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Shira Davis


Table of Contents Maps, diagrams, infographics Web, booklets, catalogues Etc, other, things


Maps Diagrams Infographics


Stormwater in the Don Study of stormwater conditions and management in the Don watershed, specifically at the Leaside Business Park. Studio design project 2011 In collaboration with Yi Zhou


POLLUTANT HOT ZONES

Percent of Pervious versus Impervious Surface Area

rshed ate nW Do Cl NO3-

WEST DON

Cl

-

-

P

Zn

Fe

Precipitation in millions of mm Cl

NO3-

P

NH3

Zn

Fe

Cu

P

Fe

Cu

100

Cl

Cl

Chloride

40

Don Watershed Leaside Business Area

-

Don Watershed Pollution Hot Zones

NTS

40

Little Don Rive

E. Coli

NH3

60 10

Don River

Un-ionized amonia

P

15

Don River at

Al

Aluminum

60

Total Suspended Solids (TSS)

NO3-

Don River

Copper

Phosphorus

Pervious Surface 80

15

Don River at

Nitrate

100

21%

Little Don River

Fe Cu

120

65%

80

-

Zn

Iron

18%

49%

120

LOWER DON

Al

Flow rates along the Don m3/s

10%Precipitation in millions of mm 35%

TAYLOR MASSEY CREEK

-

NO3-

LEASIDE

Zinc

ide as Le

Flow rates along the Don m3/s

EAST DON

P

Fe

NO3-

Roads

Sidewalk

10Parking Lots

Roofs

Impervious Surface

Surfaces in the Leaside Business Park

FLOODPLAIN BOUNDARIES AND FLOW RATES FOR THE DON RIVER, AT LEASIDE

Flow rates along the Don River Precipitatiton overall for Downtown Toronto

Flow rates along the Don m3/s /s

3

A

WEST DON

Precipitation in millions of mm

Precipitation in millions of mm B

EAST DON

120

120

100

100

80

80

15

10 40

40

Don Valley Parkway Major Arterial Streets Railroad

0

0 millions of mm

0

500

East Don

Floodplain

West Don

Lower Don

520 Don River

5

0 m3/s

20

0

JJ

FF

MM

Don River at York Mills

LOWER DON

Don River at Tom Morden

TAYLOR MASSEY CREEK

D

10

AA

Little Don River at Don Mills

60

60 C

15

15

10

5

J

F

M

0

M M

JJ

JJ

AA

SS

OO

NN

D

1000 m

Floodplain for the Don River at Leaside

Monthly Precipitation and Don River Flow

STORMWATER DRAINAGE ZONES

1 121481 m2 88 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0.00024

2 116345 m2 51 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0.00015

4

3 39130 m2 9 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0.00008

6

4 652367 m2 147 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0.00007

7

M

A

J

M

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

5 796327 m2 187 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0.00008 8 6 95782 m2 34 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0.00012

9

5

7 132870 m2 27 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0.00007

149,376,436 Litres

=

8 75592 m2 30 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0.00013

M

A

M

J

J

J

A

S

O

N

9 297201 m2 136 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0.00015

D J

F

F

10 493761 m2 125 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0.00008

ASIDE REGION

11 46060 m2 0 catch basins Area ratio CB/zone = 0

1

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

10 11

Outfalls

3

0

500

Catch Basins

1000 m Storm Lines

Combined Sewer Lines Don River

2

Floodplain Don Valley Parkway Major Arterial Streets

J

60 Olympic Sized Swimming Pools

Railroad

F

0

500

1000 m

0

500

nagement in the Leaside Business Area

ple of the complexities of stormwater management at the local scale. To the east of the site, the three main tributaries of the Don converge, resulting in a significant increase in flow through the site and south into the Lower Don. To the south, the North Toronto Waste Water bined sewer lines in the area and then releases the treated water back into the Don, contributing 11% of its flow. These factors position Leaside at an integral point in the watershed, with great potential to control water flow in the Don during wet weather.

