spent taking photos is unforgettable for me. Despite having a full-time job, I treat photography as my alter ego. It’s just an amazing stress buster after a crazy week at work, which is in fact the very reason I got into photography. If given a choice, I would love to be invisible when taking pictures, just so I could capture the real emotions of people without being spotted. But you do get noticed, and people put on a mask when that happens. But, it’s a known fact, that people on the streets photograph best when they are being themselves. My favourite photo to date has to be the monochrome one of a boy holding a lotus, which I took in Tenkasi, a district in the southern part of Tamil Nadu. I had a tele lens fixed on my camera and suddenly this kid broke into a big, hearted smile. It was a moment of pure joy. I smile every time I look it. I remember the kid, the setting, the way my heart filled with happiness when I saw him smile. It’s an indescribable memory, just what a street portrait is meant to be. www.flickr.com/photos/the_lightwave

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HOW TO SHOOT ON THE STREETS OF INDIA HOW TO APPROACH STRANGERS ON THE STREET WHEN YOU HAVE A DSLR IN HAND? People in India love being photographed. There's of course an initial hesitation, curiosity, and reluctance. But stay around long enough, and they will open up. But if the person is aware of your presence, the purity of the moment is lost and they might become very conscious. This is where you should strike up a conversation so they can get used to your presence and start being their original self.

WHAT CONVERSATION TO HAVE WITH STRANGERS PRIOR TO POINTING THE CAMERA AT THEM? My conversations with strangers are very simple. Most of the time I just get by with a smile. When the smile is reciprocated, I know I've got their permission to shoot. Otherwise, ask about their life, tell them about yours, tell them why you enjoy taking photos.

COULD PEOPLE ASK ME FOR MONEY FOR PHOTOGRAPHING THEM? Yes. That happens a lot. In fact, it has become a norm at places like Varanasi and Pushkar to ask for money in return for taking photos. I never give money but offer to buy a meal for them.

WHAT IF THEY DON’T WANT TO BE PHOTOGRAPHED? Don’t get aggressive; offer them your best smile and move on, there are more frames out there to click.

ANY RULES FOR NEWBIES TO FOLLOW ON THE STREETS? There are no stated rules - but if you strut around your fancy camera, people will most probably dismiss you for a prick. So the most essential thing for a photographer to do on the streets is to treat people as equals, only then will they let you into their lives. It's also extremely important for a photographer to know the rules of photography and know them well enough so they can break them, as and when required. There's only so much that you can learn by reading about photography. Step out without a plan, take your camera along, interact with people and have compassion.

ONE INDIAN CITY EVERY STREET PHOTOGRAPHER MUST VISIT? Mark Twain once wrote, “Varanasi is older than history, older than tradition, older even than legend and looks twice as old as all of them put together”. There's a mad and incredibly photogenic atmosphere in the old town of Varanasi. Be prepared to be overwhelmed by the chaos around; but once you’ve settled down, you'll start to see a pattern in the rhythmic chaos.

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minimalistic luxury WORDS AND PHOTOS: SHITIKA ANAND

A CELEBRATION OF MASSERIE FROM THE HEEL OF ITALY’S BOOT. WORDS AND PHOTOS: SHITIKA ANAND

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THE LAND OF ABSOLUTES. Puglia is a part of Italy with evidence of ancient cultural roots predominantly of Greek and Roman origin. The land of Puglia has survived complex agrarian atmosphere over the years, with aspects of innocence, neglect, isolation and mystery in its architecture. A prime example of which is seen in the Puglian masserie across the southeast coast. Once serving as farmhouses for those travelling along the Via Appia, these buildings are now private residences or boutique hotels. Simultaneously austere and luxurious, the charm of a masseria comes from its poetic anecdote of Italian culture.

THE IDEA The masseria embodies the life of Puglia. It’s a house filled with centuries of love and respect for nature’s beauty. These farmhouses are a result of layered sequence of construction, conceived by studying the characteristics of the earth, stone and water in Puglia. Essentially, a masserie forms a historic community that is connected across decades of territorial commodity and time spent to build it. Its building is one element among the roads, wells, towers, walls, courtyards and gates that collectively comprise of an architectural landscape across the region. The house and its surroundings - grape vines and cheese, olive and lemon trees, sheep and horses, presses and tools, urns and vessels - all represent a symbolic tableau. These ingredients add up to the daily life at a typical masseria, and are timeless constants; in an essence they exist unchanged from their earliest representation in art and myth of antiquity of this land.

