Page 1

english international politics visual communication and design mathematical methods further mathematics victorian certificate of education environment captain exams results schoolies 18th birthday parties going out apollo bay offers acceptance royal melbourne institute of technology architecture and design communications peta carlin history theory peter corrigan brent allpress materials capsule pavilion urban trajectory gallery sean mcmahon natalie robinson kris green culture seaford ideas theatre romantic life saving club lower pool sports fans morwell docklands stadiums parks community program flexibility stuart harrison gretchen wilkins cam newnham piyatida maneesook technology space frame light weight construction gymnasium disability access ena ninkovic kristian jenkins oscar niemeyer render rhino autocad drawing plan section elevation site context lighting layout graphic presentation printing lean van schaik tri polar advanced architecture urban environments x-field richard black michelle black lightness and movement house observatory thomas adolph rachel ang ephemeral architecture light space site and site again struggle conflict disapointment misunderstanding more renders enric miralles balsa wood mdf cardboard contours zap a gap model storage space australian architecture ashton raggatt mcdougall bates smart dentor corker marshall lyons sean godsell manchester unity building federation square building 8 storey hall eureka tower earthly delights jessica in gwyllim jahm maya dipolar mel lo lara santos raph freedman site model laser etching debates discussion ornament typology planning contrasting electric chapel exploration history of modern architecture mauro barracco mies van der rohe frank furness antoni gaudi archigram nationalist architecture rockefeller plaza alvar aalto scandanavia modernism function sustainability solar panels water tanks vegetable gardens saana house in plumgrove atrium missing model marijke davey star ratings balnarring lucinda mclean louise wright mornington peninsula research ryan king josh cousins understanding the city primary school site plan live trace illustrator isabelle jooste local residents two sams housing research the new suburb ian mcdougall tim pyke adelaide elizabeth density open space west heidelberg concrete bouverie haus office towers david henderson victor bredin alucubond balconies rooftop garden sculpture plaster genuine fake mark raggatt dean boothroyd epping north shopping centre retail strip portfolio anna johnson reflection understanding what it means moving forward new york city english international politics visual communication and design mathematical methods further mathematics victorian certificate of education environment captain exams results schoolies 18th birthday parties going out apollo bay offers acceptance royal melbourne institute of technology architecture and design communications peta carlin history theory peter corrigan brent allpress materials capsule pavilion urban trajectory gallery sean mcmahon natalie robinson kris green culture seaford ideas theatre rotion

RELATIONSHIPS IN DYNAMIC CONTEXTS STEPHEN HAWKEN


TABLE OF CONTENTS: INTRODUCTORY ESSAY:

Relationships in Dynamic Contexts

SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FABRICS: UNDERSTANDING THE CITY

The Playful Meanderer

PATHS THROUGH EXPERIENCES: LINKS THROUGH THRESHOLDS

Vaughn Springs House

THE OPERATIONAL AND THE TECHNICAL: SUSTAINING THE FUTURE, QUIETLY

Bouveire Haus

THE AESTHETIC OF PERSONALITY: UNLOCKING THE UNUSED

Latrobe Valley Stadium

UNDERSTANDING PRECEDENT: THE POSSIBILITIES OF PROGRAM

Electric Chapel


Relationships in Dynamic Contexts

M

My architecture is driven by a series of threads that interact with one another. These threads can be loosely grouped into three fields. An understanding of site, a reflection upon precedent and a signature of my own personality. The relationships that exist between these threads can be harmonious or they can be conflicting. My architecture is dense, it is complex and it is inconsistent. This is because of these non-linear relationships between ideas that fluctuate in presences and strength. This book is a discussion of architecture driven by relationships at play. It is a narrative that travels through five select projects and explores the ideas that have manifested themselves deep within each one and brings them to the fore. Each piece of work introduces a new thread of thought and discovers how that particular idea reacts alongside already discussed notions. For example ‘The Playful Meanderer’ delves into my passion for acquiring a thorough knowledge of site beyond the topography, instead focusing on the social and cultural fabrics that hold a town together, or let it fall apart. Whilst ‘The Vaughn Springs House’ introduces the notion of a spatial experience within a piece of architecture and how that drives us to realize a formal outcome. It is then explored how this notion of an experience reacts alongside the idea of a social understanding of site, and how the two work together in a way that drives me to generate built form. By the conclusion of this book (‘Electric Chapel’) a total of ten different threads of thought have been introduced and the complexity and density of the projects has increased.It is also wise to note that relationships between precedent such as Frank Furness, Enric Miralles, Ashton Raggatt McDougall, NMBW, Lady Gaga or Richard Black are all at play (each example appearing in relevant projects). Other threads of though include the unlocking of wasted space, maintain a stance on sustainable design, developing a personal aesthetic and resolving spaces through technical and functional resolution. Each project deals with a different set of threads, each thread with a different level of power over another. In ‘Latrobe Valley Stadium’ a particular notion, that of design aesthetic, maintains a level of dominance over all else that could lead us to believe all other ideas have been quashed. Yet this is far from the truth. This is in contrast to ‘Electric Chapel’ where there is more of a level-playing field and it is difficult to distinguish one notion from another, instead they all tend to bleed into each other in such an accepting fashion.