e Don are snowmelt and vegetation growth. As the snowmelts, flow rates in the Don peak. While precipitation does not change significantly in summer, flow rates are at their lowest during this period because water is taken up by vegetation. Coupled with the knowledge that de, this implicates the late winter and early spring months as the most critical in stormwater management, as they contribute most strongly to pollution, flooding, and erosion. As much as 51% of Leaside is covered with impervious surfaces, as compared with the 35% average atio of impervious surfaces means that during an extreme weather event, runoff from Leaside can reach up to 150 million litres. For the most part Leaside has dedicated stormwater sewers, and only a small part on the west of the site is still serviced by the combined sewer ers with storm sewers and can lead to overflow or raw sewage). Based on the location of the storm drains and their outfalls, Leaside can be divided into 11 regions for stormwater management. Currently, this stormwater from Leaside flows directly into the Don, untreated.

Stormwater Infrastructure in Leaside

stormwater management anticipate the next frontier for landscape architecture. The opportunities far outnumber the challenges, and the complexities of the site offer great potential to produce meaningful infrastructural interventions.

Extreme Daily Runoff in Leaside Region

D


The Coves - Master Plan Trail typologies and a trail master plan for the Coves (London, ON), based on ecological analysis. Ecological design project 2011 In collaboration with Mehran Atee, Jessica Wagner & Yi Zhou

2% sheet drainage wayfinding sign

2m vertical clearance

1.5m clearing and grubbing width

.05m asphalt concrete geotextile .12m subbase .subgrade

3m paved trail

dirt trail


COVES ESA SYNTHESIS MAP Area of maximum constraint Sensitive areas Existing trails Potential opportunity points

TRAIL MASTERPLAN 8

Trail typology Multi-use path

Footpath Naturalized trail


The Transposable Park Survey of vacant lots in downtown Hamilton for use in a temporary park design project. Lots were described quantitatively by size and zoning, and qualitatively by defined typologies. Thesis project 2013


VACANT LOT TYPOLOGIES

residential/commercial • small • high visibility• medium redevelopment rate

left over space • variable size • coupled with infrastructure • slow to no redevelopment

vacant building • variable use • often boarded up

remnant space • landlocked • no visibility • little or no accessibility

large • high visibility • fast redevelopment or interim use as parking


VACANT LOTS, HAMILTON


Downt

8.

O < 500 M2

lo

INDUSTRIAL

COMMERCIAL

28%

15%

DISTRIBUTION OF VACANT LOTS BY SIZE

DISTRIBUTION OF VACANT LOTS BY USE

57% 500-1000 M2

Ov

10

1000-5000 M2 5000-10,000 M2 10,000-50,000 M2

RESIDENTIAL

Residential Commercial Industrial Vacant Lots Escarpment

0

0.5

1

2 km Downtown Ha

9.7%

v


Street Life Inspired by street life on Liberty Ave in Queens NY, this modular street furniture aims to carve out public space where there is none. The system contains two parts: moveable seats, that can stack on elevated rail columns and permanent benches. Studio project 2012


TABLE AND SEAT

FAMILY SEATING IN MULTIPLE LEVELS

SEATING FOR STRANGERS OR FRIENDS


Soils of St. Bernard, LA Detailed colour and simplified greyscale maps of soil types illustrating historic river channels, and flooding probability. Studio project 2012 In collaboration with Clarence Lacy, and Curtis Puncher


Offshore Algaculture Description and evaluation of an offshore algaculture system hypothetically applied to the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet in St Bernard, Louisiana. Studio design project 2012

MATERIAL CIRCULATION

TETHERING First and last rows along the dock are anchored. In between rows are tethered to each other to control movement.

O2

Water

Nutrients

Algae

CO2

Produced by algae and escapes into air and water through semi permeable membrane

leaves system by osmosis through semi permeable membranes

Introduced with waste water, nutrients remain inside the system to be used by algae

OUT: concentrated algae to be harvested

Located along the lasat few cells in each unit it allows water to leave but keeps nutrients in, concentrating the algae before harvest.

Grows in a loop so batches with sufficient turbidity/concentration are funneled into a pipe and harvested by boat

Enters through semi permeable membrane, used by algae to produce lipids.

