Page 1

Sherif Nader GOUBRAN

Portfolio


Table of Contents Cover Page 1 Table of Contents 2 University 3

Digital Representation 4 Foundations of 3-D Design 9 Introduction to Architecture 13 Technical Drawing 17

Design Studio 1 22 Design Studio 2 28 Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems 40

Design Studio 6 161

Thesis Project 1 180

Art 187 Photography & edits 188 Artwork 194

Resume 201 Back Cover 201

Environmental Control 50 Systems and Sustainable Design Building Services Systems And 53 System Integration Design Studio 3 56 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture 64 Digital Design Studio and Workshop 86 Design Studio 4 97

Detail Design and Finishes

in Buildings 123 Interior Design 129 Design Studio 5 153

Sherif Goubran | Table of Contents | 2


University A Compilation of work done for all the different academic courses within the Bachelor of Science Degree in Architecture at AUC as well other universities and courses. Organized Chronologically. Starting: Fall 2009.


An introduction to different forms of digital representation in architecture: architectural drawings, 3D-modeling, rendering, sheet layout design and fundamentals in animation and image editing. Introduction to Building Information Modeling (BIM) and graphical representation software. Such techniques are utilized as design tools for the creative development of projects and communication with clients and consultants from different disciplines in architectural practice. Spring-2010

Digital Representation AENG 273|Dr. Mohamad Nada


First Project |

Drawing and 3-D model and exciting design of a small house Using Autocad Architecture software (scale 1:50)

Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Sherif Goubran | University| Digitical Representation | 5


First Project |

Drawing and 3-D model and exciting design of a small hous e Using Autocad Architecture software (scale 1:50)

Front Elevation

Human Eye View

Back Elevation

Interior Shot

Sherif Goubran | University| Digitical Representation | 6


Final Project|

Remodeling and Redesign of a Clinics medical Center Using Autocad and 3-D Max for Modeling (Not to Scale)

Front Elevation

Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Side Elevation

Second Floor Plan

Roof Plan

Back Elevation

Sherif Goubran | University| Digitical Representation | 7


Final Project|

Remodeling and Redesign of a Clinics medical Center Using Autocad and 3-D Max for Modeling (Not to Scale)

Ant Eye View

Roof View

Interior Waiting area View

Bird Eye View

Sherif Goubran | University| Digitical Representation | 8


Basic concepts and fundamentals of visualization, thinking, and design of simple forms in three dimensions. Presentation, communication and basic design skills using simple three dimensional modelling exercises in manual formats. Balance between aesthetic and functional design criteria. Fall - 2010

Foundations of 3-D Design AENG 250|Dr. Magda Mostafa


Full Course Work|

Diffrent Design activities using different medias  Photography of work & final Project

Sherif Goubran| University | Foundation of 3-D Design | 10


Full Course Work|

Diffrent Design activities using different medias Photography of work & final Project

Sherif Goubran| University | Foundation of 3-D Design | 11


Final Project|

Designing an Architectural element (Light fixture) Using everyday objects (straws)

Sherif Goubran| University | Foundation of 3-D Design | 12


Architectural design stages. Leadership role of architects in project delivery. Influence of site location on design. Influence of project related factors on design. Design of simple buildings. Introduction to basic building components and assemblies. Introduction to building code requirements. Fall-2010

Introduction to Architecture AENG 251|Dr. Ahmad Sherif


Design Project|

Schematic Design of a “Cartier” jewrlry Showroom and training center. Done in a group of 5 Students. (Not to Scale)

Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Sherif Goubran | University| Introduction to Architecture | 14


Design Project|

Schematic Design of a “Cartier� jewrlry Showroom and training center. Done in a group of 5 Students. (Not to Scale)

Second Floor Plan

Training Center Entrance Elevation

Layout

Section B-B

Sherif Goubran | University| Introduction to Architecture | 15


Design Project|

Schematic Design of a “Cartier” jewrlry Showroom and training center. Done in a group of 5 Students. (Not to Scale)

Human Eye View

Interior View

Bird Eye View

General Analysis

Sherif Goubran | University| Introduction to Architecture | 16


The focus of this course is to introduce students to the requisite skills of free-hand manual drawing for designers. The course is composed of three primary modules covering the conceptual, technical and media related aspects of freehand drawing as part of the design process, from first conceptualization and diagramming to drawing from observation through final rendering and representation. Spring-2011

Technical Drawing ARTV 221|Dr. Maream Marai


Sketches & Drawings|

Sketching and drawing everyday objects using different medias Ranging or a mix of Pen, ink and water Colours

Sherif Goubran | University| Technical Drawing | 18


Sketches & Drawings|

Sketching and drawing everyday objects using different medias Ranging or a mix of Pen, ink and water Colours

Sherif Goubran | University| Technical Drawing | 19


Sketches & Drawings|

Sketching and drawing everyday objects using different medias Ranging or a mix of Pen, ink and water Colours

Sherif Goubran | University| Technical Drawing | 20


Final Project|

Perspective Drawing and plan Rendering Adding architectural Elements in Plan & Perspective