These relationships are what I am concerned about. These relationships are what drive my architecture. I am not interested in merely the ideas themselves but how these ideas associate themselves with one another and lead me to develop built form. Right: A diagram that I have used to explore the relationships between each thread of thought. Light green is Balnarring. Pink, Electric Chapel. Brown, Latrobe Valley Stadium. Dark Green, Vaughn Springs House. Purple, Bouverie Haus.

Precedent

Society + Culture

Sustainability

Experience

The City

Links

Program

Detail

The Unused

Personality


SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FABRICS: UNDERSTANDING THE CITY

THE PLAYFUL MEANDERER

‘The Playful Meanderer’ is a complex that sits in the centre of Balnarring, a township that sits on the Mornington Peninsula. It involves a number of community facilities as well as dwellings for 118 residents. I completed the studio under the guidance of Lucinda McLean with assistance from Louise Wright.

Semester 1, 2012


The most basic way to study a city is through plan. I spend a great deal of time (in all my projects) studying site plans and aerial photography. Similar to the way Enric Miralles drew site plans (above) I specify key cultural/sociological features and draw links between them to discover how the city works as a whole. Below is a site plan of Balnarring, it draws links between shops, churches, halls and schools and the relationship they have with the site. For me, understanding topography comes second to a thorough knowledge of the historical, social, political and cultural context of a site.

ANGLICAN CHURCH SHOPPING CENTRE

BUS STOP

TOWN HALL

SITE

UNITING CHURCH

PRIMARY SCHOOL

SPORTS CLUB

Balna


Detailed Building Study: Balnarring Uniting Church

North Elevation 1:200

Toilet Block

Toilet Block Entrance

West Elevation 1:200

Hall/Store

Chapel

Roof Plan 1:200

South Elevation 1:200

N

East Elevation 1:200

Detailed Building Study: St. Marks Anglican Church (Chapel)

Understanding the role of key community facilities is crucial to understanding how a city operates. Above is an image of the Anglican Church in Balnarring. It was constructed in the late 19th Century when Balnarring was founded. I spent quite some at this church, studying how it interacted with the city. It is a modest piece of architecture yet what it achieves is substantial. It provides services and opportunities that typical commercial centres do not, such as a place of refuge, counsel ChapelSignificant cultural faciland support for individuals and families. ities such as Miralles’ Santa Catarina Market (above) were used as an example of how architecture can be more than simply built form and how it can provide space for services that are vital to the city around it.

North Elevation 1:200

West Elevation 1:200

Entrance

An even more modest piece of architecure is NMBW’s bench in Jeparit (above), a country town in Victoria. To put it simply, it is a bench. Yet it acts as a facility that feeds a certain cultural quality back into the city. I studied the church through model (above) and drawing (right) Roof Plan 1:200 N in great detail. This is a level of understanding that I need to achieve in order to feel as though I am allowed to design within such a context. Furthermore if I hadn’t reached this level of understanding it is likely that I would have designed an intervention hardly appropriate and that is not what my architecture stands for. My works are socially and culturally aware of their immediate context and that notion is more than evident in this project.

South Elevation 1:200

East Elevation 1:200


ADJACENT PROPERTY

These images are representations of the particular notions within the design and their relationship with each other. Above is the space behind the Uniting Church. Clockwise is Graeme Gunn’s Kensington Close townhouses. An initial plan of the program within the site. BIG Architects Maratime Youth House. NMBW’s Somers House. A development view of the public gallery and studio space. And the existing bus stop and pay phone. Between these images are relationships that tackle issues of site, social understanding and exploring precedent to discover ways in which to develop the project. All from various stages of the design process they maintain respect towards the site, and to providing the people of Balnarring with architecture that addresses their needs and wants as well as responsibly opening up public land for use, that has been previously neglected.

