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Welcome to the 10th Biennial National Multicultural Conference and Summit (NMCS) and welcome to Portland, Oregon this first week of 2017! The NMCS Coordinators, Drs. Peony Fhagen, David Rivera, Yuying Tsong, the Conference Planner, Sherry Reisman and I, are thrilled you have joined us to explore the theme “Summit Talks: Looking Back to Move Forward.� Since 1999, the NMCS has been committed to the evolving theories, research, advocacy, and practice of multicultural psychology. If this is your first time attending NMCS, thank you for coming. Open yourself to a fulfilling educational, emotional, authentic and social experience. If you are coming back for the unique experience that only the Multicultural Summit provides, we notice and cherish your return. It is time to breathe a little easier, slow down your pace, enjoy catching up colleagues and making new friends. Listen to the four Founders discuss the beginnings of NMCS on Thursday and hear early career professionals share current perspectives on Friday will gain new knowledge and insights. There is a lot to discuss! Participate in the brave spaces produced by symposia, roundtable discussions, and Difficult Dialogues. Attend the film presentations, the poster session, and the awards ceremony to experience creative inspiration. The Town Hall and closing ceremony will invoke support and challenge. Leave NMCS 2017 feeling awakened and galvanized to make changes in your life and the lives of others.

Terri M. Davis, Ph.D. 2017 NMCS Lead Coordinator Representing Host Division 17

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2017 COORDINATING TEAM TERRI M. DAVIS, Ph.D. | Lead Coordinator APA Division 17 Associate Professor and Program Director, Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in Clinical Psychology Graduate School of Professional Psychology University of Denver

DAVID P. RIVERA, Ph.D. | Fundraising & Keynote Coordinator APA Division 44 Associate Professor, Counselor Education Queens College-City University of New York

PEONY E. FHAGEN, Ph.D. | Awards & Entertainment Coordinator APA Division 45 Chair and Associate Professor, Psychology Wheaton College, MA

YUYING TSONG, Ph.D. | Programming Coordinator APA Division 35 Associate Professor, Human Services California State University, Fullerton

SHERRY R. REISMAN | Conference Planner Co-Founder Reisman-White Associations and Meetings Management

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10th Biennial National Multicultural Conference and Summit Summit Talks: Looking Back to Move Forward The National Multicultural Conference and Summit is held every two years. The Four APA Host Divisions are Division 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology), Division 35 (Society for the Psychology of Women), Division 44 (Society for the Psychological Study of LGBT Issues), and Division 45 (Society for the Psychology Study of Culture, Ethnicity and Race).

NMCS Mission and Vision Statement

The National Multicultural Conference and Summit convenes scholars in our roles as educators, practitioners, researchers, and students, in psychology and related fields, to inform and inspire multicultural theory, research, practice, and advocacy. Multiculturalism is envisioned as intersections of experiences related to age, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, indigenous heritage, national origin, race, spirituality, religion, sexual orientation, social class and socioeconomic status, and other social identities.

2017 NMCS Objectives

To create a welcoming forum for the exchange of ideas regarding multiculturalism and disparities reduction between psychologists, trainees and related health professionals. To prepare psychologists, trainees, educators and related health professionals to address the needs of diverse people worldwide through multicultural education, health, well-being, policy and advocacy. To disseminate knowledge by experts in multicultural psychology to professionals, trainees and organizations invested in multicultural concerns. To apply multicultural psychology to the daily functioning of individuals, groups, organizations and educational institutions. To understand the impact of social media (or technology), including its roles in promoting social justice and expanding access. To move beyond the binaries of our understandings of identities and experiences and to promote an intersectionality perspective to our work. To move beyond the binaries of our understandings of identities and experiences and to promote a fluid perspective to our work embracing intersectionality.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS FROM THE 2017 NMCS COORDINATING TEAM The National Multicultural Conference and Summit is only made possible through the hard work and support of many individuals and organizations. We are especially grateful for the many students who selflessly gave of their time, energy, and brilliance in the organizing and execution of the Summit, including Rachel Nielsen (University of Denver), Alice Mo (Wheaton College), Jhonatan Illera (Queens College-CUNY), and Mario Rodriguez (Queens College-CUNY). We are also grateful for Mona Elgohail (APAGS Member-at-Large, Diversity Focus) for coordinating the student team. We thank the Oregon Psychological Association leadership for providing us with valuable consultation regarding Portland-area history and resources. We are appreciative of Dr. Brad Larsen-Sanchez and Portland Mental Health for providing us with physical space to store the many boxes of supplies associated with the Summit. We thank Dr. Justin Martino-Harms and Division 44’s Education Committee for coordinating the continuing education process. We are very thankful for our “on the ground” volunteers who provided valuable assistance throughout the Summit: Jacks Cheng, Liesel Christoe-Frazier, Shaun Davis, Dana Dharmakaya Colgan, Natalie Di Francesco, Nate Goins, Nina Hidalgo, Will Hwang, Tyson Payne, Cailin Qualliotine, Ana Lauren Reiss, Angelina Godderz and Phuong Nguyen. We also thank those volunteers recruited after the printing of this program booklet. We are grateful for the multicultural-friendly staff of the Portland Marriott Waterfront Downtown. Our Marriott representatives,, Vanessa Matson and Mel Perez, were attentive to our many requests and demonstrated cultural competency and professionalism throughout the planning process. We are deeply indebted to our conference planner and her team at Reisman-White. Sherry Reisman brings years of experience and commitment to planning the Summit and we could not have pulled this off without her institutional memory and effort. This type of event could not be possible without the generous financial support of numerous organizations and donors. In addition to all of our official sponsors, exhibitors, and advertisers, we truly appreciate the organizations that sponsored our student and early career professional travel awards: APA Division 42: The Community for Psychologists in Independent Practice and the University of Missouri’s Counseling Psychology Program. We are especially thankful for the support and guidance received from the four Host Divisions: Divisions 17, 35, 44, and 45. The Summit continues to exist because of the long-standing collaboration sustained by these divisions. We are also thankful to the many former coordinators of the Summit whose hard work ensured the success of the NMCS through the years. We are grateful for the moral support and guidance they provided us along our planning journey. We especially want to thank Dr. Francisco “Cisco” Sanchez for sharing his vast institutional memory of the Summit with us throughout the planning process. Finally, we are eternally grateful for our four Founders and all those involved with the initiation of the National Multicultural Conference and Summit. The Summit only exists because of their vision and commitment to multicultural psychology. They laid the foundation for the advancement of multicultural psychology and our ability to Move Forward. With Sincerest Thanks, Terri, Peony, David, & Yuying NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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2017 SPONSORS Our Sincere Thanks and Appreciation to All of Our Hosts, Sponsors, Volunteers, and Friends

HOST DIVISIONS

GOLD ($3,000+)

SILVER ($1,500-$2,999)

PREMIER ($1,000-$1,499)

BRONZE ($500-$999)

SUPPORTING ($250-$499)

EXHIBITORS & ADVERTISERS APA Division 9: Society for the Psychological Study of Social issues, APA Publications, APA Membership, Brigham Young University, Idaho State University, Milton Hershey School, The School of Graduate Psychology at Pacific University, SAGE Publishing, West Love 5 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


GENERAL INFORMATION Conference Hotel

Marriott Portland Downtown Waterfront 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201 Front Desk: 503-226-7600

NMCS Registration Desk Hours

The NMCS registration desk is located in the Oregon Ballroom Foyer, and will be open at the following times: Wednesday, January 4 12:30 pm – 7:30 pm – Pre-Conference Workshops and General Conference Registration Thursday, January 5 7:15 am – 4:30 pm Friday, January 6 7:15 am – 3:30 pm

NMCS Badge and Continuing Education Requirements

If you registered and paid to receive CE credits for the PreConference workshops and/or the NMCS, your conference badge and personalized bar codes should be picked up at the registration desk during the hours indicated above. Your bar codes are personalized and have been linked directly to your conference registration. In order to earn CE credit for sessions, you must follow the steps below. Sign-in sheets will be collected within the first 15 minutes after the program’s start time. Sessions that are CE-eligible have the following symbol in the printed program:

Keep a list of sessions attended for your records. However, if your label AND signature are not found on the sign-in/sign-out sheet(s), or the evaluation for the session is not completed, we will not process your certificate for that session. Should you lose track of your email with your evaluations OR your CE certificates, you can login at MyOwnCertificates. com 24/7 using your email address and last name to retrieve them.

Conference Presentations

All presentations made available by presenters will be available on the NMCS website: www.multiculturalsummit.org. Only released presentations will be made available. If presentations are not available on the website, contact the presenters directly to obtain a copy.

Conference Evaluation

All participants will receive an overall conference evaluation via electronic link after NMCS. Your responses will help the 2019 NMCS Coordinating Team prepare for the next NMCS.

NMCS Tabletop Exhibits

Tabletop exhibits are located in the Oregon Ballroom Foyer and will be open at the following times: Thursday, January 5 7:15 am – 5:00 pm Friday, January 6 7:00 am – 4:00 pm

Wi-Fi Access 1. Pay for CE Credit Processing 2. Collect your personalized bar codes at the registration desk when you retrieve your badge. 3. When entering a CE-eligible session, affix one of your personalized bar code labels to the sign-in sheet located just outside the room/inside the door within the first 15 minutes of the program’s start time. Sign your name on the sign-in sheet in the space provided next to your label. 4. At the conclusion of the offering, affix one of your bar code labels to the sign-out sheet located just outside the room/ inside the door. Sign your name on the sign-out sheet in the space provided next to your label. 5. During the week following NMCS, you will receive an email with a link to the required evaluation(s) for the session(s) you attended. You must complete the evaluation(s) in order to earn credit for the session(s) you signed in for. 6. Once you have completed your evaluation(s), you will immediately receive an email with your CE certificates.

We are pleased to offer TherapyNotes-sponsored password protected Wi-Fi throughout the conference space. Visit the TherapyNotes exhibit table (Oregon Ballroom Foyer) in order to receive the day’s Wi-Fi passcode. We respectfully request that each attendee only use the code on a single device. Marriott Rewards members will enjoy complimentary Internet access in one’s sleeping room. Marriott Rewards is a free rewards program.

Gender Neutral Restrooms

Restrooms are located in the Oregon Ballroom Foyer.

Assistance/Special Requests

If you require any accommodations to participate in any NMCS activity, please let us know by stopping by the registration desk. Every effort will be made to accommodate your needs. We cannot guarantee fulfillment of onsite requests for special requirements.

To recap, required steps are: • Register for CE • Collect your bar codes • Sign-in to session(s) • Sign-out of session(s) • Complete evaluation(s) • Open the email with your .pdf certificates NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS Difficult Dialogues A Difficult Dialogues session is a 2-hour experiential discussion facilitated by one or more facilitators with expertise and experiences in a particular area that may relate to one of the 2017 NMCS themes. The role of the facilitators is to establish a safe space in which participants can fully engage with one another in meaningful dialogue about diversity issues that are difficult to discuss in everyday conversation. The difficult dialogues emphasize respectful expression of opposing views, providing an environment in which differing perspectives are defended, heard, and considered by those who hold conflicting ideas and values across cultures. The purpose of these dialogues is to provide opportunities for continued personal and professional growth as multicultural psychologists. Participants in roundtable difficult dialogues usually take risks in expressing ideas, opinions, and perspectives about culture which may challenge themselves as well as other participants. Participants are expected to demonstrate respect for one another and remain open to guidance from the facilitators at all times.

Roundtable Sessions A roundtable session is an opportunity for informal discussion and exchange of ideas between the audience and the presenters. This provides the session participants the opportunity to ask questions and discuss relevant issues in more detail than traditional didactic formats of programming.

Breakfast with the Stars Organized by NMCS student volunteers, this session provides an opportunity for students and early career professionals to meet and get to know leaders within multicultural psychology while enjoying breakfast in an informal setting.

National Multicultural Conference and Summit - 2017 Continuing Education Grievance Procedure Grievances regarding this program should be submitted directly to the Chair of the Division 44 CE Committee, Justin Martino-Harms, PsyD, jmartinoharmspsyd@gmail.com, within 48 hours of completing the program. NOTE: The Division CE Committee shall serve as a complaint panel for resolving any disputes or dissatisfaction generated by CE participants. The dispute resolution mechanism is as follows: The complainant will be offered the opportunity to present a written statement of the complaint and the desired outcome (e.g. refund of fees, awarding of withheld credits, etc.) The CE provider will be permitted an opportunity to comment in writing on the petition. The complainant will be provided a copy of the response and be permitted a final set of written comments on the response. All three documents will be reviewed by the CE Committee, which shall then render a finding and take appropriate action. The CE Committee’s actions shall only be subject to an appeal to the Division Executive Committee upon an allegation that these procedures were not followed or if the aggrieved party’s complaints are not against the CE provider, but against the CE Committee itself. In the latter case, the Division 44 Executive Committee will serve as the hearing body.

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PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS Wednesday, January 4, 2017 12:30 PM - 4:30 PM Gender diverse clients: Understanding the history and moving forward Presenters: lore m. dickey, Anneliese A. Singh, & Michael L. Hendricks​

Reaching Higher: Enhancing Quality Care with Multicultural Supervision ​Presenters: Jeanne Manese & Theo Burns

Culturally adapting psychotherapy: An evidence-based approach with practical clinical utility Presenter: Wei-Chin Hwang

Room: Salons C-D

Room: Salons A-B

Room: Salons G-H ​ What are cultural adaptations? How do we culturally adapt psychotherapy in a clinically sound and evidencebased manner? In this workshop, I will discuss how culture influences mental health processes and identify areas for cultural adaptation. In addition, we will discuss the top-down and bottom-up frameworks that I developed to culturally adapt psychotherapy. In doing so, I will present my work on culturally adapting psychotherapy for Asian heritage populations, and provide concrete examples from a culturally adapted treatment manual that I developed and tested in a randomized controlled trial. After gaining a deep structural understanding of cultural adaptations with Asian heritage populations, we will work in small groups and apply what we have learned to other ethnocultural groups. The goal of this workshop is to gain both breadth and depth of understanding, as well develop practical clinical tools to use with diverse populations. Learning objectives: 1. Understand the rationale and need for culturally adapting psychotherapy. 2. Learn theoretical and community participatory frameworks for developing culturally adapted evidence-based psychotherapy. 3. Enhance one’s ability to culturally adapt psychotherapy and improve clinical effectiveness and competency when working with various ethnocultural groups.

This session will explore work with gender diverse clients (e.g., nonbinary, transgender). The Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming People were adopted as policy by the American Psychological Association in August of 2015. This session is rooted in the concepts covered by the Guidelines. Participants are encouraged to read the Guidelines prior to this session. The session will begin with a description of the historical influences that have complicated the relationship between gender diverse clients and their mental health provider. Following this, we will delve into an understanding of the elements that comprise affirmative practice. Finally, we will explore ethical mandates that providers must consider when working with gender diverse clients. This session will rely on the use case examples to explore these concepts. This is not a basic knowledge training session, rather it is assumed that participants will at least have basic knowledge transgender and gender diverse concerns. Learning objectives: 1. Participants will be able to identify three historical considerations that have influenced the role of psychological work with gender diverse clients. 2. Participants will be able to describe the core elements of affirmative practice with gender diverse clients. 3. Participants will understand the prevailing ethical mandates for work with gender diverse clients.

The literature has noted the importance of understanding the impact of multiculturalism and diversity in clinical supervision (Falendar, Shafranske, & Falicov, 2014). The impact of culture on supervision process and outcomes is a crucial area for supervisors to know as they prepare trainees to work with diverse clients. This workshop will provide knowledge and skills for multicultural, competency-based clinical supervision and will showcase evidence-based, cultured centered approaches. Attendees will be able to explore how cultural privilege, social justice, and resilience impact clinical supervision. The presenters will facilitate attendees’ learning about supervision models that explicitly include culture, and will merge theory, research and practice so that attendees can implement evidence-based practices. The facilitators will identify ways to strengthen the supervisory relationship, address conflicts, and prevent ruptures. This workshop will cater to diverse learning styles through lecture, segments of video clips, and case study vignettes designed for small groups. Learning objectives: 1. Participants will be able to describe at least three key elements of multicultural supervision. 2. Participants will be a be able to identify at least five cultural elements of supervisors, supervisees, and/or clients that can affect multicultural supervision. 3. Participants will be able to identify at least two behaviors that strengthen the supervisory relationship in multicultural supervision. 4:30 PM - 5:15 PM