Sherif Goubran | University| Technical Drawing | 21


Studio on designing in behavioral and socio-cultural contexts. “Insideout� approach to Architecture. Design through the study of behavioral use of space. Age, sex, culture and individuality as well as complex functional relationships influence on architectural design. Study of the nature of human behavior and how it can be incorporated, facilitated, modified and influenced through architectural design. Design for special needs populations. Spring-2011

Design Studio 1 AENG 351|Dr. Nagwa Sherif& Dr. Zeinab Shafik


Design Project|

Middle Class Residential Project inspired by the Revolution (Not to Scale)

Design Statement

Egyptians have been and still are strongly guided with cultural and religious norms; they still are proud of their identity and are still holding on most of the norms, especially the ones concerning family and social behavior. Statistics today require designers to shift their attention to address the needs young couples and new families’ category of the middle class, as the category that has the most demand on small residential units. In the gloom of the recent events in Egypt, many phenomena and themes for this targeted group appeared. The most important one was the unity of different Egyptian people disregarding their social class, backgrounds or faiths. It is important to address this theme in specific from within the design in order to shrink the social gaps in the Egyptian community. Other basic needs for this social class should be also be incorporated in the design, such as affordability, flexibility, efficiency and dynamic. The new adopted design have to support the targeted group well being by providing options to increase their income and productivity such as communal project and space for work inside living space or within the residential complexes. Furthermore all designers should start addressing the themes of sustainability

Inspirations

and environmental preservation. In the design of middle class small residential units, it is important to search for solutions for energy preservation and using the environment to enhance the design’s efficiency in affordable and innovative manners. Tackling all the indicated ideas parallely, will most likely be successful in pleasing and serving the chosen target group and will aid to capture the true essence and ideologies of the recent revolution this country have witnessed.

Concept The revolution resulted in an explosion of freedoms; however diverse people are united together towards development.

Design Theme and Keywords Unity. This will be the main guiding keyword for the design. It will show on the design level in the existence of common services and spaces for social interactions as well as different sized units in the same complex. Efficiency. In terms of spaces distribution and use, energy saving, affordability and in providing different services. The minimization of wasted space, energy through studied designs and innovative environmentally friendly and interactive systems.

Concept Sketches

Sherif Goubran | University| Design Studio 1 | 23


Design Project|

Middle Class Residential Project inspired by the Revolution (Not to Scale)

Elevation Volumetric Design

First Plans Attempts

Volumetric Analysis

Sherif Goubran | 24


Design Project|

Middle Class Residential Project inspired by the Revolution (Not to Scale)

Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

Sherif Goubran | 25


Design Project|

Middle Class Residential Project inspired by the Revolution (Not to Scale)

Front Elevation

Layout

Back Elevation

Building Ant View

Sherif Goubran | University| Design Studio 1 | 26


Design Project|

Middle Class Residential Project inspired by the Revolution (Not to Scale)

Bird Eye View

Roof View

Sherif Goubran | University| Design Studio 1 | 27


Studio on form, space and composition. “Outside-in� approach to architecture. The architectural form and its composition. The compositional aspects of spatial design- expression, language, intent, dynamics etc. and their use as tools of concept and functional accommodation. Three-dimensional models and design development. Spatial approach to design. Meaning, message and symbolism. Work with architectural precedents through analysis of various works of architects. Contemporary design theory as a premise for design Fall - 2011.

Design Studio 2 AENG 352 |Dr. Magda Mostafa & Mohamad Noman


Design Project 1|

“Beyond Style” Learning to Read Architectural Language and form. A design of a house (villa prototype in Katameya) using the Architectural Language of Walter Gropius.

W a lte r G ropius By: Sherif Nader Goubran

Function Simple Efficiency Materials Flexible

1883-1969

W a lte r G ropius By: Sherif Nader Goubran

1923: design of his famous door handles that where used later in the design of the “Bauhaus” in Dessau.

1883-1969

Transparent Structured Technology Organized

1907-1910: Gropius worked on the design of the AEG Turbine factory, where Behrens introduced for the first time Glass & steel to create a full wall which had a huge effect on Gropius’ choices of materials later. As he explored the ideas of industrialization, Walter Gropius Suggested the creation of houses from pre-Fabricated parts to AEG.

Walter Gropius’ Architecture is the architecture of the spirit of the

time; in the use of materials, technologies and techniques.

A extension of the functional approach adressing sustainability and human needs while challegening the norms will be key to expressing today’s sipirt of the age.

Adapting to the “New World” and it’s “rough beauty”. Using

1920: design of the monument of the March dead in Weimar. Use of pure concrete and the form of the monument was completely new to Gropius as it revealed his tendency towards expressionism.

1910-1913: Gropius first commission that made his name: the Fagus Shoe last factory in Alfed. (in collaboration with Meyer)

1883 Walter Gropius was born in a family where his grandfather was a painter, his uncle was a well known architect (Shinkel) as well as his dad.