PRIVATE YARD PRIVATE YARD

PRIVATE YARD

PRIVATE YARD

LIVING

LIVING

LIVING LIVING

KITCHEN

UP TO BEDROOMS

DINING

UP TO BEDROOMS DINING

KITCHEN

UP TO BEDROOMS

DINING

DINING

UP TO BEDROOMS

KITCHEN

KITCHEN

PARKING SPACE PARKING SPACE

PARKING SPACE

PARKING SPACE

COMMUNAL DRIVEWAY

HOUSING PRECEDENCE STUDY KENSINGTON CLOSE KENSINGTON ROAD, SOUTH YARRA GUNN & DYRING 1:100


Once the design proposals began to develop (working alongside my partner Isabelle Jooste) it was important for me to not lose myt understanding of the city to ideals of visual aesthetic. Continuously exploring the pine forests (far left) were always a delight, especially when it was warm and sunny. As was having breakfast, lunch or dinner at one of the stores within the local shopping centre (left). The idea was not to redesign these spaces but to design alongside them, to compliment them and what they do for the town. The first few schemes (top left) included facilities such as bicycle shelters, public gallery spaces and community spaces (rather than new retail establishments). The first housing scheme involved the site itself flowing over the top of the single story dwellings making it clear that the public and community space is what was more important. Everything else took a back seat. Using a large site model I was able to configure the program within the site. Keeping parkland open was always a goal and that was achieved by scattering program around the edge. Below is the final scheme of a facility that can accomodate large markets and festivals yet close off to house smaller groups and classes inside. Its shape relates to the existing kindergarden next door. The roof slopes up to hide the rear wall of the kindergarden completely. It opens onto a central park space that connects with the rest of the site, and the town itself. It is form based upon an understanding of the city.


Above (left) is an image of the gallery spaces interior on the second level amongst the gum trees. Its aim is to bring ‘backyard artists’ out of their own backyards and provide them with a proper, public place to work. Housing studio and gallery spaces within the same building meant that artists can put their work on display immediately, there is flexibility for collaborative projects, their is an opportunity for classes to be run and the program to spill out into the open park space outside. Above (right) is a new bicycle shelter that can house a small cafe during the summer months. It sits along a key route between Peninsula towns and is a facility the town is in need of. These appear quite simplistic pieces of architecture but the thought and planning behind them is articulate and thorough. The existing social and cultural fabrics of the township are what is driving them. Incorporating housing (a private program) into the site (a public space) was always going to be difficult. Providing smaller dwellings within walking distance to the centre of town was my aim. I worked with quite a dense model which included this family housing below. These nine dwellings can house 36 people comfortably. The complex on the left rises through the pine trees, literally placing people in the tree tops. The central courtayrd is private and opens out to the rear of the Uniting Church. The complex on the right sits on the footprint of a soon to be demolished dwelling and does not rise any higher than the neighbouring church or the old gum trees. The architecture is a response to a social need for smaller housing, yet is also driven by an appropriateness to the immediate surrounding context.

LIVING

PLAY

BEDROOM

LIVING

PLAY

BEDROOM

LIVING

PLAY

BEDROOM

LIVING

PLAY

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

PLAY

LIVING

PLAY

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

PLAY

LIVING

PLAY

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

PLAY

PINE FOREST

COURTYARD

CARPORT


LIVING

B/R

STUDIO LIVING

BEDROOM

B/R BEDROOM

VEGE GARDEN STUDY

CIVIC COURT BEDROOM LIVING

LIVING

BEDROOM LIBRARY/ BOOK SWAP

PINE FOREST

BEDROOM

LIVING

STAIR

LIFT

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

LIVING

PINE FOREST

BEDROOM

PINE FOREST

LIVING

BEDROOM

BATHROOM STORE

BEDROOM

PINE FOREST

LIVING

BEDROOM

PINE FOREST

LIVING VOID LIFT

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

LIVING

BEDROOM

LIVING

D CARPARK

RT

CIVIC COURT CIVIC COURT LIVING LIVING LIFT

STAIR

VOID

LIFT

STAIR

PINE FOREST

BEDROOM

BEDROOM

BATHROOM

STUDY/ STUDIO

STORE

STORE

PINE FOREST

BATHROOM

BEDROOM

To the right is the final masterplan for the site within Balnarring. It is of modest architectural means but what it has the potential to achieve is great. Each piece and the spaces inbetween them (which are equally as important) reflect on a certain cultural or social aspect of the city. Whether it be tourist crowds throughout the summer months, the strong local music culture, heavily used bicycle routes, backyard artists, the lack of youth spaces or housing typologies, every issue has been dealt with in an appropriate manner. Scattered around the edge the architecture charges the central park space. The housing increases the population to 118 strengthening the idea of a community enormously. Its strength does not come from an overpowering aesthetic but from a confident formal proposal that is driven by an understanding of the site.