SEMI PERMEABLE MEMBRANE

IN: wastewater containing nutrients


WATER TREATMENT Microalgae can grow in wastewater, using it for nutrient supply instead of fertilizer and cleaning the water.

ADVANTAGES OF OFF SHORE ALGACULTURE

AGITATION Wave action provides agitation and keep the algae mixing so it all has access to nutrients and sunlight.

O2

O2 PRODUCTION

CO2

Algae produce oxygen, increasing oxygen levels in MRGO will allow for more biodiversity.

BREAKWATER

Growing algae in a large water bodies helps maintain a relatively constant temperature.

Photobioreactor docks and bags function as multiple breakwaters to reduce surge damage during storm events.

Microalgae can grow in wastewater, using it for nutrient supply instead of fertilizer and cleaning the water.

AGITATION Wave action provides agitation and keep the algae mixing so it all has access to nutrients and sunlight.

CARBON SINK Algae uses CO2 from the atmosphere in order to produce biodiesel, making it a green solution.

BREAKWATER Photobioreactor docks and bags function as multiple breakwaters to reduce surge damage during storm events.

$$

Algae uses CO2 from the atmosphere in order to produce biodiesel, making it a green solution.

CONSTANT TEMPERATURE

WATER TREATMENT

CO2

CARBON SINK

CHEAP 90% cheaper than any other current algae production model. Can be replaced realtively easily in case of storm.

NON INVASIVE

$$

CHEAP 90% cheaper than any other current algae production model. Can be replaced realtively easily in case of storm.

NON INVASIVE Fresh water microalgae used in a saline/brackish environment. If a bag breaks algae cannot survive and die. If MRGO becomes more fresh over time, marine algae can be used instead.


Web Booklets Catalogues


MakeSpace Design and implementation of splash page and survey about public space. Signs and flyers were created to help increase response. Thesis project 2013

Vacant spaces provide communities the opportunity to experiment with spaces and see what works and how to improve their neighbourhood in a temporary framework.

Vaca the o space to im temp

What do you want to see in your community?

Wha

http://bit.ly/XXCUoR


Vacant spaces provide communities the opportunity to experiment with spaces and see what works and how to improve their neighbourhood in a temporary framework.

If this was public space for the next year, what would you like to see? Tell us!


Rain Harvesting The basics of rainwater harvesting: the system and its parts, sizing, and capacity. In collaboration with Jessica Wagner

Table of Contents Introduction System Methods + Components 1. Catchment 2. Conveyance 3. Pre-Treatment 4. Storage 5. Post-Treatment 6. Distribution

Quantitative Example Case Studies

1. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) headquarters 2. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Source List

Catchment

Non-potable fixture

Pre-Treatment

Conveyance

Post-Treatment

Make-Up Water

Irrigation Distribution Overflow Cistern


Introduction

Table of Contents Introduction

Catchment

Rainwater harvesting has long been a common practice throughout the world. Today, many people continue to collect rainwater for various uses. While water scarcity is a global problem, Canada is home to the largest freshwater reserves in the world, and Canadians enjoy some of the lowest rates for water usage. However, rainwater harvesting has its advantages even here in Toronto: it can help reduce stormwater runoff, increase groundwater recharge, and, of course, reduce water costs for users making them less dependent on municipal supply.

System Methods + Components 1. Catchment 2. Conveyance 3. Pre-Treatment 4. Storage 5. Post-Treatment 6. Distribution

Catchment:the surface area upon which rainwater falls and is eventually collected. Material choice: Non-potable water - any kind of roof Potable water - metal, clay or concrete (avoid roofs containing zinc coatings, copper, asbestos, asphaltic compounds, no lead paint or flashings). Theoretically, for every square meter of roof catchment area, 1 Litre of rainwater can be captured per millimetre of rainfall. However, most systems can expect to lose 20% of water due to wind and leaks in the conveyance network. In addition the type of roof material will also account for initial loss.