RUSTIC ELEGANCE

"ALL THE RICH AND LUXURIOUS COMPONENTS OF MASSERIA LIFE CAN BE EXPERIENCED HERE: SUNLIGHT, SEA, FRUITS, WINES, OILS AND THE CRISP CLARITY OF THE COOL INTERIORS

INTEGRATING

WHITEWASHED

WALLS

WITH

THE

RUSTICITY

AGRICULTURAL LAND AND THE CLEANLINESS OF TERRACOTTA." - 84 -

OF

THE

These well-worn houses engender an appreciation for the effects of time on culture, a sensibility of minimalism in its interiors and the marriage of tradition and style within its four walls. Masseria Cimino is the kind that tunes your mind to lumpy unwaxed lemons, sun bleached white walls, a theatrical display of olive groves, all set against the blue yonder of the Adriatic. However, when you step inside this 18th century building, the colour palette of the property suddenly speaks louder than any Italian in sight. The house pays an artistic tribute to its rich agricultural roots, with sun-kissed tomatoes hanging from the

ceiling and twigs of rosemary and sage finding refuge in amphora-shaped olive oil jars. From the minute you step into Cimino’s land, it vows to take you on a trip through the seductive paradox of the quotidian simultaneity with mythic dimensions of its existence. The itinerary unfolds into a contemporary sequence of events; it shows the procession from the first distance views then advances to penetrate the great walls and finally arrives in its olive-rich courtyards. Once you’re acquainted with the outdoor space, the furnishings, fabrics, materials and artifacts of the interiors take over the narrative. Each room has intimate repositories of works of art, relics of the historian environs accumulated over time and their unique contemporary character. All the rich and luxurious components of masseria life can be experienced here: sunlight, sea, fruits, wines, oils and the crisp clarity of the cool interiors integrating whitewashed walls with the rusticity of the agricultural land and the cleanliness of terracotta. On the arrival of dusk, the place is lit up by staged candles lending a rich bedazzling layer of dapper sophistication whilst adding a touch of drama to the ancient walls. It’s one of those places where you’d want to meander your mornings, tuck into big portions of Spaghettini con Frutti di Mare for lunch, sip immeasurable amount of Negroamaro during supper and sleep on linen bedding under a sparkling night sky.

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HIGH SKIES, CLEAR SEAS, RUSTIC RED EARTH, CORNFLOWER BLUES, MIGHTY OLIVE TREES AND TENACIOUS WINDS.

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On the road

UBUD

THE AMAZON

WHAT DID YOU SEE ON YOUR LAST TRIP THAT FELLOW WANDERERS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT?

Ubud is busier than I’ve ever seen it. Walking the regular paths you’re swept along in a constant flow of tourists, locals, expats and visiting literary types wearing glasses and crochet and floaty skirts. The buses have been squeezing themselves through streets so tight it’s a wonder none of them have got stuck, or at least taken out a line of parked motorbikes yet. But I can’t be concerned about traffic. There’s work to be done and blogs to write and Tweets to Tweet and intoxicated writers to whine to. It’s no great secret that writers are drunks. If we’re not high on caffeine (we're convinced three cups of coffee before 8 a.m. is the only way to get a thousand words down by 10 a.m.), we’re swigging gin and tonic, like I am, right now. Becky Wicks, Author

The Amazon Jungle is a place you will love/hate/fear, mostly all at once. But if you’re an adrenalin junkie looking for your next adventure or want to really escape civilisation (doing more than just switching off your smartphone) then this is your haven. The Amazon spans across nine countries and is home to the most varied plant and animal life on the planet. Which by day you can Instagram, but at night, when everything is pitch black, you’ll only be able to hear. Trust me, one venture into ‘the lung’s’ that sustain life on this earth and you’ll never be the same, like me. Yadira Galarza, Writer

CAMBODIA AUSTIN To the uninitiated, Austin might look like the cookie cutter definition of a city. But this mellow capital has more to offer than the clichés usually associated with NYC. From food trucks serving curry to cafés offering bubble-tea and cappuccino in the same glass, Austin curbs the bizarrest of all cravings. It’s these little quirks that make this city special, or weird! The best way to soak in the weirdness is by wandering the alleyways. That’s where I saw all the magic happen, be it through pop-up live music sessions or volunteers handing out free bottles of barbecue sauce. Vishakha Chetan, Designer

GRASSE

Pink-kissed sunrises, roads cloaked in red dust, fields emerald green, monks in bright saffron attires, The Kingdom of Cambodia takes the crown for colour blocking. In its ruins you’ll spot the multitude of serene giant stone faces – a distinctive feature of the Khmer temples and make conversation with the locals dressed as Apsaras (the ‘angels’ in the Hindu and Buddhist faiths). The three-tiered temple mountains left largely unrestored with trees clawing their way out to actually exist in Ta Prohm. Visit the sandstone jewel temples of Bantey Srei, watch the sunrise, wander through the night markets of Siem Reap and drift to the 11th century. Aishwarya Rao, Marketing Executive

SEVILLE My Airbnb host recommended this tiny, unassuming bar floating on the Guadalquivir River, which cuts through the heart of terracotta-baked Seville. The river’s beautiful, but it’s littered with pontoon restaurants, as expected. Instead, I found a postage stamp of locals bobbing along with the tide, and not one stylised Moorish tile or fusion tapas menu in sight. I sat drinking £2 tinto de verano (the tackiest tourist drink, but when it’s 42C and the sun’s about to dip, I can guarantee you won’t care) and watched a group of local kids take their kayaks up the walls of the river and launch headfirst back into the water. Fiona MacDonald, Journalist