Tomes Award Ceremony | Room: Truss

5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Opening Reception | Room: Mt. Hood 9 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Thursday, January 5, 2017 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM Coffee and Tea Room: Oregon Ballroom Foyer 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM Opening Session and Keynote Conversation: “Looking Back: A Keynote Conversation with the NMCS Founders” Room: Salon E-F Presenters: Rosie Phillips Bingham, Ph.D. Lisa Porché-Burke, Ph.D. Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D. Melba J. T. Vasquez, Ph.D. Terri M. Davis, Ph.D. (Moderator) 10:00 AM – 10:15 AM Break 10:15 AM - 11:05 AM Division 45 Symposium: The Illusion of Inclusion Presenters: Enedina Garcia-Vazquez, Ph.D. - New Mexico State University Luis Vazquez, Ph.D. - New Mexico State University Don Pope-Davis, Ph.D. - New Mexico State University Hardin Coleman, Ph.D. - Boston University Room: Salons G-H It is important that ethnic diversity is represented at all levels of academia from faculty to administrators. Concerted efforts have been made to increase the pool of students of color and faculty; however, fewer direct efforts have been proposed to increase the diversity of administrators and leaders. It is critical to create opportunities for people of color to assume leadership positions since many high stakes decisions are made at these high levels. In this presentation leaders of color present experiences in administrative environments and highlight challenges and successes. Participants will learn about ways to navigate administrative environments that have traditionally excluded leaders of color. Examples and tips on becoming transformation leaders using self-awareness, knowledge and skills. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Participants will be able to explain and demonstrate knowledge of communication styles in a diversity of contexts. 2. Participants will be able to demonstrate how to use a model of diversity styles within organizational structures. 3. Participants will be able to describe and explain the differences and similarities of faculty’s attitudes and beliefs about diversity in academic environments. Symposium: Maximizing Your Multicultural Courses Chair: Fernand Lubuguin, Ph.D. - University of Denver - Graduate School of Professional Psychology. Presenters: Fernand Lubuguin, Ph.D. - University of Denver - Graduate School of Professional Psychology Lynett Henderson Metzger, Psy.D. - University of Denver - Graduate School of Professional Psychology Room: Columbia Presenters are core faculty who teach a four-course multicultural sequence in the Clinical Psychology Program in the University of Denver, Graduate School of Professional Psychology. The foundation of this Psy.D. program is a practitioner-scholar model. The four classes are required for all second-year doctoral students. Presenters will discuss their respective courses: Racial/Ethnic Identity Development; The Social Psychology of Racism and Oppression; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Issues; and Culturally Competent Psychotherapy. They will explain course development and creation of assignments, along with student responses and NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 reactions to assignments. Presenters will discuss how they communicate during the year and provide one another guidance and support, which are co-created by their unique backgrounds, areas of expertise, and sociocultural identity statuses. Participants will be able to acquire pragmatic information about pedagogy and implementation, and apply cultural competence concepts that can augment their own courses or curriculum. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Describe specific, practical information regarding the pedagogy, development, implementation, and ongoing evaluation of an established multicultural curriculum. 2. Apply cultural competence concepts in a clinical training context. 3. Utilize established and developing infrastructure for multicultural competence training. Symposium: Listening to the Margins: Intersectional Stress and Survival among Queer People of Color Chairs: Cirleen DeBlaere, Ph.D., Georgia State University Carlton E. Green, Ph.D., University of Maryland Discussant(s): Bonnie Moradi, Ph.D., University of Florida Presenters: Carlton E. Green, Ph.D., University of Maryland Kevin Delucio, M.A. - University of California, Santa Barbara Cirleen DeBlaere, Ph.D., Georgia State University Karla Anhalt, Ph.D., West Virginia University Alison Cerezo, Ph.D. - San Francisco State University Monica Biernat, Ph.D. - University of Kansas Russell Toomey, Ph.D. - University of Arizona Adrian Villicana, M.A. - University of Kansas Bonnie Moradi, Ph.D., University of Florida Room: Pearl The symposium highlights three empirical studies on the unique experiences of racial/ethnic minority LGBT people, particularly Latinx LGB individuals. Study 1 investigated the associations among two forms of discrimination (Latina/o and LGBT), internalized homonegativity, acculturation, enculturation, depression, and self-esteem with a sample of 385 sexual minority Latina/o/x youth. Study 2 compared the links between verbal coming out disclosures and psychological distress for Latino and White gay men, as well as the potential mediating roles of internalized homonegativity and sense of belongingness to the gay community in these relations. Study 3 qualitatively explored the discrimination experiences and use of alcohol and other drugs with Latinx and Black LGB women. Common themes and implications for future research and practice will be discussed. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Explain how discrimination and internalized homonegativity impact the mental health of Latina/o/x youth, as well as the moderating roles of acculturation and enculturation in these links. 2. Compare and contrast the major differences between the importance of verbal disclosure versus non-verbal disclosure among Latino and White gay men. 3. Describe the unique discrimination experiences of Latinx and Black LGB people and the potential links of these experiences to the use of alcohol and other drugs. Symposium: Re-thinking inclusion in training and practice: Adaptive methods and the promotion of multilingual training in working with individuals with different communication needs Chair: Marcela Polanco, Ph.D. - Our Lady of the Lake University Discussant(s): Marcela Polanco, Ph.D. - Our Lady of the Lake University Presenters: April Abrego, M.A. - Our Lady of the Lake University Karla Caballero, M.S. in Counseling Psychology BS in Psychology - Our Lady of the Lake University Marcela Polanco, Ph.D. - Our Lady of the Lake University Ivette Salinas, M.A. - Our Lady of the Lake University Beverly Bernal, M.A. in Counseling - Our Lady of the Lake University Mary Baldwin, M.S. in Clinical Psychology - Our Lady of the Lake University Room: Portland This discussion reaches out towards the margins of society, inviting those individuals who often experience barriers to culturally respective and competent psychotherapy. Focusing on two underserved communities, individuals with intellectual disabilities and Spanish speaking persons, the presenters will discuss the historical inaccessibility of therapy to these groups. The panel will include practical suggestions for fostering a more inclusive practice from a strengths-based therapeutic perspective. The symposia is directed at practitioners, students and educators, as the attendees are invited to consider how therapy may be adapted or accommodated to meet the client’s needs and preferences. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Identify and describe various adaptive methods that can accommodate individuals with different communication needs and preferences. 2. Analyze and critique the state of psychotherapy with the intellectually disabled community and describe practical and strengthbased adaptations that promote inclusion. 3. Apply techniques, resources, and culturally competent approaches when working with Spanish speaking populations. 11 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Thursday, January 5, 2017 Roundtable: Foreign-Born Mental Health Trainees in the States: A Dialogue between Cross-Culturalism and Multiculturalism Chair: Lei Wang, M.Ed. - Indiana University Bloomington Presenters: Lei Wang, M.Ed. - Indiana University Bloomington Ka Yan Danise Mok, M.A. - Brigham Young University Room: Mt. Hood There is a trend toward more foreign-born therapists practicing in the United States but little attention is given to those who are international students or immigrants and their needs in training and supervision. There is a call to better understand the experience of foreign-born therapists not only to provide better client care, but also to recruit and retain diverse mental health practitioners. Cultural, linguistic, and perceived discrimination/prejudice issues have been found to be prominent themes that may affect foreignborn trainees’ clinical performances and self-efficacy. These issues have been highly encouraged to be addressed when working with foreign-born trainees. Therefore, the objective of the round table discussion is to facilitate a conversation among participants to process, better understand, and support each other’s experiences in their cross-cultural journey and how their development of ethnic identities has intersected with professional identities. Roundtable: Using student activism to center the needs of marginalized students in professional graduate programs Chair: Natalie Cohen, Psy.D. - Antioch University Los Angeles Presenters: Natalie Cohen, Psy.D. - Antioch University Los Angeles Tatiana Ewing - Antioch University Los Angeles Amanda Kemphues, M.A. - Antioch University Bradlisia Dixon - Antioch University Los Angeles Room: Mt. Hood Over the past several years we have seen an emergence of movements such as Black Lives Matter and organizing to end sexual assault on college campuses across the United States. However, this political urgency on associate and undergraduate levels has not seemed to reach professional education programs. In this round table discussion members of SPARC will seek to answer the following questions: How do we center the needs of marginalized students in the classroom and in our field? How do we better engage adult learners and professionals in graduate-level education in student activism? How do we hold academic institutions accountable when addressing systemic issues such as racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, and ableism?We will also open the discussion to participants so that they can ask questions and/or reflect on their own experiences building community and participating in student activism. Roundtable: Training for Social Justice: Strategies to develop students’ awareness of the clinical implications of inequality Chair: Nicole Knickmeyer, Ph.D. Counseling Psychology - Austin Peay State University Presenters: Nicole Knickmeyer, Ph.D. Counseling Psychology - Austin Peay State University Julie Shulman, Ph.D. Counseling Psychology - Sonoma State university Room: Mt. Hood This presentation will focus on the pedagogical imperative for enhancing students’ awareness of the influence of inequalities, in particular as they pertain to socioeconomics, on the creation and maintenance of clients’ psychological distress. We will discuss strategies to enhance our current curriculum (beyond multicultural counseling classes) through the inclusion of skill development techniques that have explicit social justice aims. Ways of assisting students in broadening their scope of professional practice to include world citizen “clients” who exist beyond the margins of their offices and agencies will be suggested by facilitators as well as invited from roundtable participants. Roundtable: Intersections of Identity Within Veteran Populations and Implications for Psychological Practice Chair: Lisa Woodrich, Psy.D. - Salem VA Medical Center Presenters: Lisa Woodrich, Psy.D. - Salem VA Medical Center Cecily Sakai, Psy.D. Joshua Kellison, Ph.D. - Phoenix Children’s Hospital Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir This roundtable session will examine the role of intersectional identities of Veterans and the types of unique treatment needs of these populations. Three sub-groups are used to support the representation of the diverse nature of Veteran populations: 1) Intersectional identities within Asian American and Pacific Islander Veterans; 2) The impact of serving during Don’t Ask/Don’t Tell (DADT) on the mental health and intersectional identities of LGBT Veterans; and 3) The role of trauma in the intersectional identities of female Veterans. Attendees will identify common and unique themes using word clouds for each sub-group, and then will compare and contrast these word clouds. Attendees will demonstrate a deeper and fuller understanding of the diverse nature of Veteran identities and potential treatment needs when addressing intersectionality. NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 Roundtable: LGBTQ inclusion in county health services: Addressing social justice and health equity Chair: Vanessa Blum, Ph.D. - Contra Costa Health Services Discussant(s): Joanne Genet, PA - Contra Costa Health Services Presenters: Vanessa Blum, Ph.D. - Contra Costa Health Services Joanne Genet, PA - Contra Costa Health Services Room: Eugene There are several new federal guidelines and regulations that mandate LGBTQ inclusion. This includes changes to electronic medical records, issues of quality of care, rooming and bathroom concerns, and language usage. These guidelines and regulations provide an opportunity to begin to address social justice and health equity for the LGBTQ community. How do we create a welcoming, inclusive, high quality of care environment for our patients? This roundtable discussion will highlight new methods and provide an opportunity to learn about one county’s efforts to address these issues. The presenters will demonstrate how their efforts have prepared staff and developed leadership buy-in. Attendees will become familiar with best practice tools and additional evidence-based strategies to improve quality of care. Roundtable: Infusing Social Justice into Teaching Chair: Renee Mikorski, M. S. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Discussant(s): Kevin Fry, B. A. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Presenters: Renee Mikorski, M. S. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Keri Frantell, M.A. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Marlene Williams, M.A. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Cecile Gadson, M.A. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Joel Muller - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Kevin Fry, B.A. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst Psychology is traditionally taught from a Eurocentric, male perspective (Teo & Febbraro, 2003). Because of this, perspectives of women, people of color, and LGBT individuals are often marginalized. This roundtable discussion will discuss how graduate students in particular can infuse social justice teachings into their psychology courses. Graduate students in the Counseling Psychology doctoral program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will facilitate. This discussion will focus on issues of race/discrimination, gender/sexism, and mental health advocacy/social justice action. In addition, the discussion will be facilitated by a discussant, Kevin Fry, B. A., who specializes in LGBT research. Specific teaching techniques as well as challenges that graduate student instructors may face in teaching these subject areas will be discussed. Roundtable: Bridging the Divisional Divide: The Power of Collective Activism in Confronting Homophobia, Racism and Sexism Chair: Holly Sweet, Ph.D. - Independent Practice Discussant(s): Olivia Moorehead-Slaughter, Ph.D. - Park School, David Whitcomb, Ph.D. - University of North Dakota Presenters: Olivia Moorehead-Slaughter, Ph.D.. - Park School Holly Sweet, Ph.D. - Independent Practice David Whitcomb, Ph.D. - University of North Dakota Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir This round table discussion will focus on exploring ways to promote collaboration among groups involved with issues of gender, race, ethnicity and sexual orientation to work together to confront homophobia, racism and sexism Barriers to interdivisional collaboration will be explored as well as ways to break down those barriers and build greater connection between these divisions. Roundtable: Confronting Mistakes and Cultivating Grit in Multicultural Psychology: A Discussion for Faculty Allies Looking for Strategies and Tools Chair: Kayoko Yokoyama, Ph.D. - JFK University Discussant(s): Sukie Magraw, Ph.D. Presenter: Kayoko Yokoyama, Ph.D. - JFK University Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst Graduate faculty teaching multicultural psychology courses face unique challenges in mentoring and training students toward multicultural competence. Students often report fear of making mistakes and resistance to discomfort. At the same time, faculty face their own fears in this challenge of cultivating students’ multicultural competence. Faculty may hesitate to confront conflicts or take ownership of their own biases and microaggressions. In this discussion, participants will explore common experiences in teaching multicultural psychology and share strategies and tools in managing student fear and discomfort, as well as exploring opportunities 13 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Thursday, January 5, 2017 to utilize their own experiences in the service of teaching multicultural psychology. Additionally, participants will have opportunities to touch upon relevant concepts such as the positive psychology construct of grit (Duckworth, Petersen, Matthews, & Kelly, 2007), Buddhist perspectives like equanimity and non-attachment, group cohesion (Yalom & Leszcz, 2005), and other tools that may facilitate the resilience graduate psychology students. Roundtable: Cultural competence within VA multidisciplinary teams: Exploring intersectionality across disciplines, team dynamics, and the delivery of competent care in a VA medical setting Chair: Cynthia Funes - VA Northern California Health Care Discussant(s): Jae Yeon Jeong, Ph.D. - VA Maryland Health Care System Presenters: Jae Yeon Jeong, Ph.D. - VA Maryland Health Care System Cynthia Funes - VA Northern California Health Care Quyen Sklar, M.A. Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir This roundtable discussion originated from a small work group tasked to examine how psychologists and other health professionals in VA medical settings work together to provide culturally sensitive care to a diverse Veteran patient population. Work group members serve on the VA Psychology Training Council’s (VAPTC) Multicultural and Diversity Committee (MDC). In recent years, there has been a progressive movement towards holistic and patient-centered care. As a result, many clinical programs at VA medical centers and beyond adhere to team-based, multidisciplinary approaches to patient care. It is important to explore how we can promote culturally competent care in these team-based approaches. In addition to the delivery of clinical services, another emphasis in this roundtable will be on team dynamics and working with team members from diverse backgrounds/ professional training. This interactive discussion will conclude with helpful strategies and suggestions for broaching similar discussions around cultural competence within a multidisciplinary team. Roundtable: Underrecognized Intersectionality: Multicultural Competence in Rural Practice Chair: Melanie M. Lantz, Ph.D. - Louisiana Tech University Presenters: Melanie M. Lantz, Ph.D. - Louisiana Tech University Danielle Franks, B.A. - Louisiana Tech University Tashara Williams, M.A. - Louisiana Tech University Lindsey Shamp, M.A. - Louisiana Tech University Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Roundtable discussants will discuss the intersectionality of rural culture and multicultural competencies, both from the perspective of the extant literature, and their experience working at a rural university training clinic in the South. Attributes of rural culture and rural practice, including the necessarily wide scope of practice, will be reviewed. As well, unique challenges faced by individuals from marginalized groups in rural settings, and implications for training and practice, will be discussed. Finally, we will review the importance of competency development given the typically urban training model, and and the need for social justice training and advocacy in rural settings. Time will be provided for attendees to share their own experiences for discussion, or to ask questions based on our experience or familiarity with the literature. Roundtable: It’s not easy being an Asian family in the United States: Generational challenges amongst Asian American families Chair: Jessica Liu - Lehigh University Presenters: Jessica Liu - Lehigh University David Nguyen, M.Ed - Lehigh University Christopher Liang, Ph.D. - Lehigh University Justine Fan Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst The purpose of this presentation is 1) to discuss three different research projects that explore parent-child relationships within the Asian American community, 2) to engage the audience in a discussion about challenges they have faced in working with this population, and 3) to brainstorm suggestions together for future clinical and research implications to expand on current research efforts. The first study will discuss the intergenerational cultural conflicts experienced by second generation Chinese and Taiwanese Americans and how these ICC’s impact their overall well-being. The second study will discuss the different motivating factors that promote the use of various paternal parenting behaviors in Asian American families using Ajzen’s (1991) theory of planned behaviour framework. The third study will discuss the findings from a six hour psychosocial educational workshops presented in Mandarin to immigrant parents from Hong Kong, Taiwan and China aimed to increase parents’ awareness about child mental health symptoms.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 Roundtable: Literature and Collaboration: Counselors and Teachers Creating Safer Spaces Together Chair: Laura Oldham, Ph.D. - New Mexico State University Presenters: Laura Oldham, Ph.D. - New Mexico State University Kayla Bolland, B.A. - New Mexico State University Tabitha Collins Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst Botelho & Rudman (2009) posit that literature exists to provide students with mirrors to reflect their own experiences, windows to see the way others experience the world, and doors which lead to enacting social justice. Unfortunately, literature which shows LGBT individuals in a positive light is difficult to obtain (Greytak, Kosciw, & Diaz, 2009). Lack of representation in literature coupled with frequent harassment based on gender identity creates a learning environment that is not welcoming or safe, especially for adolescents who identify as gender non-conforming. By creating partnerships between educators and counselors/psychologists and utilizing bibliotherapy as an intervention, the silence about gender non-conforming adolescents might be disrupted and together we can work towards creating a safer school climate (McCulliss & Chamerblain, 2013). With collaboration as the intent, curriculum will be designed and presented by the teacher while the counselor/psychologists can help with the facilitation of conversations about gender/gender identity. Roundtable: Addressing Strengths and Barriers for Doctoral Students of Color in Pursuing a Professoriate Career Chair: Shondolyn Sanders, M.S. - The University of Memphis Discussant(s): Mae-Lynn Germany - The University of Memphis; Laura Marks, Ph.D. - The University of Memphis Presenters: Shondolyn Sanders, M.S. - The University of Memphis Mae-Lynn Germany - The University of Memphis Laura Marks, Ph.D. - The University of Memphis Room: Mt. Hood The purpose of this roundtable discussion will be to present the literature around those experiences of doctoral students of color that impact professoriate career planning. At the end of the discussion, attendees will be able to explain the need for colleges, universities, and faculty members to proactively promote supportive environments for doctoral students of color, especially those who may be considering academic careers. Not only is the number of minority students lacking at selective research institutions, but the overall number of students of color also falls short in relation to the representation of this group in society. Therefore, it is vital for disciplines within the health professions field to strive towards addressing and closing this educational gap, and to begin work in this area we need to start having critical conversations about this issue. Roundtable: Knowing Your Worth: Unveiling Salary and Benefits Negotiation Strategies for Graduate Students and Early Career Psychologists Chair: Marisa M. Moore, Ph.D - Marist College Presenters: Marisa M. Moore, Ph.D - Marist College Kimberly Burdine, Ph.D. - University of Texas at Austin Room: Mt. Hood Women-identified professionals earn 79% of what their male-identified counterparts earn, with women of color facing larger wage gaps; African-American women earn only 60% and Hispanic women 55% to what white men earn (Maloney, 2016). As the wage gap exists amongst psychologists and varies by work setting (APA’s Center for Workforce Studies, 2014), negotiating for more money can feel discordant with the altruistic reasons most psychologists join the profession (Winerman, 2014). The presenters discovered in their own experience that having a series of mentorship interventions helped to empower them to use their marketability to negotiate against the factors listed above. Paying homage to the objectives of NMCS and tapping into our own relational styles, we intend to facilitate an engaging forum to discuss these issues, allowing for graduate students and early career professionals to address their questions and concerns and leave with tangible tools to apply during the negotiation process. Roundtable: “Once a Feather, Always a Feather”: A Narrative of the Struggles and Triumphs of Running an LGBTQ+ Support Group Chair: Enedelia Sauceda, Ph.D. - University of North Texas Presenters: Enedelia Sauceda, Ph.D. - University of North Texas Megan Guinn, Ph.D. - Virginia Commonwealth University Shelly Sheinbein - University of North Texas Room: Eugene Group psychotherapy has become commonplace in university counseling centers and has a supportive, validating, and empowering history with the LGBTQ community (DeBord & Perez, 2000). However, the empirical literature is scant regarding practical and tangible guidance, education, or training on effectively navigating the unique issues and challenges faced by clinicians working 15 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Thursday, January 5, 2017 with the LGBTQ population in the group context. Echoing the almost twenty-year call for consultation and professional involvement (Lenihan, 1985), this roundtable discussion hopes to address the complexities, benefits, and challenges associated with running LGBTQ process-oriented support groups. This discussion seeks to provide a space for sharing experiences, resources, and strategies for navigating and clarifying group structure, guidelines, and ethics when working within a small and interconnected minority community. 10:15 AM - 12:00 PM Difficult Dialogues: Difficult Dialogues: To view or not to view? Facing into Mental Health Professionals Processing of Our Collective Trauma Presenters: Wendi Williams, Ph.D. - Bank Street College of Education Anissa L. Moody, Ph.D. - City University of New York, Queensborough Community College Room: Salons C-D To view or not to view, becomes a very real question? In our article, With Black Pain Going Viral, How Do We Treat Our Collective Trauma? (www.ebony.com/wellness-empowerment/black-collective-trauma#ixzz4IdylnMCQ) we articulate the challenge to bearing witness in solidarity, love and compassion with those brutalized within our communities alongside the collective and vicarious trauma of continuing to witness this violence. This article was written for the lay person and inspired a conversation to occur at the NMCS. As the NMCS attracts students and professional psychologists, (practitioners and/or researchers), we seek to direct this discussion to the particular ways members of this group interface with collective trauma of themselves and their clients through vicariously experiencing and re-experiencing ethnoviolent imagery on their digital screens. Difficult Dialogues: Difficult Dialogues: Honoring Original Voices: Addressing Colonization & Reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples Presenters: Consuelo E. Cavalieri, Ph.D. - University of St. Thomas Karlee Fellner, Ph.D. - University of Calgary Room: Salons A-B In the field of psychology, both the literature and community experiences indicate that conventional Western Eurosettler approaches to psychotherapy, teaching, and research are often not effective with the Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island (i.e., North America). This difficult dialogue invites participants to consider reasons for this, including factors that reinforce neo-colonialism in the field. We will invite participants to consider how colonial dynamics influence teaching, research, and the therapeutic process. We will strive to co-create decolonizing narratives that promote reconciliation and healing for the diverse peoples living within settler colonial societies. This dialogue will open with self-locating, prompting participants to consider their social and geographic locations within current colonial contexts. We will work to question, challenge, and discard beliefs that reinforce colonial ideals. Participants will further discuss the importance of decolonizing as a foundation for cultural safety with Indigenous clients and students, as well as broader applicability to environmental and social justice. 10:15 AM – 12:15 PM American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs This film is about a Chinese American philosopher, writer, and activist from Detroit, MI who spent 75 years engaging is social activism. What does it mean to be a revolutionary in the 21st century is addressed. 2013, 84 minutes, A Lee Lee Film. Room: Salon I 11:25 AM - 12:15 PM Roundtable: Still We Rise: Faculty Racial Battle Fatigue at Predominantly White Institutions Chair: Cassandra Page, Psy.D. - Regent University Discussant(s): Christina Lee Kim, Ph.D. - Biola University Presenters: Cassandra Page, Psy.D. - Regent University Christina Lee Kim, Ph.D. - Biola University Room: Mt. Hood This roundtable discussion will highlight the various experiences of racial battle fatigue among female multicultural educators in graduate psychology programs who work at predominantly white institutions (PWIs). These experiences include, but are not limited to, increased anxiety and depression, stress, fatigue, as well as decreased self-esteem and well being (Smith, 2015). In light of NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 these associated psychological factors, the beginning, maintenance, and impact of the Colorblind Era on female faculty members of color teaching multicultural competence will be explored. The resulting difficulties encountered and triumphs experienced will also be addressed. Roundtable: Making “Homeland” Somewhere Else: Analyzing the Experience of Crossing Borders and Reflecting on the Well-Being and Reconstruction of Identities. Chair: Anastasiya Tsoy, M.A. Discussant(s): Irmaris Rioz - Vazquez, Ph.D. Presenters: Anastasiya Tsoy, M.A. Irmaris Rioz-Vazquez, Ph.D. Oliva M. Espin, Ph.D. - San Diego State University Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir

Roundtable: Employment and Underemployment among Refugees Resettled in the U.S Chair: Christina Lee Kim, Ph.D. - Biola University Presenters: Dina Birman, Ph.D. - University of Miami Miryam Haarlammert, MA - University of Miami Wendy Moore, M.S. - University of Miami Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir A marker of successful adaptation and integration for immigrants and refugees is finding gainful employment in the country where they resettle. Yet refugees face many barriers to finding employment, and many become underemployed (Chen, Smith, & Mustard, 2010). The proposed symposium will address the topic of employment and underemployment of refugees. Three papers will describe research projects designed to understand the process and predictors of employment of refugees. The first paper reports on a study of 450 Soviet Jewish refugees resettled in 2 contrasting communities in Maryland. The second paper reports on a qualitative study of Cuban refugee physicians and their experience of integrating into the medical field in resettlement in the U.S. The third paper describes a collaborative research project between a university research team and state refugee services to understand predictors of employment for newly arriving refugees.

Roundtable: Multicultural competence of faculty: Moving forward or losing ground? Chair: Amy L. Reynolds, Ph.D. - University at Buffalo Discussant(s): Ayşe Çiftçi, Ph.D. - Purdue University Presenters: Amy L. Reynolds, Ph.D. - University at Buffalo Kimberly Burdine, Ph.D. - University of Texas at Austin Arpana Inman, Ph.D. - Lehigh University Ayşe Çiftçi, Ph.D. - Purdue University Room: Eugene The multicultural counseling literature is replete with research on the multicultural competence of psychologists. Often the assumption is that faculty educators who train graduate students are already culturally competent; however, there is limited research examining the multicultural competence of faculty. First, this symposium will offer a rationale for why all faculty members need to enhance their multicultural competence. Next, the need to develop instrumentation to measure faculty multicultural competence across academic disciplines and the creation of the Instructor Multicultural Competence Inventory (IMCI) will be explored. Finally, the efforts to infuse multicultural content throughout the doctoral curriculum will be examined. The goal of this symposium is to explore multicultural competence of faculty members from multiple perspectives in order to expand the tools and strategies needed to create change within our training programs.

Roundtable: From Theory to Practice: Social Justice Advocacy in Graduate Training Programs Chair: Sarah Arango, M.Ed., M.A. - University of Texas at Austin Presenters: Sarah Arango, M.Ed., M.A. - University of Texas at Austin Whitney Adams, M.A. - University of Texas at Austin Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst The call for Counseling Psychology graduate training programs to incorporate social justice advocacy (SJA) as a core commitment has become increasingly central to the discussion of multicultural competence. Although SJA is complex and often challenging, it 17 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Thursday, January 5, 2017 cannot be seen as separate from practice or research. Without SJA, we run the risk of not only being ineffective with the individuals we work with, but also of perpetuating the status quo and that drives the systemic oppression that is incredibly detrimental to the individuals and communities we aim to “help”. This roundtable is catered towards graduate students and seeks to (a) share and explore the various ways that SJA has been incorporated into Counseling Psychology graduate training programs; (b) discuss the potential barriers that can arise in attempting to move SJA from theory to practice; and (c) facilitate a conversation about the ways that graduate students can foster SJA within their programs. Roundtable: Structural Racism in Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs): Learning from the Past to Transform the Present Chair: Anneliese A. Singh, Ph.D. - University of Georgia Presenters: Anneliese A. Singh, Ph.D. - University of Georgia Michael Mobley, Ph.D. - Salem State University Room: Mt. Hood In this roundtable, the presenters explore how structural racism occurs within Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs) on various levels, impacting students, faculty, staff, and the larger community. The intent of this roundtable is to explore these occurrences and the shared mechanisms of oppression across these groups and across PWIs across the country in order to collaboratively identify social justice advocacy and change strategies that work in the real world. During the 2015 NMCS, many students and faculty came together to discuss issues of structural racism within PWIs, and how resisting racialized structures within these institutions came with costs and barriers for both students and faculty of color who dared to confront them. This roundtable will generate strategies of resistance to structural racism within PWIs, but will also explore how students and faculty of color may draw upon their individual and collective resilience to dismantle racism within PWIs. Roundtable: Witnessing before the hearing: Reflections on praxis with clients preparing for Reconciliation and Refugee protection hearings Chair: Sharalyn Jordan, Ph.D. - Simon Fraser University Discussant(s): Alanaise Goodwill, Ph.D. - University of British Columbia Presenters: Sharalyn Jordan, Ph.D. - Simon Fraser University Alanaise Goodwill, Ph.D. - University of British Columbia Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Tribunals of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) and Refugee Protection Division (RPD) represent official efforts to redress colonial wrongs and human rights violations. Both tribunals offer official recognition of injustice and protection or compensation. Yet, those seeking recognition must meet the demands of an impersonal and imperfect bureaucracy: requiring participants to recount and face cross-examination on past events that are traumatic and steeped in shame. As counselling psychology scholar-practitioners we have witnessed and supported the engagements of First Nations people with the IRSSA (Author G) and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (LGBTQ) refugees with the RPD systems (Author J). Roundtable hosts will discuss the challenges to fostering safety with individuals impacted by institutional violence. We reflect on the possibilities and tensions in using psychotherapy, research and advocacy to reduce potential re-traumatization and support tribunal participants to speak their truth to power. Roundtable: Psychosocial Movements of LGBTQ Migrants Chair: Anil Lalwani, M.S. - Cleveland State University Discussant(s): Julia Phillips, Ph.D. Presenters: Anil Lalwani, M.S. - Cleveland State University Julia Phillips, Ph.D - Cleveland State University Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir The purpose of this roundtable is to give voice to the phenomenon of migration by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals away from more heterosexist and transphobic areas toward more affirming and queer-friendly cities and countries. The session pertains to the intersecting themes of immigration and LGBTQ experiences, as it aims to address psychosocial movements of LGBTQ individuals – both domestic- and international-identified. This also informs the specific objectives of the session. To facilitate competency in working with LGBTQ migrants, this session will first discuss international and domestic laws and policies that apply to LGBTQ migrants (e.g., Shakhsari, 2014). Next, this session will collectively revise international and domestic research on the psychosocial effects of such migrations and relocations (e.g., Cerezo, Morales, Quintero, Rothman, 2014; South Asian Network & Satrang, 2010). And lastly, this session will describe implications for counseling research, training, and practice

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 Roundtable: Creating Social Change Agents: Considerations for Trainees of Color Chair: Chandni Shah, M.S.Ed. - University of Texas at Austin Presenters: Chandni Shah, M.S.Ed. - University of Texas at Austin Mona Ghosheh, Ph.D. - University of Texas at Austin Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst As counseling psychology doctoral training programs increasingly emphasize social justice competencies, there is a growing need for internship programs to provide trainees with applied social justice training. The authors (predoctoral intern and psychologist) worked with community gate keepers and participants to develop, facilitate, and evaluate a two part workshop- Becoming an Ambassador: Asian American Identity, Gender, & Leadership. This experience highlighted two components, which are lacking in social justice training guidelines: (a) developmental phases for social justice competencies and (b) intersectional identities of trainees. The authors propose that these two components are necessary for trainees of color, whose social justice competency development intersects with racial identity development. The authors will briefly provide a case example of how these components impacted their experience. The goal of the roundtable session will be to start a dialogue about assessing social justice competency development in conjunction with racial identity development.

Roundtable: Using service learning to increase psychology graduate students’ multicultural competence and meet the needs of immigrant Latina/o farm workers Chair: Shahana Koslofsky, Ph.D. - Pacific University, Ruth Zuniga, Ph.D. - Pacific University Discussant(s): Shahana Koslofsky, Ph.D. - Pacific University, Ruth Zuniga, Ph.D. - Pacific University Presenters: Shahana Koslofsky, Ph.D. - Pacific University Ruth Zuniga, Ph.D. - Pacific University Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst This presentation will provide an overview of a service learning program that was developed to enhance the multicultural competency of psychology graduate students. The facilitators will discuss the implementation of two bilingual labs developed to accompany basic clinical skills and treatment and interventions courses in a graduate psychology program. These labs include both in class and service learning components; in class meetings consist of didactic and role play experiences while the service learning component consists of delivering psychoeducation presentations on mental health topics to farm workers in the field. This presentation will include a discussion of how to develop and deliver service learning programs, the benefits and challenges to such programs, and a review of data summarizing students’ experiences in this learning model. This roundtable will conclude with a group discussion on ways to integrate service learning into graduate psychology programs to enhance psychology graduate students’ multicultural competency.

Roundtable: Reflections and Recommendations for Multiculturally-Responsive Training: Supervision, Teaching, and Advising for Marginalized Identities Chair: Anjuli Chitkara-Barry, M.S. - University of Oregon Discussant(s): Harpreet Nagra, M.S., M.C.- University of Oregon Presenters: Nina Hidalgo - University of Oregon Anjuli Chitkara-Barry, M.S. - University of Oregon Harpreet Nagra, M.S., M.C.- University of Oregon Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst Supervision, advising, and multiculturally-responsive training (Falender et al., 2013) are vital components to training doctoral students, especially those in applied fields (Pope-Davis & Coleman, 1996). Much of the extant literature is geared for supervisors who identify as being in the “majority culture,” thus, the intersection of marginalized experiences (e.g., cultural differences in interaction style, overt/ covert disabilities, age, sexual orientation, and ethnicity) are not always addressed (Ali et al., 2004). Using Bronfenbrenner’s (1992) ecological systems theory of human development, we will share experiences and recommendations to acknowledge the importance of various intersecting identities (e.g., ethnicity, ability/disability, SES, age, gender, and sexual orientation) on personal and professional development in the context of graduate psychology training. Reflections will be used to share lessons learned and provide suggestions for the development of multiculturally-sensitive and responsive training in mental health fields, and empowering current students, teachers, supervisors, and advisors to take action.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 Roundtable: Critical Positionalities: Moving toward new ways of teaching, counseling, and connecting across differences Chair: Josh Newbury, LCSW - University of Utah Counseling Center Discussant(s): Tanji Vei, M. Ed - University of Utah Presenters: Josh Newbury, LCSW - University of Utah Counseling Center Tanji Vei, M. Ed - University of Utah Room: Mt. Hood In a playful spirit, we share our curriculum for a multicultural training where participants were encouraged through art and scrutiny of progressive media to wonder about their own positionalities within our broader social context and explore how the values of our dominant culture work through all of us. We examine how moving forward in multicultural work requires all of us to move beyond competency, and instead, wonder about the ways we are all wrapped up in governing narratives. As such, our round table discussion focuses on how to create wiggle room in education and counseling that enables us to move in new directions.

Roundtable: Multicultural training from a POC lens: Implications for counselor training at a PWI Chair: Uma P. Dorn, Ph.D. - University of Utah Presenters: Uma P. Dorn, Ph.D. - University of Utah Karen Tao, Ph.D. - University of Utah Kritzia Merced, M.S. - University of Utah Room: Mt. Hood Multicultural training and its complexities are challenging to address in any academic setting; however, at a PWI there are additional layers that often need to be considered. In this roundtable we will discuss differing perspectives when training students in multicultural counseling including teaching from a POC lens and supporting the learning of both students of color and white students.

Roundtable: Looking back to Mentor Forward: Community, Success, and Navigating the Academy as Students and Faculty of Color. Chair: Bryan O. Rojas-AraĂşz M.S.- University Of Oregon Counseling Psychology Discussant(s): Derrick Bines - University Of Oregon Counseling Psychology Presenters: Bryan O. Rojas-AraĂşz M.S.- University Of Oregon Counseling Psychology Derrick Bines - University Of Oregon Counseling Psychology Room: Eugene With the growing numbers of students of color in primary, secondary, and postsecondary education (National Center for Education Statistics, 2012); Krogstad and Fry, 2014), it is important that we work to address barriers faced by these populations. These barriers include isolation, hostile environments, and irrelevant curriculum, among others (Gay, 2004). Building communities that promote mentorship and create cultural capital banks that can be shared and passed down to future students and scholars may be a way to combat these barriers. This interactive discussion will center on the role of building community, mentorship, and sharing experiences in identifying best practices, common challenges and barriers, and providing advice for students and professionals of color on navigating through the academy.