LIVING

Above are the drawings of the two 8-storey apartment towers that sit within the site. They rise to the tops BEDROOM spaces that LIVING already exist inbetween the trees of the old pine trees and their odd plans are driven by empty (this is to prevent trees from having to be removed from the site). They introduce a new housing typology BEDROOM into Balnarring which addresses the social need for smaller dwellings, LIVING expecially for retired couples, that are within walking distance to the centre of town. PINE FOREST PINE FOREST

BEDROOM

LIVING

VOID LIFT

Below is an image of the final presentation, which took place in Two Sams cafe in Balnarring. Presenting the BEDROOM LIVING work directly to the people of the town only reaffirmed to me that acquiring a rich understanding is vital to developeing architecture. Furthermore, discussion and BEDROOM dialogue between the architect and the people of LIVING the city is also necessary. I believe understanding site goes beyond the mere topography. It is about immersBEDROOMand discovering LIVING ing yourself in the social and cultural aspects of the site how and why the city functions as it does. This notion does interact with other threads of thought, but here it is at its most prominent. CIVIC COURT

LIVING

LIFT

VOID

BEDROOM

STAIR

BEDROOM STUDY/ STUDIO

STORE

BATHROOM

PINE FOREST

LIVING


NG

BALNARRING ROAD

BALNARRING ANGLICAN CHURCH

BALNARRING SHOPPING CENTRE

FRANKSTON-FLINDERS ROAD BUS SHELTER/ INFORMATION BOOTH

BICYCLE HUB RETAIL PLAYGROUND

TOILET BLOCK

SKATE PARK KINDERGARTEN + CHILD CARE BALNARRING TOWN HALL HERITAGE TAVERN

COMMUNITY HUB

BALNARRING VILLAGE MOTOR INN

STUDIO SPACE

8X1 BEDROOM DWELLINGS

TEA TREE FOREST

BALNARRING CULTURAL PRECINCT GALLERY/ STUDIO SPACE

8X1 BEDROOM DWELLINGS

OPEN PARKLANDS

PINE FOREST

3X1 BEDROOM DWELLINGS + 1X2 BEDROOM DWELLING

BALNARRING BEACH ROAD

OUTDOOR AMPITHEATRE 4X1 BEDROOM DWELLINGS + 2X2 BEDROOM DWELLING

BALNRRING UNITING CHURCH

PUBLIC LIBRARY

PINE FOREST

6X3 BEDROOM DWELLINGS

BALNARRING PRIMARY SCHOOL

CIVIC COURT

3X3 BEDROOM DWELLINGS


PATHS THROUGH EXPERIENCES: LINKS THROUGH THRESHOLDS VAUGHN SPRINGS HOUSE

‘Vaughn Springs House’ is a single dwelling located in Vaughn Springs, a small township outside of Castelmaine, VIctoria. It house a family of three and a pet dog. It was completed under the guidance of Richard Black with assistance from Michelle Black.

Semester 1, 2011


Manifesting itself within the design of the Vaughn Springs House is a particularly strong train of thought and that is of light and space, of the transitory and of the experience of architecture. In my opinion, James Turrell (below) is the absolute master of light and space. Having his level of expertise is something I can only dream of yet it has not stopped my from attempting to inject his ideas into my own work. Above is the interior of the Vaughn Springs House. The sloped walls broken by the large reveals allow light to come in to dance across the floor. The long corridor is the pathway through this experience. Without doubt I have struggled to tranfer this notion from being purely conceptual to it being a piece of built form, yet it is something that continues to interest me and, to an extent, drive my work. Below are detailed technical examples of how the space operates as a piece of built form. Also below (right) are aerial photographs of the beginning of my concept gestures. An observatory located within the RMIT Alumni Courtyard.


I spent a great deal of time trying to understand the site (above), like Balnarring. I also spent a great deal of time trying to understand Richard and Michelle Black’s work (above). However combining the ideas of site and city with the ideas of light, space and the transitory was where I began to struggle. Far above is my conceptual idea and below is a development section of the house within the site. There is evident conPROPOSEDbetween DWELLING ANDthe STUDIOideas. SPACE flict Do not misunderstand me, I love conflict. The conflict between the ideas that drive VAUGHN SPRINGS my work excites me, it develops a narrative that can be played out. However in this perticular instance the SECTION AA’ conflict between ideas was not at all successful. The idea of a long corridor on such a slope is question1:200 able. I was forcing the idea into the site instead of letting the two ideas influence each other in a more constructive manner. The section, and the architecture is dramatic. I strive for drama. However the project seems to somewhat ignore the site. In turn, the conceptual idea of light and space is severley weakened. For me, this is the first project where the relationships between the ideas played a negative role. The relationships were a way for an idea to gain leverage over another, instead of working in a co-operative manner to properly tackle the design issues that were presented to me.