A scent evokes nostalgia; and at Parfumerie Galimard in Grasse I created that very memory through a perfume that was uniquely mine. An expert ‘nose’ guided me on how to design my signature scent from scratch - I learnt about the Top (Peak), Middle (Heart) and Base (Fond) notes, and was taught how to select oils that would pleasantly blend with each other. Giving a name to my newly-created juice was most challenging, but ‘Angie en Provence’ seemed appropriate after some pondering. Wearing my scent now reminds me of the moment I created it; just what a fragrance is meant to do, right? Angela Eisentrager, Beauty Blogger

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Your itinerary AROUND THE WORLD

WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

LITERARY MOMENTS, 5 HOTELS

FOREVER YOURS

IN 6 FLAVOURS Oltukai Lodge, Amboseli (254 0456

Iconic Santorini (Imerovigli, +30 2286

All postcards were found at Alfies antique

Florence: Carapina (Via Lambertesca,

22275, www.oltukailodge.com) Doubles

028950, www.iconicsantorini.com)

market in London (13-25 Church St,

18 and Piazza Oberdan +39 055 676930,

from £200

Aether Boutique Stay

London NW8 8DT, 020 7723 6066,

www.carapina.it)

Mara Serena Safari Lodge, (Masai

(Glastros, Mykonos Town 84600, +30

www.alfiesantiques.com)

London: Gelato Mio (138 Holland

Mara National Reserve, http://www.

22890 77303, www.aethermykonos.com)

Park Avenue +44 (0) 20 7727 019,

serenahotels.com/serenamara). Doubles

Rimondi Boutique Hotel

www.gelatomio.co.uk)

from £200

(Xanthoudidou 10, Rethimnon, Crete, +30

Thessaloniki: Gelato e amore (44 Alexander Svolou 44, +30 2310 242014)

MAKING CALIFORNIAN WAVES

Paris: Martine Lambert

A VEGGIE DELIGHT

2831 051289, www.hotelsrimondi.com)

v|edge (Ossenstraat 102, 9000 Ghent,

COCO-MAT Eco Residences (Vagia

+32 (0)483 016 119, www.vedge.be)

beach, Serifos, +30 2106251971,

(39 Rue Cler, +33 1 40 62 97 18,

Neptune’s Net (42505 Pacific Coast Hwy,

www.serifos.coco-matt-hotels.com)

www.martine-lambert.com)

Malibu, CA 90265, United States, +1 310-

Astarte Suites (Caldera-Akrotiri,

Zadar: Kavana Danica (Siroka Ulica

457-3095, www.neptunesnet.com)

Santorini, +30 2286 083388,

Banot (Dizengoff Street 212, Tel Aviv)

www.astartesuites.gr)

Frau Blau (HaHashmal Street 8, Tel Aviv)

8, +3859344022558) Tokyo, Grom Parlour

TREND TROTTER

Frida (Dizengoff Street 190, Tel Aviv) THE COLOUR OF ADVENTURE

(330-13 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, +81 035369 8966, www.grom.jp)

Wayoutback Australian Safari (30

Aviv, +972 3 527 9899,

Kidman St, Alice Springs NT 0871,

www.katomenta.com)

Australia, +61 8 8952 4324,

Hamashbir (Dizengoff Centre, Dizengoff

www.wayoutback.com.au), overnight

Street and King George Street, Tel Aviv,

Buvette (42 Grove Street, between

tour starting from £180 pp, including

+972 3 528 5136)

Bleecker and Bedford streets, +01 212 255

meals, camping and transfers.

3590, www.buvettegastrotheque.com)

ASOS, www.asos.com

INDIA, INDIA

Country Road, www.countryroad.com.au

See more of Rakesh’s work on www.flickr.

Olympus, www.shop.olympus.co.uk

com/photos/the_lightwave/

Ray-Ban, www.ray-ban.com/uk

Find out more about tourism in India on

SWEET KALE OF MINE THE WEEKEND CLUB See more of Jordi and Joske’s lifestyle

THE OM DIARIES Purple Valley Yoga Centre (Bairo Alto,

Gertrud (Dizengoff Street 225, Tel Aviv) Katomenta (Dizengoff Street 173, Tel

See more street photography by Xiaohan "Ashka" Shen on www.xiaohan.com

photography work on www.simmenhuis.com

THE ROSE AMONG THE THORNS

MINIMALISTIC LUXURY

Bardez, Goa, India, +91 832 226 8364, www.yogagoa.com). One week course

Masseria Cimino (Contrada Maciola,

starting from £650, including stay and meals.

72010 Savelletri, Italy, +39 080 482 7886,

www.incredibleindia.com

www.masseriacimino.com)

#WANDERERSUMMER @WANDERER.MAGAZINE PO BOX 89 PRIMROSE HILL NW1 - 92 -

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A travel magazine for pioneering career women who travel to get lost and get lost to find themselves.

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