Symposium: Safe Space? Addressing Racial Microagressions in Therapy Chair: Daniel C. Rosen, Ph.D. Presenters: Daniel Rosen, Ph.D. Monnica Williams, Ph.D. Jonathan Kanter, Ph.D. Room: Portland Despite best intentions and awareness of multicultural competencies, many psychologists continue to engage in racial microagressions with their clients of color. These unintentional slights, often the result of implicit racial bias and the presence of challenging thoughts and emotions experienced by the psychologist may negatively impact the therapeutic relationship and client outcomes. Emerging contextual behavioral approaches to psychotherapy, including Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) have identified empirically supported intrapersonal and interpersonal processes that have potential to support optimal therapeutic practices by reducing racial microagressions in therapy. This symposium will provide participants the opportunity to understand the topography of racial microagressions in therapy and their impact on our clients of color, and to explore cutting edge contextual behavioral research that may provide a path forward in the training and development of culturally responsive psychologists. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Define and describe racial microagressions, including those that occur in the context of therapy; NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 2. Explain the relationship between racial microagressions, racial bias and inter-racial anxiety in the context of therapy; 3. Discuss relevant interventions from Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) related to addressing racial microagressions in therapy; 4. Discuss relevant interventions from Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) related to addressing racial Microagressions in therapy; 5. Describe their plan for how they will apply the interventions presented to address racial microagressions in their own professional practice. Symposium: Muslim Women: Exploring health and wellbeing at the intersection of race, religion and gender Chair: Lamise Shawahin, Ph.D. - Edward J. Hines Veterans Affairs Medical Center Discussant(s): Suchi Daga, Ph.D. - Miami University Presenters: Lamise Shawahin, Ph.D. - Edward J. Hines Veterans Affairs Medical Center Suchi Daga, Ph.D. - Miami University Mona Elgohail, Ph.D. - Drexel University Venus Mahmoodi, Ph.D. - Palo Alto University Room: Columbia This symposium centers Muslim women’s experiences at the intersection of a marginalized religious and gender identity and focuses on the influence of psychosocial factors on mental and physical health outcomes. The symposium is unified by theories of minority health and attends to psychological, biological, and social factors contributing to the mental and physical health of Muslim women. The first two panels focus on reproductive health of Muslim women exploring infertility and postpartum depression and the third panel explores the impact of discrimination on depressive symptoms among Muslim American women. While the symposium suggests Muslim women living in the west as a subject of study, the panels challenge the notion of a monolithic experience among Muslim Women and emphasize the role of ethnic and national identity, variations in religious practices, and individual diversity. Panelists each provide a critical exploration of research, clinical practice, and advocacy implications. At the econclusion of the workshop, you will be able to: 1. Describe psychosocial factors that contribute to and protect against the development of depressive symptoms among Muslim women. 2. Apply a culturally competent approach to clinical practice, research, and advocacy with Muslim women. 3. Discuss biopsychosocial factors contributing to physical and mental health among Muslim women. Symposium: Looking Back to Move Forward: Using Psychology to Make Positive Social Change Chair: Gwendolyn P. Keita, Ph.D. - American Psychological Association Discussant(s): Gwendolyn P. Keita, Ph.D. - American Psychological Association Presenters: Shari Miles-Cohen, Ph.D. - American Psychological Association Gwendolyn P. Keita, Ph.D. - American Psychological Association Lula Beatty, Ph.D. - American Pychological Association Clinton Anderson, Ph.D. - American Psychological Association Room: Pearl We will reflect on the APA Public Interest Directorate’s commitment to apply psychological science to solve the fundamental problems of human justice and fair treatment by highlighting projects underway in three directorate offices that focus on engaging girls of color (Women’s Programs Office), social justice psychologists (Health Disparities Office), and LGBTI human rights activists (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Concerns Office) in efforts to implement interventions using psychology to make positive social change. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Describe public interest psychology. 2. Define participatory action research. 3. List several women of color psychologists and their significant contributions to the fieldUse the “I am Psyched!” museum to explain the use of exhibits to broaden psychology’s public image and as a tool to reach marginalized groups. 4. Describe challenges psychologists have experienced translating research to effect positive change. 5. Discuss components of effective information dissemination, including conveying urgency, clarifying myths and misconceptions, and addressing competing concerns. 6. Demonstrate introductory knowledge of the theory of planned behavior and its application in designing interventions. 7. Demonstrate introductory knowledge of the research on intergroup contact and prejudice reduction. 8. Demonstrate introductory knowledge of the International Psychology Network for LGBTI Issues. 12:15 PM – 1:15 PM Lunch on your own 21 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


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Poster Session and Refreshments Salon E-F 1:15 PM - 2:15 PM 1. Curanderismo and Culture-Specific Syndromes: Cultural Competency in the Clinical Treatment of Mexican-American Clients Presenter: Eloiza Alcaraz, Psy.D. - Mount Saint Mary’s University 2. Trainees’ Social Justice Development in a Group Therapy Course: An Exploratory Qualitative Study Presenters: Alexis Arczynski, Ph.D. - University of Oklahoma Hyung Seok Seo - University of Oklahoma Michael Azarani - University of Oklahoma Erika Warbinton - University of Oklahoma Stephanie Hoover, Ph.D. - Western Oregon University 3. Mexican Migrant Survivors’ Reasons for Staying in or Leaving Abusive Relationships: A Pilot Study Presenters: Selin Ari - California State University, Long Beach/ Courtney Ahrens, Ph.D - California State University, Long Beach Cassandra Gearhart, M.A. - California State University at Long Beach Vanessa Altamirano - California State University, Long Beach Patsy Rodriguez 4. Acculturation and Neuropsychological Test Performance in Hispanic Individuals Presenter: Justina F Avila, M.A. - University of New Mexico 5. The Role of Gender in Vicarious Traumatization in Clinicians Who Treat Sexual Trauma Presenters: Krista Bacon, M.A. - Pacific University School of Graduate Psychology Lisa Christiansen, Psy.D.- Pacific University 6. Internalized Racial Oppression as a predictor of mental Health Functioning for Black Adutls Presenters: Tamba-Kuii Bailey, Ph.D. - University of San Francisco Lou Felipe, Ph.D - University of San Francisco Lilian Gonzalez - University of San Francisco Emily Spadafora - University of San Francisco 7. Risky Sexual Behaviors, Sexual Socialization, and Ethnic Pride among Latino Youth Presenter: Sheena Balolong Publico, B.S. - California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University, Los Angeles Chelsie Dunn, M.A., MPH - Virginia Commonwealth University Marilisa Raju, B.A. - California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University, Los Angeles Shawndeeia Drinkard, M.A. - California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University, Los Angeles Michi Fu, Ph.D. - California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University, Los Angeles 8. An Exploratory Study of the Impact of Acculturative Stress on Wellness and Mental Health Practices of U.S.-born Latinas Presenter: Andrea Salazar, M.A. - University of Wisconsin - Madison 9. The Relationship between Activism Participation and Efficacy in LGBTQ+ Students Presenters: Dexter Bracken - Coastal Carolina University Emalee Quickel, Ph.D. Lisa Winters, Ph.D. - Coastal Carolina University 10. An Examination of Coming Out Growth for Bisexual Individuals Presenters: Jenna Brownfield Chris Brown Sathya Baanu Jeevanba Sarah B. VanMattson Justine E. Haukebo Sara M. Aslan 11. Experiences of campus climate among graduate students in health professions Presenters: Kim Bui - Pacific University Ruth Zuniga, Ph.D. - Pacific University Paul Michael, Ph.D.- Pacific University Roxanne Duran NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 12. “However far the stream flows, it never forgets its source”: Names and their clinical relevance to experiences of discrimination. Presenter: Batsirai Bvunzawabaya - University of Pennsylvania, Counseling And Psychological Services (CAPS) 13. Oregon Latino Youth and the Effects of Overestimated Recidivism Risk Presenters: Cassendra Caceres, M.A. - Pacific University Jane Tram, Ph. D - Pacific University Tammy Truijens, M.A., M.B.A - Pacific University 14. Stereotypes of Lesbians and Gay Older Adults: Findings and Implications for Multicultural Psychology Presenters: Silvia Sara Canetto, Ph.D. - Colorado State University Devi Deviyanti - Colorado State University Paul Hernandez, Ph.D. - West Virginia University Sara Weisenbach, Ph.D. 15. A Factor Analysis of Acculturation for Central Florida and Island Puerto Ricans Presenters: Cristalis Capielo, M.A. - Arizona State University Edward Delgado-Romero, Ph.D. - The University of Georgia Stephen Fogleman, M.A. - The University of Georgia Brooke Rappaport, M.S. - The University of Georgia 16. Carrying the Weight of Sexual Assault: Examining the Effect of Anti-Fat Prejudice on Women’s Post-Sexual Assault Experiences Presenter: Tanya Cass, B.A. - University of Wisconsin Milwaukee 17. Effect of Perpetual Foreigner Objectification on Latinos’ Health and Quality of Life Presenters: Yuriva Cervantes-Manzo, Ph.D. Michael Loewy, Ph.D. - California School of Professional Psychology 18. Psychological Difficulties in African Americans with Sickle Cell Disease Presenters: Shanece Champion Erin O’Callaghan 19. Homonegativity and Counselors’ Judgment of LGB Clients’ Well-Being: A Moderation Test of LGB-Affirmative Counseling Presenters: Ruth Chu-Lien Chao, Ph.D. - University of Denver Joseph Longo, Ph.D. Doris Zhang, B.A. 20. Service-Learning: A Multicultural Training Method to Enhance Multicultural Competence Presenters: Ruth Chu-Lien Chao, Ph.D. - University of Denver Doris Zhang, B.A. 21. Ethnic and sexual minority stresses among Asian American sexual minorities Presenters: Cliff (Yung-Chi) Chen, Ph.D. - Queens College of the City University of New York Michael Lau, Ph.D. - The Chicago School of Professional Psychology 22. Model Minority Stereotype: Towards a Better Understanding on how Stereotype Influences Diagnostic Biases in Asian Americans Presenters: Alice Wen-jui Cheng, Ph.D. - University of Hartford Melina Calle, M.A. - University of Hartford Shykina Brown, M.A. - University of Hartford 23. Diverse Expressions of Bisexual Identity: A Latent Profile Analysis Presenters: Andrew Y. Choi, M.A. - University of California, Santa Barbara Stephanie E. A. Mendez, MEd - University of California, Santa Barbara 24. Are we practicing what we preach? A critical examination of cultural competency training in Canadian counselling psychology Presenters: Julie Cohen, M.A. - University of Calgary Anusha Kassan, Ph.D. - University of Calgary Nancy Arthur - University of Calgary Suzanne Goopy, Ph.D. - University of Calgary 25. Minimal training in multiculturalism: Implications and Consequences Presenter: Felicia Connor, M.A. - NYU Lagone Medical Center 26. Passing the feather from generation to generation: Results of a national leadership academy developed for American Indians and Alaska Natives Presenters: Mandy Conrad - National American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC/ University of Iowa Anne Helene Skinstad, Ph.D. - University of Iowa/National American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC 23 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Thursday, January 5, 2017 27. Examining the Psychosocial Development and Experience of Effeminate Black Gay Men Presenters: Carlton Cummings, B.S. - Palo Alto University Teceta Tormala, Ph.D. - Palo Alto University 28. Diversity and Multicultural Training Development: Assessment and Findings at a VA Medical Center- Miami University Presenter: Kristen Payne, Ph.D. - Clement J. Zablocki VA Medical Center 29. The Effectiveness of Didactic and Perspective-taking Interventions on Reducing Multiple Dimensions of Heterosexism Presenters: John DeBerry - New Mexico State University Eve Adams - New Mexico State University 30. Discerning different worldviews: The case for combining sensemaking, and personal and social constructivism during qualitative research inquiries Presenter: LeAnn DeHoff - Independent Consultant and Researcher 31. “Race doesn’t bother me”: White therapy clients’ approaches to working with Therapists of Color Presenters: Jordan Dunn, M.A. - New School for Social Research Joanna Adeley - New School for Social Research Sophia Williams, M.A. – New School for Social Research Kathryn McCauley - New School for Social Research Reagan Rodriguez - New School for Social Research Doris Chang, Ph.D. - New School for Social Research 32. Clarifying the Relationship Between BMI and Psychological Well-Being: Perceived Weight Discrimination and Internalized Weight Stigma Presenters: Zachary Elison, M.S..Ed - Purdue University Ayşe Çiftçi, Ph.D. - Purdue University 33. Workplace Weight Discrimination and Access to Decent Work Presenters: Zachary Elison, M.S..Ed - Purdue University Blake Allan, Ph.D. - Purdue University 34. Minority Perceptions of Natural Disaster Victims and Survivors Based Upon Race and Gender Presenters: Elizabeth Farrah Louis, M.A. - The University of Georgia Alan Stewart, Ph.D. - The University of Georgia 35. Exploring Non-Binary Transgender Clients’ Counseling Experiences: Empowerment in Counseling Presenters: Michelle Farrell - The University of Missouri- Kansas City Laurel Watson, Ph.D. - The University of Missouri- Kansas City 36. Multicultural Competence within Psychology Graduate Programs: A Call to Action and Initial Qualitative Results Presenters: Cassi Franklin - The University of Kansas Marcy Vandament - The University of Kansas 37. A Social Dominance Perspective on the Intersection of Racism and Classism Presenters: Danielle Franks - Louisiana Tech University Melanie M. Lantz, Ph.D. - Louisiana Tech University 38. The Relationship between Alcohol Consumption and Stereotype Endorsement for Mexican Americans Presenters: Maria Garcia Yolanda Niemann, Ph.D. – University of North Texas 39. Latina/o Undergraduates in Engineering Majors: A Qualitative Study Presenters: Patton Garriott, Ph.D. - University of Denver Rachel Navarro Lisa Flores, Ph.D. – University of Missouri Hang-Shim Lee, Ph.D. - Oklahoma State University Diana Slivensky Melissa Muñoz Ruben Atilano Ching-Lan Lin Rebecca Gonzalez Laura Luna

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 40. Objectified Body Consciousness as a Function of Race Presenters: Madeline Gere - Westminster College Christopher Davids, Ph.D. - Westminster College 41. Narratives of Racialized Sexual and Gender Minorities: An Exploration of Identity, Community, and Discrimination Presenter: Monica A. Ghabrial, BSc, M.A. - University of Toronto 42. First year persistence: Minority student retention in higher education Presenters: Arpita Ghosh, Ph.D. Mercedes Santana, M.Ed. - University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Nadya Fouad, Ph.D. 43. Psychological Consequences of Denying the Narrative of “The Other�: A Case Study of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. Presenters: Adami Gordon Ruba Alami - Alliant International University 44. Incremental Clinical Utility of ADHD Assessment Measures with Latino Children Presenters: Margaret Grace - Marquette University Theresa L. Kapke - Marquette University Al Castro - United Community Center Alyson C. Gerdes 45. Culturally Responsible Embodiment Research with Newcomer Women in Canada Presenters: Amy Green, M.A. - University of Calgary Anusha Kassan, Ph.D. - University of Calgary Suzanne Goopy, Ph.D. - University of Calgary Shelly Russell-Mayhew, Ph.D. - University of Calgary 46. Relationships after Transition: A Qualitative Study of Transgender Men and Their Female, Sexual Minority Partners Presenters: Amber Hager, Ph.D. - University of New Haven Counseling and Psychological Services Michael Loewy, Ph.D. - California School of Professional Psychology 47. Examining Suicide Amongst the Homeless: Understanding Risk Factors, Preferred Means, and Means Restriction Feasibility Presenters: Lori Holleran, M.S., MPH Gabrielle Poon, M.S. 48. Vulnerability, Intersectionality and Structural Violence: Trauma (and Violence)-Informed Support for Asylum Seekers Presenter: Kirby Huminuik, M.A. - University of British Columbia 49. Non-cognitive variables influencing student achievement among students of color: the impact of stereotype threat,racial attitudes and self efficacy Presenter: Michelle James, Ph.D. - Oakton Community College 50. Aging and Care Problems Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT+) Older Adults Presenters: Amanda Jamski-Jornd Megan Lynch 51. Treating Intersex Clients: An Emphasis on Nonmedical Procedures- A Literature Review Presenters: Amanda Jamski-Jornd Megan Lynch 52. Effects Of Acculturation And Adaptation On Psychological Well-Being In The Thai Population Residing In The United States Presenters: Mindy Jitmanowan, Ph.D. Michael Loewy, Ph.D. - California School of Professional Psychology 53. Indo-West Indian Mental Health Presenter: Gregory Kanhai, M.S. 54. Examining Latino Family Attendance and Engagement in Treatment for Childhood ADHD: The Role of Parental Cultural Factors Presenters: Theresa L. Kapke - Marquette University Margaret A. Grace - Marquette University Al Castro - United Community Center Alyson C. Gerdes

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 55. Creating a Multi-Layered, Rapid-Ethnography, Methodology to Capture the Experiences of Newcomer Youth in a Meaningful, Ethical, and Culturally Sensitive Way Presenters: Anusha Kassan, Ph.D. - University of Calgary Suzanne Goopy, Ph.D. - University of Calgary 56. Forced Out? The Experiences of Individuals in Same-Sex Binational Relationships Living in Asia Presenters: Anusha Kassan, Ph.D. - University of Calgary Nadine Nakamura, Ph.D. - University of La Verne 57. Where does our Knowledge of Ethnic Minority Groups Come From? Geographic Locations of Ethnic Minority Research Participants Presenters: Amanda Kemphues, M.A. - Antioch University Sylvie Taylor, Ph.D. - Antioch University Los Angeles 58. The Psychological Well-Being of Missionary Kids Presenter: Alicia Key, M.S. - Ball State University 59. Self-Esteem as a Mediator for the Relationship between Distal and Proximal Minority Stress Presenters: Brooke King , B.A. Nathan Grant Smith, Ph.D.- University of Houston Ezemenari M. Obasi, Ph.D - University of Houston Lorraine R. Reitzel, Ph.D - University of Houston 60. Double Life, Double Trouble: Asian Indian American College Student Mental Health Presenters: Ami Kumar Lauren Smith 61. Correlates of Affect Among Buddhist Female Caregivers of Elderly Parents or Parents-In-Law in Japan Presenters: Kanako Kunitomi, Ph.D. - California School of Professional Psychology Michael Loewy, Ph.D. - California School of Professional Psychology 62. The Influence of Christian Belief on Perceptions of Counselor Empathy, Response Type, and Social Influence Presenter: Chun-Fang Kuo, Ph.D. - Central Michigan University Counseling Center 63. The Intergenerational Transmission of Trauma Amongst Second Generation Survivors of the Armenian Genocide Presenter: Lucy Kyupelyan, Psy.D. - Heritage Clinic, Center for Aging Resources 64. Examining Role of Gender in Self-Objectification: Proposing a Gender Inclusive Study Presenters: Anil Lalwani, M.S. - Cleveland State University Sara Nardone - Cleveland State University Erica Wiley Whiteman - Cleveland State University 65. Planning for the future in times of uncertainty: Same-sex binational couples under DOMA Presenters: Samantha LaMartine, M.A. - University of La Verne Ashley Peak - University of La Verne Chun-I Li, Ph.D. Nadine Nakamura, Ph.D. - University of La Verne 66. A Multi-Method Examination of Multicultural Competence Presenters: Melanie M. Lantz, Ph.D. - Louisiana Tech University Danielle Franks - Louisiana Tech University Lindsey Shamp, M.A. - Louisiana Tech University Tashara Williams, M.A. - Louisiana Tech University Mallory Garza, B.A. - Louisiana Tech University 67. The Chinese Mental Health Value Scale: Measuring Chinese college students’ cultural values, values of mental health, and subjective well-being Presenters: Yujia Lei, M.A. - The University of Kansas Changming Duan, Ph.D. - The University of Kansas 68. LGBT Inclusiveness at HBCUs: Policy vs. Experiences Presenters: Carmen Lewis , Psy.D.- Veterans Healthcare Organization Keita Grant Hillary Hill Brittany Smith NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 69. Relationship between Spirituality, Meaning in Life, and Empathy Presenters: Shengnan Li, M.A. - University of Kansas Changming Duan, Ph.D. - The University of Kansas 70. Experiences and findings from Multicultural Integrated Kidney Education (MIKE) program: Co-creating a culturally-informed health education prevention program for diverse youth Presenters: Susan Li, Ph.D. - Pacific University Jillian Freitas - Pacific University Maritza Cobian - Pacific University Alexandra Schmidt - Pacific University Emma Cohan - Pacific University Cheryl Neal - MIKE Program 71. Intersections of Culture and Trauma: Understanding Identities and Experiences of Salvadoran Refugee College Students Presenters: Janette Linares, B.A. Cara Maffini - San Jose State University 72. Gender differences in Chinese and Taiwanese American older adults’ attitudes about mental health and help seeking Presenters: Jessica Liu - Lehigh University Yuying Tsong, Ph.D. - California State University, Fullerton 73. Difficulties of International Graduate Students and Recommendations for Relevant Mental Health Services and Future Research Presenters: Lina Liw - Purdue University Ayşe Çiftçi, Ph.D. - Purdue University 74. Internationalizing Multiculturalism: Toward an Expanded Taxonomy of Multiculturalism Presenter: Rodney Lowman, Ph.D. - CSPP/Alliant International University, San Diego 75. Health Disparities Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Adults: Literature Review Presenters: Megan Lynch Amanda Jamski-Jornd 76. Culture and Parenting among Teen Fathers Presenters: Cecilia Macedo, BA. - San Jose State University Cara Maffini - San Jose State University 77. Alcohol Use Disparities for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth in a South East Asian Context: Evidence from the Philippines Presenters: Eric Julian Manalastas, Ph.D. - University of the Philippines Diliman Christian Joy Cruz - University of the Philippines Diliman 78. Exploring the intersectionality of gender identity and neurodiversity: The experience of being trans* and autistic Presenters: Meredith Maroney, M.S. - University of Massachusetts Boston Sharon Horne, Ph.D. - University of Massachusetts Boston 79. Mentoring Latino College Students Presenters: Karla Martinez - California State University, Fullerton Mia Sevier, Ph.D. - California State University, Fullerton 80. Killing the Messenger: The Effect of Communicator Weight on Perception of Bias in Explanations of Weight Stigmatization Presenters: Julie Matsen, M.A. - Ball State University Linh Littleford, Ph.D. 81. Mental Health Based on Intersections of Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, Race, and SES Presenters: Emmie Matsuno, PhD - University of California, Santa Barbara Joshua Goodman, M.A. - University of California, Santa Barbara Caitlin Merrill, B.A. - University of California, Santa Barbara Tania Israel, Ph.D. - University of California, Santa Barbara 82. Perceived Discrimination, Social Support, and Psychological Wellbeing of Female Muslim Immigrants Living in the United States Presenters: Lindsay Mayott, M.A. - Purdue University Ayşe Çiftçi, Ph.D. - Purdue University 83. A Grounded Theory Exploration of Clergy’s Counseling Referral Practices in Black Churches Presenter: Morgan McCain, M.A.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 84. “When Will I Hold You Again?”: Undocumented Transnational Couples Presenters: Carolina Meza Perez, M.A. - Alliant International University Elaine Burke, Psy.D. 85. Step I: Being accused The psychological effects of being accused Presenters: Cristina Minana - Alliant International University Lisa Liu, Ph.D. - Alliant International University 86. The Effectiveness of Uniquely Teaching Asian American Psychology Through Community Immersion, Re-Living History and Personal-Relational Narratives Presenter: Matthew Mock, Ph.D. - John F. Kennedy University 87. Understanding the Integration of Foreign Educated Cuban Physicians into the U.S. Medical Field Presenter: Wendy Moore, M.S. - University of Miami 88. Adaptation and Validation of The Multidimensional Inventory of Black Identity in Multi-ethnic Muslim Americans Presenters: Imman Musa, B.A. - Saint Louis University Jadah Stephens, M.A. - Saint Louis University Wanni Zhou, M.S. - Saint Louis University Kira Hudson Banks, Ph.D. - Saint Louis University 89. Social Cognition in African Americans with Schizophrenia: An Empirical Study Presenter: Arundati Nagendra - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 90. “Like a family I never had before” – Engaging Refugee Youth Through Community Building Within After-School Support Services Presenter: Negin Naraghi, M.A., LPC Intern - Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization 91. “Development and Content Validation of a Spiritual Immersion Inventory: Implications for Psychotherapy with Asian Immigrants Presenters: Desiree Uyen Nguyen, M.A., M.S.W. - Alliant International University Richard Mendoza, Ph.D. - Alliant International University 92. Young gay men’s experience of homophobic bullying during adolescence Presenters: Raymond Nickerson, Psy.D. - The Portia Bell Hume Center for Behavioral Health Michael Loewy, Ph.D. - California School of Professional Psychology 93. Tokenism and its Impacts on Work Engagement and Burnout Presenters: Yolanda Niemann, Ph.D. - University of North Texas Alvin Akibar, B.A. - University of North Texas Corianne Bazemore-James, M.S. Kecia Thomas, Ph.D. 94. Factors in Minority Graduate Students’ Stress Presenters: Martin Nolasco - Purdue University Ayşe Çiftçi, Ph.D. - Purdue University 95. Utilizing Best Practices from Psychological Science to Address Racial Health Disparities in Primary Care Medicine Presenters: Yelena Novik, BA - Bastyr University Janin Khaleel - Bastyr University Erin Arney - Bastyr University Anastasia Ramey - Bastyr University Deja Heckard - Bastyr University Daniel Rosen, Ph.D. 96. Exploring health and counseling resources for transgender college students Presenters: Katie Ohene - Pacific University Tamara Tasker, Psy.D. - Pacific University 97. What’s the Deal with Women’s Comedy?: A Grounded Theory Exploration of Female Comedians’ Experiences on the Scene Presenter: Susie Paterson, M.A. 98. How perceptions of public policy and media depictions of undocumented immigrants relate to well-being Presenter: Beth Perlman

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 99. Vietnamese American Older Adults Mental Health Belief, Knowledge, and Help Seeking Presenters: Vi Pham, M.S. - California State University, Fullerton Phuong Nguyen, A.A. - California State University, Fullerton Ngan Nguyen, A.A. - California State University, Fullerton Yuying Tsong, Ph.D. - California State University, Fullerton 100. What’s Ethnicity Got to Do with It?: African American Parental Ethnic Identity, Gender, and Cultural Socialization Practices Presenters: Kayla Phillips, B.A. Jade Kinney. B.A. Jonathan Mitchell 101. Partners of Trans and Gender Diverse Individuals: A Qualitative Exploration Presenters: Lisa Platt, Ph.D. - West Virginia University Kayla Bolland, B.A. - New Mexico State University 102. Empathy and Compassion Training for Counseling Psychologists: Current State and Next Steps Presenter: Rohini Puri-Bose, Ph.D. - University of Missouri 103. Racial Battle Fatigue: It Matters Presenters: Catherine Ragland Woods - University of Oregon Krista Chronister, Ph.D. - University of Oregon 104. Culture within Patient Appointments Presenter: Janani Raman, Ph.D. - Salem VAMC 105. Well-being and flourishing among high school and university students in Nicaragua Presenters: Daniel Rodriguez - George Fox University (Student) Kelly Chang, Ph.D. 106. Immigrants of African Descent: Discrimination, Acculturative Stress, and Mental Health Presenters: Lauren Rogers-Sirin, Ph.D - The College of Staten Island, CUNY Collette Chapman-Hilliard, Ph.D. - The College of Staten Island, CUNY 107. The New Majority: Finding Connections in Undergraduate Peer Mentoring Presenters: Ariana Romero, B.A. - California State University, Fullerton Mia Sevier, Ph.D. - California State University, Fullerton 108. An Exploratory Study of Barriers to Entry for Men in Professional Psychology Presenter: Samuel Beasley, Ph.D. - Western Michigan University 109. Building Relationships, Promoting Health: An Empirical Evaluation of a Culturally Based Substance Abuse Prevention and Outreach Program with Multicultural University Students Presenter: Alicia San Miguel, M.A. - Washington State University 110. Disparities of Race and Gender in College Major Fields: A 30 Year Review Presenters: Mercedes Santana, M.Ed. - University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Arpita Ghosh, Ph.D. 111. Trends and Patterns in Research Since Multicultural Guidelines Publication Presenters: Mercedes Santana, M.Ed. - University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Arpita Ghosh, Ph.D. 112. Latin@s Fuera de Serie; No Todos Somos Iguales: A Cultural Humility Approach To working with Diverse Latin@ Immigrants Presenter: Jeanette Santos, M.A. - Our Lady of the Lake University 113. Using Brief Therapy to Help Dedicated Latina Mothers Include Self-Care Activities in Their Lives Presenter: Jeanette Santos, M.A. - Our Lady of the Lake University 114. Facebook and Professionalism in the Context of Multicultural Training Presenters: Lindsey Shamp, M.A. - Louisiana Tech University Donna Thomas, Ph.D. - Louisiana Tech University Melanie M. Lantz, Ph.D. - Louisiana Tech University Cody Cloud, M.A. - Louisiana Tech University