CORRUGATED IRON ROOF LUMBER JOISTS AND GIRDERS LUMBER FRAMING BONDEK FLOOR SLAB STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAME SPOTTED GUM DOORS SPOTTED GUM CLADDING PERMEABLE STEEL BALCONY CONCRETE FOOTINGS

N D

C

A

A

B

B

D

C

Far above is an axonometric techincal drawing of the house and its construction. There are also a series of images taken during continued site exploration. Above is the final plan of the house within the site and below are images of models used to develop the ideas behind the architecture. Breaking through thresholds to develop links and using these links to create a pathway through an experience is a train of thought which has strengthened as I have worked through my education. Here it is evident, not particularly strong, but it is evident. As I learn to work with this notion in a way so that it respects other threads of thought within my work it becomes far more succesful. This is clear in projects such as Bouverie Haus and Electric Chapel.


THE OPERATIONAL AND THE TECHNICAL: SUSTAINING THE FUTURE, QUIETLY BOUVERIE HAUS

‘Bouveire Haus’ is a 16 storey boutique office tower just located in Carlton, Melbourne. It houses 14 levels of office space, a retail ground level and a rooftop bar/cafe. It was completed under the guidance of David Henderson.

Semester 2, 2012


Bouverie Haus is a ‘technology’ project and therefore emphasis is placed upon the technical resolution within the drawings. This notion of technical understanding however, for me, did not maintain complete dominance throughout the design process. Issues surrounding an understanding of the city also came into play. It drove me to take the typical private office tower and break it down to allow for more public programs to seep in. This included ground level retail and roof top cafe’s and bars. Breaking down the thresholds between the city and the architecture led me to design balconies on almost every level, and atrium spaces that cut through floors in an effort to break the monotonous stacking of program. Again, evident are a number of threads of thought at play with each other. Whilst technical resolution is prominent it is not a single driving force.

STRUCTURALMODEL:

Another key influence behind the design was to establish, for myself, a position on sustainable design. I have never favoured solar panels, wind turbines or the like that are tacked onto buildings in an effort to call them ‘sustanable’. The precedent I researched, Studio 505’s Pixel building (opposite the site) and Council House 2 are sustainable yet they preach this. A building should not have to preach to the city around it that it is sustainable. Bouveire Haus sustains the future, quietly. I have used simple, cheap materials like concrete and alucobond, that can be quickly assembled by a small local labour force. This keeps the construction time of the building to a minimum, reduces costs and employs local people. Furthermore, if need be in 20 or 30 years time the building can be pulled apart with little difficulty. This is my position on sustainable design. Cheap, easy buildings. Rather than expensive buildings that call out to their immediate context that they somehow care for the environment.


The detail within the drawings is immense. Above is the north elevation and a section looking west. Below is the tower sitting within its site, the final ground floor plan and a detailed axonometric of how the facade will be constructed. To the right is the final site plan. These drawings exaggerate the technical qualities of the project and bring them to the fore, however you can not dismiss the role that other threads of thought have played. Similar to the Playful Meanderer, there is a clear idea that maintains a certain dominance over all else. However this idea does not quash those lesser than it, the relationship is that of co-operation and compromise. It is an effort to work at a number of levels to develop a sustainble, technically resolved piece of built form.


THE AESTHETIC OF PERSONALITY: UNLOCKING THE UNUSED LATROBE VALLEY STADIUM

‘Latrobe Valley Stadium’ is a 9,000 seat multi-purpose stadia located in Morwell, in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria. It houses Australia Rules Football, Soccer and Equestrian amongst other community and musical events. It was complted under the guidance of Stuart Harrison and Gretchen Wilkins.

Semester 2, 2010


Latrobe Valley Stadium is interesting for me because when you look at it you are so overwhlemed by the drama of the design aesthetic that it becomes very easy to lose all the other threads of thought which have driven the work. It would appear that the shocking red walls and jagged edges maintain pure dominance, they do not. That is because I spent quite some time studying and understanding the city of Morwell (the site) as well as many precedent pieces. The notion of ‘unlocking the unused’ was evident in the Playful Meanderer, again it is evident here. I chose to site the stadium on a wasted piece of land that is wedged inbetween a freeway, an onramp and and a freight railway line. Exploring the site further I discovered the strong local sports culture and chose to develop a stadium that could house AFL, soccer and equestrian events. Studying precedents such as Cox’s AAMI Park and Harrison and White’s Preston Oval I was able to layout a plan that accomodated all these sports, as well as markets, concerts and festivals. Perhaps the strongest aspect of the design is the cut which allows the public to use the stadium as a park when it is not is use.

PEDESTRIAN ROUTE VEHICLE ROUTE PARKING ZONES

Left are a series of diagrams that explore a number of key design decisions made during the development process. Firstly was to deal with the issues of traffic movement, not only vehicles but pedestrians. Other issues included sight from the freeway and sound protection from both the freeway and the train line. Finally issues of overflow parking were dealt with by drawing links between spaces that could be utilised for events with particularly large crowds.


