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YOUTH APPRENTICESHIP

MENTOR HANDBOOK A comprehensive guide for employers working with Madison high school youth apprentices

Prepared for MADISON AREA BUSINESSES

Contact Sherrie L. Stuessy Experiential Learning Coordinator Madison Metropolitan School District slstuessy@madison.k12.wi.us (608) 663-1978


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CONTACT INFORMATION

Sherrie L. Stuessy Experiential Learning Coordinator Madison Metropolitan School District 545 West Dayton Street, Room 124 Madison, WI 53703 slstuessy@madison.k12.wi.us (608) 663-1978 (608) 442-2149 (fax)

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TABLE OF CONTENTS What is the Youth Apprenticeship (YA) Program? ......................................................................... 1 How is YA Delivered In Madison? ....................................................................................................... 2 What are the State-Approved YA Areas? .......................................................................................... 3 What are the Benefits of Participating in YA? ................................................................................. 5 What are the Steps to Participate In YA? ......................................................................................... 7 How can I Successfully Mentor Students? ..................................................................................... 11 Working with students ......................................................................................................................... 11 Mentor-student relationships .............................................................................................................. 12 Communication strategies ................................................................................................................... 13 Mentor tips for communicating with students .............................................................................. 13 Legal requirements ................................................................................................................................ 14 Safe work environments....................................................................................................................... 15

Employer Resources ............................................................................................................................. 16 Appendix A: Education Training Agreement................................................................................. 17 Appendix B: Performance Evaluation Form ................................................................................... 19 Appendix C: Skill Standards Checklist ............................................................................................... 22

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WHAT IS THE YOUTH APPRENTICESHIP (YA) PROGRAM? Developed by the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Youth Apprenticeship (YA) is a nationally recognized program that offers high school juniors and seniors an opportunity to combine academic and technical instruction with paid, on-the-job learning through an industry-established curriculum. Upon completion, youth apprentices earn a Certificate of Occupational Proficiency in their chosen career cluster (see pages 3-4 for state-approved YA areas).

Technical Instruction

Academic Instruction

WorkBased Learning

Certificate of Occupational Proficiency Occupational, interpersonal and employability skills High school diploma In order to be successful in today’s society, all students need to chart their personalized pathway to college, career and community success. By expanding the walls of the classroom to include business, every student’s personalized pathway will lead to graduation with a post-secondary plan that could lead to an industry recognized certificate and/or licensure, an associate degree or baccalaureate degree and beyond. YA students will possess the tools necessary to be successful in an evolving and ever-changing economy.

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HOW IS YA DELIVERED IN MADISON? YA is administered by the Department of Workforce Development in cooperation with the Department of Public Instruction, the Wisconsin Technical College System and the University of Wisconsin System. Funding for the program is provided through state grants to local YA partnerships. In a collaborative effort to deliver YA to students, the Workforce Development Board of South Central Wisconsin oversees the program in the South Central region, including Dane County and Jefferson County. The Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce and the Madison Metropolitan School District (MMSD) formed a partnership to facilitate YA locally in Madison. Together, the Chamber and MMSD are committed to providing industry-relevant experiences to our Madison students, building the local workforce and positively influencing the community.

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WHAT ARE THE STATE-APPROVED YA AREAS? Career Cluster Area

Youth Apprenticeship Units of Study Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resource- Animals:  Animal Basics Unit  Small Animal / Vet Assistant Unit  Large Animal / Herd Unit Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resource- Plants:  Plant Basics Unit  Crops Unit  Greenhouse / Floral Unit  Landscaping Unit Architecture & Construction:  Architectural Drafting Unit  Architectural Planning Unit Hospitality & Tourism:  Maintenance & Grounds Unit Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resource- Plants:  Landscaping Unit Arts, A/V Technology & Communications:  Graphic Design & Pre-Press Unit  Press & Post-Press Unit Information Technology:  Web & Digital Media Unit Hospitality & Tourism:  Lodging – Front Office Unit  Reservations & Tour/Activity Unit  Management 1 Unit  Management 2 Unit Finance:  Accounting Services Basic Unit  Accounting Services Advanced Unit  Banking Basic Unit  Banking Advanced Unit  Insurance Services Unit Health Science:  Certified Nursing Assistant Unit  Pharmacy Technician Unit  Medical Office Unit  Ambulatory / Support Services  Medical Assistant Hospitality & Tourism:  Food & Beverage – Dining Area Unit  Food & Beverage – Kitchen Unit  Lodging – Housekeeping Unit