Left: the new theatre in Berlin & to the right: the museum of Arts & Crafts in Berlin both designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel

1903

1907

Walter Gropius studied in Berlin and Munich from 1903-1907. Once he graduated he worked with Peter Behrens: chief designer for AEG until he established his own practice with Adolf Mayer in 1910. (Mies Van der Rohe & Le Courbosier also wroked with Behrens)

1914: Design of the Werkbund exhibition in cologne with glass facades that reveal rather than conceal interiors. (with Meyer)

1910

In 1910: He joined the Deutscher Werkbund which effected his philosophy and AppreciaExamples tion for crafts. of Behrens’ He tried to designs for AEG ranging design furnifrom architec- ture, , interiors even locomoture to adties inspired vertisements by the freethat strongly incluenced the dom of design young gropius.

1915 1914: WWI Gropius was a Cavalary officer & was wounded badly during combat. He was maried to Alma Mahler in 1915. He was demobalized in 1918.

1919

1923

1927

1916 - 1919: Gropius delivered a proposal for his administrative concepts of the Kunstgewerbeschule Weimar where he highlighted the negative effects of industrialization on crafts and suggested to reunited artist, craftsman and technician keeping the “spirit of the age”. He was appointed director in 1919. After the war, Gropius became politically active, he joined a number of groups and associations mainly auiming to re-establish arts and creativity that politics and economy demolished. later in 1920, he took a step back from politics and insisted the “Bauhaus” remains unpolitical for his safety, for the safety of the “bauhaus” and its students.

“modern“ techniques that are a result of industrial advances. Re-defining and re-shaping ideas and processes of design to use new materials and new and faster building techniques serve the real purposes. Confront challenges, using new and faster building techniques. Designing from utensil to the full dwelling using new technology to conform and serve the needs of the users. Deviating from the norms in forms and designs, “the object is determined by its nature” & “its

form is shaped by its function” away of all Romantic

beautification creating simple,

basic and direct designs. Putting

in mind the economic aspect and using the idea of standard types to create architecture as a necessity.

Mood Board

Time line

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 29

1933


Design Project 1|

“Beyond Style� Learning to Read Architectural Language and form. A design of a house (villa prototype in Katameya) using the Architectural Language of Walter Gropius. (Not to Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 30


Design Project 1|

“Beyond Style� Learning to Read Architectural Language and form. A design of a house (villa prototype in Katameya) using the Architectural Language of Walter Gropius. (Not To Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 31


Design Project 1|

“Beyond Style� Learning to Read Architectural Language and form. A design of a house (villa prototype in Katameya) using the Architectural Language of Walter Gropius. (Not To Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 32


Design Project 1|

“Beyond Style� Learning to Read Architectural Language and form. A design of a house (villa prototype in Katameya) using the Architectural Language of Walter Gropius. (Not To Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 33


Midterm Project |

Continuation to the “Beyond Style� Learning to Read Architectural Language and form. A design of a Residential Studio for an architect using the Architectural Language of Santiago Calatrava. (Not To Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 34


Midterm Project |

Continuation to the “Beyond Style� Learning to Read Architectural Language and form. A design of a Residential Studio for an architect using the Architectural Language of Santiago Calatrava. (Not To Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 35


Midterm Project |

Continuation to the “Beyond Style� Learning to Read Architectural Language and form. A design of a Residential Studio for an architect using the Architectural Language of Santiago Calatrava. (Not To Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 36


Final Design Project|

Design of an Oriental Music pavilion in Azhar park to house different performances and serve the garden space by providing a visual and physical experience for its users (Not to Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 37


Final Design Project|

Design of an Oriental Music pavilion in Azhar park to house different performances and serve the garden space by providing a visual and physical experience for its users (Not to Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 38


Final Design Project|

Design of an Oriental Music pavilion in Azhar park to house different performances and serve the garden space by providing a visual and physical experience for its users (Not to Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 2 | 39


Context, history and framework of regional, city and urban planning. Concepts, features and characteristics of human settlements. Interrelationship between socio-cultural contexts and housing processes. Design of housing areas and housing units. Design of ‘appropriate’ and ‘responsive’ residential environments within specific resources. Concepts and system components of GIS. Creation and management of a geodatabase. GIS analysis and applications in housing projects. Fall - 2011

Housing Design and

Geographic Information Systems AENG 368 |Dr. Sherine Wahba


Design Assignment 1|

Design of a Duplex House or Attachable Villa that could be used as a prototype in a Hosing compound (Not to Scale)

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Sherif Goubran | University | Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems | 41


Design Assignment 1|

Design of a Duplex House or Attachable Villa that could be used as a prototype in a Hosing compound (Not to Scale)

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Sherif Goubran | University | Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems | 42


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Housing Prototypes Design |

Design of Different Housing Prototypes serving Different Egyptian Social classes to be used in the Housing project (Not to Scale)

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Sherif Goubran | University | Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems | 43

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Housing Prototypes Design |

Design of Different Housing Prototypes serving Different Egyptian Social classes to be used in the Housing project (Not to Scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems |

Low Income Housing units (2 Bedrooms 55 m2) Front Elevation

Sherif Goubran | University | Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems | 44


Housing Prototypes Design |

Design of Different Housing Prototypes serving Different Egyptian Social classes to be used in the Housing project (Not to Scale)

Middle Income Housing units (3 Bedrooms 100 m2) Typical Floor

Middle Income Housing units (3 Bedrooms 100 m2) Unit Details

Sherif Goubran | University | Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems | 45