Above are images of Morwell, of the freeway that runs around the stadium and of the main street of the town. The warm red colours very prominent on the local council building. The stadium can house events such as this one, Future Music Festival, comfortably. Again links can be made between the aesthetic and the event itself. ARM’s Perth Arena has a certain dramatic quality similar to Latrobe Valley Stadium seen above in the midst of a festival of somekind. The red wall is a technique I have employed to create drama. Like ARM’s National Museum of Australia (previous page), it is there to be seen. The aesthetic is driven by a desire to be noticed, particularly from the freeway. It embodies shock, excitement and fun, everything I believe sports architecture should be. However it is because I have pushed this design aesthetic to its absolute maximum, that the drama is so heightened we tend to lose sight of the basic principles of the design. The social and cultural understanding of the city appears to take a back seat, as does the logical planning of program. The aesthetic is brought to the fore with great gusto nearly dismissing all other threads of thought.


Above are a series of images that I used throughout the design process to explore how the stadium would house the many programs it was capable of dealing with. Left is the final floor plan (ground level) revealing how the stadium operates underneath the typical mezzanine level. Below is an image that reveals the cut through the stands, through the red wall and into the heart of the project.

STABLES

PLANT ROOM

STORE

STORE

MULTIPURPOSE SPACE

STORE

ADMIN SPACE

STORE FUNCTION ROOM

KITCHEN

ENTRY

FUNCTION ROOM

WC WC WC

WC

MULTIPURPOSE SPACE

What Latrobe Valley Stadium does is present a different set of relationships between ideas. Not only do social and cultural udnerstanding, unlocking the unused and the possibilities of program work with the notion of the aesthetic of personality, but they manage to strengthen it to a state where it appears to take over. Yet it does not. If anything this aesthetic strengthens the roles of these other notions. The relationships are not about compromise or co-operation but of pure assistance to one another to boost their value within the work. What manifested as a series of small notions developed into a concise piece of built form that tackles many, if not all, of the design issues presented. Below is the final key view of the stadium. It reveals the red wall, the arch, the main entry points and the cut through the seating allowing you, to look inside.


UNDERSTANDING PRECEDENT: THE POSSIBILITIES OF PROGRAM ELECTRIC CHAPEL

‘Electric Chapel’ is a single structure located in the Central Business Distric of Melbourne. It houses a chapel, a monastery and a children’s theme park. It was completed under the guidance of Jessica In and Gwyll Jahn with assistance from Paul Minifie.

Semester 2, 2011


Little

treet

ale S

Lonsd

Queen t Stree

262 Queen Street 1:200 St Paul’s Cathedral Sir Christopher Wren

Electric Chapel was born out of an understanding of precedent. This understanding went beyond pure aesthetic quality and instead focused on how the artist/architect projected their own ideals and values into their selected medium. Precedent was used throughout the entire project as a way of solving difficult programattic issues as well as ideas of representation, ornamnetation and formal responses. Above are the works of Sir Christopher Wren, J. G. Ballard and Antoni Gaudi. Also above is the first floor plan, Wren’s St Pauls’ Cathedral placed on the site. Many small experiments like this were carried out in an effort to properly understand the driving forces behind the precedent and in turn, discover a way to exploit those ideas to deal with the issues within the brief. Left is a final drawing of the void space within the building. Below it is the first section through the project. These complex shapes and forms were only possible through the use of programs such as Maya (below right). Forms were developed based upon ideas, these forms were then translated onto the site, filled with program and manipulated to become functional. I repeated this process over and over again in an effort to fully explore not only the precedent, but the possibilities of the unique program in the brief. Electric Chapel was to be a chapel, with accomodation for monks. It was also to be a childrens fun park. Initial exploration (like on this page) was useful however as the project developed the relationships between notions of precedent and program only became more twisted.

PRIVATE GARDEN

ACCOMODATION

LIBRARY

PRIVATE GARDEN

ARCADE SPACE

EXISTING DEVELOPMENT

CHAPEL

LITTLE LONSDALE STREET

PUBLIC PLAZA

262 Queen Street Proposed Monastry & Theme Park SECTION AA’ 1:100


treet

ale S

onsd

le L

Litt

Chapel

Cross Tower

Office Library

Temporary Exhibition Space

WC

Store Elevator Lobby

WC

Brooklyn

Entry Hall

en Que Stree t

262 Queen Street Proposed Monastry & Theme Park Ground 1:200

Similar to the layout of these pages, a ‘scrapbooking’ method was used where I would layout precedent, sketches, drawings altogether and attempt to draw links about how each piece could potentially solve an issues within another. In this resepct Electric Chapel is my most dense and thorough project because the relationships between these ideas of precedent, program, the city, my aesthetic, etc. are all so intertwined with one another. Above are pieces by Frank Furness (used to tackle the chapel facade) and Renee Magritte (used to employ a sense of surrealism within the fun park). Studying Disneyland and Coney Island drove the program within the fun park. Forms developed in Maya were used to represent emotions. Sketch plans spent time dealing with laying the program out with a relationship to the city around it. The manuscripts were used in an attempt to sum up the basic principles of Electric Chapel. The cross and the heart prominent symbols in Lady Gaga’s Born This Way album, which contains the song Electric Chapel. Below is a progress section of Electric Chapel. Introduced here is the narrative. The two programs maintain a di-polar relationship. Pushing each other apart, yet held together by the boundaries of the site. The create tears within the facade, spaces which cannot be used. This is the true beginning of Electric Chapel.