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 115. Chinese LGBs’ Psychological Well-being: Do Minority Stress and Filial Piety Matter? Presenters: Jianmin Shao - Soka University of America Esther Chang, Ph.D. - Soka University of America 116. Not All with Turban and Beard Belong to ISIS or Taliban Presenters: Ratanpriya Sharma, B.T. - Indiana University Y. Barry Chung, Ph.D. - University of Indiana 117. Opioid Addiction in the Asian American Community Presenters: Katherine Sheu, B.S.- California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles Jessie Lowell, Ph.D. - California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles 118. Narratives of Resistance: Using Narrative-Based Group Therapy to Deconstruct Gendered Racial Microaggressions Presenters: Shola Shodiya-Zeumault, B.A. - San Francisco State University Tiffany O’Shaughnessy, Ph.D. - San Francisco State University 119. Race and politics during the U.S. presidential primary campaigns Presenters: Margaret Signorella, Ph.D. - Penn State Greater Allegheny Jessica Trent, B.A. - Penn State Greater Allegheny 120. Reasons for and Against Disclosure of Sexual Behavior to Medical Providers in Men who Have Sex with Men Presenters: Alan Silver, M.S. Jennifer Antick, Ph.D. Laura Edwards-Leeper, Ph.D.- Pacific University Brad Larsen Sanchez, Psy.D. - Portland Mental Health 121. A Theoretical Inquiry: Predictors for Sexual Orientation Identity Disclosure in Black LGBs Presenter: Dawnielle Simmons - Western Michigan University 122. The Changing Landscape of Intersectionality in Transgender Youth: From the Perspective of Medical Providers Presenters: Alyshia Smith, M.S. Laura Edwards-Leeper, Ph.D.- Pacific University Shawn Davis, Ph.D. - Pacific University 123. Association of Perceived Discrimination and Racial Identity with Depressive Symptoms among African American Adolescents Presenters: Tasia Smith, Ph.D. Carolyn Tucker, Ph.D. Tya Arthur, Ph.D. Tara Morrissette, M.S. 124. Health Disparities and Cultural Considerations in Neurorehabilitation of Linguistic and Ethnic/Racial Minorities Presenters: Lucia Smith-Wexler, Ph.D. - Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Medical Center Joseph Rath, Ph.D. - Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Medical Center Yuen Shan Lee, Ph.D. - Rusk Rehabilitation, NYULMC Valerie Ellois, Ph.D. - Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Medical Center 125. Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual (LGB) Socioeconomic Status and Negative Affect: The Moderating Effects of LGB Identity Superiority. Presenters: Daniel Soltis, M.A. - University of Houston Nathan Grant Smith, Ph.D.- University of Houston Ezemenari M. Obasi, Ph.D - University of Houston Lorraine R. Reitzel, Ph.D - University of Houston 126. Infrahumanization through a Gender Lens Presenter: Laura Stephens, Ph.D. - Medgar Evers College 127. The power of Pocahontas: Effects of stereotypical representations of American Indians on implicit and explicit bias Presenter: Haley Strass - Iowa State University 128. Does accent matter in counseling? Ratings of English Language Learner (ELL) counselor credibility based on their accent Presenters: Yuxin Sun, M.A. - Auburn University Haidi Song - Auburn University 129. In-Group and Out-Group Processes, As Evidenced By Social Distancing, Between Asian Indians and Indian Americans Presenters: Shraddha Sundaram, M.A. - University of Florida Martin Heesacker, Ph.D. - University of Florida NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 130. Clients and community as leaders and experts: Findings from an appreciative inquiry grounded theory study Presenters: Rebecca Toporek, Ph.D. - San Francisco State University Cynthia Yee - San Francisco State University Revae Hitt - San Francisco State University Helen Crawford - San Francisco State University 131. Is Less Enough? An Evaluation of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program in a Rural School Presenters: Trinh Tran - Pacific University School of Professional Psychology Laura Edwards-Leeper, Ph.D.- Pacific University 132. Possible Psychosocial Outcomes of Social Networking Use within the Transgender Population: A Review of the Literature Presenter: Jen Trimpey, M.A. - University of San Francisco 133. Adult Latina/Latino Perceptions of Discrimination in Healthcare Settings Presenters: Joshua Turner, MS - New Mexico State University Anna Lopez, Ph.D. Hsiu-Lan Cheng, Ph.D. 134. Coping Skills, Social Support, and Quality of Life among Puerto Rican Women Undergoing Drug and/or Alcohol Treatment Presenters: Cheryl Vázquez-Colón, M.S. - Western Washington University Joseph E. Trimble, Ph.D. – Western Washington University 135. Gender and Prison: Prison Experiences of Straight and Gay Detainees Presenter: Salvacion Villafuerte, Ph.D., RPm, RPsy - Bicol University 136. Religiosity as a Potential Moderator for Smoking Dependence Among Sexual Minorities Presenters: E. Charli Washington, B.A. - University of Houston Nathan Grant Smith, Ph.D.- University of Houston Ezemenari M. Obasi, Ph.D - University of Houston Lorraine R. Reitzel, Ph.D - University of Houston 137. “I feel like I don’t belong.” Examining the Social and Cultural Experiences of Bicultural and Biracial College Students. Presenters: Michael West, B.A. Cara Maffini - San Jose State University 138. A review of the literature for biracial development in military communities Presenters: Charlotte Williams - New Mexico State University Luis Vazquez, Ph.D. - New Mexico State University 139. Honoring the past and imagining the future: speculating about the psychological implications of Afrofuturism Presenter: Sophia Williams, M.A. – New School for Social Research 140. Introducing the Cross Scale of Social Attitudes-Adult (CSSAA) Presenters: Frank Worrell, Ph.D. - UC Berkeley Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, Ph.D. - UC Berkeley Amanda Wang, BA - UC Berkeley 141. Exploring Student Awareness of Racial Microaggressions Presenters: Danita Wynes, M.A. - Louisiana Tech University Lindsey Shamp, M.A. - Louisiana Tech University 142. Mental Health Literacy and Help-Seeking in Cambodia Presenters: Joann Yang, M.S. Yuying Tsong, Ph.D. - California State University, Fullerton

2:15 PM – 2:30 PM Break

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM Division 35 Symposium: When Feminists Collide: Navigating Professional Dilemmas for Advancing Social Justice Chair: Olivia Moorehead-Slaughter, Ph.D.. - Park School Discussant(s): Wendi Williams, Ph.D. - Bank Street College of Education Presenters: Olivia Moorehead-Slaughter, Ph.D.. - Park School Margaret Signorella, Ph.D. - Penn State Greater Allegheny BraVada Garrett-Akinsanya, Ph.D. - Brakins Consulting & Psychological Services Wendi Williams, Ph.D. - Bank Street College of Education Room: Salons G-H Within the American Psychological Association’s Society for the Psychology of Women division, contentious discussions about social justice issues have pushed the members of the division to understand its roles and responsibilities, and identify solutions. Examples of tactics used in the past year will first be described, and along with examples from different organizations, will be used to identify key dilemmas faced by individuals working within multicultural feminist organizations. Drawing on these examples and the literature, we will examine key strategies for moving forward, and specifically, ways to pursue social justice without destructive practices. Part of the discussion will include consideration of what is feminist process and how to use it to harness the strengths of differences of opinions and come to a consensus. We will also address the impact that conflict may have on ECPs and how to include ECPs in problem solving without potentially putting them at risk. The overarching question is: How do we manage conflict in our challenge to honor our commitments to social justice? At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Identify respectful and productive ways to discuss and potentially solve contentious issues in diverse organizations. 2. Provide examples of processes used to open dialog and move toward resolution. 3. Learn to apply feminist process to problem solving in a multicultural environment. Roundtable: Putting minority stress in context: Examining experiences of international students in the US from a socio-ecological perspective Chair: Ka Yan Danise Mok, M.A. - Brigham Young University Presenters: Ka Yan Danise Mok, M.A. - Brigham Young University Lei Wang, M.Ed. - Indiana University Bloomington Room: Mt. Hood Because of the increasing number of enrollment of international students in the U.S., there has been a call to focus on the retention of international students (Andrade, 2006). While the racial climate change as experiences of racism involves more incidents of microaggression in the U.S. (Sue, 2010), international students are directly affected. This roundtable session is two-fold, with the first half facilitating a discussion on racial minority stress among international students and an experiential component in the latter that helps contextualize such stressors using the socio-ecological model (Bronfenbrenner, 1979). Our goal is to assist mental health practitioners make sense of how these different systems shape clients’ cross-national experiences and inform their case conceptualization and treatment plans in a culturally-sensitive manner. Roundtable: Clinical Supervision with International Students: A Roundtable Discussion Chair: Sharon Bowman, Ph.D. - Ball State University Presenters: Sharon Bowman, Ph.D. - Ball State University Pia Nathani, M.S. - Ball State University Michiko Iwasaki, Ph.D. - Loyola University Maryland Room: Mt. Hood This roundtable is intended to encourage scholarly and experiential focus on clinical supervision in international context. The three co-facilitators of this roundtable are an African American faculty member and long-time clinical supervisor, along with a Japanese faculty member and an Indian doctoral student who have been both international supervisees and supervisors. Together we will provide participants with a forum to explore the complex experiences of international supervisees while identifying ways to increase awareness and open communication in their own clinical and supervision dyads. This discussion is particularly meaningful as research indicates positive client outcomes are partially a result of a mutually understanding supervisory relationship – whereby multicultural issues are discussed openly in supervision (Ancis & Marshall, 2010). Furthermore, the proposed roundtable addresses the aims of counseling psychology programs regarding embracing internationalization of psychology and preparation of competent counselors and supervisors.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 Roundtable: Intersectionality of ethnicity, nationality, and sexual orientation: Reaching out to ethnic minority LGBQ international students Chair: Elena Yakunina, Ph.D. - University at Buffalo Presenters: Elena Yakunina, Ph.D. - University at Buffalo Heike Mitchell, M.Sc. - University of Akron Shaznin Daruwalla, Psy.D. - Oregon State University Counseling and Psychological Services Room: Mt. Hood We can estimate that there were at least 48,000 LGBQ international students in the U.S. during the 2014-2015 academic year and that many of these students come from ethnic minority backgrounds. Ethnic minority LGBQ international students face intersecting layers of oppression based on country of origin, immigration status, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Given the multiple challenges experienced by ethnic minority LGBQ international students, mental health professionals need to be prepared to meet these students’ needs in a culturally sensitive manner. In their clinical work, mental health professionals should demonstrate affirmation of diverse cultural backgrounds, ethnicities and sexual orientations, as well as recognize the complex interplay of multiple intersecting identities and multiple areas of oppression. The discussion of this theoretically-oriented 50-minute roundtable will focus on opportunities for mental health professionals to engage and serve this invisible and marginalized group of students through both clinical services and social justice work. Roundtable: Collaborative Programming to Decrease Disparity in Accessing Campus Resources: International Students in a Higher Education Setting Chair: Yi-An L. Burleson, Ph.D. - University of Washington Discussant(s): Katherine W. Wong - University of Washinton Presenters: Yi-An Burleson, Ph.D. - University of Washington Katherine W. Wong - University of Washinton Room: Mt. Hood In the trend of globalizing world and global education in the US, engaging both domestic and international students can enhance the sensitivity and understanding of diversity of students. Furthermore, the majority of international students are from Asian cultures where mental health and seeking campus resources are frequently stigmatized. Thus, the roundtable will focus on sharing and brainstorming creative collaboration on college campus to better serve international students. Presenters (a psychologist and an international student service advisor) will present values and experiences in global education and contribution of international students to promote multicultural and mutual adaptation. Presenters will also facilitate interactive small group discussions for participants to share experiences and generate new strategies for developing collaborative services and programming which emphasize facilitating international student engagement and openness to assess campus mental health and other resources as well as changing campus culture for global education and international students. Roundtable: The Argument for White Allies During Racial Battle Fatigue Chair: Cassandra Page, Psy.D. - Regent University Discussant(s): Kristyn Troyer, Psy.D. - Regent University Presenters: Cassandra Page, Psy.D. - Regent University Kristyn Troyer, Psy.D. - Regent University Courtney Brown - Regent University Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Racial battle fatigue is the distressing mental and emotional experience of being an “Other.” In today’s racial climate, minority faculty members within predominantly white institutions (PWIs) struggle to balance their inner experience while also providing multicultural competence within the field. In an era of colorblindness, the experience of the “Other” is often silenced; however, change is possible. With the development of the “White ally,” further understanding of White privilege and racism are acknowledged, revealed, and addressed. This roundtable will engage the participants in the experience of a faculty member of color’s involvement in a PWI. It will also discuss the partnership and identity development of the White ally among faculty and students. The dialogue will conclude with a real-world application regarding how White allies can advocate for peers/mentors of minority status who have experienced, are experiencing, and will experience racial battle fatigue. Roundtable: “Am I The Oppressor?”: Exploring Strategies to Decolonize Graduate Psychology Education Chair: Vaneeta Sandhu, Psy.D. - Adler University Discussant(s): Rosa Wu, Ph.D. - Adler University Presenters: Vaneeta Sandhu, Psy.D. - Adler University Rosa Wu, Ph.D. - Adler University Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir 33 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Thursday, January 5, 2017 This roundtable discussion aims to provide participants with increased competency to address the perpetuation of colonialism and other oppressive features in graduate psychology programs. The facilitators will share strategies they have exercised both in and out of the classroom to manage the systemic needs of higher education institutions and published standards of the field, and simultaneously align with a responsibility to highlight the power imbalance of heavily Western discourse. These strategies include initiatives taken at programmatic and departmental levels, course design, and class assignments and exercises. Attendees will discuss a specific core competency wherein they will be asked to highlight the oppressive features and then strategize an approach to decolonize the nature of the core competency. Participants will then have the opportunity to engage with the facilitators, as well as amongst themselves, to share strategies, experiences, and support as we navigate this important, yet undefined, practice of ethical teaching. Roundtable: Employing a Social Justice Perspective when Counseling People about Race-Related Violence Chair: Jerome Farrell Discussant(s): Benjamin Wood Presenters: Benjamin Wood - Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts Jerome Farrell - Lehigh University Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Clients experiencing race-related violence can benefit from therapeutic support and intervention. Psychodynamic, humanistic, and cognitive behavioral theoretical orientations offer clinicians ways in which they can address race-related violence. However, these orientations do not overtly focus on changing power imbalances. A social justice perspective in counseling offers clinicians a way of address power imbalances. The structured discussion provides clinicians the chance to discuss the benefits and drawbacks of adopting a social justice perspective in counseling clients experiencing race-related violence. The discussion does not have a specific conclusion regarding what the correct approach is to adopt. Rather, the goal is to encourage clinicians to question how, when, and if they should adopt a social justice perspective when race-related violence enters into therapy. Roundtable: Toward the Development of a Multicultural Supervision Training Framework Chair: Amanda Waters, Ph.D.- University of Connecticut Presenters: Megan Guinn, Ph.D. - Virginia Commonwealth University Amanda Waters, Ph.D.- University of Connecticut Emily Bryant, Ph.D. - Brookwood Hills Psychological Associates Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst Our aim is to increase inclusivity and cultural humility in our practice and training of multicultural clinical supervision via a framework for multicultural supervision that accounts for the intersectionality of supervisors’ and supervisees’ identities. This dialogue will bring together multiple levels of practitioners to share our collective knowledge to define our current practice, ongoing assessment, and mechanisms of change in the field of multicultural supervision. The majority of the discussion will seek to answer the question, “How do we provide inclusive multicultural supervision training?,” through self-reflection regarding personal supervision training experiences and discussion of effective incorporation of multiculturalism and modeling of cultural humility. Participants will be encouraged to explore challenges inherent in this endeavor, particularly focusing on markers indicating a facilitative supervisory relationship and how to address relational ruptures. Participation will improve the teaching, training, and implementation of multicultural supervision across systemic levels of development. Roundtable: Cultural Social Influences and Power Differentials: Critical Explorations Surrounding Professional Rhetoric Related to the Supervisory Relationship Chair: Marcela Polanco, Ph.D. - Our Lady of the Lake University Discussant(s): Marcela Polanco, Ph.D. - Our Lady of the Lake University Presenters: Tirzah LeFeber - Our Lady of the Lake University Marcela Polanco, Ph.D. - Our Lady of the Lake University Johanna Becho – Our Lady of the Lake University Antonia Garcia - Our Lady of the Lake University Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst The panel presenters, (a white supervisor-in-training from Wisconsin and two Mexican American graduate supervisees) will facilitate a critical, roundtable discussion based from a just perspective on supervision addressing the challenges of the practice in the most recent outcome-based professional rhetoric. The presenters will adopt a autoethnographic perspective to revise the surrounding professionalization of the relationships between supervisors and supervisees in a family therapy master’s and counseling psychology doctorate programs, both socially justice oriented. Presenters will highlight the intersection of various cultural social influences and professional boundaries, particularly the power differentials typical to academic infrastructures. NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 Roundtable: Reflections on Power, Privilege, and Multicultural identities in the Supervisory Dyad Chair: Frances Diaz, Psy.D. - University of California Irvine Presenters: Frances Diaz, Psy.D. - University of California Irvine Carmen Cruz, Psy.D. - Texas Woman’s University Counseling Center Mary Mendoza-Newman, Ph.D. - Stanford University CAPS Vaden Health Center Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst The supervisor competency movement has provided opportunity for the field to begin to shift the focus from trainee development alone, to include an examination of the pivotal role the supervisor has in the supervisory relationship. In order to truly understand the multiple factors that influence the supervisory process, it is essential that the role of power, privilege, identity and multicultural competence of the supervisors be considered. This roundtable will facilitate a dialogue around the complexities of integrating feedback and awareness of supervisors own level of competence in each of these areas. Facilitators will provide a space to explore the intersections of these key areas and how they influence the supervisory experience overall. Roundtable: Cultural Considerations in Counselor Training and Supervision: Applications to Gatekeeping Chair: Dominick Scalise, Ph.D - Avila University Discussant(s): Carlton Green, Ph.D.- University of Maryland Presenters: Dominick Scalise, Ph.D - Avila University Carlton Green, Ph.D.- University of Maryland Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst The panelists will facilitate dialogue surrounding the function of cultural identities within supervisory relationships in professional counseling. Presenters will provide two illustrative supervisory cases to generate discussion. Panelists will highlight power dynamics when supervisors and trainees of differing cultural backgrounds enter into a process of feedback or conflict. The discussion will center on competent practice while attending to ethical obligations to protect the public (Falender & Shafranske, 2007). The “culture of nice” (MacDonald, 2011) along with supervisor and supervisee empowerment, fear, and competence will be addressed as they relate to training culturally competent counselors, providing culturally sensitive supervision, and protecting the public from culturally insensitive practices. Participants who have interests in providing culturally sensitive supervision around the intersections of race, gender, religion, and other cultural identities are encouraged to attend. Participants will leave with strategies to increase their commitment to either culturally sensitive supervision or protecting. Roundtable: An Anti-Racist Approach to Professional Development and Cultural Comptency among Faculty in a Two Year Institution Chair: Michelle James, Ph.D. - Oakton Community College Presenters: Michelle James, Ph.D. - Oakton Community College Lynn Woodbury, Ph.D. - Oakton Community College Gloria Liu, M.S. - Oakton Community College Room: Eugene Much has been written about the damaging effects of systematic racism and other oppressions on student achievement, student learning and retention. But little has been done at the higher education level to ensure that anti- oppressive and anti-bias approaches to teaching are being sought after. The current presentation is an effort to describe the experience of conducting a professional development seminar that examines the “anti-bias classroom” This presentation will address the pedagogical issues, management and classroom practices. Discussion will highlight the facilitators efforts in helping participants to distinguish cultural exploration from exploitation; to identify and examine white/male privilege and to explore the misuse of power and its dynamic in the educational endeavor. This session will describe the components of that training, and the criteria for participation. It will also address the challenges, and the rewards associated with this work and will conclude with lessons needed for conducting future. Roundtable: Diverse Formats for Multicultural and Diversity Courses: Online and Co-Teaching Considerations Chair: Kimber Shelton, Ph.D. - KLS Counseling & Consulting Services/Yorkville University Presenters: Kimber Shelton, Ph.D. - KLS Counseling & Consulting Services/Yorkville University Geoff Bathje, Ph.D. - Adler University Room: Eugene The necessity of cultural competent counseling practice is well documented in psychological and counseling literature (APA, 2011). There is a wealth of research available on multicultural counseling training and graduate student experience (Sammons & Speight, 2008). In contrast, there is less information available on the experiences of faculty teaching diversity courses (Reynolds, 2011), particularly faculty using alternative instructional forms including online teaching and co-teaching. This roundtable will focus on exploring faculty perceptions on the potential benefits and costs associated with diverse formats for diversity and multicultural instruction. Facilitators will provide evidenced-based scholarship on online and co-teaching platforms, as well as share their personal 35 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Thursday, January 5, 2017 experiences in diverse teaching modalities. Facilitators will discuss issues related to addressing microaggressions, oppression, and social justice with diverse teaching modalities. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to share their own experiences with multicultural education and will explore ways to improve support for faculty teaching multicultural courses. Symposium: Teaching a Multiculturalism-Informed Psychology of People Chair: Jasmine Mena, Ph.D. - Bucknell University, Kathryn Quina, Ph.D. – University of Rhode Island Discussant(s): Beverly Greene, Ph.D. - St. Johns University Presenters: Jasmine Mena, Ph.D. - Bucknell University Beverly Greene, Ph.D. - St. Johns University Kathryn Quina, Ph.D. – University of Rhode Island Melba J.T. Vasquez, Ph.D., ABPP – Private Practice Jacqueline Weinstock, Ph.D. - The University of Vermont Joseph E. Trimble, Ph.D. – Western Washington University Gayle Skawennio Morse, Ph.D. – The Sage Colleges Room: Columbia Multicultural awareness, knowledge and skills are imperative to adequately address the needs of today’s society. Psychology classrooms across the nation represent ideal locations for the multicultural transformation to take place. This symposium is comprised of three panels and a discussant who will address the multicultural transformation of the psychology curriculum. Each panelist is a contributor to an edited volume about the multicultural transformation of the psychology curriculum. This symposium will be most exciting to those who want to transform their courses, yet have confronted the real barriers of identifying the best approach, literature, resources and assignments. The panelists will make the process of transforming courses exciting and more accessible and will help educators feel more successful in doing so. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Disseminate knowledge by multicultural psychology experts to psychology educators invested in multicultural issues 2. Prepare educators of psychology and related fields to address the needs of diverse people through multicultural education 3. Discuss the limitations of single identity constructions and promote intersectional perspectives in psychology education Symposium: The origins of sizeism and ethical implications of behavioral weight loss programs Chair: Alison M. Kouba - Bastyr University Discussant(s): Alexia Giblin, Ph.D., CEDS Presenters: Alison M. Kouba - Bastyr University Daniel Rosen, Ph.D. - Bastyr University Alexia Giblin, Ph.D., CEDS Room: Portland The presentation explores the origins of sizeism through the greater cultural lens of oppression and the multicultural guidelines that inform culturally responsive practice in psychology. Behavioral weight loss programs are then evaluated as framed by this definition of sizeism, and examined within the context ethical code as defined by central APA documents. The presentation will examine the ethical issues of treatment effectiveness and evidence-based medicine, client dignity and non-discrimination, and informed consent and values. The presentation is designed to allow attendees to understand how the emergence of sizeism from a longer-standing history of oppression (e.g., sexism, racism) contributes to the use of behavioral weight loss programs, and will help psychologists make ethically-informed and evidence-based decisions about their participation in such programs moving forward. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Describe the origins of sizeism within a wider cultural context of racism. 2. Apply the APA ethics code to counseling approaches in order to avoid sizeism and weight discrimination. 3. Discuss the implications of behavioral weight loss programs regarding cultural competence and ethics, and critique the programs’ role in furthering sizeism. Symposium: Social justice outreach with police departments: Strengthening officers’ multicultural competencies and culturally-responsive approaches Chair: Matthew Powless - Indiana University Bloomington Discussant(s): Jacks Cheng - Indiana University Bloomington Presenters: Elyssa Klann - Indiana University Matthew Powless - Indiana University Bloomington Jacks Cheng - Indiana University Bloomington J. Y. Cindy Kim - University of Iowa Room: Pearl Multicultural and diversity training in policing has become an important point of contention with the deaths and criminalization of people of color, and the exoneration of the White perpetrators in these cases (Correll et al., 2007; Garcia & Sharif, 2015). The present NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 symposium seeks to address the lack of extant literature and programs targeting this arising issue, and our efforts as counseling psychologists in advocating for minority voices and multicultural knowledge. In this presentation, we will (a) describe counseling psychologists’ role as social justice advocates in policing, (b) present the development and implementation of our diversity training with a local police department, and (c) discuss ongoing issues in multiculturally competent policing, recruitment, and training. At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to consult with law enforcement agencies and design multicultural interventions that reflect the needs of the agencies and the people they serve. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Identify mechanisms for strengthening capacities (i.e., individual, institutional, infrastructural) for practice and research with police officers in diverse communities. 2. Plan and prepare for relevant issues in multicultural consultation with law enforcement, from the entry phase of the consulting relationship through the termination stage. 3. Apply relevant multicultural theory to the practical task of working to improve law enforcement’s approach to multicultural issues. 4. Construct multiculturally-based interventions for use with police departments, using the tripartite approach to address officers’ multicultural awareness, knowledge, and skills. 5. Assist police forces with the application of multiculturally effective policing strategies and the utilization of diverse community resources. 2:30 PM – 4:15 PM Difficult Dialogues: Difficult Dialogues: Practicing Emotional Labor: Sharing Strategies to Address Microaggressions in Graduate Counselor Education Presenters: Tiffany O’Shaughnessy, Ph.D. - San Francisco State University Alison Cerezo, Ph.D. - San Francisco State University Janie Pinterits, Ph.D. - Alliant International University Room: Salons A-B This session will discuss strategies for managing “emotional labor” (Harper, 2016), or the process wherein individuals are charged with responding to manifestations of oppression in academic spaces. Namely, we will discuss lessons learned as two early-career psychologist assistant professors and one mid-career psychologist in a senior diversity officer role. We each face the need to respond to students’ experiences of microaggressions and microassaults (Sue et al., 2007) experienced in training settings. However, how we respond to students’ needs is colored by our professional roles within a department/university, and intersectional social positions as newer, queer, and/or professors/administrators of color. We will highlight mechanisms for engaging in collaborative change processes that speak to the inclusive, socially just values of our profession. Relying on Yosso’s (2005) community cultural wealth model, we will discuss fostering student advocacy on behalf of their own needs that borrows from important lessons born from students’ own cultural communities. Difficult Dialogues: Difficult Dialogues: Extending and Patching the Pipeline to Transform the Academy: Strategies to Increase the Representation of Faculty of Color Presenters: Christopher Liang, Ph.D. - Lehigh University Helen A. Neville, Ph.D. - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Lisa Spanierman, Ph.D. - Arizona State University Room: Salons C-D Data from the Department of Education indicate that the underrepresentation is present at every rank, but is more apparent at the associate and full professor levels. Increasing the presence of visible under-represented groups, women and people of color, is needed. Strategies for addressing underrepresentation of faculty of color has been a focus among institutions of higher education and among education scholars. Despite recruitment efforts data indicate a continued lack of representation of these groups in the faculty ranks. This difficult dialogue is designed to engage an audience in a discussion of challenges and successes in navigating the politics within the academy to recruit, select, and retain faculty from underrepresented groups, especially in psychology and related fields. The dialogue is also designed to provide students and ECPs with strategies for how best to prepare for the academy as well as help mid-career, senior level psychologist/administrators positively affect change at their own institutions. 2:30 PM – 4:30 PM The New Black This film centers on the parallels between the Black civil rights movement of the 20th century and the LGBT civil rights of the 21st century. Highlighted is the 2012 campaign to maintain marriage equality rights in Maryland. 2013, 74 minutes, A Yoruba Richen Film Room: Salon I 37 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Thursday, January 5, 2017 3:40 PM – 4:30 PM Roundtable: “Testimonialistas con Poder:”Addressing the mental health needs and sociopolitical realities of Latinx adolescents through testimonios at a southwest secondary school Chair: Alejandro Cervantes, M.S. – New Mexico State University Presenter: Alejandro Cervantes,M.S. – New Mexico State University Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst Latinxs being the largest ethnic minority group in the United States, there is a sense of urgency in the mental health field to become culturally aware, competent, and action-oriented in creating cultural, therapeutic interventions for this group. As the counseling field moves towards a social justice praxis, counselors need to engage Latinx students in discussing their sociopolitical realities as it relates to their everyday experiences in schools. Especially with Latinx adolescents, Liberation Psychology, and testimonios as praxis allows for opportunities for young teenagers to participate in social justice and advocacy that improves their schools and communities. Counselors who utilize Liberation Psychology and testimonios praxis may create a new identity for Latinx students that involve empathy, connectedness, catharsis, strength, collaboration, imagination, and creativity. Roundtable: The Psychological Effects of Gentrification on AAPI Members Chair: Stephanie Phan - John F. Kennedy University Discussant(s): Kayoko Yokoyama Presenters: Stephanie Phan - John F. Kennedy University Mike Hoang - John F Kennedy University Claire Reclosado-Baclay - John F. Kennedy University Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst Currently, population and economic growth are booming in the San Francisco Bay Area, forcing a significant increase in housing development as a means of accommodating the thousands of newcomers flocking in for jobs in the technology or business industries each year. Cities, towns, and districts that were once considered less desirable are experiencing mass changes at the hands of gentrification. The goal of this discussion is to bring to light the psychological impact of gentrification on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) who are living on fixed incomes and the impact gentrification has on communities. As three self-identified AAPI psychology doctoral students, we have consistently noticed the lack of inclusion of AAPI members. The first goal is to address that, oftentimes, AAPI members are overlooked when topics such as poverty or educational attainment (Formoso, Weber & Atkins, 2010) are discussed. Roundtable: Aloha We Stand: Critical Mass, Multiculturalism, and Native Hawaiian/Asian American- Pacific Islander Inclusion at a Liberal Arts University. Chair: Alyson Burns-Glover, Ph.D. - Pacific University Oregon Discussant(s): Edna Kealani Doar Gehring, M.S. Presenters: Alyson Burns-Glover, Ph.D. - Pacific University Oregon Edna Gehring, M.S. - Pacific University, Oregon Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst Presenters will detail their 25-year collaboration to increase Native Hawaiian/AAPI inclusion, retention, and sense of belonging at a liberal-arts university in the Pacific Northwest. We will detail specific Native Hawaiian and Local culture strengths integrated into the activities of the Nā Haumāna O` Hawai`i (Students of Hawaii) organization and detail specific programming and outreach changes that have increased enrollment and retention. The university’s organization was established in 1959 and our university has the largest per capita enrollment of Native Hawaiians outside of University of Hawai`i, Mānoa. Prior to cultural interventions, students from Hawai`i low enrollment and retention rates. For the last 10 years, our campus population has averaged 22% students from Hawai`i and they have higher retention and six-year graduation rates than their mainland peers. We review survey results, institutional data, “Talk Story” and provide operationalized examples of how this collaboration has transformed diversity practices.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 Roundtable: Othered: International practitioners break the silence around challenges in the workplace Chair: Shaznin Daruwalla, Psy.D.- Oregon State University Counseling and Psychological Services Presenters: Shaznin Daruwalla, Psy.D.- Oregon State University Counseling and Psychological Services Bong Joo Hwang, Ph.D. - Arizona State University Jinhee Kang, Ph.D. - University of Maryland Counseling Center Room: Eugene There is silence on the discrimination issues experienced by international therapists in the practice setting. These issues can range from microaggressions experienced by this rapidly growing community among mental health professionals to the systemic forces that shape their experiences in the U.S. In this phenomenological roundtable discussion, three international psychologists, in various stages of their professional development, identity development, immigration status, and time in the U.S., will discuss their lived experiences in this country. This “difficult dialogue” will also include a critique of the socioculturallegal context within which international practitioners live their lives: immigration laws and processes. Finally, the panel will explore advocacy efforts initiated within and by international practitioner community, and ways to support this community through social justice work. Roundtable: In (y)our shoes: Bilingual counseling and lived experiences Chair: Jacks Cheng - Indiana University Bloomington Presenters: Jacks Cheng - Indiana University Bloomington Lei Wang, M.Ed. - Indiana University Bloomington Sarah Arango, M.Ed., M.A. - University of Texas at Austin Room: Eugene Language is considered to be a tool for self-construction and -expression. As the demand for bilingual services increases due to globalization, language has adopted a more crucial role in psychotherapeutic interventions. In particular, researchers have recognized language’s implication in encoding memories and emotions, and in formalizing cultural frameworks. Facilitators of this roundtable use their own personal and clinical experiences in their role as bilingual psychology trainees to (a) share experiences of counselors and clients providing and accessing these services, (b) introduce underlying issues for the development and implementation of bilingual services, (c) facilitate a discussion on progress, barriers, and implications, and (d) advocate for additional resources and formal training for bilingual counselors and services. Roundtable: Did that really just happen? Managing race-related critical incidents in the postsecondary classroom Chair: Harriet Curtis-Boles, Ph.D. - California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University Presenters: Harriet Curtis-Boles, Ph.D. - California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University Yuki Okubo, Ph.D. - Salisbury University Ana Chupina, Ph.D. - Shirley Hufstedler School of Education, Alliant International University Room: Mt. Hood Students of color in postsecondary education are challenged with experiences of racism and marginalization in the classroom that can result in silencing, feelings of exclusion and failure. These experiences include racist comments, negative stereotyping, devaluation, isolation and tokenism. Support and validation can diminish the personal and academic impact of these micro and macro-aggressions. Correction of misassumptions and misinformation and facilitated discussions can allow their perspectives to be heard and respected. This session is designed to address race-related critical incidents in the classroom through a presentation of key concepts and facilitated discussion of vignettes that illustrate examples of race-related microagressions in the classroom. The facilitators will also generate best practices from the group discussion as well as share strategies from their collective 35 years of experience facilitating difficult dialogues in the postsecondary classroom. Roundtable: Disrupting the Status Quo: Positionality, Pedagogy, and Relational Processes Chair: Consuelo E. Cavalieri, Ph.D. - University of St. Thomas Presenters: Consuelo E. Cavalieri, Ph.D. - University of St. Thomas Bryana French, Ph.D. - University of St. Thomas Salina Renninger, Ph.D. - University of St. Thomas Room: Mt. Hood In this roundtable discussion, tenure-track and tenured faculty will explore social justice training occurring within our professional environments. We will launch our roundtable by discussing our efforts to think critically about social justice training using the concepts of “positionality” and the “working alliance”. Our discussion is centered on providing specific examples of our work and exchanging our reflections on our positionalities as women who identify as Indigenous, Black biracial, and White, all with origins in poor or working class families. Our roundtable will promote rich dialogue as to the ways we are working to disrupt and dismantle structural inequities embedded within the status quo. In our efforts to build working alliances, we will discuss how we leverage our identities as sources of power and draw from decolonizing and critical pedagogies to disrupt “traditional” models of education. 39 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Thursday, January 5, 2017 Roundtable: Hispanics in Education Chair: Rubi gonzales - University of Texas at El Paso Discussant(s): Rocio Acevedo - University of Texas at El Paso Presenters: Rubi gonzales - University of Texas at El Paso Rocio Acevedo - University of Texas at El Paso Room: Mt. Hood Hispanics are becoming the fastest growing minority and the low number of Hispanics at every educational level is under severe underrepresentation especially in higher education (Cuådraz, 2005). At the end of this session, the audience will better understand the critical role of faculty mentoring and support in promoting socialization, research, scholarship, degree completion, and career development; realize the imminent need of conducting further research to explore more in-depth the socialization experiences that affect the retention, and attrition rates of Latinas pursuing a doctoral degree in an epoch where Hispanics are the largest ethnic group, and cultural diversity is a common trait in the United States; reflect on the future challenges and needs of Latina doctoral students and better ways in which effective and affective support systems can be implemented for the completion of their doctoral degree and professional advancement. Roundtable: Diversity Coordinators at University/College Counseling Centers: The Benefits, Burden, and Blunders Chair: Zoeann Finzi-Smith, Ph.D. - George Washington University Mental Health Services Discussant(s): Kimber Shelton, Ph.D. - KLS Counseling & Consulting Services/Yorkville University Presenters: Zoeann Finzi-Smith, Ph.D. - George Washington University Mental Health Services Kimber Shelton, Ph.D. - KLS Counseling & Consulting Services/Yorkville University Room: Mt. Hood Increased focused on issues of diversity, inclusivity and social justice are some of the many advantages to the creation of Diversity Coordinator positions within college counseling. However, the addition of Diversity Coordinator positions may leave counseling centers vulnerable to the belief that one person is solely responsible for all counseling center diversity initiatives or counseling centers may approach diversity as menial tasks relegated to entry-level staff and trainees. This roundtable will focus on discussing the how to’s, logistics, advancements and development of Diversity Coordinator positions, as well as the professional and personal costs and benefits to both the university and the individuals in these positions. Personal factors to be explored include burnout, compassion fatigue, cultural taxation, altruism, autonomy to develop diversity initiatives, and engaging in practice aligned with values. Professional factors include demonstrating commitment to diversity, inclusiveness of underrepresented groups, and accountability to larger diversity initiatives. Roundtable: Addressing White Client Racism in Counseling Sessions Chair: Kyrai Antares, M.A. - Western Michigan University Presenters: Kyrai Antares, M.A. - Western Michigan University Dawnielle Simmons, M.Ed. - Western Michigan University Room: Mt. Hood The purpose of this roundtable is to generate an explorative discussion focused on addressing White client racism in counseling sessions. Several authors have cited racism as a clinical issue to be addressed by counseling professionals (Dunbar, 2004; Skillings & Dobbins, 1991, 2000; Thompson & Neville, 1999). White client racism within counseling sessions is a place where the systemic white racial frame meets the personal, psychological processes of individual clients and counselors. The dynamics of racial conflict in the wider culture play out in the therapeutic context; and through intentional therapeutic intervention, so can the force of change. Roundtable: Unpacking the silence: Addressing the ways in which lack of engagement in multicultural conversations perpetuates the status quo Chair: Jacquelyn Francisco, Ph.D. Discussant(s): Jessica Coulter, Ph.D. Presenter: Jacquelyn Francisco, Ph.D. Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir This 50-minute roundtable discussion seeks to combat the pervasive silence around multicultural issues and emphasize the resounding effects within our communities. The discussion will highlight persons traditionally denied voices in communities and the impact this has on individuals and groups. Participants will be challenged to identify current contributing factors of silence in their lives, as well as barriers to change. The group will engage in a solution-focused discussion, sharing ideas for engaging others in culturally informed conversations, integrating multicultural issues into professional and colloquial discussions, and encouraging advocacy through conversations.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 Roundtable: Convergent and Divergent Forces from the Past: Intersections of Multiculturalism, Feminism and Group Therapy Chair: Jamie R. Funderburk, Ph.D. - Counseling and Wellness Center Presenters: Jamie Funderburk, Ph.D. - Counseling and Wellness Center Zully Rivera-Ramos, Ph.D. Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Feminism, Multiculturalism and the impact of multiple oppressed identities on psychological wellbeing as been studied extensively over the past 50 years. Racism, sexism, heterosexism, ageism, classism and religious discrimination and their have often been linked to increased psychological distress. Group dynamics, theory, and therapeutic process have also been demonstrated to be a powerful force in facilitating both personal and professional growth and development. Conversely,Social Psychology research as demonstrated the often negative impact of dominant group members values, beliefs and biases, through virtue of their greater power, on minority group members wellbeing. Further, ongoing groups have historically been an integral component of consciousness raising related to oppressed identities with the goals of. mutual empowerment to facilitate activism for social justice. Through round table discussion , vignettes and shared wisdom, we will explore the convergent and divergent forces of multiculturalism, Feminism and group treatment as they inform clinical. Roundtable: Re-examining issues in mental health that affect women of color Chair: Bianca L. Guzman, Ph.D. - California State University Los Angeles Discussant(s): Barbara Yee Presenters: Bianca L. Guzman, Ph.D. - California State University Los Angeles Gayle Skawennio Morse, Ph.D. – The Sage Colleges Julii Green, Ph.D. - Clinical Psy.D. Program/CSPP at Alliant International University Barbara Yee, Ph.D. - University of Hawaii at Mānoa Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir The theme of the summit is “Looking back to move forward.” This sentiment of looking back to see where we stood in order to examine how we move forward cannot be more fitting in relation to issues of mental health, multiculturalism and women. Research indicates that women of color continue to experience mental health disparities despite the knowledge that we currently possess to impact the mental health of women of color. The purpose of our roundtable is to examine how mental health issues continue to persist for Latinas, American Indians, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian’s and African American women and how new understandings of intersectionality between race, class, ethnicity and gender can assist mental health professionals to better serve women of color. Symposium: Training the Next Generation of Clinical Psychologists to Provide Affirmative Care to Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Youth Chair: Laura Edwards-Leeper, Ph.D.- Pacific University Discussant(s): Laura Edwards-Leeper, Ph.D.- Pacific University Presenters: Laura Edwards-Leeper, Ph.D.- Pacific University Alyshia Smith, M.S. - Pacific University Tara Sharafin, M.A. - Pacific University Kyle Ahlf, M.S, M.A. - Pacific University Jillian Freitas, M.A. - Pacific University Kelsy Newton, M.S. - Pacific University Room: Portland The number of Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming (TGNC) youth seeking health services is rapidly increasing. Professional guidelines emphasize the importance of interdisciplinary care. Psychologists possess unique skills that contribute to optimal care. However, the demand for services has exceeded the number of psychologists trained to offer this specialized care, largely due to lack of training opportunities. Pacific University’s School of Graduate Psychology, in collaboration with Randall Children’s Hospital, has implemented the first clinical psychology, graduate training opportunity for students hoping to work with TGNC youth. The primary goal is to train the students on the evaluations recommended for TGNC youth seeking medical interventions. Students participate in an assessment practicum, supervised by a national expert in the care of TGNC youth. The supervisor and 3-4 students will present this symposium. The presentation will include a description of the practicum, an overview of the students’ experience, future directions, and Q&A. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Describe the primary training needs of psychologists who desire to work with transgender and gender non-conforming (TGNC) youth. 2. List the main components of the TGNC graduate training program offered at Pacific University for clinical psychology students. 3. Design a similar TGNC training program at their home institution.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017 Symposium: Strategies for Recruiting LGBTQ Participants for Psychological Research Chair: Joshua A. Goodman, M.A. - University of California, Santa Barbara Discussant(s): Nathan Grant Smith, Ph.D.- University of Houston Presenters: Joshua A. Goodman, M.A. - University of California, Santa Barbara Emmie Matsuno, PhD - University of California, Santa Barbara Todd Avellar, Ph.D. – University of Wisconsin William Ryan, B.A. - University of California, Santa Barbara Nathan Grant Smith, Ph.D.- University of Houston Room: Pearl LGBTQ populations face high rates of mental health concerns, yet it can be difficult to recruit a diverse sample for psychological research due to challenges in reaching LGBTQ people who are not out and who are not located in metropolitan areas with large LGBTQ populations. In this symposium, attendees will learn about different methods of recruiting LGBTQ participants. Following an overview of different recruitment methods, the symposium will include panelists who highlight 1) recruitment within online communities (e.g., social media, listservs), 2) online recruitment outside of LGBTQ communities through the crowdsourcing task website MTurk, and 3) recruitment in diverse college settings. Each panelist will discuss the strengths and limitations of their recruitment method and discuss an example of their recruitment method from their own research. By the end of this symposium, attendees will be able to evaluate different methods of participant recruitment and apply this knowledge to their own research. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Explain different methods of participant recruitment within LGBTQ populations, including the distinctions between methods 2. List at least two strengths and limitations of each method of participant recruitment 3. Evaluate if a recruitment method will be a good fit for their LGBTQ-related research project Symposium: Testing the Biopsychosocial Model of Gendered Racial Microaggressions Chair: Jioni A. Lewis, Ph.D. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Discussant(s): Helen A. Neville, Ph.D. - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Presenters: Jioni A. Lewis, Ph.D.- University of Tennessee, Knoxville Erica Peppers, M.P.H. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Cecile Gadson, M.A. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Marlene Williams, M.A. - University of Tennessee, Knoxville Room: Columbia The goal of this symposium is to introduce a biopsychosocial model of gendered racial microaggressions (i.e., subtle and everyday forms of gendered racism). This symposium will highlight a series of presentations that explore the impact of gendered racial microaggressions (GRMS) on mental and physical health outcomes, and variables that buffer against the negative effects of gendered racism stress. The three presentations include: (1) introduction of the theoretical biopsychosocial model of GRMS and testing the model by exploring the mediating role of coping strategies; (2) A quantitative study exploring the relations between GRMS and physical health outcomes; this study will also highlight the mediating role of self-objectification in this relation; (3) A quantitative study exploring whether gendered racial identity (centrality, public regard, and private regard) serves as a buffer in the relations between GRMS and psychological distress. Implications and future research directions will also be discussed.