Housing Prototypes Design |

Design of Different Housing Prototypes serving Different Egyptian Social classes to be used in the Housing project (Not to Scale)

Middle Income Housing units (3 Bedrooms 100 m2) Front Elevation

Sherif Goubran | University | Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems | 46


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Sherif Goubran | University | Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems | 47


Housing Prototypes Design |

Design of Different Housing Prototypes serving Different Egyptian Social classes to be used in the Housing project (Not to Scale)

High Income Housing units (3 Bedrooms 175 m2) Front Elevation

Sherif Goubran | Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems | 48


Housing Design Project|

Working on a real site (Houtteya) in Mohandesseen Giza, a complete analysis of the current site conditions along with a proposal for a re-design was made. (group work & not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | University | Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems | 49


Basic principles and application of environmental systems: acoustic, lighting, HVAC, energy use, and their integration with the building envelop. Performance of the building envelops materials and assemblies. Introduction to LEED and similar systems. Sustainable design principles and its applications. Sustainable design project. Fall - 2011

Environmental Control Systems and Sustainable Design AENG - 326 | Dr. Ahmad Fikry


Design Project|

Design of a house in Aswan (Egypt) using the different environmental design approaches learnt in the course and analysing the design using different programs and experiments. (Not to scale)

Enviromental House Design (Aswan) Aeng 326: Environmental Control & Sustainable Design By: Moaz Mohamad, Salma Samir & Sherif Goubran Weather & Environmental Data Gathering

Design Choices and Ideas

Wind Analysis

Wall Sections Designed (left) & Base Case Walls:

Required by the Egyptian Energy Code R= 1.4 Design: Reflective coat + 2.5 cm Cement dense Plaster + 12 cm Dense Brick + 2.5 cm expanded Polystyrene + 12 cm dense Brick + 2.5 cm cement dense plaster

Achieved R=1.52

Windows:

Design: High Performance metal windows with triple glazing (2 ordinary glaze & an infrared reflective third glaze), low E-coating and Argon filled.

Winter

Autumn

Mainly wind blows from direct north during most seasons with speeds averaging between 15 and 35 Km/h (4.167 and 9.72 m/s). Some North West wind frequency is apparent on the wind rose but it is mainly low in speed and not frequent. Some western winds are also available but insignificant when compared to the northern prevailing wind. Some very infrequent and slow winds are shown to have an eastern and north eastern direction.

Summer

Roofs:

Required by the Egyptian Energy Code R= 2.2 Design: Reflective Coat + 2.5 cm cement tiles + 2.5 cement mortar + 5 cm sand + 10 cm ordinary concrete +2 cm Bitumen layer + 5 cm expanded Polystyrene + 15 cm reinforced concrete + 2.5 gypsum plaster

Achieved R=2.24

Shading element Temperature & Humidity Analysis

Using the Sun inclination angles in the summer season, We were able to identify the most efficient shading devices that will block or minimize direct sun penetration while allowing sufficient natural lighting in order to minimize the heat gain of the building during the extremely hot summer season. The design of the shading elements was made to resemble the local architectural and elements that were used in the vernacular architecture of Aswan while proritizing their efficiency over their styling to minimize coast and complications of construction.

The data indicate very high temperatures during the summer with very low humidity and relatively cold temperatures during the winter with higher humidity levels especially during the night. From this data we can confirm the desert climate the city of Aswan experiences, based on the humidity and temperature variations.

Solar Radiation Analysis Unlike the case with values of direct solar radiation, the diffused solar radiation values vary greatly throughout the year. Throughout the period between January- March and OctoberDecember, the diffused solar radiation values do not exceed 500 W/m2 and these high values are only reached between 10 am-1 pm. However, throughout the months of April - September, the diffused solar radiation values ranges between 900+ W/m2. Once again, these values are only reached between 10 am - 1 pm.

Shading elements design

Ventilation elements

Diffused

Direct

The climatic zone experiences in general very high direct solar radiation throughout the year. Between 6-8 am and 3-5 pm, the solar radiation reaches the high levels ranging from 300-700 W/m2, However, the maximum values are reached from 8 am to 3 pm, ranging from 700-900+ W/ m2. These values are maintained throughout the year with very slight differences.

Psychometric Charts Wind Chimney

The use of glass and other heat conducting materials on the chimney to heat the air inside it and allow for better ventilation.

Wind Catcher

Use of think material to help protect the air duct from heat to keep the air cool. in these wind catches, moist membranes are going to be placed to cool the air during hot summer days (applying indirect evaporative passive technique)

Courtyard

Location from comfort zone

After Analysis of the six passive techniques used to affect the climatic conditions of Aswan, it was concluded that the optimum solution is found when using a combination of Thermal Mass + Night Ventilation technique and Indirect evaporative cooling technique. This arrangements ensures that with the exception of the Months of August and July, the climatic conditions throughout the year in Aswan are maintained within the comfort zone area of the curve. Although the climatic conditions during the month of August lie on the borderline of the comfort zone area, none of the passive techniques were found to affect the conditions during the month of July.