Little Lonsdale Street


Development of this narrative was continuous. As was exploring precedent, understanding it and using it to manipulate the programs to follow this di-polar relationship. This series of images are from all stages of the design process. Clockwise from top left. A progress elevation clrealy shows the two seperate programs and the tension between them. This is very different to later elevations which project a more united facade, concealing the tension between the program. Through artwork and photography (for example Lady Gaga or Hieronymus Bosch) I explored ideas of complexity, bold representation and minute detail. Both were used to develop detailing within the fun park and determine how this aesthetic would interact with the chapel.

Little Lonsdale Street

262 Queen Street Proposed Monastry & Theme Park Queen Street Elevation 1:200

As the narrative developed the elevation became more difficult. What was a di-polar relationship had flipped. The story had progressed so that now the two programs had smashed into one another yet still remained two seperate objects. The section of the idea was very concise, yet now it was complex. A series of spaces that interlocked through a number of stairs and ramps in all directions. Developing the project through plan was less complex. The Chapel was to open out into the smaller street (Little Lonsdale Street) whilst the fun park opened out onto the larger (Queen Street). Both cut through to a single public plaza that unlocked public space and fed it back into the city. These principles of the city remained throughout the entire design process.

treet

ale S

onsd

le L

Litt

B

A

Public Plaza

B

Que treet

en S

The almost ‘blocky’ pushing and pulling methods of Alvar Aalto’s works were employed to tackle not only the facade, but the laying out of program. The last image is an initial program diagram that explores where each program sits within the building. I talk about Electric Chapel as my most ‘dense’ project because almost all of the previously discussed threads of thought are at play. This only becomes more evident as the project develops and the narrative continues to progress. More ideas are brought in to tackle certain issues and in turn these ideas alter previously used ones leaving the relationships to drive the project.

A

262 Queen Street Proposed Monastery & Theme Park Level One 1:200


Top right is the final manuscript. It is a heart (the fun park) overlayed with a cross (the chapel) and engraved with the letters ‘EC’ (Electric Chapel). In the final weeks I used this to represent my project in its most basic form. It is two clearly seperate objects, smashed into one another, yet still evidently two different symbols. The following pages contain final sketches and drawings of Electric Chapel. I had reached a stage within my design process where I felt that I had explored precedent, program and issues of the city to their full extent. It then became more about using these ideas to develop the piece of built form, rather than using them over and over again to explore further issues and representations. The images (top left) are diagrams exploring this formal built resolution. They are rich with ideas, and the relationships between these ideas influence each other strongly. The narrative is at play, aesthetically they remain two very seperate objects. On fun, exciting, the other calm and content. Entrances and plazas are cut through the ground floor to integrate the building into its surrounding context. Program within the facade is planned thoroughly. The carousel sits within a dramatic cantilever that hangs over Queen Street staring down at the road. The monks housing recedes off the street yet sits above all else and faces the northern sun. It opens out to a private roof top garden that hides all aspects of the fun park below. Left, is a final section. It shows the private garden and to its right, the large carousel/playground space. Below are two food halls and a pathway from the House of Horrors to the Aracde Hall. Below that is the public plaza. The stairwell off Little Lonsdale leads down, this allows for the chapel to maintain a very high ceiling height. Below again is a storage space and plant rooms. The multi-coloured glass panels, the brick facade, the cathedral like windows and doors and the dramatic void space are all elements discovered in my thorough exploration of precedent. Furthermore it is this understanding combined with other ideas of the city, of aesthetic and of program, that has developed the final piece of built form.


A A

B

B

Bed

Bed Bed

W.C.

W.C.

MegaPlayground

D

Upper Food Hall

D

Little Lonsdale Street

Little Lonsdale Street

House of Horrors W.C.

W.C.

W.C.