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Career Cluster Area

Youth Apprenticeship Units of Study Information Technology:  IT Essentials Unit  Hardware Unit  Software Unit Manufacturing:  Assembly & Packaging Unit  Manufacturing Processes Unit  Machining Unit  Welding Unit  Production Operations Management Unit  Basic Industrial Equipment Unit  Advanced Industrial Equipment Unit Hospitality & Tourism:  Marketing & Sales 1 Unit  Marketing & Sales 2 Unit  Meetings & Events Unit STEM-Science & Math:  Bioscience Applications Unit STEM-Engineering & Technology:  Engineering Drafting Unit  Mechanical / Electrical Engineering Unit  Civil Engineering Unit Transportation, Distribution & Logistics-Auto Collision:  Collision Basics Repair Unit  Non-structural Analysis & Repair Unit  Painting & Refinishing Unit  Damage Analysis & Electrical Repair Unit Transportation, Distribution & Logistics – Auto Technician:  Vehicle Basics & General Service Unit  Brake Systems Unit  Electrical / Electronics Unit  Suspension & Steering Unit  Engine Performance & Repair Unit Transportation, Distribution & Logistics – Logistics / Supply Chain Management:  Planning & Purchasing Unit  Inventory Management & Production  Storage & Warehousing  Distribution & Transportation Operations

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WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF PARTICIPATING IN YA? “The Youth Apprenticeship Program serves our community with a valuable education service by enabling young people to participate in these real work experiences.” —Brendan O’Rourke, Isthmus Engineering & Manufacturing Cooperative

“The program is a win-win situation, not only for the employee, but for the employers and also our schools.”

The success of our economy is heavily based on the development of a highly skilled workforce. Employers are regularly faced with the challenge of finding skilled employees to meet their company’s needs. In order to develop a sustainable solution to this challenge, local communities must invest in the next generation workforce. Integrating workbased learning and classroom instruction fortifies the link between school and industry and, thus, prepares a more qualified workforce. Participating as an employer in YA is a great way to support students, the educational system, economic development and standard of living in Madison. Participating employers have seen a positive return on their YA investment. Since its inception in 1991, more than 10,000 youth apprentices statewide have graduated from YA. According to state exit surveys, employers have gone on to offer jobs to 85 percent of their two-year youth apprentices and 98 percent of participating employers say they would recommend the program to other businesses and organizations.

—Charlie Cupp, Zimbrick Honda Service Center

“This experience has given me a glimpse of the real world. I am so fortunate to be a part of the Youth Apprenticeship Program.” —LaFollette High School Senior, Pharmacy Technician

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Partnering with education and participating in YA yields benefits that directly impact your business and industry. YA enables employers to build a qualified workforce, maintain a well-trained staff and decrease hiring/training expenses, and contribute to the community.

Build a qualified workforce

• Provide an experience that enhances classroom instruction. • Assist the student in developing sought-after skills directly aligned with national occupational skill standards. • Create an employee that is ready to enter and be successful in the workforce and/or post-secondary education upon graduation.

Maintain a well-trained staff and decrease hiring/training expenses

• Use YA as a recruitment pipeline for entry-level positions and provide supervisory opportunities for staff. • Hire trained youth apprentices upon graduation, who understand your business. • Eliminate the need for costly and time-consuming search and screening processes.

Contribute to the community

• Invest in the future workforce. • Influence curricula to ensure it incorporates the latest technology and industry practices. • Raise awareness of your industry among the future workforce. • Enhance your organization's image as a supporter of education and Madison schools.

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WHAT ARE THE STEPS TO PARTICIPATE IN YA?

 Step 1: Discuss interest with MMSD YA staff

 Step 2: Screen, interview and select candidates

 Step 3: Sign Education Training Agreement (ETA)

 Step 4: Complete performance evaluations, competency checklist and other required forms

 Step 5: YA graduation

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Step 1: Discuss interest with MMSD YA staff Contact the Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce or the MMSD Experiential Learning Coordinator to discuss the details of YA and determine the appropriate course of action for your organization and its needs. At this time, review the skill standards checklist for the career cluster unit of study that best fits your organization (see Appendix C). Ensure all the competencies listed can be achieved through an apprenticeship placement. If the skill standards checklist cannot be completed in its entirety through the placement, the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager and MMSD’s Experiential Learning Coordinator will arrange for supplemental apprenticeship experiences. This must be discussed with MMSD YA staff prior to participating in the program. In addition to reviewing program details and paperwork, it is also important to consult appropriate parties at your organization regarding participation. Once participation is cleared, identify possible mentors to work with the apprentice(s) throughout the program. The Chamber’s Business and Education Manager and MMSD’s Experiential Learning Coordinator are there to support you and the youth apprentices throughout the YA process to ensure a positive program experience.