After applying Night Ventilation & Indirect Evaporation

In summer, the courtyard is shaded using white cloth and a water feature is activated to help block the sun rays and allow air to ventilate & evaporate the water to create a cool pool of air in the heart of the house.

In winter, the white cloth is changed with a transparent (plastic based) cover that can be used to seal the space and the water feature is no activated. This allows for sun penetration and a limit on air flow creating a green house effect & heating all the space and the thermal mass around it.

Cross ventilation (1:100)

Passive Techniques

Night cooling refers to the operation of natural ventilation at night in order to purge excess heat and cool the building fabric. A building with sufficient thermal mass, which can be exposed to nighttime ventilation, can reduce peak daytime temperatures by 2° to 3° using this strategy. Night cooling offers the potential to minimize or even avoid the use of mechanical cooling and improve the internal conditions in naturally ventilated buildings. Good control of night cooling is required in order to achieve maximum free cooling whilst avoiding overcooling and subsequent re-heating or thermal discomfort the following day. Night Ventilation

Indirect Evaporation

Using water saturated membranes to force air flow through resulting in the evaporation of water and considerably cooling the air. These membranes can be placed in the window openings, or in wind tunnels and towers. This results in the cooling of effect of cooling towers (using in AC technology since a longtime as shown in the figure). This concept was used in all times in Egyptian culture by the concept of placing the water container “kola” near the window to cool it and thus cool the air entering through the window.

Using a combination of stack and pressure ventilation techniques with the assistance of 2 wind chimneys and 2 wind catchers to ventilate all activity zones perfectly. Providing several ventilation inlets and outlets in some rooms to allow for a more controlled ventilation due to the fact that the weather in Aswan has both extreme hot and cold.

Sherif Goubran | University | Environmental Control Systems and Sustainable Design | 51


Design Project|

Design of a house in Aswan (Egypt) using the different environmental design approaches learnt in the course and analysing the design using different programs and experiments. (Not to scale)

Design of a sustainable House (Aswan)

Ecotect Analysis Winter Shadow Analysis

Thermal Analysis Base Case (Hottest Day): The temperatures of the enclosed building zones are way above comfort zone. They are throughout the day similar or even higher than the outside temperature due to the very poor resistivity of the materials used in building and the lack of appropriate ventilation during hot weather. A clear need for wall, roof and window cross section as well as ventilation and other applied passive techniques is apparent.

Designed Cross section (Hottest Day): The inside temperatures start to be more stable and the resistivity of the building zones is apparent in the hotter times of the day. However, all the inside temperatures are still outside the comfort zone which indicates the clear need for good ventilation (especially night ventilation) and the use of other passive techniques applied such as indirect and direct evaporative cooling.

Top View

Designed Cross section (Coldest Day): Despite the strong winds and the relatively low temperatures during the night, the building, using its thermal mass, orientation and design, is able to keep its inside temperatures at all times at around the comfort zone level. This helps minimize the energy use for heating during such cold winter days.

Perspective

Allowing for earlier sun exposure to the living space building block to allow for more heat gain to account for the loss of energy during the night (blinds will be used interiorly to block light penetration) allowing for a good use of the building thermal mass.

The courtyard space, the core of the building has more sun exposure all day to work as a heat radiating factor for the whole house.

Designed Cross section & Good ventilation (Hottest Day): The building inside temperatures is within comfort zone during all night and is always noticeably bellow the outside temperature. However, due to the very rough weather of the location, natural ventilation can only partially solve the problem of overheating of the inside zone more than comfort levels. This makes it very clear that the addition of other passive techniques is a must to counter this very strong heating effect.

8 AM

12 PM

Summer Shadow Analysis

Ventilation Schedule: The timing of the building ventilation is based on when the outside temperature is relatively low and when air speeds are appropriate for good ventilation: making night time the best timing for the ventilation to be efficient and to use the building thermal mass to keep its cool during the day.

Ground Floor Plan (1:100)

Top View

6 AM

All windows overlooking bedrooms and living spaces are shaded in order not to disturb the user’s sleep.

The window overlooking the secondary (1st floor bedrooms) has some light penetration in order to help wake the younger users up early (enhancing human behaviour)

8 AM

Perspective

10 AM

Courtyard has some good morning sun to allow for morning use of outdoor space

The use of the building to shade the reception spaces building block until the end of the day to help minimize their heat gain in the afternoon (since they will be mostly be used later in the day)

4 PM

Natural Light Analysis & Heliodon Adding all the designed passive techniques used in the design aside from the ventilation such as evaporative, indirect evaporative cooling and the seasonal courtyard cover, the building was able to perform with a very high efficiency to most (about 90%) of the inside temperatures of all zones within the needed comfort zone making the design a successful one.

3D Shots

The temperature of the spaces after the use of passive techniques other than ventilation is based on the Ecotect weather tool analysis and is related with a ration to the result of the ventilated and passively cooled,

A Heliodon study was conducted to measure illuminance levels in different locations in the zone as base case study and then with the addition of a light shelf and enlarging the windows. Sensors were fixed on the roof, near the windows and far from them. The table above shows the readings of the illuminance in Lux taken in the study. The variation of lighting levels is clear from the graph where the peak is the closest point to the window. The study shows a great increase in the lighting levels between the base study and modified design where next to the window the illuminance increase about 45%.