4:30 PM – 4:45 PM Break

4:45 PM – 6:45 PM Awards Ceremony: Ancestors Recognition; Distinguished Elders Ceremony; Rising and Shining Stars Awards Room: Salon E-F

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Friday, January 6, 2017 7:00 AM - 8:15 AM Continental Breakfast Room: Salons A-F Breakfast with the Stars Room: Mt. Hood Organized by NMCS student volunteers, this session provides an opportunity for students and early career professionals to meet and get to know leaders within multicultural psychology while enjoying breakfast in an informal setting. 8:30 AM – 9:45 AM Keynote Conversation: “Looking Forward to the Future of Multicultural Psychology: A Conversation with Early Career

Psychologists”

Room: Salons E-F Presenters: Carlton E. Green, Ph.D. Mira Krishnan, Ph.D. Melissa Tehee, Ph.D., J.D. Kevin Leo Yabut Nadal, Ph.D. (moderator) 9:45 AM – 10:00 AM Break 10:00 AM – 11:45 AM Difficult Dialogues: Difficult Dialogues: Sage Aging: How Wrong We Are About Old-er People Presenter: Ellen Cole, Ph.D. - The Sage Colleges Room: Salons A-B This Difficult Dialogue will begin with a description of (a) my own research and writing on ageism and positive aging, and (b) an interactive blog I co-facilitate for women in their 70’s. To-date we’ve received over 800 submissions from all over the globe, offering rich, often poignant details about what it’s like to be old. In addition, I will suggest possible discussion topics. I hope we will share stories about ageism we have experienced, observed, or enacted and discuss a variety of age-related facts vs. myths. Major themes are likely to be (1) the prevailing culture of ageism in the U.S. (with some important exceptions among particular ethnicities and communities), (2) other issues related to intersectionality, (3) the challenges and rewards of aging, and (4) what we can do to combat ageism and promote sage aging for ourselves, others we encounter, and society as a whole. Difficult Dialogues: Difficult Dialogues: Feeling Othered in Your Own Space: Causes, Consequences and Manifestations of Oppression Presenters: Nahal Kaivan, M.A. - Duke University Jessica Liu - Lehigh University Room: Salons C-D The experiences for people of color at primarily white institutions is layered with complexities, especially considering the political and sociocultural events unraveling daily in the the United States. Academe is often considered a more critical, open, and educated microcosm of broader society. The purpose of this difficult dialogue is to explore how racially oppressive encounters manifest in academic institutions and surrounding communities. We will interrogate and understand academia as a microcosm of broader culture perpetuating social events decried through research, initiatives and programming geared towards inclusion. Systems of power and the role they play in sustaining and perpetuating systems of oppression for people of color will also be explored. Participants will be asked to consider the system’s role in oppression, personal responsibility or complicity in oppression, and consciousness raising with the possibility for liberation through critical reflection.

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10:00 AM – 10:50 AM Division 44 Roundtable: Intersectionality, violence, and healing: Lessons from Orlando Presenters: Glenda Russell, Ph.D. - University of Colorado Boulder Arlene Noriega, Ph.D. - Rock Bridge Psychological Associates., LLC Gary Howell, Psy.D. - Florida School of Professional Psychology, Center for Psychological Growth Beverly Greene, Ph.D. - St. Johns University Kimberly Balsam, Ph.D. - Pacific Graduate School of Psychology, Palo Alto University Room: Salons G-H This program is a Roundtable Discussion focusing on the psychological impact of the Orlando massacre on LGBT and Latino/ a/x individuals and communities as well as society at large. Four experts in the fields of research, clinical work, and advocacy will examine sociohistorical, intersectionality, and empirical perspectives on this event. Suggestions for clinical work and training clinicians to work effectively with intersectionality issues will be included. 1. Participants will get an understanding of communication in a diversity of contexts. 2. The presenters will demonstrate how participants can use a model of diversity styles within organizational structures. 3. Participants will be exposed to differences and similarities of faculty’s attitudes and beliefs about diversity in academic environments. Roundtable: Growing up Digital: Intersectional Identity Development in the Age of Web 2.0 Chair: Anissa Moody, Ph.D. Presenter: Wendi Williams, Ph.D. - Bank Street College of Education Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst During this 50-minute roundtable discussion, we consider adolescent identity development in the era of user-generated content by members of our society that have never lived without this level of connectivity and expressivity (i.e., digital natives). We utilize the point-of-view of adolescent girls of African descent (Black girls) as a springboard from which to consider the intersection of gender, race, class, access, voice and silence to shape and articulate one’s sense of self of digitized social media environments. Roundtable: When Your Trauma is “Trending”: Navigating Racial Trauma in the Age of Social Media Chair: Tranese Morgan, M.A. Discussant(s): Aryssa Washington, M.A. - Regent University Presenters: Tranese Morgan, M.A. Aryssa Washington, M.A. - Regent University Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst For the past three years the circumstances surrounding the deaths of Sandra Bland, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Garner and a growing list of others, have been at the forefront of the discussion about race in America. Yet, the collective and individual racial trauma that Black Americans are subject to as they attempt to make sense of and process their emotions surrounding these events as well as their own experiences with racism has remained relatively underexplored. Furthermore, exposure to a continuous stream of stories and traumatic images through mass media outlets may play a significant a role in perpetuating negative mental health outcomes (Buss, McLaughlin & Sheridan, 2013; Silver et. al. 2013). Thus, the purpose of this roundtable discussion will be to explore the factors contributing to the perpetuation of racial trauma in the Black community and the potential role of social media in navigating these experiences. Roundtable: Social Justice and the Internet: The Joys and Perils of Taking Advocacy Work Online Chair: Brian TaeHyuk Keum, M.A. - University of Maryland-College Park Presenters: Brian TaeHyuk Keum, M.A. - University of Maryland-College Park Lei Wang, M.Ed. - Indiana University Bloomington Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst The Internet has taken a ubiquitous presence in people’s daily lives (Raacke & Bonds-Raacke, 2008). It continues to influence many domains of human interactions, including the way that mental health professionals study and engage in today’s social issues. This is an advantage that professionals can also utilize in advocating for social justice. We aim to visit the following themes in our roundtable: (1) the meaning of having an online presence for mental health professionals, (2) use of social media for community engagement, and (3) personal advocacy work via the Internet.We hope to facilitate an in-depth discussion of the benefits and drawbacks for mental health professionals engaging in online presence. Our goal is to help participants consider implications and make informed decisions for utilizing online social platforms for conducting their social justice work in addition to maintaining their personal social connections. NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Friday January 6, 2017 Roundtable: @NamingIt #StepYourSocialJusticeGameUp Chair: Bedford E. F. Palmer II, Ph.D. - Saint Mary’s College of California Presenters: Bedford Palmer, II, Ph.D. - Saint Mary’s College of California LaMisha Hill, Ph.D. - Multicultural Resource Center at UCSF Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst The purpose of this roundtable session will be to share innovative approaches towards promoting social justice and mental health through social media platforms. Dr. Bedford Palmer II and Dr. LaMisha Hill (counseling psychologists in the Oakland, California) collaborated in order to develop a social justice oriented podcast, “Naming It: Two Black psychologists discuss the ‘intersectionality’ of all things social justice-current events-psychology.” Social media can be used by psychologists in order to; a) develop a community of engaged online advocates; b) engage in direct activism within social media platforms; and c) create psychologically relevant and social justice oriented content for direct public consumption. This roundtable will focus on the utility of social media in the furtherance of social justice from the perspective of professional psychology.

Roundtable: How to keep one foot in the sand: Negotiating racial/cultural identity and professional identity Chair: Crissy Miyake, Psy.D. - Milton Hershey School Presenter: Crissy Miyake, Psy.D. - Milton Hershey School Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir The process of becoming a clinician involves incorporating a new identity into the existing sense of self. This can be increasingly challenging for clinicians of diverse backgrounds. Psychology itself; its theories, interventions, and training has its own culture and norms that are inherently Euro-American biased. The socialization into Psychology for trainees and young professionals in particular can be challenging as their indoctrination into the field can lead to an awareness of the incongruence between their own racial/ cultural identity and their emerging professional identity. Research into graduate students of color in the field have shown that many consider leaving their training and the profession. This conveys how hard this experience can be and highlights how more open discussions and awareness is needed to promote a healthy integrated cultural and professional identity.

Roundtable: Using the Ancient Wisdom of Mindfulness to Heal from Oppression Chair: Eve M. Adams, Ph.D.- New Mexico State University Presenters: Eve M. Adams, Ph.D.- New Mexico State University Virginia Longoria, Ph.D. - New Mexico State University Tracie L. Hitter, Ph.D. – New Mexo State University Linda James Myers, Ph.D. - Ohio State University Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Mindfulness practices emphasize acceptance, non-judgment and cultivation of inner peace in the midst of stressful circumstances. The utility of mindfulness-based psychological interventions used in culturally responsive ways with oppressed groups is just beginning to be explored. This roundtable discussion will allow participants to discuss how they have utilized mindfulness interventions in order to help those who have experienced oppression. The discussion will include interventions for individuals, groups, and communities. The three facilitators have experience providing mindfulness interventions within the LGBT and Latino communities (including how to offered practices in Spanish). Each of the facilitators will provide some information about three different cultural worldview models that are relevant to mindfulness practices. Participants will receive a script for a culturally-focused mindfulness intervention and a list of resources (websites and references) related to the cultural models that can inform mindfulness-based interventions with oppressed groups and persons.

Roundtable: Giving Voice to Silenced Epistemologies: Integrating Ancestral and Contemporary Knowledge from African, American Indian and Hmong Perspectives Chair: Talee Vang, M.A. - University of St. Thomas Presenters: Talee Vang, M.A. - University of St. Thomas Alice Auma Tindi, LICSW - University of St. Thomas Consuelo E. Cavalieri, Ph.D. - University of St. Thomas Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir In this roundtable, we would like to give voice to our African, American Indian, and Hmong ancestors. We would like to acknowledge the witchdoctors, medicine people, and shaman for keeping our healing practices alive. We would also like to acknowledge what we feel and know yet seldom bring into our classrooms as students or faculty: souls, spirits and yes, the psyche. In our roundtable 45 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Friday, January 6, 2017 discussion, we would like to unpeel the layers of epistemological privilege that amplify models of health that quietly silence our ancestral knowledge. We will wrestle with integrating our ancestral knowledge with emerging research from perspectives that center the power of interrogation of these ideas in our communities. We will invite participants to share their stories, reflections and connections with the hope of sparking Ubuntu, a deep reflection on our collective humanity, the relations we foster, and the accountability we have to promote each other’s wellbeing. Roundtable: Making Invisible Themes in the VA More Visible through Psychology Diversity Programming Chair: Erin Watson, Psy.D. Discussant(s): Michael Burnias, Psy.D., Kelly Koo, Ph.D., William Hua, Ph.D. Presenters: Erin Watson - San Franciscao VA Health Care System Michael Burnias - San Francisco VA Health Care System Kelly Koo - San Franciscao VA Health Care System William Hua - San Franciscao VA Health Care System Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Within the VA Health Care System, there is a crucial need to provide culturally competent care to Veteran patients, and to ensure providers deliver care with the utmost cultural sensitivity and up-to-date knowledge. In an effort to prepare healthcare professionals to meet the needs of an ever-growing diverse Veteran patient population and staff, the SFVAHCS developed the Psychology Diversity Committee (PDC). The mission of the PDC is to develop and provide diversity programming, training, and supervision to all services across the medical center. These efforts are achieved through four sub-committees: Consultation and Resources; Diversity, Didactics, and Discussion; Advertising/Public Relations; and Diversity Interview Taskforce. Four VA PDC staff psychologists will discuss the PDC’s current efforts, barriers, and future plans to make the invisible visible within individual, organizational, and systemic levels of the VA. Roundtable: Disability and chronic illness among Psychologists-in-Training (PITs): Impact on functioning, intersectional identities, and strategies for self-care Chair: Martha E Banks, Ph.D. - ABackans DCP, Inc. Presenters: Monica U. Ellis, M.A., MACL - Fuller Theological Seminary Graduate School of Psychology Martha E Banks, Ph.D. - ABackans DCP, Inc. Eric Samuels, Psy.D. - UC Berkeley Counseling and Psychological Services Alyssa Aguilar, Psy.D. - Rosemead School of Psychology Valamere Mickler, M.A. - Walden University Valesia Ho, M.A. - Wright Institute Room: Eugene The demands on students in clinical psychology training programs have increased in past years due to the internship imbalance and an increasingly competitive job market. Students are required to balance academic, research, and clinical duties in addition to any service and familial responsibilities. The challenge of managing this balance is magnified for psychologists-in-training (PITs) living with chronic illness or disabilities. Speakers will share personal narratives of thriving in graduate school with chronic illness/ disabilities as well as highlight extant research on the topic. Attendees will advance their knowledge of the challenges faced by PITs living with chronic illness/disabilities as well as learn suggestions for supporting these students in their graduate programs. Roundtable: Feminist Multicultural Dissertation Process Chair: Jennifer Chain, Ph.D. Presenters: Jennifer Chain, Ph.D. Kerrie Wilkins, M.A. - Indiana University Angela Izmarian, Ph.D. Room: Eugene In this roundtable discussion, we invite our participants to join us in a dialogue to envision a more multicultural and feminist dissertation process. The dissertation process is often marred with significant barriers that thwart student success, particularly for students from marginalized backgrounds. These barriers may deter student’s persistence to degree completion or leave such indelible scars that they opt out of research and academia upon degree completion. We plan to use this roundtable discussion as an experiential process to inform a model of multicultural and feminist dissertation process in order to decolonize psychology education and maximize the success of underrepresented students in the pursuit of a doctorate in psychology and a career in research or academia.