Step 2: Screen, interview and select apprentices YA candidates are screened for the program based on district-approved criteria. However, employers are encouraged to screen, interview and select apprentices following their organization’s protocol. The Chamber’s Business and Education Manager and MMSD’s Experiential Learning Coordinator can assist you with candidate screening, scheduling interviews and matching candidates with employers as needed. Once you are prepared to hire, contact the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager to confirm hiring the chosen youth apprentice(s). At this time, ensure your youth apprentice(s) can work the required hours: A minimum of 450 hours for a Level 1 certificate A minimum of 900 hours for a Level 2 certificate While staying in compliance with child labor laws (see page 14), the youth apprentice’s schedule is at the discretion of the employer. Although the schedule may not require hours during the school day, all youth apprentices are expected to have release time from their regular school day to report to work. It is recommended that the youth apprentice work a minimum of 3 hours per shift in order to maximize the learning experience. Youth apprentices are to earn minimum wage or more. Compensation must be in accordance with minimum wage laws (see page 14). The only cost of participating in YA is the wages paid to the youth apprentice(s).

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Step 3: Sign the Education Training Agreement (ETA) The youth apprenticeship does not officially begin until the Education Training Agreement (ETA) is signed (see Appendix A). A meeting is held with the youth apprentice, the youth apprentice’s parent/guardian (if the youth apprentice is under 18 years of age), the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager and the workplace mentor. This agreement must be signed within two weeks of the youth apprentice’s first day of employment. Prior to the youth apprentice beginning work, inform other employees about YA, its goals, training expectations and the responsibilities of the youth apprentice. Remember, this is a work-based learning and mentorship experience. It is also an opportunity to provide supervisory and mentorship roles to employees – empowering them to provide training and an authentic learning experience. Mentor training is also provided as a part of YA and is covered in the contents of this manual (see page 11). If you would like to request additional or more in-depth mentor training, contact the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager to arrange mentor training experiences that best suit the needs of your organization and the selected mentors that will work through the program with the youth apprentice(s).

Step 4: Complete performance evaluations, competency checklist and required forms As youth apprentices earn high school credit and a grade for their YA performance, evaluations (see Appendix B) need to be completed once per academic quarter in approximately late October, mid-January, late March and late May. It is the youth apprentice’s responsibility to schedule the performance evaluation meeting two weeks prior to the end of the academic quarter. The Chamber’s Business and Education Manager will provide you with evaluation forms and instructions for completion. The evaluation will be delivered to the youth apprentice, the youth apprentice’s parent/guardian (if the youth apprentice is under 18 years of age) and the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager. The evaluation is used to obtain useful information about the youth apprentice’s progress as related to the program competencies. For areas where the youth apprentice earns a low score, mentors must identify specific ways the apprentice can improve performance. Youth apprentices are expected to be held to the same standards as all employees. If they do not comply with company rules, the employer may terminate the apprentice(s). Since YA is a work-based learning and mentorship experience, employers are strongly encouraged to contact and/or meet with the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager prior to terminating a student worker. The competency checklist will be used throughout the apprenticeship to plan learning experiences and gauge progress throughout the employment period. Employers should attempt to coordinate worksite training with classroom instruction as much as possible. This will help the youth apprentice apply classroom

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learning in the workplace and apply workplace learning in the classroom. If the youth apprentice does not meet the academic requirements of the program, s/he is no longer eligible to participate in YA. Employers must assign a mentor to work through the program with the youth apprentice. The mentor will regularly visit the competency checklist and ensure that the checklist can be completed by the end of the apprenticeship period. The youth apprentice must have a completed checklist by the due date provided by the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager in order for the youth apprentice to fulfill program requirements. Competency checklists will be provided to employers and the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager will assist as necessary. Checklists will be used to gauge progress, communicate expectations and demonstrate learning.

Step 5: YA graduation Once the apprenticeship and all required forms are completed, the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager will submit YA paperwork to the appropriate contact at the Department of Workforce Development. Following processing, the youth apprentice will receive a Certificate of Occupational Proficiency in his/her chosen career cluster. Without the commitment of local employers, programs like YA would not exist. The Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce and the Madison Metropolitan School District is, in turn, committed to recognizing those that participate in the program. Each year, we are committed to improving the program we provide and we value your feedback. At the conclusion of the academic year, the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager will elicit your feedback and request a testimonial. All employer feedback and testimonials are greatly appreciated. Economic development is a key benefit in having a sustainable YA program in the Madison community. It is our goal to sustain a successfully growing YA program. Upon graduation, the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager will provide you with new candidates to replace the graduates.