This paper aim to review the process of rainwater harvesting, its elements and techniques, as well as guidelines for designing a rainwater harvesting system. The paper focuses on rainwater harvesting on a small scale from the roofs of residential or commercial buildings. Roof runoff is considerably cleaner than runoff from other surfaces, making any cleaning or filtration processes simpler.

Quantitative Example

Steel

Rainwater can be used for many applications such as: Toilets Washing clothes Irrigation Vehicle washing Air conditioning systems

Case Studies

1. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) headquarters 2. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Source List

In Ontario rainwater can be used for flushing toilets and urinals as well as sub-surface irrigation and below ground irrigation systems (Ontario Building Code). All rainwater connections must be made in accordance with Ontario‘s Building Code. 2006. Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, Toronto, ON., and in accordance with local authorities.

Asphaltic shingles

0.25 mm initial loss

0.5 mm initial loss

Fiberglass sheets

Asphalt flat roof

Hypalon (rubber) flat roof

Fiberglass sheets

Asphalt flat roof

Hypalon (rubber) flat roof

0.5 mm initial loss

1.5 mm initial loss

1.5 mm initial loss

Catchment

Rainwater Pollutants Non-potable fixture

Pre-Treatment

Catchment surface: washing off of chemicals on material surface, leaching of chemicals for surface material. Environment: Environmental factors (air pollution, animal waste, plant activity (pollen, leaves))

Conveyance

Leaves and pollen Post-Treatment

Animal droppings

Chemical from roof

Air pollution

Make-Up Water

Irrigation Distribution Abestos Lead zinc

Overflow Cistern

Conveyance

Conveyance

off

Pre-treatment

on

Ontario Building Code specifies that rainwater may be used for toilet and urinal flushing providing that the rainwater is free of solids . However, it does not specify the degree of treatment required for rainwater to be considered free of solids. GUTTER AND DOWNSPOUT:

REQUIRED GUTTER SIZE BASED ON LOCAL CLIMATE (RAINFALL INTENSITY) AND ROOF SIZE

Traditional conveyance system found in most residential houses.

GUTTER PROTECTORS

Design rainfall intensity (15 min. rainfall, mm) 18.75

71 Max roof drainage area served per 130 downspout (m2) 212

25

31.25

37.5

43.75

50

53

43

35

30

27

98

78

65

56

49

159

127

106

91

79

56.25

62.5

Minimum required gutter size and type

24

21

100 mm [4 in.] Kstyle

43

39

125 mm [5 in.] Kstyle

71

64

150 mm [6 in.] Kstyle

Perforated gutter protector with mesh screen

Snap-on gutter protector

Louvered gutter protector

Helmet-like gutter protector

Shingles

Gutter SCUPPER AND DOWNSPOUT: Used in flat roof buildings, with external or internal drainage system.

Soffit

REQUIRED DOWNSPOUT SIZE BASED ON GUTTER SIZE AND DOWNSPOUT TYPE Minimum downspout size (mm [in])

RAIN HEADS

Gutter size and type

Rectangular type

Square type

Rain head (Leaf Beater)

100 mm [4 in.] K-style

50x75 [2x3 ]

75x75 [3x3]

125 mm [5 in.] K-style

50x75 [2x3]

75x75 [3x3]

150 mm [6 in.] K-style

75 x 100 [3x4]

100x100 [4x4]

Rain head (Leaf Eater)

Downspout from roof gutter

Air pollution GUTTER AND RAIN CHAIN: Rain chain acts as downspout. It conveys water while minimizing splashing and water loss. Used for its aesthetics.

Screen

RULE OF THUMB: 1 square inch outlet for every 100 square feet of roof area

Debris pushed/ swept away by incoming rainwater To cistern

Pre-treatment

Distribution

Storage

Storage Friction Loss (m)

FIRST FLUSH DEVICES First flush devices collect and dispose of the first amount of rainwater from every rain event so it doesn’t contaminate any water already in the storage tank. They are especially important if none of the pre-treatment systems above are used, or if potable water is desired.

cistern (noun)

1. A tank for storing water, esp. one supplying taps or as part of a flushing toilet. 2. An underground reservoir for rainwater.