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Friday January 6, 2017 Symposium: Biscuits and Bigotry: How Psychologists in the South Have Navigated Political Attacks Against LGBTQ Rights Chair: Leticia Y. Flores, Ph.D. - University of Tennessee Discussant(s): Erica H. Wise, Ph.D. - University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Presenters: Leticia Flores, Ph.D. - University of Tennessee Erica Wise, Ph.D. - University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Kimberly Pentel, M.A. Shane Bierma, BS - University of Tennessee Caitlin Clevenger, M.A. - University of Tennessee Arundati Nagendra, BS - University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Gretchen Kurdziel, M.A. Lisa Brownstone, M.A. - University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Room: Columbia In 2016, the Tennessee and North Carolina legislatures launched an unprecedented attack on LGBTQ rights. Tennessee’s House Bill 1840 legally protects counselors who refuse to treat LGBTQ patients and others whose identities conflict with counselors’ “sincerely held principles”. North Carolina’s House Bill 2, passed into law, blocks local governments from passing anti-LGBTQ discrimination rules and requires transgender people at state facilities to use restrooms corresponding to the sex on their birth certificate rather than their identified gender. Examining the isolating and close-knit nature of rural life, the influence of Evangelical religious belief and historical racism, and the inherent psychological stoicism unique to this region may illuminate why the national LGBTQ civil rights movement has met with such backlash in the South. Greater understanding of the cultural values and heterogeneity of the South can equip mental health professionals to advocate effectively for equality and legal protections for LGBTQ citizens. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. List two recently enacted laws which have spurred social debate regarding LGBTQ rights in the southern U.S. 2. Identify three ways in which southern rural culture intersects with sexual orientation and gender identity to affect individual wellbeing and mental health. 3. List three ways psychology professionals can advocate for LGBT clients and citizens in the southern U.S.

Symposium: Globally Authentic and Culturally Diverse Leadership: New Dimensions, Models, and Initiatives Chair: Joseph E. Trimble, Ph.D. – Western Washington University Discussant(s): Melba J. T. Vasquez, Ph.D. Presenter: Joseph E. Trimble, Ph.D. – Western Washington University Room: Pearl With the growing population diversity and mobility in the US and throughout the world, leaders and members will find themselves in more heterogeneous contexts within organizations and communities than ever before. Leaders of tomorrow need to be responsive to rapid change, prepared to lead a diverse workforce, and practice in ways that are culturally responsive and competent in meeting the needs of a diverse population. This demands that leadership theories and research need to be more inclusive and robust if they are to remain relevant. Our theories and research on leadership have neglected the influence of diversity on access to leadership positions and the exercise of leadership. Leadership models influence the ethnocentric disparities, which continue to exist in corporate, higher education, science, and political sectors in the representation of women and racial/ethnic minorities within the ranks of leadership. The symposium will respond to many of these topics. At the conclusion of this symposium, you will be able to: 1. Define leadership principles and identify the ways they influence policy formulations, group organization and behavior, and intergroup and interracial attitudes and behavior; 2. Describe several important studies and controversies in the multicultural leadership field; 3. List the basic theories, methodologies, and findings of research that incorporate leadership analysis in understanding diversity influences in the field; 4. Evaluate the policy and ethical implications of leadership research and practice on vulnerable populations and society as a whole; and, 5. Compare models, initiatives, perspectives, and assessment methods that seek to evaluate and promote authentic and diverse leadership.

Symposium: Culturally-relevant and Class-conscious High Impact Practices to support students at a Hispanic Serving Institution Chair: Bianca Guzmán, Ph.D. - California State University Los Angeles Discussant(s): Truyen Tran - Jumpstart Senior Program Director Presenters: Bianca Guzman, Ph.D. - California State University Los Angeles Claudia Kouyoumdjian, Ph.D. - California State University Los Angeles Kortney Hernandez, Ph.D. - Cal State LA Truyen Tran - Jumpstart Senior Program Director Room: Portland 47 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Friday, January 6, 2017 The current panel examines three service learning opportunities for Latino students on a 4-year HSI campus that foster a sense of belonging in students and can assist in the persistence and graduation rates of Latino students. We will present on the GO East LA initiative a cradle to career program that creates a sense of belonging in Latino college students by having students participate in research and programming that serves their local P-12 schools. We will discuss the Jumpstart program a national non-profit organization 501(c)(3) that partners with higher education institutions to recruit college students to serve in preschool classrooms in disenfranchised areas near the universities through workstudy. We will discuss the role of a service learning courses and how students who participate in courses like this can enhance their understanding of course content and advance their personal and civic values/skills that promote social justice. 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM The Same Difference This film examines gender discrimination, sexual orientation oppression, and male privilege in the lives of Black lesbians. Intragroup discrimination based on butch and femme categorizations are highlighted. 2015, 78 minutes, A Nneka Onuorah Film Room: Salon I 11:10 AM – 12:00 PM Roundtable: Microaggressions and Mental Health: A Strengths-Based Conversation Chair: Laura Marks, Ph.D. - The University of Memphis Presenters: Laura Marks, Ph.D. - The University of Memphis Madeline Stenersen - The University of Memphis Shondolyn Sanders, M.S. - The University of Memphis Brittany Lee - The University of Memphis Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Microaggressions have deleterious mental health effects in people of color. This round table presentation will center on a discussion around strengths-based factors that may buffer the negative effect of microaggressions on mental health in undergraduate students, graduate students, and adults in the workplace. Research and advocacy action steps will also be discussed. Roundtable: Microaggressions, Mindfulness, Multiculturalism, and Evidence-Based Treatments Chair: Nida Mirza, Psy.D. - The Clinic Discussant(s): Natalie Todd, Psy.D. - University of California, San Francisco Jacqueline Raines, Psy.D. - Kaiser Permanente Presenters: Nida Mirza, Psy.D. - The Clinic Natalie Todd, Psy.D. - University of California, San Francisco Jacqueline Raines, Psy.D. - Kaiser Permanente Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir This roundtable will critically examine a prominent evidence-based psychotherapy treatment, dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), from a social justice lens. DBT is broadly utilized for problems of emotion regulation and includes many feminist principles. However, we will focus on the core component of this treatment, mindfulness, and bolstering its uses in more culturally-responsible, less oppressive practice. We will explore the complex ethics of teaching mindfulness as part of psychotherapy - adapting complex and ancient faith and spiritual value systems and implementing them in a “Western” context. How can we stay committed to social justice without misappropriating traditions but appreciating their potential therapeutic value? The roundtable will also analyze how microaggressions are underappreciated in evidence-based treatments such as DBT, which may prove a disservice to underserved populations that could otherwise benefit greatly from psychotherapy. We offer examples of how microaggressions can be conceptualized in psychotherapy as the invalidating environment, akin to traumatic events.

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Friday January 6, 2017 Roundtable: Addressing Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Consensual Non-monogamy at University Counseling Centers: Perspectives from Post-Doctoral Fellows at UC Berkeley CPS Chair: Jeannette Bergfeld, Psy.D. Presenters: Jeannette Bergfeld, Psy.D. - UC Berkeley Counseling and Psychological Services Heath Schechinger, Ph.D. - UC Berkeley Counseling and Psychological Services Eric Samuels, Psy.D. - UC Berkeley Counseling and Psychological Services Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Discussions of sexual orientation, gender identity, and consensual non-monogamy are becoming increasingly relevant at university counseling centers, as college students are coming out in larger numbers and looking to find community and resources on their campuses. While universities have made a lot of progress, LGBTQ students are still harassed, are not as comfortable with their campus climate, and are more likely to consider dropping out. In this roundtable discussion, we will introduce the practices at UC Berkeley Counseling and Psychological Services as an example of how one counseling center is attempting to be inclusive of gender and sexual minority students and staff. Attendees will explore how their centers have addressed the needs of gender and sexual minority students and staff and how they might improve the services they offer. Discussion will center around the current practices of the participants’ centers’ strengths and growth edges based on the provided best practices. Roundtable: Meeting the needs of community college students of color: Reflections from Flint, MI and Beyond Chair: Brian P. Littleton - Mott Community College Discussant(s): Katherine L. N. Colles , Ph.D Presenters: Brian P. Littleton - Mott Community College Katherine Colles, Ph.D. - Eastern Washington University Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir The achievement gap between students of color and White students is a higher education pressing issue. Although, “community colleges remain the predominant entry point for postsecondary education for students of color,” (Perrakis, 2013, p.16), most research is done on students attending four year institutions (Harris et al., 2013). Community colleges students are more likely than those attending four-year institutions to be non-traditional, first-generation, have dependent children, and have a disability (American Association of Community Colleges, 2015). This roundtable will facilitate researchers, educators, and practitioners’ discussion of innovative ways to address three issues related to the achievement gap among students of color attending community colleges. First, challenges faced by this population will be reviewed. Second, strategies that faculty and practitioners can implement to close the achievement gap will be addressed. Third, fostering collaborations between community colleges and researchers to increase research on community college students of color while will be discussed. Roundtable: Looking Back and Within Regarding the LGBTQIA “versus” Christian Debate: Strengthening Connection through Courageous Conversation Chair: Enedelia Sauceda, Ph.D. - University of North Texas Presenters: Enedelia Sauceda, Ph.D. - University of North Texas Kimberly Burdine, Ph.D. - University of Texas at Austin Megan Guinn, Ph.D. - Virginia Commonwealth University Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst These facilitators invite continued dialogue that seeks a more holistic and multifaceted understanding of our religious, cultural, gender, and sexual identity intersections- one that offers connection and reconciliation where dissonance and conflict often permeate. Our multicultural guidelines and efforts help to raise consciousness and protect our queer-identified populations from bigoted, homophobic and transphobic interventions. However, little guidance is given on how to foster authentic connection as we fight against chronic disconnection due to  systemic oppression, religious trauma, religious privilege and a hurtful socio-political climate. Specifically, this dialogue will strive to address the sources of connection and disconnection that arise among queer identified individuals, affirming allies, Christians, and where they all intersect. Attendees will discuss the intersections of sexuality, gender, culture, and spirituality; the typical defenses that emerge in the LGBTQIA “versus” Christian debate; and relevant professional and clinical implications.

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Friday, January 6, 2017 Roundtable: Navigating the legislative backlash: The training implications of the so-called “religious freedom” and other discriminatory legislation. Chair: Nicole Knickmeyer, Ph.D. Counseling Psychology - Austin Peay State University Presenters: Nicole Knickmeyer, Ph.D. Counseling Psychology - Austin Peay State University Julie Shulman, Ph.D. Counseling Psychology - Sonoma State university Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst This roundtable discussion will consider training strategies to assist counselor educators in responding to discriminatory “religious freedom” legislation that has been proposed in many states and passed in TN and MS. We will explore ways for counselor educators manage the conflict between professional ethical code and new state laws governing practice. We will consider the implications of this legislation for our roles as professional gate-keepers. Lastly, we will identify ways to strengthen training with respect to political and social advocacy and action. Participants will be invited to join roundtable facilitators in generating creative strategies for navigating the legislative backlash. Roundtable: “Breaking the Christian script: When diversity education challenges socialized religious narratives in psychology graduate students.” Chair: Aundrea Paxton, M.A. Presenters: Aundrea Paxton, M.A. Sarah Beck, M.A. Chiyah Lawrence, M.A. Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst For students at a faith-based accredited doctoral training program in psychology, religion is an important part of their experience, but how have their spiritual journeys impacted how they interact with diversity education? The purpose of this roundtable is to invite discussion about how to help students integrate their religious worldview with other diverse worldviews in efforts to prepare psychologists, supervisors, faculty, and students to competently and justly address diversity issues. Roundtable: At the Intersection of Multicultural Training and Faith Beliefs: The Experience of Educators Chair: Christina Kim, Ph.D. - Biola University Presenters: Christina Kim, Ph.D. - Biola University Cassandra Page, Psy.D. - Regent University Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst This roundtable discussion will address the topic of diversity/multicultural education, particularly as it intersects with conservative faith beliefs. Two faculty of color at faith-based institutions will briefly share their experiences of teaching multiculturalism at their respective institutions, which are conservative, faith-based PWIs. The roundtable will then open to discussion around challenges related to the intersection of multicultural education and students’ faith beliefs, as well as pedagogical strategies for navigating these challenges. Given recent court cases related to the “Conscience Clause” and the Pedagogical Statement published by the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA, 2015), we aim for this roundtable to be a place for shared understanding and support around the challenges of diversity education and an opportunity for the exchange of ideas around pedagogical strategies and research topics on the intersection of multiculturalism and faith beliefs. Roundtable: Revising the APA Multicultural Guidelines and Developing Guidelines on Race and Ethnicity Chair: Joseph E. Trimble, Ph.D. – Western Washington University Discussant(s): Gayle Skawennio Morse, Ph.D. – The Sage Colleges Presenters: Joseph E. Trimble, Ph.D. – Western Washington University Sandra Mattar, Psy.D. - Center for Multicultural Mental Health Gayle Skawennio Morse, Ph.D. – The Sage Colleges Helen A. Neville, Ph.D. - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Karen Suyemoto, Ph.D. - University of Massachusetts Boston Room: Eugene Foundational knowledge about race and ethnicity is necessary for psychologists to be ethical, competent practitioners, scholars, educators, and/or consultants. Since publication of the original “Guidelines on Multicultural Education, Training, Research, Practice, and Organizational Change for Psychologists” the knowledge available has significantly increased, with greater attention to understanding the unique and differentiated needs of various diverse populations. In 2015 the APA decided to both update the Multicultural Guidelines and develop new guidelines specific to addressing issues of race and ethnicity in psychologists’ professional activities. This discussion panel provides an update on the progress of the Task Force on Race and Ethnicity Competence Guildelines, presenting an overview of the status and the frameworks, working definitions, general guildelines, and guidlelines specific to therapy, research and, education and training. NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Friday January 6, 2017 Symposium: “So, what DOES it mean to be Deaf?” Chair: Cheryl Wu, Psy.D. - Gallaudet University, Department of Counseling SooHyun Tak - Department of Counseling, Gallaudet University Presenters: Cheryl Wu, Psy.D. - Gallaudet University, Department of Counseling SooHyun Tak - Department of Counseling, Gallaudet University Room: Pearl In this symposium, presenters will facilitate a process by which participants can explore the answers to the question of “What it means to be Deaf?” from a socio-cultural perspective within the socio-political context of our American society. Presenters will take participants through a brief introductory experiential learning activity that will enable participants to identify and begin to unpack their personal biases, assumptions related to “deafness” and “disability” and explore some of the common stereotypes and microaggressions associated with this cultural group. In addition, the major theoretical models of disability as they pertain specifically to individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing will be reviewed with emphasis on the two most current deaf related theoretical frameworks of: “Deafhood” and “Deaf Gain”. This will then be followed by an intersectional analysis as applied to the American Deaf Community and the social identity sub groups within it. At he conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Identify and assess personal and collective biases, assumptions and microaggressions related to deaf and hard of hearing individuals in order to develop appropriate responses when working with deaf or hard of hearing clients and communities. 2. Evaluate and describe their understanding and concept of “normalcy” as it applies to members in the American Deaf Communitytheir cultural identity and self-concept. 3. Through exposure to “Deafhood” and “Deaf Gain” theoretical frameworks, participants will ASSESS their current perception of deafness as a disability and view of Deaf people as one homogenous social identity group in order to recognize the tremendous diversity within the American Deaf Community along all human dimensions of social identity related but not limited to race-ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, age, spirituality and religion, language and communication, education, disability, etc.

Symposium: Disability and parenting: The Final Frontier Chair: Alan Goldberg, Psy.D, ABPP; J.D. - State of Arizona Disability Determination Services Administration Presenters: Alan Goldberg, Psy.D, ABPP; J.D. - State of Arizona Disability Determination Services Administration Alette Coble-Temple, Psy.D. - John F. Kennedy University Room: Portland This disability related symposium addresses discrimination involving parents with disabilities. A historical overview of legislation for civil rights of those with disabilities will be presented, followed by information about Child Protective Services and termination of parental rights for parents with disabilities. Issues involving intellectual and physical disabilities will be reviewed. Presenters will discuss parenting assessments, interventions to enhance parenting skills, adaptive equipment, APA Guidelines on Assessment of and Intervention with persons with Disabilities, and the role of psychologists in enabling parenting with a disability. A cutting edge, comprehensive, evidence based approach to assessing mothers with disabilities in regard to parenting will be presented. Multiple resources available for people with disabilities (and those who work with them) will be shared with participants. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Explain the history of U.S. civil rights laws affecting individuals with disabilities. 2. Describe problems with assessment tools used for evaluation of parenting potential in individuals with disabilities. 3. Apply an evidence based approach to assessment of mothers with disabilities in regard to parenting. 4. List 3 ways that individuals with disabilities are discriminated against in Child Protective Services proceedings.

Symposium: Counseling African American Women Interpersonal Trauma Survivors: From Trials to Triumph Chair: Robyn L. Gobin, Ph.D. Discussant(s): Thema Bryant-Davis, Ph.D. - Pepperdine University Presenters: Robyn L. Gobin, Ph.D.- University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Thema Bryant-Davis, Ph.D. - Pepperdine University Room: Columbia Interpersonal trauma, including sexual assault and sex trafficking, is highly prevalent among African American women causing significant mental, physical, and spiritual distress. There are a growing number of programs which have been created to facilitate the recovery process of interpersonal trauma survivors, however limited scholarship has focused on the cultural context of recovery for U.S. based survivors. Based on both a critical review of the literature and clinical intervention experience, the authors will provide treatment recommendations for working with African American women who are survivors. These treatment recommendations can be integrated into a range of treatment orientations and approaches. Overall an integrative strengths-based, culturally congruent model 51 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Friday, January 6, 2017 is recommended which is based in womanist, African American feminist psychology. Recommendations include acknowledgment and incorporation of cultural strengths, resistance to oppression, expressive arts, spirituality and religiosity, wrap around services, intersectional identity, sisterhood/social support, empowerment, activism, and post traumatic growth or thriving. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Explain the impact of interpersonal trauma on mental, physical, and spiritual well-being in African American women. 2. Describe the cultural context of betrayal trauma for African American women. 3. Apply culturally congruent treatment strategies in assessment, treatment planning, and intervention with African American women. 4. Describe the risk factors for interpersonal trauma which serve as particular barriers for African American girls and women. 5. Describe the psychological effects of sex trafficking and sexual assault. 6. Explain the difference between a culturally negligent trauma intervention versus a culturally contextualized trauma intervention.

1:30 PM – 2:20 PM Difficult Dialogues: Difficult Dialogues: From Noun to Verb: Effective Allying Presenters: Nadine Nakamura, Ph.D. - University of La Verne Mira Krishnan, Ph.D. - Mira Krishnan LLC Adrian Rodriquez, Ph.D. - California State University, Fullerton Room: Salons C-D Many of us occupy both marginalized and privileged identities. In some instances, we may play the role of an ally, while in others we might feel that we could benefit from allyship. But what does it mean to be an ally? Is it useful to think of being an ally as a noun or would it be more beneficial to think of allying as a verb? This Difficult Dialogue brings together individuals with diverse marginalized and privileged identities to reflect on how allyship and/or the lack of allyship from others have informed their conceptualizations around how to better allies. Through discussion, we will examine how we hold ourselves to a high standard when we ally, and how marginalized groups or communities hold allies accountable. The goal of this topic is not to “teach” participants, but rather to engage in an open, exploratory dialogue that leads to new knowledge and awareness. Division 17 Symposium: Counseling Psychology and Social Justice Leadership in the Real World: An Intergenerational Call to the Field Presenters: Anneliese Singh, Ph.D. - University of Georgia Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D. - Teachers College, Columbia University Rebecca Toporek, Ph.D. - San Francisco State University Bryana French, Ph.D. - University of St. Thomas Tiffany O’Shaughnessy, Ph.D. - San Francisco State University Brittan Davis, M.Ed. - University of Pennsylvania Counseling and Psychological Services Gilbert Jew, M.A. Room: Salons G-H In this session, counseling psychologists across generations will discuss how to engage in social justice leadership in everyday practice. Social justice has been a long-time value of counseling psychology, however, there are numerous challenges in implementing this value as a lived experience. Counseling psychology students, along with counseling psychologists across the professional lifespan (early career, mid-career, late-career) will have an intergenerational dialogue that is honest, authentic, and real about the challenges and opportunities to integrating social justice within counseling psychology leadership. In doing so, social justice leadership strategies are identified that not only are proclaimed values, but are also more importantly lived experiences. This intergenerational session will intentionally and engage attendees in a dynamic and lively session to identify fierce innovations of counseling psychology and social justice leadership related to current liberation movements in the world (e.g., Black Lives Matter, Trans Liberation movement). At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Identify the history of social justice leadership within counseling psychology 2. Name three social justice leadership strategies for engagement in the current world 3. Learn how an intergenerational dialogue on social justice leadership can support strategy innovation

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Friday January 6, 2017 Roundtable: The role of psychologists in advocating for optimal culturally competent care to gender diverse populations Chair: Joshua Kellison, Ph.D. - Phoenix Children’s Hospital Presenters: Joshua Kellison, Ph.D. - Phoenix Children’s Hospital Aakash Kishore, Ph.D. - VA PIHCS Erin Fettes, Psy.D. - VA PIHCS Kate Richmond, Ph.D. - Muhlenberg College Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir This roundtable session seeks to encourage discussions between panelists and attendees regarding the roles of psychologists in the advocacy and provision of culturally competent care for gender diverse populations. Three sub-themes are used to support the representation of the various roles and settings of contemporary psychologists: 1) The (over)medicalization of trans* healthcare competency in large healthcare institutions; 2) Self reflection of psychologists when working with gender diverse populations; 3) The role of psychologists in both college counseling centers and in supporting the development of gender diverse student leaders in academic institutions. Attendees will identify common and unique roles of psychologists and recommendations in various settings for competent care and advocacy for gender diverse populations.

Roundtable: Disrupting Organizational Constraints: Making social justice interventions work. Chair: Bedford Palmer, II, Ph.D. - Saint Mary’s College of California Presenters: Bedford Palmer, II, Ph.D. - Saint Mary’s College of California Gloria Sosa, Ph.D, LPC-MI - Saint Mary’s College of California Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst This round table will focus on the development of a solutions focused intervention, which was used to address campus climate in relation to a hate crime incident. The presenters were asked to develop a campus intervention, but were constrained to a one-hour time frame in order to develop a solutions oriented conversation between over 250 members of the campus community. Though best practice would demand the use of more time and smaller groups, we were forced to work within the hour time frame. Keeping these constraints in mind, we simultaneously facilitated seventeen 8-10 person, 45 minute think tanks. We also engaged the support of a small group of faculty and staff allies to serve as table coaches. These think tanks were facilitated based on four critical assumptions and one solution focused directive.

Roundtable: Microaggressions and the Consensual Non-monogamy Community: Recommendations for Addressing Mononormativity in Research and Clinical Practice Chair: Ivonne Mejia, Psy.D. - University of California, Berkeley Discussant(s): Heath Schechinger, Ph.D. Presenters: Ivonne Mejia, Psy.D. - University of California, Berkeley Heath Schechinger, Ph.D. - UC Berkeley Counseling and Psychological Services Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst While there is a growing interest in consensual non-monogamy (CNM), the number of resources available to guide researchers and practitioners in the field of psychology remain scarce. Researchers continue to use methods and measures that assume sexual exclusivity as the hallmark feature of a healthy romantic relationship, and practitioners rarely receive education and training on CNM issues. Furthermore, the literature has suggested that practitioners hold stigmatized attitudes towards the CNM community and frequently engage in harmful clinical practices. In this roundtable discussion, we will discuss some of the common microaggressions committed by researchers and practitioners when working with clients who engage in CNM and identify ways to create and invite a CNM-affirming space. Attendees will also be given an opportunity to reflect on how (or if) they are addressing the needs of the CNM population in their work and how they might be more inclusive in their practices.

Roundtable: Fostering psychological impotence Chair: Rafael S. Harris, Jr., Psy.D. - Bay Pines VA Discussant(s): Jason Steward, Ph.D. - Bay Pines VA Presenters: Rafael S. Harris, Jr., Psy.D. - Bay Pines VA Jason Steward, Ph.D. - Bay Pines VA Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst This presentation is a scholarly review of an article from The Atlantic titled, “The coddling of the American mind”. In it, a case is made regarding how concepts supposedly consistent with emotional wellness miss the mark entirely and instead promote pathology. The 53 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Friday, January 6, 2017 presentation will highlight how entire paradigms relative to political correctness, multicultural competence, and empowerment instill fear. In fostering fear, the by-product is contrary and dangerous to what psychology aims to communicate about what contributes to good citizenship and overall emotional maturity. Concepts such as multicultural competence, social justice, oppression, and advocacy are well-intended and critical in mental health and society in general. Equally important is knowing their limitations. This presentation will aim to highlight these limitations and offer a balanced perspective so that respect and goodwill stay front and center.

Roundtable: Fusing Internationalization and Multicultural Psychology Chair: Sarah Arango, M.Ed., M.A. - University of Texas at Austin Presenters: Sarah Arango, M.Ed., M.A. - University of Texas at Austin Jacks Cheng - Indiana University Bloomington Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst Multicultural psychology has become a core part of Counseling Psychology graduate programs within the U.S., but much of the focus has remained within the context of the North America and Western Europe. This roundtable will address the importance of internationalization within psychology, and the need to expand multicultural training to incorporate international worldviews and experiences, and to foster competencies that are applicable in international contexts. Facilitators and participants will focus on (a) obstacles that bicultural and/or international faculty and students face when going back to their home country, or in doing work abroad, after having been trained within a U.S. program; (b) the experiences that students and faculty have had in incorporating internationalization in the classroom and beyond; and (c) exchange resources and ideas about the ways to make these changes in our programs, and ways to take part in international research and professional development opportunities.

Roundtable: Lives Worth Saving: Social Justice for Women in the Sex Work Industry Chair: Madeline Stenersen - The University of Memphis Presenters: Madeline Stenersen - The University of Memphis Elin Ovrebo, Ph.D. - The University of Memphis Room: Eugene Women in the sex trade industry often have complex and varied needs regarding mental health. This round table discussion will focus on how the field of psychology can best address these needs as well as what individual clinicians can do to best help clients who have previously or are currently working in the sex trade industry. This includes but is not limited to common mental health issues facing this population in the U.S. and globally, language used, specific needs of trans* sex workers, myths about the sex trade industry, and how clinicians can get involved in outreach in their own communities. Research and advocacy steps will also be discussed.