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HOW CAN I SUCCESSFULLY MENTOR STUDENTS? Mentors are more than just supervisors. Mentors are role models that coach youth apprentices on how to be successful employees at their organization and connect learning in the classroom to performance on the job.

Working with students Being relatively new to the workforce, youth apprentices may not understand what it takes to achieve positive outcomes. It is the mentors’ responsibility to guide youth apprentices toward setting appropriate goals and coach them through the strategies to achieve goals in a timely manner. On-the-job learning should not only focus on technical skill, but also on acquiring the soft skills necessary to be a successful employee in the workforce. Understanding the learning process of youth apprentices is imperative in successful mentorship. Direct instruction, selfreflection and understanding the principles behind actions are all key ingredients to learning. Positive outcomes can be achieved through the youth apprentice observing and imitating successful coworkers. Social relationships are also important for success. Youth apprentices have high expectations for the adults working around them and value their respect, even if they are unsure how to earn it. They want to be an accepted member of the team and, when treated as equals, are likely to respond with adult behaviors.

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Mentor-student relationships The relationship between the mentor and the youth apprentice can be divided into two stages: initiation and mentorship. Mentors should be aware of each stage so they can properly guide the youth apprentice to success. In the initiation stage, the youth apprentice is just beginning employment, so s/he may feel awkward or unsure of her/his capabilities and potential. As a result, the apprentice often views the mentor with inflated esteem and the mentor should focus on instilling a sense of self-worth in the apprentice. In time, the relationship will progress to the mentorship stage in which the youth apprentice experiences increased responsibility and is awarded more independence from the mentor. In this stage, the mentor should emphasize support and encouragement. Successful mentor-student relationships rely heavily on having an understanding of the mentor’s roles and responsibilities. The mentor, supervisor and trainer are sometimes not the same person and, as a result, mentor roles and responsibilities may differ from those of a trainer or supervisor.

Mentor Remember student social and learning needs Mediate among trainer, supervisor and student Inform student about workplace norms, social relations and expectations

Act as a coach and role model Communicate with coordinator Evaluate progress

Provide consistent caring support and guidance

Supervisor Provide instruction on industry and workplace competencies

Trainer Articulate responsibilities and expectations Assist in developing a proper training plan Educate student about safety

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Communication strategies The goal of work-based education is to encourage youth apprentices to assume the responsibility of learning new skills, evaluating progress and setting goals. Successful youth apprentices apply learned information to their work, seek feedback about their performance, ask questions, identify concerns and improve communication. Constructive feedback encourages youth apprentices to take responsibility for their behavior. Effective use of positive and negative feedback builds trust and promotes positive working relationships. Feedback should be based on established and communicated standards so youth apprentices understand what constitutes a job well done. Open-ended communication (responses beyond “yes” and “no”) and active listening (mirroring, paraphrasing, summarizing and pausing before speaking) both promote positive communication strategies, as they communicate a willingness to help, encourage the youth apprentice to ask questions and address concerns, and enable the youth apprentice to explain his/her understanding. Instituting conflict resolution strategies that strengthen communication between the mentor, youth apprentice and coordinator can ensure working relationships are not tarnished. Listening patiently, solving problems together, allowing for a cooling-off period and involving the coordinator are all useful conflict resolution strategies.

Mentor tips for communicating with students The following list of ideas can help mentors develop effective communication strategies with youth apprentices:         

Use clear, defined language Make use of analogy, comparison, example/show and tell and illustration/visual aids Use step-by-step and progression/process techniques Explain the background and knowledge behind tasks Encourage questions as well as ask them Summarize often Help clarify goals and compile activities to meet those goals based on skill standards Schedule regular meetings to discuss performance and examine goals/learning plans Be sensitive to gender and cross-cultural differences