Recommended Cistern Capacities based on Catchment Areas and Rainwater Demands Toronto, Ontario Recommended storage tank capacities for catchment areas and rainwater demands for RWH systems located in Toronto, Ontario

First flush device size: Small roofs (<1000 sqft) = 5 gallons. Larger roofs – 10 gallons per 1000/sqft roof

In feed from roof

Downspout from gutters

Tee junction Connection to tank

Floating sealing ball Diverter chamber

Rainwater fills holes in the ball, making it heavy, thus stretching the elastic and closing the valve seat. After the rain stops the rainwater leaks out of the ball and the elastic returns to its original position

SafeRain first-flush unit waterproof elastic

Filter screen Wall/post bracket

Chamber outlet

Screw cap with O ring seal

Flow control valve

Hose connection

FLOATING BALL FIRST-FLUSH Downspout from gutters

Baffle gate Adjusted shaft - shorter stretch distance allows adjusting the first flush quantity

Chamber seat

Pipe bracket

Rainwater conveyance drainage pipe

BAFFLE FIRST FLUSH

AUSTRALIAN FIRST FLUSH

To cistern

Rainwater outlet (pressurized pipe)

To drain

Overflow outlet Top-up Level

Low Water Level

on

250

300

350

400

450

500

600

700

800

900

1,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

5,000

Roof Catchment Area (m) 2

Static

1,500 2,000 Height

5,000(m) 5,000

2,500

3,000

5,000

5,000

100

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

150

2,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

2,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

250

2,000

5,000

5,000

7,500

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

300

2,000

5,000

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

350

-

5,000

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

400

-

5,000

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

5,000 Static5,000

5,000

450

-

5,000

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

(m) 7,500 7,500

7,500

500

-

5,000

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

-

5,000

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

10,000

10,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

5,000 5,000 5,000

5,000

5,000 Lift 5,000 7,500 7,500

5,000 5,000 7,500 7,500

7,500

7,500

700

-

5,000

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

7,500

800

-

5,000

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

900

-

-

-

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

-

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

Jet Pump

-

5,000

2,000

-

-

5,000

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

15,000

15,000

15,000

2,500

-

-

-

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

15,000

15,000

15,000

3,000

-

-

-

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

7,500

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

15,000

15,000

15,000

Pump Size

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

15,000

15,000

15,000

Recommended rainwater storage tank capacities generated using the Rainwater Harvesting System Design Tool assuming: 1.

Historical rainfall for the City of Toronto, from 1961 -2005 (median annual rainfall: 678 mm);

2.

Optimum rainwater storage tank capacity values include an assumption of a 20% unused volume (typically referred to as ‘dead space’) .

Water level sensor float switch

Pump intake

Variations in Cistern Size scale 1:100 Make-Up Water System Regardless of the size of the rainwater storage tank or size of the catchment area, there will be times when there is insufficient rainfall to meet the demands placed on the system, and the cistern will run dry. The make-up water system recognizes when there is insufficient rainwater and performs an action such asv triggering a warning light or switching to an alternative supply of water.

Diverter chamber To Cistern

Garden hose fitting to direct first-flush to landscape area

200

2,000

1,500

Elbow

Diverter chamber

Regulator valve

150

2,000

Downspout from gutters Tee junction

Floating sealing ball

Screen

100

2,000

1,000 Distribution

off

Ball seat

Floating ball seal chamber when it’s full. Additional water is diverted to cistern.

50

50

600

High Water Level

rainwater cistern capacity

TYPICAL STAND-PIPE FIRST-FLUSH

Diverter outlet

Electrical supply conduit

Optimum Rainwater Storage Tank Capacity (L)

Rainwater Demand (Litres per day)

200

Electrical wiring Make-up pipe (potable source)

Valve seat

Stainless steel screen

Ball seal

Access riser (below ground tanks) or Access hatch (above ground tanks)

To cistern

Screw cap and hose screens

Irrigation hose

Drip irrigator

Storage

Cross Connection Risk Potable water used in a make-up system is to be brought into close proximity with rainwater, typically of poorer quality. If a connection is made between the rainwater system and a municipal or well water system, there is a risk that the rainwater can be drawn into the potable water system through the process of back flow. Care must be taken when implementing and managing a make-up water system.

