Page 17

5 minute fiction

OFF SHIFT 95th EDITION. 2010

by Bernard S. Jansen

Real Threats

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Monday 13 September Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill Jason Bull

Tuesday 14 September Moura Coal n Cattle Pool night Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill Jason Bull

Wednesday 15 September Emerald Maraboon Tavern FEVER Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill Jason Bull Blackwater Blackwater Hotel Motel Mundine v Waters fight night

Thursday 16 September Emerald Maraboon Tavern Karaoke with Henry Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill Patch

your

to gigs

Friday 17 September Emerald Maraboon Tavern DJ Mezziah Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill A14 Blackwater Blackwater Hotel Motel Grand opening of “The Meeting Place” bar and disco

Saturday 18 September Emerald Maraboon Tavern Chloe Tully Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill A14 Blackwater Blackwater Hotel Motel Karaoke with Steve O

Sunday 19 September Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill Gunna Duo

Monday 20 September Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill Josh Rawiri

Tuesday 21 September Emerald Maraboon Tavern Kye Cole Band Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill Josh Rawiri

shift

gigs.

.com

mail

r@g mine

Moura Coal n Cattle Pool night

Wednesday 22 September Rockhampton The Great Western John Butler Trio - $71 Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill Carinda Christie

Thursday 23 September Emerald Maraboon Tavern Karaoke with Henry Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill Carinda Christie

Friday 24 September Emerald Maraboon Tavern DJ Lacey Rockhampton The Great Western Young Guns Rodeo Blackwater Blackwater Hotel Motel Disco Nights

Saturday 25 September Emerald Maraboon Tavern DJ Lacey Airlie Beach KCs Bar & Grill Kieran McCarthy Moura Coal n Cattle Karaoke Blackwater Blackwater Hotel Motel Karaoke with Steve O

Tim sat in the crowded departure lounge, flipping through a magazine, bored. He looked around every so often to see others also waiting, also bored. There was a TV mounted high on the wall showing an American soapie, with the sound muted, thankfully. A young Indian-looking man came in, wearing a CIO Mining shirt like Tim’s. He saw Tim, and made his way over. CIO was a multinational mining company; it was common for its employees to meet each other randomly at airports. “Hello,” said the newcomer. “I’m Saleem. I’m an electrical grad up at Western Creek Coal.” He sat down across from Tim, and put his laptop bag beside him. He had just the slightest trace of an accent. “I’m Tim.” He leaned forward and they shook hands across the aisle. “I do SAP support for all the Queensland and New South Wales coal sites.” Saleem smiled. “You must fly a lot, then.” Tim grinned. “Platinum frequent flyer, most years.” “That would drive me crazy,” said Saleem. “No matter how much I fly, the security just frustrates me. I get the random explosive check every time I come through. I just had my carry-on searched, after the x-ray check.” “Really?” said Tim. “I’ve never had them go through my carry-on.” Saleem shrugged. “It’s one of the hazards of looking like me, rather than you,” he said, matter-of-factly. He added, “And having Muhammad as my first name doesn’t help.” “Saleem’s not your first name?” “Where my family’s from in Pakistan, Muhammad is every man’s first name. Saleem is my second name; it’s what I’ve always been called by.” “Well, I’m sorry if they give you a hard time just for that. I think security is important, but they shouldn’t be targeting you just because of what you look like, or for your religion. That’s just prejudice. Security should be focussed on real threats.” Tim realised he was starting to rant. He changed the subject, and asked Saleem if he’d been with CIO for long. Eighteen months, he said. Suddenly Saleem asked, “Hey, are you Tim Murdoch?” “Yeah, that’s right.” Saleem smiled. “I’ve actually been meaning to give you a call – everyone says I should talk to you. I need your expertise on a project I’m working on.”

Tim smiled back. He liked helping people with SAP problems, and he loved being seen as the go-to man. “What can I do you for?” “I need your help to make a bomb,” said Saleem. Tim blinked. The people around fell silent. No one looked directly at them, but Tim could feel their eyes, and he wasn’t good at feeling that type of thing. He coughed, then said softly, “You need my help for what?” Saleem looked around, then back at Tim. “To make a bomb. Everyone says you’re the one to talk to.” “Everyone?” “Sure: my boss, other grads, lots of people. They say you’ve made more bombs than anyone else in CIO. That you make them quickly, and, most importantly as far as I’m concerned, you get them right, the first time.” The circle of quiet, nervous people had expanded now, like a ripple in a pond. The entire departure lounge was hanging on their every word, though everyone kept looking at their magazines and laptops, or at the TV, or out the window. “I’m afraid I don’t know what you’re talking about.” Saleem looked bemused. “You’re are the SAP guru, Tim Murdoch?” Tim smiled, self-consciously. He liked being called a guru, though he’d never admit it, and he sometimes even pretended to complain about it. “Hardly a guru,” he said, “but I know a thing or two about SAP.” “Then why don’t you know about how to make bombs? I’m quite new to SAP myself, but I thought that building a Bill of Materials would be child’s play for someone like you.” Tim almost choked. Of course: Bill of Materials. He always referred to Bills of Materials as “BOM’s”, for short. Everyone did. Saleem had been after his expertise, so why on earth had Tim thought he was talking about building a bomb? “Oh,” he said, after a few moments. “You mean you want my help to build a BOM!” Saleem’s mouth dropped open. “Isn’t this what I’ve been saying for five minutes?” he said. He spoke quickly now, and louder, and his accent was becoming stronger. “I have all the parts and components. I just need you to help me build my BOM!” Tim looked up then, and saw the security guards. There seemed to be a dozen, or more, coming at them from every direction.

Bernard S. Jansen is 32, married has three young boys. He lives in Emerald, works as an engineer at a local coal mine and is active in his local church. Read more of Bernard’s writing online at surgebin.blogspot.com or email him at bernard.jansen@gmail.com GOT AN IDEA FOR A STORY? Let Bernard know - email him at bernard.jansen@gmail.com or hop on his blog surgebin.blogspot.com

Page 17 - Shift Miner Magazine, 13th September 2010

SM95_ Shiftminer Magazine  

Mining Community Magazine