First Floor Plan (1:100)

South Elevation (1:100)

Section A-A Courtyard (1:100)

West Elevation (1:100)

Section B-B Ventilation Elements (1:100)

North Elevation (1:100)

East Elevation (1:100)

Sherif Goubran | University | Environmental Control Systems and Sustainable Design | 52


Basic principles of plumbing, electrical, and mechanical systems in buildings. Integration of building systems. Assessment, selection and integration of structural systems, building envelop, environmental, life safety, and building systems into building design Spring - 2012

Building Services systems and Integration

AENG - 426 | Dr. Ismail Shaker


Composite Plan|

Reading & understanding plan drawings of different disciplines of engineering, editing and compiling them on architectural drawings Conflict detection and resolution (Not to Scale)

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Sherif Goubran | Universtity | Building Services Systems and Integration | 54


Composite Section|

Reading & understanding composite drawings of different disciplines of engineering and drawing them on Architectural Sections Conflict detection and resolution (Not to Scale)

Sherif Goubran | Universtity | Building Services Systems and Integration | 55


Studio on Environment and Sustainability. This studio will allow students to investigate various aspects of the environment and ‘sustainability’ as a force within the architectural profession. Recent increases in global climatic and social pressures have necessitated environmental awareness as well as new architectural design solutions. Using current sustainable design strategies as a foundation, students will analyze and implement their own environmentally responsible analysis and designs. Conservation and recycling of materials and waste management. Field trip to gain hand on experience on the sustainable design and waste management is a requirement.

Design Studio 3 AENG - 453 | Dr. Basil Kamel

A Place to Remember: Design of live, work and sell complex of units in 6th of October City. Spring - 2012


Wall Section Design| Wall Section| Sherif Nader Goubran |

Design and Analyse an environmentally friendly sustainable wall section that can be used as the main building unit of the project A concept of the Wall as a living space (Not to Scale)

Aeng-453 Design III

Concept:

Development:

Analysis (Ecotect):

Providing the user with the flexibility to shape and alter some of the usable spaces provided within the wall (or double wall component of the building) by the use of recyclable and easily found materials

Starting with the brainstorm of different ideas and simple uses. Just by having the bottles and using them as a building block with rugged earth to create wall components. The development of the flexible use mesh component and the integration of the vegetation and solar panels within the design.

Using the building mass to create negative spaces that could be used from different levels within the project and that is enclosed or defined using the water bottles mesh (semi transparent). The shading effect of such mesh was analysed and calculated Based on daily averages using Ecotect. Analysis was made based on the conceptional mass model shown.

Using an innovative fixation system for the water bottles to allow them to be placed in a mesh configuration that allows for various uses depending on space and user needs.

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

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Plastic Bottles waste

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Using an innovative fixation system for the water bottles to allow them to be placed in a mesh configuration that allows for various uses depending on space and user needs.

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A Fully shaded Scenario of the walls using the mesh for a south Facade. Allowing for indirect (low incidence) lighting. (Efficient)

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Combining and integrating different environmental aspects within the design, such as use of drain water to cool down building components, roof gardens with high trees vegetations and the creating intermediate spaces within the building that allows for different heat and environmental adaptability in different seasons.

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A semi shaded Scenario of the walls using the mesh for a south Facade. Allowing for more direct incident lighting.

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Different uses of the mesh: -Semitransparent member to be used as partitioning -Lighting enhancing (by the use of salted water) -Using mud to fill the mesh and to be used as vertical vegetation elements. -using rugged earth to close the mesh and create a wall with a high light permeabil ity.

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A fully exposed Scenario of the walls using the mesh for a south Facade. Continuous direct lighting exposure throughout the day

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 3 | 57


- The site is located on a major with a direct access from it.

- The existant landscaping patte and styles could be extended a employed in the design

Site Analysis|

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Analysing all aspects effecting the design of the land in 6th of October site (SODIC development) Architectural, social and behavioural analysis (Not to Scale)

6th of October Site analy Architectural styles

Project categorization

Cairo.Alexandria road

The site is located in the periphery of the city of the 6th of October (Sheikh Zayed) and on the Alexandria-Cairo desert road. This area has gone through intensive development in the last decade in the field of residential and desert agricultural developments. Despite the development the site is generally characterized and interconnected with the desert environment. The surrounding developments include mainly residential (High end residential units), commercial development, and agricultural development. The next five years though would witness a change in the surrounding since most of the planned compounds would be delivered and residents would start to live in the place. So it is expected that it would be a luxurious residential district with commercial centers serving these districts.