Overflow System The purpose of the overflow system is to handle excessive rainwater flows, directing them away from the rainwater storage tank to a suitable location. Overflow volumes can be directed to grade, a storm sewer, or an on-site soakaway pit. In each case, rainwater can be conveyed via gravity flow or pumping.

2,000 litres 2m x 2m x 0.5m

Post-Treatment

Cold Weather Rainwater Storage Snow collection will yield 1/10th the amount of water. For example, one centimeter of accumulated snow will yield 1mm of rainwater collection.

Post-storage treatment includes filtration, disinfection, and/or treatment for aesthetic issues like colour, taste, or odour. This level of treatment is generally not necessary unless water is intended to be potable.

Placing tanks in ground below freezing line is the best way to keep tank safe through winter months. It is recommended that large tanks are used in cold climates because they take longer to freeze. All pipes and cistern components must be insulated or have heat take to keep components from freezing.

Collection efficiency losses are not typically found with post-storage treatment devices, although some are associated with a loss in system pressure.

summer cisterns should always be cleaned and emptied at the end of the season.

The most common form of post-storage treatment is 5 micron particle filtration, followed by and ultraviolet (UV) disinfection.

7,50 litres 2m x 2m x 1.87m

15,000 litres 2m x 2m x 3.75m

Distribution Gravity System: If the cistern is elevated above fixtures, the system may run on gravity. 2.31ft of pipe is required to gain 1PSI of pressure. Pumped System: A pressurized pump distribution systemDistribution is needed when cistern is located below ground or at grade and cannot reach the required pressure. Water is pumped from the rainwater tank, pressurized, and delivered it to fixtures located at higher elevations. The system is comprised of a pump, a ‘pressure tank‘ (a tank used to store pressurized water), a pressure switch or constant pressure components, independent plumbing lines and various other plumbing components. This system is shown in the adjacent diagram).

Filtration

Filtration removes suspended particles from water by passing it through a permeable material.

non-potable fixture

Friction Loss (m)(m) Friction Loss

Water issues targeted:

Above Ground Cistern

• Turbidity • Total suspended solids

Sloped roof reduces snow weight

Treatment Devices: Rainwater conveyance drainage pipe Insulated Pipe

• Particle filtration (i.e., bag/sock or cartridge filter) • Slow sand filtration • Membrane filtration

Friction Loss (m)

Disinfection removes or inactivates microorganisms by chemical or physical means. Regulation equipment

Pump

Insulation Concrete Foundation

Static Height (m)

Water issues targeted:

1.5 meters Below frost line (Toronto)

Rainwater outlet

• Ultraviolet (UV) • Chlorine • Ozonation • Slow sand filter • Membrane filtration • Thermal treatment

Water issues targeted:

Below Ground Cistern Pump

• Hydrogen sulphide • Organic matter • Manganese • Iron

Treatment Devices:

• Activated carbon • Ozonation • Slow sand filter • Reverse Osmosis • Membrane filtration with chemical addition

Static

Pressure tank

Intake Pump

Static Lift Lift (m) (m)

Static Lift (m)

Distribution

Jet Pump

Pump Size

Aesthetic Treatment

Aesthetic issue treatment removes constituents from water that contribute towards colour, taste, or odour issues.

Rainwater conveyance drainage pipe Overflow outlet

Jet pump Cistern

• Microbiological contaminants (viruses, bacteria and protozoa)

Treatment Devices: Heat tape (optional)

Static Height(m) Static Height (m)

Irrigation

Distribution

Disinfection

Distribution

Jet Pump How much system pressure is required?