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Legal requirements Wisconsin Statutes Section 103.64-103.82 and Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter DWD 270, establish maximum hours of work, time of day restrictions, and prohibited employment for minors 11 through 17 years of age.  Hours. Youth Apprenticeship students are considered “student learners” because they are enrolled in a work-based learning program. Therefore, Youth Apprenticeship students may be allowed to work during school hours. The hours that 16- and 17-year-old minors may work is not limited.  Wages. Youth workers must be paid at least minimum wage. Wisconsin wage statutes require employers pay all workers all wages on at least a monthly basis, except farm labor which can be paid at quarterly intervals.  Minimum Wage. The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and Wisconsin law establish minimum wage rates in the private sector and for government employees. Covered workers are entitled to minimum wage of not less than $7.25 per hour effective July 24, 2009, under both federal and state laws.  Opportunity Wage. “Opportunity employee” means an employee who is not yet 20 years old and who has been in employment status with a particular employer for 90 or fewer consecutive calendar days from the date of initial employment. Both federal law and Wisconsin law have an opportunity rate. Currently, Wisconsin’s rate is $5.90 per hour, which exceeds the federal rate ($4.25 per hour). Since employers must comply with both, the Wisconsin rate must be paid. On the 91st day, the rate must go up to $7.25 per hour.  Tipped Employee Wage. “Tipped Employees” means an employee who is working for a business in which they may receive tips (servers, waiters and waitresses). The base minimum wage for a student earning an Opportunity Wage (see above) is $2.13/hour and minimum wage is $2.33 per hour. “Tipped Employees” may receive an additional payment if the average per hour wage including tips is less than $5.90 per hour for Opportunity Wage earners and $7.25 Minimum Wage earners, to bring the employee up to the minimum wage in which they are earning. (Source: http://www.wirestaurant.org/pdf/membership/minwage09.pdf)  Work Permits. Work permits are not needed for the Youth Apprenticeship program. Students and employers must have an approved Education Training Agreement (ETA) on file with the school AND the employer instead. If employers hire youth apprentices to perform “other work duties” outside of the YA duties listed on the skill standards checklist, a work permit is required for those duties.  Worker’s Compensation. When a minor becomes an employee of a company, they must be covered by the employer’s compensation coverage. Please see the Department of Workforce Development web page for more detailed information.  Liability. Employers are liable for the service provided at their organization and determining liability for an accident can only be settled in a court of law. Generally, if an employer has adequate general liability and workers compensation coverage, no additional liability coverage is necessary. Youth apprentices are responsible for their transportation to and from work and for their insurance. Since youth apprentices are enrolled in a full-time public educational institution and are receiving school credit for participation, they are not eligible for unemployment compensation.  Unions and Layoffs. A youth apprentice cannot be hired to displace or replace a currently employed worker. Child labor laws prohibit youth apprentices from working with an employer where a strike or active lockout is active. The youth apprentice cannot impair existing contracts or collective bargaining agreements. Any youth apprenticeship program inconsistent with the terms of a collective bargaining agreement can be approved only with the written occurrence of the labor organization and the employer. For more information regarding YA legal requirements, please visit the Department of Workforce Development web page: http://dwd.wisconsin.gov/youthapprenticeship/legal.htm

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Safe work environments All employers strive to provide a safe work environment for employees. Safety instruction is very important for students in work-based learning programs. The mentor can work with the Chamber’s Business and Education Manager to put together a plan for safety instruction. Worksite policies, transportation, work permits, school policies on absenteeism and academic performance, emergency procedures, conflict resolution procedures and labor laws should also be addressed. Harassment is unwelcome verbal or physical conduct, graphic materials, sexual advances, or other acts which interfere with a person’s work or can reasonably be seen to create hostile, intimidating or offensive environments which may include:  Physical harassment or other threat of harm against individuals or their property.  Verbal abuse, whether it attacks an individual personality or on the grounds of age, race, sex, sexual orientation, ethnic background, religious beliefs, and/or disability.  Graffiti or graphics of the above nature.  Unwelcome sexual advances.  Implications that employment decisions will be based on accepting unwelcome sexual advances  Retaliation against any employee who has used this policy to raise concerns.  The workplace will be free of discrimination and sexual harassment. Sexual harassment occurs when behavior is unwanted or unwelcomed, sexual or related to the gender of the person and/or is in the context of a relationship where one person has more power than the other.

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Employer Resources Attached is a copy of the following employer resources:  Appendix A: Education Training Agreement (ETA)  Appendix B: Performance Evaluation Form  Appendix C: Skill Standards Checklist

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Appendix A

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Greater Madison Chamber / Madison Metropolitan School District Youth Apprenticeship Mentor Handbook

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Appendix B

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Profile for Sherrie L. Stuessy

Youth Apprenticeship Mentor Handbook  

prepared by Madison Metropolitan School District, Madison, WI

Youth Apprenticeship Mentor Handbook  

prepared by Madison Metropolitan School District, Madison, WI

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