Roundtable: How to Approach Training, Research, and Practice focused on Individuals Engaged in Sex Work (IESW) Chair: Kayla Bolland,B.A. - New Mexico State University Discussant(s): Tracie L. Hitter, Ph.D. – New Mexo State University Presenters: Kayla Bolland, B.A. - New Mexico State University Tracie L. Hitter, Ph.D. – New Mexo State University Room: Eugene Sex work has long been debated as being either exploitative or empowering to individuals engaged in sex work (IESW), with much of the research being historically based on a pathology-focused lens that has ignored the strengths of IESW and the coping strategies they utilize in the face of challenges associated with their work. These dualistic views of sex work have allowed for little middle ground or consideration about how the diversity of the population of IESW might add nuance to the conceptualization and perception of sex work. This roundtable discussion concerning IESW will consider 1) how to reconcile the current dichotomous views on sex work, 2) how sex work can be approached with a more resilience focus in research and clinical practice, and 3) recommended methodological approaches for research.

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Friday January 6, 2017 Roundtable: Transgender and Gender Nonconforming (TGNC) People of Color- A Call for Research and Action Following the Orlando Mass Shooting Chair: Patrick Marcoux - Western Michigan University Discussant(s): Maime Butler, M.A. - Western Michigan University, Kristin Roberts Presenters: Patrick Marcoux - Western Michigan University Maime Butler, M.A. - Western Michigan University Kristin Roberts Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Current research on transgender individuals and research on racial and ethnic identity largely ignore the existence of intersecting identities. It is to the detriment of the clients, counseling psychologists and researchers that these complex narratives are left unexamined. In this roundtable discussion, we will describe the direction of the research in counseling psychology, assess the directions of research suggested and take note of existing research across interdisciplinary fields. Finally, through the examination of research and community bodies that are going above and beyond in addressing the needs of TGNC people of color, we hope to shed light on the importance of more research needed in this area. This will include action plans that would help better engage TGNC people of color in therapy and gain access to resources in our respective communities. Roundtable: It’s more than a Bathroom Pass: Improving Healthcare for Transgender individuals Chair: Nicole Jackson, Ph.D. - Columbus VA Discussant(s): Milo Wilson, Ph.D. Presenters: Nicole Jackson, Ph.D. - Columbus VA Milo Wilson, Ph.D. Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir This roundtable discussion will focus on the impact of recent legislation focused on limiting transgender rights, specifically around use of gendered spaces. The discussion will include a brief overview of the current public policy landscape for transgender rights and focused discussion. The focused discussion will address barriers to providing trans-specific healthcare, methods for improving clinical practice, and generally strengthening knowledge, awareness, and skills for working with gender diverse individuals. Participants will have the opportunity to share effective, culturally-responsive practice and advocacy strategies, and to generate innovative strategies to improve trans-affirming healthcare in their practice setting. Roundtable: Transitioning and Trans* Grief and Loss: Family, Social Support, Career, and Identity Chair: Mae-Lynn Germany - The University of Memphis Discussant(s): Anna Pederson - University of Memphis Presenters: Mae-Lynn Germany - The University of Memphis Anna Pederson - University of Memphis Sara Bridges, Ph.D. - University of Memphis Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir In cultures emphasizing gender dualism, where rigid distinctions of male/female, man/woman, masculine/feminine prevail, individuals with more liminal, fluid identities may face greater societal disenfranchisement and stigmatization. Transgender individuals encounter unique losses while coming out and through transition. These losses may be external and tangible (e.g. career, relationships) as well as internal and intangible, such as the negotiation roles and parting with identities. We seek to address how practitioners can identify and support the ambiguous nature of trans* loss and disenfranchised grief. Symposium: The “B” is not Silent: Discrimination, Internalization, and Bisexuality Identity. Chair: Christopher Davids, Ph.D. - Westminster College Presenter: Christopher Davids, Ph.D. - Westminster College Room: Columbia The purpose of this symposium is to highlight recent research findings related to bisexuality and mental health. The three presentations that were included examine bisexuality from the perspectives of discrimination, internalization of sociocultural beliefs, and the identity development process. The first presentation included examines factors that determine which sexual identity labels are chosen by individuals. The second presenter will address monosexism and biphobia. Our final presenter will present on disordered eating among bisexual women in the context of antibiseuxal discrimination. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Advocate for the inclusion of bisexual individuals 2. Explain the relationship between bisexuality, discrimination, and mental health 3. Critique social structures that inhibit the wellbeing of bisexual individuals 55 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Friday, January 6, 2017 Symposium: Leadership and Diversity: Unspoken Challenges Chair: Linda Forrest, Ph.D. - University of Oregon Presenters: Linda Forrest, Ph.D. - University of Oregon Cirleen DeBlaere, Ph.D. - Georgia State University Amber Hewitt, Ph.D. - University of Akron Y. Barry Chung, Ph.D. - University of Indiana Candice Crowell, Ph.D. - University of Kentucky Room: Portland This symposium focuses on the intersection of leadership and diversity. Intersectionality and hierarchies of privilege/oppression among us create special, often unspoken, leadership challenges, many of which are not adequately covered in the psychology literature. Yet within psychology, there are bold and initial attempts (e.g., feminist, diversity, adaptive) to bring multicultural understandings to leadership theory and research. The three presentations focus on different leadership challenges seen through diversity lenses. (1) Using qualitative content analysis, we will present data on contextual factors that influence the leadership development of participants who have completed a Leadership Academy. (2) Using an intersectionality framework, we will describe leader strategies for how to navigate conflict and confrontation with a special focus on moments when leaders are afraid. (3) By highlighting practical strategies used by prominent psychologists, we will speak to the challenges that people of color experience when they seek high-level leadership positions in university settings. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Describe three contextual variables that influence leadership development after receiving leadership training with a diversity focus 2. Articulate three strategies for dealing with your own leadership fears when facilitating conflict emerging in groups with different perspectives and diverse identities 3. Explain three unique leadership challenges that people of color experience Symposium: Examining Identity within Affinity Groups as a Precursor for Inter-Group Dialogue Chair: Michele Ribeiro, Ed.D. - Counseling and Psychological Services, Oregon State University Discussant(s): Brandi Douglas, M.Ed. - Oregon State University/University Housing and Dining Services Presenters: Michele Ribeiro, Ed.D. - Counseling and Psychological Services, Oregon State University Brandi Douglas, M.Ed. - Oregon State University/University Housing and Dining Services Shaznin Daruwalla, Psy.D. – CAPS, Oregon State University Amarah Khan, Ph.D. - Diversity and Cultural Engagement, Oregon State University Charlene Martinez - Integrated Learning for Social Change, Oregaon State University Jesseanne Pope, BS - Women’s Center, Oregon State University Room: Pearl When students are able to understand racial identity development, socialization processes and liberation opportunities, they are left to feel more empowered and move toward action rather than emotions that immobilize change. This session will provide a lens for how social justice retreats have given awareness, knowledge and skills to graduate and undergraduate students as they move from shame and pain to advocates for social change. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. List theories and models that guide the focus of the different social justice retreats. 2. Compare the difference and similarities in themes of each retreat. 3. Explain outcomes that were correlated to attending the social justice retreats. Symposium: Integrated Care for Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Students within the University Health System – Identifying Next Steps for Your University Chair: Laura Alie, Psy.D. Discussant(s): lore dickey, Ph.D. – Louisiana Tech University Presenters: Laura Alie, Psy.D. lore dickey, Ph.D. – Louisiana Tech University Kerrie Wilkins, M.A. Stacie Rowan, Ph.D. Karen Williams, Ph.D. Anna Harte, M.D. Room: Salons A-B This symposium will highlight three models of care for transgender/gender nonconforming (TGNC) college students currently implemented at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Oregon, and Cornell University which utilize multidisciplinary teams including medical doctors, nurse practitioners, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, health promotion departments, student health insurance, campus housing, and campus and community partners. Presenters will share how counseling services NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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Friday January 6, 2017 collaborate with primary care to assess and provide letters for hormones and surgery. Assessment protocols and sample letters will be provided. A discussion of the current level of TGNC health care at audience participants’ universities will allow for participants to identify avenues for increasing services to this population on their campuses (e.g. navigating student health insurance plans, collaborating with campus and community providers, campus housing and financial concerns, administrative barriers, name and gender change within the electronic medical record, etc.). At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 1. Describe terms related to TGNC identities and the psychosocial and medical issues TGNC students face. 2. Describe multiple components of a comprehensive, integrated TGNC Care Team within a University Health Service. 3. Assess their own university’s level of TGNC Care and identify next steps toward improving that care.

1:30 PM – 3:30 PM The Mask You Live In This film considers the impact that masculinity standards have on our society. The identity challenges of boys and men, through a close up look at how race, class, and gender intersect in their lives, are the focus. 2015, 90 minutes, The Representation Project. Room: Salon I 2:40 PM – 3:30 PM Roundtable: The Burden of Mental Illness: Let’s Talk About Mental Health Privilege Chair: Navneet Thind, M.A., M.Ed. - University of Houston Discussant(s): Navneet Thind, M.A., M.Ed. - University of Houston, Jennifer Wang-Hall - University of Houston Presenters: Navneet Thind, M.A., M.Ed. - University of Houston Jennifer Wang-Hall - University of Houston Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst The theme of this roundtable discussion is mental health privilege. Conversation regarding mental health privilege is already in progress on social media. However, there has been no formal discussion about this topic in the field of Psychology. The purpose of this 50-minute discussion is to initiate dialogue about the marginalization of individuals with mental illness, and to inform others of how this “invisible” illness can affect individuals on a day to day basis. Facilitators will pose questions to the attendees, and attendees will engage in discussion. Facilitators will also provide attendees with a mental health checklist that they have developed as an example and ask for comments. Ultimately, attendees will be able to identify, develop, and discuss examples of mental health privilege. Roundtable: The experience of cultural difference in psychoanalytic psychotherapy Chair: Jenny Holcomb, M.A., M.A. Presenters: Jenny Holcomb, M.A., M.A. - Rosemead School of Psychology/Biola University Christina Kim, Ph.D. - Biola University Melanie Taylor, Psy.D. - Biola University Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst This roundtable discussion will address the topic of the therapists’ experience of applying psychodynamic, psychoanalytic theory and technique in multicultural contexts. Findings from a recent qualitative study on this topic will be briefly presented, followed by discussion amongst attendees. The goal is to exchange ideas and further the dialogue around the topic of psychoanalytic psychotherapy in multicultural contexts, with the hopes of promoting further research and possibly creating collaborative working groups. Roundtable: The Pearls & Perils of a Diversity Committee: A Dissemination Dialogue Chair: Karen Suyemoto, Ph.D. - University of Massachusetts Boston Presenters: Karen Suyemoto, Ph.D. - University of Massachusetts Boston Natalie Arbid, BA - University of Massachusetts Boston Keira O’Donovan - University of Massachusetts, Boston Devon Oosting - University of Massachusetts Boston Lauren Page Wadsworth - University of Massachusetts Boston Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst 57 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Friday, January 6, 2017 This roundtable draws on 15 years of experience, presenting benefits and barriers of developing and maintaining a diversity committee in a doctoral training program. While diversity committees can be spaces of personal growth and emotional support, engaging in difficult dialogues and attempting to address problematic diversity climate issues have inherent challenges. Facilitators will describe a successful model for a diversity committee; reflect on lessons learned from the process of developing and maintaining a diversity committee; and consider benefits and barriers experienced by students and faculty, both White and people of color. We will then facilitate discussion focused on sharing experiences of having a diversity committee and address questions regarding developing a diversity committee in different programs and institutional settings with attention to diversity climate. Our aim in our own diversity committee and in this session is to contribute to greater multicultural responsiveness and social justice in psychology training. Roundtable: Lessons Learned- Diverse Pathways to Success Chair: Marcos Briano, Ph.D. - Pasadena City College Presenters: Marcos Briano, Ph.D. - Pasadena City College Paul-Roy Taylor Sheena M. Turner-August, Ph.D. Saimir Thano, Ph.D. - California State University, Northridge Room: Hawthorn-Belmont-Laurelhurst What happens after graduate school? This relatively benign question is riddled with a multitude of answers and various professional trajectories. For many recent graduates, transitioning from a student role to an early career professional can be a daunting and uncertain process. Everyone is faced with the task of making “calculated” or “purposeful” decisions, in an effort to achieve a vision of being “successful.” Is success merely a measurement of the number of peer-reviewed journal publications, professional titles, income, lucrative practice, honors/awards, or affiliations with psychology associations? This forum will provide an open, introspective and frank dialogue about this transition process from the perspective of recent graduates who are amidst their own transition process. Join us for an interactive dialogue in learning from our lessons learned through personal experiences and be prepared to engage in a conversation, in which you can voice your own questions/concerns. Roundtable: Feminist Constructivist Grounded Theory for Social Justice Research Chair: Alexis Arczynski, Ph.D. - University of Oklahoma Discussant(s): Sue Morrow, Ph.D. - University of Utah Presenters: Alexis Arczynski, Ph.D. - University of Oklahoma Sue Morrow, Ph.D. - University of Utah Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Grounded theory methodology has been found to be appropriate for implementation in feminist, multicultural, and social justice research. In this roundtable discussion, cofacilitators and participants will look back to move forward into a more contemporary and feminist research perspective that is relevant to feminist, multicultural, and social justice-oriented research agendas. To accomplish this task, we offer background information on a feminist constructivist paradigm and constructivist grounded theory methods; provide case examples to illustrate the application of feminist constructivist grounded theory methods in data collection and analysis; and facilitate discussion focused on the rewards and challenges of engaging in feminist constructivist qualitative research as well as the possible solutions to surmount challenges faced when conducting feminist constructivist qualitative research. Roundtable: “Hey, Guys!” and Ladies, gals, women, womyn, and sisters: Examining contemporary language use among feminists Chair: Kayoko Yokoyama, Ph.D. Discussant(s): Stephanie Phan, M.A. - John F. Kennedy University Presenters: Kayoko Yokoyama, Ph.D. - JFK University Stephanie Phan, M.A. - John F. Kennedy University Catherine Hsieh, Ph.D. - University of California Irvine Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Ladies, gals, guys, women, womyn, bitch, and sisters – How do you refer to yourself and other feminists? What are your preferences regarding such terms and how has your consciousness around these labels evolved over time? This roundtable discussion will focus on the modern use of feminist language and explore meanings that feminists associate with specific terms. Alice Walker sagely pointed out how contemporary women often use greetings such as “Hey guys” when addressing other women and the implicit silencing of femininity and invisibility of such language (Bilger, 2002). The concept for this roundtable discussion evolved from discussion among Asian Pacific American feminists on the APA Division 35 (Section 5) listserv and the yearning to be more intentional about using inclusive and welcoming language. We hope to invite other feminists of color, as well as White feminist allies, to this discussion.

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Friday January 6, 2017 Roundtable: Political Analysis: Cornerstone of Feminist Multicultural Counseling Chair: Sue Morrow, Ph.D. - University of Utah, Donna Hawxhurst, Ph.D. - Women’s Resource Center, University of Utah Presenters: Sue Morrow, Ph.D. - University of Utah Donna Hawxhurst, Ph.D. - Women’s Resource Center, University of Utah Room: Meadowlark-DouglasFir Feminist therapy has often been described as a philosophy, as opposed to a set of techniques. Although it is indeed a philosophy (or, rather, a set of political/ philosophical premises), it is much more. Multicultural counseling has developed a number of important strategies that are still growing in number and sophistication. The facilitators of this roundtable have over 40 years’ experience and training in feminist multicultural counseling and psychotherapy, including articles about FMT and about feminist political analysis as a cornerstone of feminist multicultural counseling and psychotherapy. The roundtable format will consist of a brief presentation of the model developed by the presenters of an empowerment model of feminist political analysis, a short workshop-type exercise for participants, followed by open discussion among attendees. The roundtable will “look back to move forward” by identifying the barriers to and evolution of FMT. Roundtable: From Police Harassment to Systemic Injustice: The Manifestation of Microaggressions and Overt Discrimination in the Criminal Justice System Chair: Kevin Nadal, Ph.D.- City University of New York Presenters: Tanya Erazp, M.A., CASAC-T - CUNY Graduate Center & CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice Chassitty Whittman, M.A. - John Jay College of Criminal Justice Lindsey Davis, M.A. - John Jay College of Criminal Justice Room: Eugene This roundtable will address the various types of microaggressions that may exist in the criminal justice system; panelists will focus on issues related to race; sexual orientation; gender identity; and the intersection of them all. Roundtable: The mental health implications of prisons: What can history tell us about the future of our systems of incarceration? Chair: Jasmine Jenkins Discussant(s): Lindsay Krause, Stephanie Shiffler Presenters: Jasmine Jenkins Lindsay Krause - University of Georgia Stephanie Shiffler - University of Georgia Room: Eugene The purpose of this round table is to utilize our mental health framework and what we know about the history of prisons to discuss the best solutions for the future of our criminal justice system. In 1790, The United States developed its first prison, the Eastern State Penitentiary, which served to remove criminal offenders from the community. Subsequently, incarceration has served many purposes: (1) harsh punishment (2) isolated time for sinners to find religion (3) rehabilitation (4) detainment for undocumented individuals and (5) housing for individuals suffering from mental illnesses. There are more individuals suffering from mental illnesses in prison than there are in psychiatric hospitals (Davis, 2003). For many, being placed in a confined space with limited resources exacerbates mental illnesses. As psychologists in training, we provide therapeutic interventions for adjudicated youth; therefore we personally witness the detrimental impact of confinement and aspire to positively transform the prison system. Symposium: Cultural Mentoring for Native Americans: Imparting Authentic Identity, Values, and Ethics Chair: Wendy Peters, Ph.D. - The NETT, Ltd.. Presenters: Wendy Peters, Ph.D. - The NETT, Ltd. Melinda A Garcia, Ph.D. Julii Green, Ph.D. - Clinical Psy.D. Program/CSPP at Alliant International University Room: Pearl The “Reservation to Graduation” (R2G) mentoring project was developed to address Native student retention and mitigate attrition. The R2G project took an indigenous approach to serving the unique needs of Native students by providing culturally adapted mentoring and by creating an ad hoc community sustained through peer support and the inclusion of exemplars who could model cultural strengths in relation to identity, values, and ethics. As fundamental cornerstones of Native culture, these elements are crucial to the successful development of Native students who aspire to become Native scholars and not merely scholars who happen to be ethnically Native. Program evaluation and feedback from the students after the first gathering was extremely positive and affirmed that R2G was not only well received, but also making a difference. Key findings and outcomes will be shared by the panelists. At the conclusion of the symposium, you will be able to: 59 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Friday, January 6, 2017 1. 2. 3. 4.

List 4 significant differences between indigenous approaches to mentoring and Western approaches to mentoring. Describe the developmental model in an indigenous approach to mentoring. Identify 3 major risk points for indigenous students in graduate programs. Describe 3 important ways that R2G addresses those risk factors.

Symposium: Learning from the margins: Looking forward in LGBTQQ+ psychology training Chair: Theodore Burnes, Ph.D. - Antioch University Presenters: Theodore Burnes, Ph.D. - Antioch University Jeanne Stanley, Ph.D. - Watershed Counseling and Consultation Services Anneliese Singh, Ph.D. - University of Georgia Konjit Page, Ph.D. - University of San Francisco lore dickey, Ph.D. – Louisiana Tech University Daniel Walinsky, Ph.D. - Salem State University Kate Richmond, Ph.D. - Muhlenberg College Luke Allen, M.A. - University of Missouri, Kansas City Room: Portland Current theory in psychology has noted that training future mental health researchers and practitioners on issues of sexual orientation and gender identity is changing. Further, women and people of color are often stigmatized by multiple levels of oppression; as such, the need for scholarship that highlights how educators address issues within their pedagogy that utilizes sex-positive, feminist, multicultural frameworks is high. Given this need, the presenters of this symposium answer calls for mental health research and practitioners to understand contemporary strategies for teaching LGBTQ psychology in various settings. One presentation team will present a comprehensive theoretical and historical framework about teaching LGBTQ psychology from a feminist multicultural framework. Another presentation team will help attendees learn about ways to use community-based learning strategies in teaching about gender and gender identity. A third presentation team will discuss future recommendations for training that centralizes the experiences of training for people of color.

3:30 PM – 3:45 PM Break 3:45 PM – 5:45 PM Town Hall and Closing Ceremonies Room: Salon E-F Share your experiences and reflections with all NMCS participants and then witness the transfer process from NMCS 2017 to the NMCS 2019 Coordinators.

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KEYNOTE SPEAKERS Rosie Phillips Bingham, Ph.D., ABPP, is Vice President for Student Affairs and Professor of Counseling Psychology at the University of Memphis. She has been in this position since 2003 and has articulated a division mission of “Students Learning through Engagement and Involvement.” She earned a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology/Education from Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, Illinois and earned a Master of Arts degree in Counseling and Guidance and a doctorate in Counseling Psychology from The Ohio State University. Her primary practical and scholarly passions are: the power of inclusion; multicultural vocational psychology; ethics; and living well in a diverse society. She currently serves on the American Psychological Association Finance Committee. She previously served on the American Psychological Association Board of Directors and is past President of the Society of Counseling Psychology (17). She was Co-Chair of the Council of Student Affairs Board for the Association of Public and Land Grant Universities where she urged Vice Presidents to make assessment an essential part of the work in Student Affairs. She has served on the editorial boards of several journals, including current service on the Journal of Career Assessment, and is the author of numerous articles and book chapters on career counseling and has co-edited two books. She is a founding board member of the Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis where she served as Chair of the Board for two years. Her awards include the Janet E. Helms Award for Mentoring and Scholarship, the Authur S. Holman Lifetime Achievement Award, the Charles and Shirley Thomas Award Division 45 (2004), the Dalmas A. Taylor Award, The National Multicultural Conference Certificate of Appreciation (2007), The APA Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Issues (2007), and the Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis Legend’s Award. Dr. Bingham has received an APA Presidential Citation, was named an Elder by the National Multicultural Conference and Summit, and received the NASPA Pillar of the Profession Award in 2015, and the Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice for APA Award, 2015. She, along with Drs. Lisa Porche-Burke, Derald Wing Sue and Melba Vasquez, is a founder of the National Multicultural Conference and Summit. Bingham is the proud daughter of Savanah and Jake Phillips, a former sanitation worker who participated in the sanitation strike in which Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in 1968. She is married to John Davis and is mother to Michael Akil Davis.

Lisa Porché-Burke, Ph.D., is known internationally as a leader, educator, and expert on program development, multiculturalism, and recruitment and retention of students and faculty of color. Her previous experience includes being the President and CEO of the Phillips Graduate Institute and the California Family Counseling Center (Encino, CA). Dr. Porché-Burke is the first African American woman to earn a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Notre Dame University. After receiving her doctorate, she embraced the concept of diversity and became passionately committed to developing educational programs and services for diverse and multicultural populations. She was a member of the APA Multicultural Guidelines Task Force and the APA Task Force on Diversity in Course Content, Publications, and Training Programs. Dr. Porché-Burke is a founding member of APA’s Division 45 and the National Multicultural Conference and Summit where she served on the coordinating team of the first three Summits.

Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology and Education in the Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology at Teachers College and the School of Social Work, Columbia University. He was the co-founder of the National Multicultural Conference and Summit, co-founder and first President of the Asian American Psychological Association, past presidents of the Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity and Race, and the Society of Counseling Psychology. Derald has served as Editor of the Journal for Counseling and Development, Associate Editor of the American Psychologist, Editorial Board Member to The Counseling Psychologist, Asian American Journal of Psychology, Asian Journal of Counselling, and serves on the Council of Elders for Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. Derald is a pioneer in the field of multicultural psychology, microaggression theory, racial dialogues, multicultural counseling and therapy, and the psychology of racism/antiracism. He is author of four best-selling texts: (1) COUNSELING THE CULTURALLY DIVERSE: THEORY AND PRACTICE, (2) OVERCOMING OUR RACISM: THE JOURNEY TO LIBERATION, (3) MICROAGGRESSIONS IN EVERYDAY LIFE: RACE, GENDER AND SEXUAL ORIENTATION, and (4) RACE TALK AND THE CONSPIRACY OF SILENCE: UNDERSTANDING AND FACILITATING DIFFICULT DIALOGUES ON RACE. The former has been identified as the most frequently cited publication in the multicultural field and used by nearly 70% of the graduate counseling psychology market. His microaggression book was awarded the 2010 National Diversity and Inclusion Book Prize from UnityFirst.com and Forbes Diversity. 61 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


Because of a personal life-changing experience with racism directed toward his family, Derald’s research direction evolved into the study of the psychology of racism and antiracism. When he was invited to address President Clinton’s Race Advisory Board on the National Dialogue on Race and participated in a congressional briefing on the Psychology of Racism and the Myth of the Color-Blind Society, Derald realized that the invisibility of whiteness and ethnocentric monoculturalism were harmful not only to People of Color, but Whites as well. His services have been widely sought by many groups and organizations. He has also done extensive cultural diversity training for many Fortune 500 companies, institutions of higher education, governmental agencies, public schools, and mental health organizations. In that capacity, Derald has worked with mental health practitioners, university faculty, teachers, students, community leaders, senior executives, and middle-level managers. He serves on the Advisory Board of the MTV Look Different Campaign, which has created antiracism TV programs to educate millennials about microaggressions and to facilitate dialogues on race. His work is recognized not only on a national level, but on an international one as well. He has worked with UNESCO on their Teaching Respect for All that uses education to combat racism and xenophobia in countries like Asia, Africa, Europe, South America and the Middle East. As evidence of Dr. Sue's stature in the field, two studies of multicultural publications and scholars concluded, Impressively, Derald Wing Sue is without doubt the most influential multicultural scholar in the United States today. On a more personal note, he is blessed to have a loving life partner, two outstanding adult children, and two bright, talented, and compassionate granddaughters.

Melba J.T. Vasquez, Ph.D., ABPP, is in independent practice in Austin, Texas. The most exciting, humbling and intimidating period in her career was when she served as President of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2011) She is the first Latina and woman of color of 120 presidencies of APA to serve in that role. Her theme for the 2011 APA convention was social justice. Her special presidential initiatives included examination of psychology’s contributions to the grand challenges in society, including immigration, discrimination, and educational disparities; three very hard working task forces produced the reports: • Crossroads: The Psychology of Immigration in the New Century (APA, 2012a); • Pathways to a Better America: Preventing Discrimination and Promoting Diversity, (APA, 2012b); • Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Education: Psychology’s Contributions to Understanding and Reducing Disparities (APA, 2012c). Dr. Vasquez also served a term on the APA Board of Directors. She is a former president of the Texas Psychological Association (TPA) and of Divisions 35 (Society of Psychology of Women) and 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology) of the APA. She is a co-founder of APA Division 45, Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, and of the National Multicultural Conference and Summit. She is a Fellow of twelve Divisions of the APA and holds the Diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP). She obtained her doctorate in counseling psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1978. Before becoming a psychologist, she taught middle school. She is a coauthor of five editions of Ethics in Psychotherapy & Counseling: A Practical Guide (with Ken Pope). She is also co-author of How to Survive and Thrive as a Therapist: Information, Ideas and Resources for Psychologists in Practice; and of the APA Ethics Code Commentary and Case Illustrations. Dr. Vasquez has also published over 50 book chapters and 35 journal articles in the areas of professional ethics, ethnic minority psychology, psychology of women, counseling and psychotherapy, and supervision and training. She has been honored with over 45 awards for distinguished professional contributions, career service, leadership, advocacy, and mentorship, some of the most recent include: • The Leona Tyler Award, APA Division 17, 2015; • Distinguished Elder, National Multicultural Conference and Summit, 2015; • Distinguished Alumni, Texas State University, 2014; • Raymond D. Fowler Award for Outstanding Contributions to APA, 2014. • Asuncion Miteria Austria and John Robinson Distinguished Mentoring Award, APA Division 45, 2013; • Distinguished Professional Career Award from the National Latina/o Psychological Association, 2012; • Carolyn Wood Sheriff Award, APA Division 35, 2010. She is married to Jim H. Miller, a big supporter of her career; she very much values the full support of her friends and extended family, including her stepdaughter, mother, 6 siblings and their families. She is grateful that despite having only elementary educations, both her parents were politically involved at the grassroots level, engaged in civil rights activities, and articulated a strong belief in and support for education. She appreciates that they guided her into productive, social justice advocacy all her life.