PUMP HEAD = REQUIRED SYSTEM PRESSURE + TOTAL DYNAMIC HEAD

Pump Sizeconnected to the pump and PUMP HEAD: This is the pressure required by the fixtures pressurized distribution system - this determines the pump size. REQUIRED SYSTEM PRESSURE: variable based on use (40-60PSI for residential applications or minimum 20PSI for garden hose). TOTAL DYNAMIC HEAD: the loss in pressure (head loss) that takes place as water is lifted from a low elevation to a high elevation, and the losses that take place when water is being pumped through long stretches of pipe and fittings. Total Dynamic Head = static lift + static height + friction loss 1. Static Lift is the height that water must be lifted before arriving at the pump (applicable only for systems utilizing a jet pump) 2. Static Height is the height from the pump to the furthest fixture 3. Friction Loss is the pressure loss when water travels through pipes and fittings.


Wäll “Ikea” mock-up for designed zig-zag wall or partition. Site technologies project 2012


1

WALL

> [+

3x

]

[+

3x

]

[+

3x

[+

10x

] ]

4x

[+

5x

]

[+

5x

]

2

12x

Design and Quality IKEA of Sweden

2

3

3

5

4

4

5

CONNECTORS - PRODUCT INFORMATION

PACKAGE INFORMATION

VERTICAL

Each bag sold can be used to create one wall section 6 panels high by 2 panels wide. In order to create a stable wall at least half of the packages used should be of type A (containing coloured connectors).

180°

A

HORIZONTAL 60°

120°

90°

150°

FOR ANGLED WALL SECTIONS

180° 12 IDENTICAL HORIZONTAL CONNECTORS

+ 10 VERTICAL CONNECTORS

5.0

1.0

2.0

27.0

10.0

22.0

PRODUCT DIMENSIONS (mm) 1:1

5.0 95.0

B

FOR STRAIGHT WALL SECTIONS

KEY FEATURES Easy to use and reuse, the Re-Wall system allows one to create screens, nooks and small shelves. Pratically infinite configurations to suit your space no matter how often you move. Light weight and encourages use of recycled materials.

12 IDENTICAL HORIZONTAL CONNECTORS

+ 10 VERTICAL CONNECTORS

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION Polypropylene

CARE INSTRUCTIONS Wipe clean with a water dampened soft cloth and a mild non-abrasive dish detergent or soap, if necessary.


The Transposable Park Sample catalogue pages for the transposable park kit of parts. Communities could order parts depending on the park programs they want to see. Thesis project 2013


POLES

BUBBLES

BOXES

BUBBLES

The nesting boxes pack small but offer a great variety with many sizes for different programs. They can be moved easily and come together to create interesting seating or box landscapes.

A. Large eliptoid base, covers a 20 m2 with inflatable sides for an enclosed space with 1 entrance.

Double layer polyvinyl

m m 30 00

B. Small round base, covers 3 m2 with inflatable sides for an enclosed space with one entrance.

Inflation nozzle

3000 mm

500 mm

The poles provide the basis of most programs with a host of versatile accessories and attachments. They instantly define a space with their strong vertical character, replacing trees until they have the time to grow.

C. Small cylindrical shape, with a 1-1.5 m diamater and openings at each end.

m

00

m

60

00

20 m m

Step II: Insert pole

Step III: Fill hole with lime and compact.

950 mm

700 mm

The inflatable bubble provides an inclosed and protected space for gatherings. An accessible room within the park, it can fit into any oddly shaped space and provide shelter from rain and wind. 1000 mm

Step I: Dig a hole roughly a third of the height of the pole.

m m

95 0

600 mm

700 mm

44 0

10 00

When lofted over poles it provides shade like a tent, but it can also be strung linearly to create a barrier from safety hazards like train tracks.

m m

m m

38 0

400 mm

m m 30 0

m m

m m

400 mm

35 0

600 mm

500 mm

35 0

m m

m m

38 0

0 30

m m

m m

0 35

0 35

m m

4000 mm

700 mm

m m

44 0

m m

38 0

0 40

1500 mm

Outdoor fabic sheets that can be secured using cords and carabiners at the edges to create canopies, fences, and playgrounds.

Also available with a metalic outdoor finish for a dramatic rainbow like effect.