D

Living

D C

C

C

C Private Balcony Carousel

Arcade Hall

Queen Street

Queen Street

A A

le

Litt

Chapel

B

Electric Chapel 272 Queen Street Level 3 Carnivale with Monk Accomodation 1:200

Electric Chapel 272 Queen Street Level 2 House of Horrors with Arcade Hall and Food Hall 1:200

The development of the planning on the previous page can be seen clearly here. This assortment of precedent, sketches, diagrams and final drawings explore the functionality behind the facade. The narrative explored the idea that behind the very seperate facades, the program could weave together more harmoniously. The plaza is used by both, as is the office space, library, food halls and grand ballroom. Whilst clear programmatic seperation may be necessary the possibilites of combining certain aspects of the program present unique opportunities. This notion of the ‘possibilites of program’ has A been used to B resolve funtional planning.

treet

ale S

sd Lon

B

Prayer Room

Entrance Hall (Above) Library

treet

en S

Que

Public Park

262 Queen Street Proposed Monastry & Theme Park Basement 1 1:200

W.C. treet

ale S

onsd

le L

Litt

W.C.

Green Balcony Grand Ballroom

Food Hall

W.C.

Void

House of Horrors

Arcade Hall Que treet

en S

D 262 Queen Street Proposed Monastry & Theme Park Level 1 1:200

Little Lonsdale Street

W.C.

Office

D

C

C

Public Plaza

Entrance Hall

Queen Street

A

B


Both these pages contain a series of final drawings of Electric Chapel. Top left is the public plaza space Electric Chapel with a stairwell up into the entry hall for the fun park. Top middle is a section through the viod space. 272 Queen Street Section BB 1:200 It reveals the space housing the carousel with slopes towards Queen Street. It also reveals the complexity in hiding the library space behind the chapel, underneath the office which both look towards a loading bay. Above is the House of Horrors with its shallow, jagged ceiling contrasting the mega playground space with its high, airy, bubbly interior. Top right is a typical view from the street revelaing the super graphic cross (for the chapel) on the fun park facade. To the right is the final Little Lonsdale Street elevation, and below are details hidden within these drawings.


FOOD NOMNO


I have chosen to close this book with Electric Chapel because it best represents what my work is about. It is about an understanding of not only ideas, but how those ideas react with one another and can influence each other to develop architecture. What is so exciting about this is that as I continue my education, my architecture is free to develop and incorporate new ideas and issues without dismissing ones I have always found important. My architecture never has been, and never will be driven by single ideas. It will always be about a narrative between ideas, a narrative that is far from linear. These ideas that I have explored will continue to appear in my works however their strength and presence it is impossible to say. My architecture is driven by these relationships in these dynamic contexts.


english international politics visual communication and design mathematical methods further mathematics victorian certificate of education environment captain exams results schoolies 18th birthday parties going out apollo bay offers acceptance royal melbourne institute of technology architecture and design communications peta carlin history theory peter corrigan brent allpress materials capsule pavilion urban trajectory gallery sean mcmahon natalie robinson kris green culture seaford ideas theatre romantic life saving club lower pool sports fans morwell docklands stadiums parks community program flexibility stuart harrison gretchen wilkins cam newnham piyatida maneesook technology space frame light weight construction gymnasium disability access ena ninkovic kristian jenkins oscar niemeyer render rhino autocad drawing plan section elevation site context lighting layout graphic presentation printing lean van schaik tri polar advanced architecture urban environments x-field richard black michelle black lightness and movement house observatory thomas adolph rachel ang ephemeral architecture light space site and site again struggle conflict disapointment misunderstanding more renders enric miralles balsa wood mdf cardboard contours zap a gap model storage space australian architecture ashton raggatt mcdougall bates smart dentor corker marshall lyons sean godsell manchester unity building federation square building 8 storey hall eureka tower earthly delights jessica in gwyllim jahm maya dipolar mel lo lara santos raph freedman site model laser etching debates discussion ornament typology planning contrasting electric chapel exploration history of modern architecture mauro barracco mies van der rohe frank furness antoni gaudi archigram nationalist architecture rockefeller plaza alvar aalto scandanavia modernism function sustainability solar panels water tanks vegetable gardens saana house in plumgrove atrium missing model marijke davey star ratings balnarring lucinda mclean louise wright mornington peninsula research ryan king josh cousins understanding the city primary school site plan live trace illustrator isabelle jooste local residents two sams housing research the new suburb ian mcdougall tim pyke adelaide elizabeth density open space west heidelberg concrete bouverie haus office towers david henderson victor bredin alucubond balconies rooftop garden sculpture plaster genuine fake mark raggatt dean boothroyd epping north shopping centre retail strip portfolio anna johnson reflection understanding what it means moving forward new york city english international politics visual communication and design mathematical methods further mathematics victorian certificate of education environment captain exams results schoolies 18th birthday parties going out apollo bay offers acceptance royal melbourne institute of technology architecture and design communications peta carlin history theory peter corrigan brent allpress materials capsule pavilion urban trajectory gallery sean mcmahon natalie robinson kris green culture seaford ideas theatre rotion

Relationships In Dynamic Contexts  

A portfolio of Bachelor design and architecture work completed at RMIT. 2010-2012.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you