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EARLY CAREER PSYCHOLOGIST PANEL Dr. Carlton E. Green earned his Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology, as well as dual Masters degrees in Mental Health Counseling and Pastoral Ministry, from Boston College. At BC, he was an active member of the Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture, where he was engaged in scholarship and consultation pertaining to race and culture, supervision, and trauma. Dr. Green’s dedication to diversity and inclusion facilitated his appointment as the Multicultural Post-doctoral Fellow in Counseling and Psychological Services at the University of Houston, the second most racially and ethnically diverse institution in the country. Dr. Green is currently a staff psychologist in his 4th year at the University of Maryland Counseling Center. Carlton is also a member of the historic Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, VA. There, he serves in the AGAPE Mental Health Ministry, which provides mental health counseling, outreach, and referrals to church members. Dr. Green is also an active member in the Society of Counseling Psychology, and he also serves as the co-chair of the Committee on Racial and Ethnic Diversity for Division 44. Recently, Carlton was awarded the 2016 Division of Student Affairs Outstanding Service Award at the University of Maryland. Additionally, he received the 2016 Diversity Mentorship Scholarship from the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies (ACCTA). The scholarship program aims to increase diversity among counseling center training directors and to enhance the ACCTA’s members’ knowledge about diversity issues. Dr. Mira Krishnan completed her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Florida in 2009, her clinical internship in neuropsychology at the University of Chicago 2008-2009, and her fellowship in neuropsychology at Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital 2009-2011. She completed ABPP in clinical neuropsychology in 2013, and she is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Michigan State University. Mira spent most of the last five years building an interdisciplinary autism evaluation and treatment center. In 2016, she created a hybrid private practice / firm providing consultative, education and training, and clinical services. At APA, she is co-chair of the Division 44 Committee for Transgender People and Gender Diversity and a part of the Division 35 Taskforce for Gender Inclusivity. She is also a Board Member of Equality Michigan, a statewide organization promoting LGBTQIA+ equality, and Board Advisor to the Association of Children’s Residential Centers, where she has co-authored two position papers on treating youth in residential settings. Dr. Melissa Tehee is a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. She is an assistant professor at Utah State University in the department of Psychology and Director of the American Indian Support Project. Dr. Tehee earned dual degrees in Clinical Psychology, Policy, and Law (Ph.D./J.D.) with a certificate in Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy at the University of Arizona. She completed her predoctoral internship at the University of California San Diego and San Diego VA consortium. Dr. Tehee has a Master of Science in Psychology from Western Washington University and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of Nebraska. Dr. Tehee’s clinical and research interests are in addressing trauma across the life span in diverse populations. Her research has focused on racism, domestic violence, and other trauma experienced by ethnic and racial minorities, especially American Indians. Her interdisciplinary training allows her to consider the convergence of these topics with law and policy. Other interests include the dissonance of the APA ethics code with culture, multicultural competence, and mentoring. Currently Dr. Tehee serves on the executive committee for Division 45 as the Member at Large, Native American Slate. She is also an active member of the Society of Indian Psychologists, serves on the executive council, is chair of the mentoring committee, and is co-coordinator of the annual convention. Dr. Kevin Leo Yabut Nadal is an award-winning scholar/activist who received his doctorate in counseling psychology from Columbia University. Currently, he is the Executive Director of the CLAGS: The Center for LGBTQ Studies at the City University of New York (CUNY), as well as an Associate Professor of psychology at both John Jay College of Criminal Justice and GC- CUNY. He is one of the leading researchers in understanding the impacts of microaggressions, or subtle forms of discrimination, on the mental and physical health of people of color; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people; and other marginalized groups. He has published over 90 works on multicultural issues in the fields of psychology and education. A California-bred New Yorker, he was named one of People Magazine’s hottest bachelors in 2006; he once won an argument with Bill O’Reilly on Fox News Channel’s “The O’Reilly Factor”; and he was even once a Hot Topic on ABC’s “The View”. He has been featured in the New York Times, Buzzfeed, Huffington Post, PBS, the Weather Channel, the History Channel, HGTV, Philippine News, The Filipino Channel, and Filipinas Magazine. He is the author of seven books including Filipino American Psychology: A Handbook of Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice and That’s So Gay: Microaggressions and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Community. He is the President of the Asian American Psychological Association, a National Trustee of the Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS), and a co-founder of the LGBTQ Scholars of Color Network. He has received the Early Career Award for Contributions to Excellence by the Asian American Psychological Association, the Emerging Professional Award for Research from the American Psychological Association Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity and Race, and the Early Career Award for Research from the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program. Finally, he is the host of Out Talk with Dr. Kevin Nadal, a talk show focusing on social justice issues in the US. 63 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


DISTINGUISHED ELDERS One of the hallmark features of the NMCS is the Elders ceremony, where we take time to honor a select group of individuals for their 30+ years of commitment and contribution to the development and advancement of multiculturalism in psychology. As teachers, practitioners, scholars, mentors, and advocates, these individuals have spent their professional lives promoting diversity interests and have been devoted to the causes that we value as culturally competent professionals. We are so honored to recognize the following individuals for their professional accomplishments, and we thank them for their tireless efforts to improving psychological research and practice. Dr. Fran Trotman is retired Professor of the graduate department of Psychological Counseling at Monmouth University and continues to practice therapy. She was a vocal activist during the 60s and 70s who was incarcerated for her work against injustice! While completing her second masters and then a PhD in Counseling Psychology at Columbia University, she worked as a Guidance Counselor in New Jersey. Dr. Trotman’s work with school children inspired her dissertation research on race, class, gender, and IQ with an unprecedented all female sample which was published in the Journal of Educational Psychology in 1977 and is still widely used as required in graduate and undergraduate courses. Dr. Trotman’s interest in the social, emotional, cognitive, and academic adjustment of children, adolescents, and college students has remained and she co-authored two books on these topics: Promoting academic resilience in multicultural America: Factors affecting students’ success in 2004 and A focus on hope: 50 resilient students speak in 2011. She was the first African American to be tenured in her entire institution until 2011. As chair of the psychology department, Dr. Trotman developed three graduate degree programs: Masters of Arts in Counseling Psychology, the post Masters Certificate, and the Masters of Science in Mental Health Counseling which was the first CACREP-accredited mental health program in the state of New Jersey. As a teacher and mentor Dr. Trotman is known for exposing her students to a variety of cultural experiences to help them build multicultural competence as part of their graduate school training. Her dedication to promoting health and well-being more generally lead her to found and direct her university’s Center for Human and Community Wellness. As a feminist and multiculturalist scholar, Dr. Trotman pioneered the expansion of psychotherapy to be accessible to people from a variety of backgrounds and addressed issues of intersectionality even before the term became in vogue in the literature. She has written extensively about psychotherapy with Black women, addressing stressors commonly experienced such as racism, sexism, and the imposter syndrome. She extended her focus to age and ageism and published her third, co-edited, book, Psychotherapy and counseling with older women: crosscultural, family, and end-of-life issues, in 2001. Finally, she extended her interest in women and aging cross-culturally and conducted a series of presentations on Chinese women and aging at various institutions in China in 2013. Her nominator, Louise Silverstein aptly wrote about her work to make mental health counseling careers through the graduate programs she built accessible to a diverse body of students: “I was amazed at the courage she showed in having a dream, and then confronting the systemic barriers that emerged as she tried to realize that dream”. Dr. Natalie Porter is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology, which is part of Alliant International University. Dr. Porter grew up in Florida and lived through the Jim Crow south, which deeply affected her perspectives on injustice and unfair treatment. She was fortunate to have a mother who racially socialized her not to follow the attitudes and behaviors of some of her peers. During middle and high school she read books such as Letters from Mississippi and the Autobiography of Malcolm X and these works shaped her thinking about oppression. Dr. Porter’s early activism and advocacy in the 1970s for the poor, Black workers, and registered voters in the South was fueled by outrage against inequities. Her commitment to working with and supporting the oppressed has not abated since that very early work. Dr. Porter is a feminist and multicultural psychologist who has been a pioneer in her scholarship, teaching, and practice: her work as an activist-scholar is phenomenal. She earned the first Edwin B. Newman Psi Chi Graduate Research Award for her work titled Are Women Invisible Leaders? in 1978. She co-developed the first feminist code of ethics through the Feminist Therapy Institute, which she also co-founded in 1988. Her early career work also includes chairing the Citizens for Human Rights and attempting to get LGB persons added as a protected class in the Lincoln, Nebraska charter. Dr. Porter’s pioneering scholarship includes the first models of feminist, antiracist, and multicultural supervision in clinical work. At the University of New Mexico she developed an APA accredited multicultural internship for children and families and became the program’s first director. As Dean at the California School for Professional Psychology, she started the MA program in Japan in partnership with Japanese feminists to address the needs of women in Japan. Finally, Dr. Porter developed, in her capacity as a visiting professor and with the support of psychology faculty from African institutions, an Afrocentric psychology program at Tubman University in Harper, Liberia. Dr. Porter recently wrote, “I continue[d] writing, lecturing, organizing, and teaching about these multicultural and feminist concerns at the University of New Mexico and to this very day at CSPP. They are the core of all I have worked for and achieved in psychology and hopefully passed on to generations of students”.

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Dr. Linda M. Forrest is Professor Emeritus at the University of Oregon, Eugene and a Fellow of APA through all four host divisions of NMCS: 17, 35, 44, & 45. Her early multicultural and feminist scholarship in the 70s and 80s focused on two important social issues: rape and job opportunities for matriculating college women in local businesses. In 1998 she organized what is known as “the Michigan Conference” where women psychologists and graduate students convened to make feminist and multicultural perspectives, principals, and values a central theme as they examined 10 major topics in psychology including assessment, ethics, pedagogy etc. More recently, Dr. Forrest’s action oriented approach to expand psychology has lead to tangible changes in leadership in the American Psychological Association, to shifts in hiring practices at her university, and to more effective approaches to training and education in Counseling Psychology. These structural changes lead to lasting shifts in institutional culture that sustain diversity and inclusivity. Noteworthy is her work as Chair of the APA Ethics Committee in 2011 when she established a grant-funded with the Society of Indian Psychologists to better understand Native American perspectives on professional psychological ethics. At the time, this work was recognized by APA as a model for further initiatives between APA and the Ethnic Minority Psychological Associations. Dr. Forrest also demonstrated a commitment to internationalizing Counseling Psychology, when, as President of Division 17, she organized and convened the 2008 International Counseling Psychology Conference that included over 200 international scholars from developing and developed countries. While Dr. Forrest’s vitae boasts many awards indicating that she is widely recognized, her supporters note how humble she is; befitting of a scholar-activist whose focus is on promoting lasting change, not promoting herself. Dr. Forrest has also been a dedicated mentor, for which she has received awards, to graduate students in her department, helping to recruit and graduate students from marginalized groups (i.e., racial/ethnic minorities, LGBTQ, and women) at higher rates than other departments at her university. She epitomizes the ideal “White Ally” whose dedication to inclusiveness and diversity in psychology is truly admirable. Her nominator, Michael Mobley, said it best: “Her lifework quilt exemplifies the essence and intentions of the National Multicultural Conference and Summit”.

Dr. Ruth Fassinger is Professor Emerita in the Counseling Psychology program at the University of Maryland, College Park. She received her PhD in psychology from the Ohio State University in 1987 after a previous career in primary and secondary education. She worked as a staff psychologist and adjunct faculty member at both UC/Santa Barbara and Arizona State University before her tenure at the University of Maryland, and she continued her therapeutic work for more than 20 years in her independent therapy practice specializing in gender, work/career, and LGBT issues. At her institution, she was a Distinguished Scholar-Teacher and served in many leadership roles, including Director of the College of Education Honors Program, Director of the College Park Scholars Advocates for Children Program, and Chair of the (then) Department of Counseling and Personnel Services in the College of Education. Also an affiliate faculty member in Women’s Studies, she co-founded the Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity as well as the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies program. She mentored dozens of graduate and undergraduate students through her leadership and research, including an NSF-funded study of women in industrial chemistry. Dr. Fassinger left Maryland for the California Bay Area in 2008. She served as Dean of the College of Education at California State University, Stanislaus, where she oversaw 19 bachelors, masters, and doctoral programs on two campuses and at additional satellite locations, and then served as (founding) Dean of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies at John F. Kennedy University, where she oversaw 11 masters and doctoral programs across three campuses and managed three counseling centers that served the local communities. Most recently, she served as a Visiting Scholar at the American Psychological Association, where she completed a research project sponsored by the Science Directorate and the Women’s Programs Office aimed at documenting gender patterns in the psychology workforce. Currently, she maintains an independent practice in consulting, training, career/leadership coaching, writing, and providing research and evaluation assistance.

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RISING AND SHINING STARS Dr. Kevin Nadal received his BA in Psychology and Political Science from the University of California Irvine in 2000. He has two masters degrees in Counseling Psychology: an MA from Michigan State University and a Masters in Philosophy from Columbia University. He also earned his PhD in Counseling Psychology from Columbia in 2008. He is currently an Associate Professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate School at CUNY. His areas of research are microaggressions against LGBTQ+ communities and Filipino American psychology. Since getting his doctorate in 2008, he has published numerous articles authored several books including: Filipinos in New York City (2015), That’s So Gay! Microaggressions and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Community (2013), and Filipino American psychology: A handbook of theory, research, and clinical practice (2011). He has co-edited a book titled Women and Mental Disorders (2011) and edited a book titled Filipino American psychology: A collective of personal narratives (2010). Dr. Nadal has shared his expertise through media with articles appearing in the Huffington Post, Psychology Today, Buzzfeed, and the New York Times. He also has appeared on The O’Reilly Factor of FoxNews and in the PBS Documentary The Hidden Dream among other TV and web series appearances.

Dr. Nadine Nakamura earned her BA in Psychology with a specialization in Asian American Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1998. In 2007 she earned her doctorate in Clinical Psychology with a specialization in Health Psychology from The George Washington University. She is current an assistant professor in the department of psychology at the University of La Verne. She was awarded the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program Early Career Achievement Award in 2014. She served on APA’s Presidential Task Force on Immigration in 2011. Dr. Nakamura has published over 20 peer reviewed manuscripts and given over 50 refereed or invited presentations. Her areas of research are LGBTQ+ immigrants with a focus on same-sex binational couples and health risk-related behaviors. Dr. Nakamura is a highly regarded instructor in her department who has been described as “an expert lecturer who fosters critical thinking among her students by creating an atmosphere of support and safety”. In addition, she has been dissertation chair for 8 doctoral students and served as dissertation committee member for 9 doctoral students.

Dr. Y Barry Chung earned his BA from the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling at the National Taiwan Normal University in 1988. He earned his doctorate in Educational Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1996. He is currently a professor and training director of the counseling psychology doctoral program at Indiana University. In 2014 he received an APA Presidential citation for his scholarship in career development, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues, and multicultural counseling; and his exemplary leadership and service. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed journal articles, co-edited two books, written 18 book chapters, and delivered approximately 100 peerreviewed conference presentations. Most remarkable is his international engagement, delivering over 60 invited presentations: many of which were in Taiwan. In 2016 he was awarded the Excellent Contributions Award, International section from Division 17. He is an APA Fellow and also a Fellow of Divisions 17, 44 and 45 and the Asian American Psychological Association.

Dr. Debra Kawahara earned her BA in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and in 1994 earned her doctorate in clinical psychology with a focus on multicultural community from the California School of Professional Psychology. She is current Professor and Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at the California School of Professional Psychology. She also holds an adjunct faculty position at the CSPPHong Kong Clinical PsyD program. Dr. Kawahara is a feminist and multicultural scholar whose work centers on Asian American and Latina women in therapy. She is widely published and in 2018, she will be the first woman of color to be editor of the journal Women and Therapy. She is a Fellow of Divisions 35 and 45 and has been co-coordinator for NMCS several times. In 2015 she received Division 45’s Distinguished Career Contributions for Service Award and in 2012 she received Division 35’s Pioneer Award (Section 5, Asian Pacific Islanders Women). She has served as the chair of over 30 multicultural/clinical focused dissertation research projects and been a mentor to many aspiring multicultural psychologists. One such student who is now an assistant professor wrote “Dr. Kawahara encouraged students to speak their truth and embrace one another’s differences as well as become engaged in multicultural scholarship and activism”. NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017

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DISTINGUISHED ANCESTORS The Distinguished Ancestors Award, instituted at the 2007 National Multicultural Conference and Summit, recognizes deceased psychologists for their professional contributions in multicultural psychology through research, practice, training, and/or social advocacy. The Coordinators of the 2011 NMCS are pleased to honor the enduring contributions and legacy that the following individuals have made to the field of multicultural psychology. These individuals and their life’s work will never be forgotten.

Helin Stavridou Astin: 1932-2015 Dr. Astin was a Greek immigrant who came to the US at the age of 19 to attend Adelphi University. She earned a masters degree in psychology from Ohio University and a doctorate in psychology in 1957, only the second woman to do so at that time from the University of Maryland. Throughout her life, Dr. Astin maintained a strong Greek ethnic identity along with a committed womanist identity as evidenced by her work on women’s career development and higher education experiences. Dr. Astin dedicated her work to educational equity in a number of ways including as professor and mentor for 29 years at UCLA, as chair of APA’s Committee on Women in Psychology, as president of APA’s Division 35, as cofounder of UCLA’s Higher Education Research Institute, the Center for the Study of Women, and the Women’s Studies Program, and finally as author/co-author of several major books. Namely, the 1969 classic The Woman Doctorate in America, Higher Education and the Disadvantaged Student in 1972, Minorities in American Higher Education in 1982, Women of Influence, Women of Vision in 1991, and finally Cultivating the Spirit: How College Can Enhance Students’ Inner Lives in 2010. Along with her major contributions to multicultural psychology, Dr. Astin is also remembered as having a big heart and delivering the wonderfully warm greeting “Hello, my love”.

Phyllis Bronstein: 1939-2012 Dr. Bronstein, a New Yorker throughout her childhood, pursued her interest in Literature at the University of Michigan where she earned a BA in English and at Boston University where she earned a MA in Literature and Creative Writing. It was at Harvard University where she pursued her doctorate in Social Psychology: studying parenting in Mexico in collaboration with anthropologists Beatrice and John Whiting. Dr. Bronstein continued study, after earning her degree in social psychology, at Harvard Medical School gaining clinical psychology training and completing an internship in ethnicity and mental health. She spent more than 20 very productive years in the Department of Psychology at the University of Vermont focusing on several areas of research including child/adolescent development and sociocultural factors in parenting, multicultural and gender issues in the psychology curriculum, and sexist/racist/ageist practices (i.e., workplace discrimination) in academia and clinical work. She completed major works with collaborators in each area of research including the book Fatherhood Today: Men’s Changing Role in the Family in 1988, the APA publication Teaching a Psychology of People: Resources for Gender and Sociocultural Awareness in 1990 and the 2003 revision Teaching Gender and Multicultural Awareness: Resources for the Psychology Classroom, and a chapter in the book New Directions in Learning titled Ivory Halls and Glass Walls. Dr. Bronstein was the co-founder of the University of Vermont’s President’s Commission on the Status of Women, the Faculty Women’s Caucus, and a Faculty Mentoring Program.

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Giuseppe Costantino: 1937-2015 Dr. Constantino was an immigrant from Italy who came to the US on a Fulbright scholarship and dedicated his life’s work to the mental health of immigrant children and families, particularly Latino/ as. He earned a BA in Psychology from Baruch College, a MA in School Psychology from City College, and a PhD from New York University in Clinical/Community Psychology in 1975. Dr. Constantino spent almost 40 years working in a variety of head positions (i.e., chief psychologist, clinical director, Director of research, training and new programs) at the Sunset Park Family Health Center/New York University Langone Lutheran Medical Center. He also spent 25 years engaged in research at the Hispanic Research Center at Fordham University. His culturally appropriate interventions and assessments were groundbreaking and provided useful models for culturally sensitive clinical work with children, adolescents, and families. Dr. Constantino is recognized for his Cuento Therapies, the TEMAS (Tell-me-a-story) Assessment Method, and Hero/Heroine Therapy for adolescents.

James M. Croteau: 1957-2016 Dr. Croteau grew up Catholic in the south during the 1960s, which had a major influence on his worldview. With a strong and positive gay identity, he dedicated his career to LGBTQ topics including race and sexual orientation issues. Dr. Croteau earned his BA from Loyola University and his PhD in Counseling Psychology from Southern Illinois University. After working at Ithaca College’s Counseling Center for a short time, he settled in Kalamazoo, Michigan where he worked in the Department of Counseling Education and Counseling Psychology at Western Michigan University for over 20 years. He was honored for his extensive contribution to the literature on LGBTQ psychology as a Fellow of APA’s Divisions 17 & 44. More recently, Dr. Croteau published his social justice oriented poetry, which can be found on-line.

Out of Body by James Croteau On the day I told my mother I was gay, I sat near where the wall meets the ceiling and looked down at us talking In my studio apartment, first place I lived on my own Forty years later, I returned to that spot and looked down at her narrow last room on her last night.

Richard Henry Dana: 1927-2015 Dr. Dana was a student leader in the Congress of Racial Equality and engaged in several sitin protests in the 1940s before graduating from Princeton University in 1949. He completed his doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Illinois in 1953. While he worked at the University of Alabama for approximately 20 years, he produced major contributions to the field of multicultural psychology later in life while living in Portland, Oregon after retiring from the University of Alabama. Between 1993 and 2008, Dr. Dana authored/co-authored/edited five major works including: Understanding Cultural Identity in Intervention and Assessment; Handbook of Cross-Cultural and Multicultural Personality; Multicultural Assessment Principles, Applications, and Examples; and Cultural Competency Training in a Global Society.

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42 = Clinical + Business

Join our diverse community! Sign up now at division42.org Join now for 2017 and start using your member benefits immediately!

Division 42 Membership Includes: ❖ Mentoring ❖ Business ps from fellow Division 42 members ❖ CE workshops, webinars & conference calls ❖ Mastermind groups ❖ New Journal — Praccce Innovaaons …and much more!

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NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT LEGACY FUND DONOR LIST List as of 11/18/16

Up to $99

Apryl Alexander Batsirai Bvunzawabaya Jennifer Cornish Minority Collective, Clinical Psychology Program, Boston University Nadia T. Hasan Melanie M. Lantz Konjit V. Page Diana Prescott Bonnie Strickland Shihwe Wang Karen Wyche

$100- $499

Laura Alie Anonymous Alfiee Breland-Noble Lindsey R. Buckman Jean A. Carter Connie Chan David Chiriboga Joan Chrisler Alette Coble-Temple William Cross Candice Crowell Christopher Davids Kathleen H. Dockett Leticia Y. Flores Michi Fu BraVada M. Garret-Akinsanya Joseph Hammer Erin Hardin Arthur M. Horne Sharon Horne Phyllis Katz Debra M. Kawahara Jennifer Manly Sandra Mattar Tiffany O’Shaughnessy David Pantalone Julia Phillips Antonio Puente Jeffrey Ring David P. Rivera Shara Sand Peter Sheras Nathan Smith Teri Strong Pratyusha Tummala-Narra

$500- $999

APA Public Interest Caucus Laura Barbanel Linda Beckman Lisa Y. Flores Jo-Ida C. Hansen Cindy L. Juntunen Bonnie Markham Corann Okorodudu Sarah Shreeve Henry Tomes Reiko H. True

$1,000- $4,999

APA Division 44- Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Issues Assembly of Scientist-Practitioner Psychologists Nancy L. Baker Kimberly Balsam Lula Beatty Donald Bersoff Janis Bohan Sharon L. Bowman Laura S. Brown CASAP Caucus Armand R. Cerbone Y. Barry Chung Ayse Ciftci Jane Clement Terri M. Davis Changming Duan Nabil El-Ghoroury Ethnic Minority Caucus Martin Heesacker Barbara Henley Jane H. Jacobs Sue C. Jacobs Suzanne Bennett Johnson Antoinette Kavanaugh Gwendolyn P. Keita Gerald P. Koocher Jean Lau Chin Justin D. McDonald Richard McGraw Shari Miles-Cohen Michael Mobley John Moritsugu Helen Neville

Ruperto Perez Mark Pope Michael O. Ranney Beth N. Rom-Rymer Francisco J. Sanchez Stephanie Shields Kumea Shorter-Gooden Louise Silverstein Beatrice Tatem and Vivian Barnette Mary Wieneke Frank Worrell Women’s Caucus Roger L. Worthington Maria Cecilia Zea

$5,000- $9,999

2013 NMCS Coordinators APA Division 29 - Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy Kermit Crawford Jessica Henderson Daniel Michael L. Hendricks Jennifer Kelly Derald Wing Sue Beverly Daniel Tatum Melba J. T. Vasquez and Jim Miller

$10,000- $24,999

APA Division 17 - Society of Counseling Psychology APA Division 35 - Psychology of Women APA Division 45 - Society for Psych Study of Ethnic Minority Issues Norman B. Anderson Louise Douce Douglas C. Haldeman Kimberlyn Leary Olivia Moorehead-Slaughter

$25,000- $49,999

Rosie Phillips Bingham

73 NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL CONFERENCE AND SUMMIT 2017


2019 COORDINATING TEAM DAVID P. RIVERA, Ph.D. | Lead Coordinator

APA Division 44 Associate Professor, Counselor Education Queens College-City University of New York

KARLEE D. FELLNER, Ph.D. | Fundraising & Keynote Coordinator

APA Division 45 Assistant Professor, Indigenous Education Counseling Psychology University of Calgary

WENDI WILLIAMS, Ph.D. | Awards & Entertainment Coordinator

APA Division 35 Associate Dean of Academic Affairs Bank Street College of Education

JILL LEE-BARBER, Ph.D. | Programming Coordinator

APA Division 17 Senior Director of Psychological and Health Services Director of Training for Internship Georgia State University

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SPSSI is proud to support NMCS 2017! The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues or SPSSI generates, distributes, and applies social science knowledge to address societal problems and promote social justice. Founded in 1936, SPSSI is distinct in its commitment to the application of sound science to the development of effective social policy. SPSSI educates policymakers through unique advocacy activities that draw on the expertise of our members and their research. We also (a) foster policyrelevant research through awards and grants, (b) disseminate scientific advances through our highly-rated publications, (c) sponsor conferences, convention programs, and policy workshops, and (d) facilitate information exchange and dialogue between members, policymakers, and the public.

Some Membership Benefits Include

SPSSI Journals

 A community of scholars committed to social justice  Free subscription to SPSSI’s 3 journals: JSI, ASAP and SIPR  Discounts on SPSSI conference registration

 Eligibility to apply for grants, fellowships and awards  Access to policy & teaching resources including fact sheets, syllabi and event reports

Special offer for NMCS attendees! For NMCS attendees only! Visit www.spssi.org before Dec 15, 2016 to receive $20 off your first year with the code NMCS16.

www.spssi.org

|

www.spssitimeline.org

|

(202) 675-6956

Profile for Sherry Reisman

National Multicultural Conference and Summit  

Mission The National Multicultural Conference & Summit convenes scholars in our roles as educators, practitioners, researchers, and students...

National Multicultural Conference and Summit  

Mission The National Multicultural Conference & Summit convenes scholars in our roles as educators, practitioners, researchers, and students...

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