0 40

Ø200

m m

m m

C. Large boxes - (top right), provide a stage for large events, festivals and shows.

0 45

B. Medium boxes - these boxes are suitable as tables counters and even higher seating when combined with small boxes.

0 70

Ø200

Also available in a variety of coloured patterns.

A. Small boxes (above packed, right unpacked). A variety of seating sized boxes from single seats to benches.

m m

m m

m m

B. Small poles - short poles up to 1.5 m height (above ground) to provide greater support for weighty programs.

0 70

0 95

00 10

A. Large poles - 15-20 mm diamater used for canopies and visual effect.

m m

m m

FABRIC FOIL

LED Pole

LED Light I

LED Light II

Storage Box

BMX Ramp I

BMX Ramp II

Fabric Foil

Cord

Locking Carabiner

Short plastic poles cover an LED core to provide maximum lighting.

Flared LED rings can slide onto poles individually or in patterns to create visual interest and increase night time safetey.

A flexibile LED band can be attached to poles individually or in patterns to create visual interest and increase night time safetey.

A substitute for some of the smaller nesting boxes, this one is equipped with a door and lock to store more valuable park items such as bike repair tools, or a volleyball.

A double sided ramp for training and tricks in small spaces.

With one sloping edge and one straight edge these ramps can be combined together with nesting boxes for interesting BMX possibilities.

A. Small - 7 m x 4 m

Strong slightly elastic cord, used to secure canvas to poles and to the ground for multiple programs - as a canopy, screen, fence, playground etc.

Used in conjuction with elastic cord to secure canvas. Locks for maximum security. A small an integral park of the transposable park.

SAMPLE PROGRAM ARRANGMENTS

Poles Canopy Boxes S

Speakers

Projector

Volleyball Net & Court

Directional outdoor speakers for movies nights and theatre shows, or any other large event.

Simple but poweful projector for outdoor movie experiences. Can be used for screens as wide as 20’.

A simple net that can be attached to poles with locking carabiners. The rolled up volleyball court can be secured into place with the help of anchors.

B

Boxes M Boxes L

Open Air Cinema

A. Poles - (2) medium & large

B. Nesting Boxes - (1) small + (1) medium

C. Canopy - Small 20’x11’

Lighting Bubble

C

Locked storage Bike stand Cables Cable anchor

Cord Anchor I

Cord Anchor II

Gravel

A hidden anchor for securing canopies to reduce tripping hazards. Simple to insert into the ground and access when needed.

A sprial anchor that can be easily inserted into the soil to anchor canopies with a carabiner.

Ground cover for pathways and unplanted open spaces. Also available in coconut shell.

Gravel

A

Net B Projector Speaker Picnic Site

A. Poles - (2) large

B. Nesting Boxes - (2) small + (1) medium

C. Canopy - (1) large

Carabiner Ramps Trees A Wild flowers

Bicycle Stand I

Bicycle Stand II

Pole Ring

A pole attachement for resting bicycles during repairs. The design attaches with screws and allows a bike to rest off the ground for simple adjustments.

A pole attachement for clamping a bicycle frame. Just the thing when you need your bike to stay still as you twist parts on and off.

A metal ring that can be screwed onto poles. Provides an anchor for nets and canopies.

C Playground

A. Poles - (1) small

B. Canopy - (1) large

Cinema

Stores

Open-air

Pop-up

Volleyball

Ice skating

garden

Bike Shop

Picnic Site

Art

Community

BMX

Istallation

Playground

Cafe A C

Market

ORDERING YOUR PARK

Theatre

ACCESSORIES

B. Large - 20m x 10 m


Etc Other Things


Floor Plan Sample floor plan (Drawn in CAD and Illustrator). Personal project 2013


KITCHEN

BEDROOM

LIVING/DINING ROOM

FOYER WASHROOM


Ex Libris Bookplate designs Personal project 2009


EX LIBRIS

EX LIBRIS


Doctor Who T-shirt Fanart design Personal project 2010


Fo

ctor Y o D

e ve r N ou

rget Y o ur

First


Illustrations Ink on scratchboard



Shira Davis Design Portfolio