Beverly Hills (a high end residential compound owned and built by SODIC developments) includes

Looking apartment at the sitebuildings of the project and thetargeting surroundings andclass location, weplanned can conclude that there are several user target groups. The first target group and houses of analyzing medium sizes high income with well facilities.residents Beverly Hills is designed andthe constructed modern of de-middle to high user class. The second target group would be the would belandscaping the 6th ofand October who surround area of using the site and concepts range from sign with the usewill of modern construction materials and the design uses classical ornaments and to the first target group. The third target group would be the invescraftsmen/artists that work in the spaces to be designed offering some kind of service components such as cornices, gabled roofs and classical stone work. The design uses very simple tors or businessmen who seek to make profit out of these spaces. Finally the last target group would be the sub division target group who intend to use or own and basic geometry and basic structural systems in the design, lacking any creative or innovative only partdesign of the building for help a single specific use being orthe workspace. ideas that could inspire new designs in the residential, area. However,retail due to high percentage land use for landscaping and greenery in this residential compound, it greatly could assist the site

Patternsclimatically of use of and spaces (Interior) and the site could use the greenery patterns already exciting in environmentally

The site is mainly accessible from the Dahshour road which links the Alexandria desert road to the 6th of october city. Another way to access the site is by using the Alexandria road directly. The site is already connected to the adjacent developments (sodic and beverly hills).

Dahshour road

Allocated site

Top right: Site location with surrounding developments, road network and projects. left: Solid void relaionship for the site locations. Right: Area allocations for land use according to the neighnourhood laws (Different than implemented in neighbouring developments Bottom right: Neighbouring developments description. Bottom left: Architectural styles and analysis for the different projects within the context of the plot

Area allocations

Landscaping 40%

Services 20%

Foot Print 40%

Beverly Hills to create and integrate the different vegetation and landscaping elements within the Single use Combinedsurrounding. use (Live-work-sell) This style and pattern of design was not continued in all of the development area used by SODIC, In the combined use, the different spaces of the building are all used by the same users serving one the adjacent lands to the site have been developed as a commercial center called “The Strip” In the single use, the different spaces of the building are divided into clear zones main function. Here a number of scenarios/patterns the interaction between spaces & a andused by different owners. In each building there would be different people ownfor high endexist retail and design boutiques. The stripfor is designed and built using contemporary ing and using every single space. There would be a family living in the apartment number ofavant-garde scenarios/patterns for the interaction client and provider. architectural concepts (suchbetween as the one followed in Designopolis). Using concepts of regional modern and building basing on cultural and human behavioral needs and trends, The for instance, a mid-sized company in the workspace and a showroom in the retail Interaction between space. Strip patternspaces: and style could be useful for the site as it provides a good and neutral adjacent surThe relationship between may differ would beofthe the spaces rounding for the spaces site thathere could assist its vastly design.since The it geometry Theowner Strip isofalmost linear (being decision to defineHowever, the zonesasbased on his business’ needs.aimed For instance the owner choose that a strip). the designers of the project to concentrate on may the experience of thePatterns of use of spaces Looking at the different kinds of users that the space may attract it can be the workspace at the which the products are createdand would a private zone where no clients can open user for space, different curvatures tilts be were used within the buildings, creating observed that their needs in the exterior zone of the space are unified. This goes access or walkways view. On the other he may to space make interesting it a public or semi-public where within thehand buildings, to choose make the and encouragezone the user to discover clients areand able to view craftsmen in action maybe interact withmodern them for thethe sake ofof learning explore the design. the façadeordesign used in rather with use modernthe stoneback to our cultural and human psychology background of the intended users. Peoprofessionfinishes (workshop). (not found locally), modern curtain walls as well as simple outdoor and landscaping to ple who will visit the project will seek outdoor interaction spaces where they could meet, socialize, view each other and maybe enjoy a refreshing beverage or meal. concentrate the focus on the buildings. Also adjacent to the site in study, is the development area Interaction between client and by provider: before there owned and developed SODIC in cooperation with Solidaire named WestTown Cairo. It is sup-As stated Top left: Beverly hills are several users that will visit the space; some will visit to strip theright: dayThe out with no other intention rather than having some fun. Others The clientposed here may to interact in several being visually, personally educationto bechoose designed as the new center manners for the western area of the capital, or including a numberspend of Top Middle left: A boutique at the strip a product. Other users may visit to attend a workdifferent developments residential, commercial to of administrative ally. On the visual level client mayranging choosefrom to observe the different types products andbuildings. view theCur- may visit the space to purchase Middle right & bottom: Cairo west cmmercial and residential in the designs from contemporary modern architects craftsmenrently or artists in design action phase, only forthe thearea sakewill of include satisfying their curiosity. On the personal level the shop in order to learn a skill or two. Anyway it can be concluded that the exterior and and with aims the to be a pioneer green and environmental design in the area zone should provide services that complete the project in terms of satisfying all client maylocally choose tointernationally interact in person salesman orinthe craftsmen for the sake of clarificaand in Egypt as a whole. Located on the ither side of the Dahshour road a plot of land outside users’ needs. It should offer what the interior spaces does not provide and more. tion or negotiation or simply pleasure. the ownership of SODIC developments, the area is not very developed with the existence of an electric plant adjacent to the development land and the high way connecting 6th of October to Alex-Cairo desert road (Dahshour Road). However, numerous privately owned pieces of land are built up as private residences and many of the lands are sold for future developments or currently under development from different companies or privately. None of the surrounding developments or project’s designs, use of materials, geometry or patterns could help in the design or inspiring the project since they all seem to be following international styles of architecture and not putting in consideration all the contextual factors of the area. However, it is important to understand this architectural style and understand all its problematic design decisions to make sure the project - Due to the site’s remote location, studyafinds and contrasts examples of bad architecture using good and supported design - Locationininside booming develop-these theand user group might awareness be restricted the use of environmental ment areadecisions which is in expected to materials be to the residents of the surrounding the center of western Cairo in the compounds. near future. Environmental analysis:

S W

Comfort Percentages

The and site is geometry is restrictive - The site The is allocated in an already site is located on Dahsour -road mainly surrounded bywhen desert areas. The most prevailing comes to the designaxis andwhich mustgives be the plot a relatively small exinhabitedwind area direction with infrastructure and is a bit tilted onitthe plot longitudinal welltilted to produce dy- so it hits three sides of the plot. services available. posure to north wind. The dailymanipulated sun path is also on the aland namic environment. - The site The is adjacent to a commercial desert environment in which the plot is allocated requires some attention when dealing with site isand exposed to the harsh de- Wind blows carrying sands strip mall environmental which can helpaspects to attract since it -isThe a rough dynamic environment. sert environment, this needs the attention this mallbeusers. and of dust must taken into consideration in building designspecial to avoid inconveniences on windy treatment in the design. days. Massing design of the building must try to tackle the solar exposure of the building to prehigh solar - The site vent is located on a gains. major street - The site is within very close proximwith a direct access from it. ityfound to a residential area which imposThe use of native plants already in the desert environment could be encorporated in the design and wouldpatterns help in taming without draining es the alotenvironment of design restrictions when it too much water resources. - The existant landscaping comes to noise and glare. and styles could be extended and employed in the design

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Architectural analysis: Beverly Hills (a high end residential compound owned and built by SODIC developments) includes apartment buildings and houses of medium sizes targeting high income class with well planned landscaping and facilities. Beverly Hills is designed and constructed using modern concepts of design with the use of modern construction materials and the design uses classical ornaments and components such as cornices, gabled roofs and classical stone work. The design uses very simple and basic geometry and basic structural systems in the design, lacking any creative or innovative design ideas that could help inspire new designs in the area. However, due to the high percentage land use for landscaping and greenery in this residential compound, it greatly could assist the site

Project categorization

- No characteristic style in the area which gives you freedom when approaching the design.

T

- The piece of land on the other side of dahshour road opposite to our site is privately owend so it is hard to speculate its development.

- The current developments are lack- Due to the demographics of the area ing any interactive retail zones for arts (high income reisdents) blue collar and crafts. workers would have to employed from surrounding neighbourhoods. - The area is highly residential which allows for greater pool of potential - Due to the close proximity to bevercustomers. ly hills the site maybe associated with beverly hills compound. - The area has a great solar exposure with clear skies which poses great - The sodic development has planned conditions for solar energy generafor a traditional style market place tion.

- Theevolution area is highly residential w History and of surroundi

allows for greater pool of pote The 6th of customers. October city was initiated in th evolving on the industrial level with the c area hasMany a great solar exp no demand- The on the city. years later with layer clear did skies whichand poses gre the residential initiate even conditions for solar energy gen 400 km2 and it occupies around 500,000 tion.

- The new developments with m ern style architecture would en courage the design to be mode and innovative but still in conte

2003

Pattern of use of spaces (E

Looking at the different kinds o man psychology background of 2003beverage or enjoy a refreshing some fun. Others may visit the should provide services that co

Elements of composition:

2003 Analyzing the behavioral aspect

Visual Interaction Opening up spaces and creating tween different entities being ‘i exterior’ or ‘interior to interior’ mal use of barriers and the crea spaces together.

2007

SELECTED DESIGN TECHNIQUES: 1. passive solar heating 2. thermal mass effects 3. exposed mass + night-purge ventilation 4. natural ventilation 5. direct evaporative cooling

NAME: CAIRO LOCATION: EGY WEEKDAYS: 00:00 - 24:00 Hrs WEEKENDS: 00:00 - 24:00 Hrs POSITION: 30.1°, 31.4°

2007

© Weather Tool

%

Architectural styles

- The current developments are ing any interactive retail zones crafts. Culturaland context:

Architectural analysis: Behavioural aspects and analysis:

Urban analysis:

Solid-Void relationship

- No characteristic style in the a which gives you freedom when proaching the design.

Before

MULTIPLE PASSIVE DESIGN TECHNIQUES

2007 After

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Commercial and economical context

2009 As the densification of 6th of October city last decade or so), an analysis of the surr West town perspective viewcan over be limited Top to aleft: few examples and yet Top right: Designopolis shopping mall spaces surrounding the site Middle left: Haram city are Designop right: Haram city concepts a furnishing Middle and interior related Mall of arabia shopping cente stores, andBottom Mall left: of Arabia, the second lar Bottom right: West town central area (we high-middle to high end retail stores.

A closer look at Designopolis would revea crust of society, possibly only the highest provided services are aimed at “changing which can be considered the intended m project provides other leisure services th children’s play area and a gallery wall ( to struction), its home furnishing shops are and social scene for the area.

The second major commercial outlet in th ping centre in Egypt which spreads over a is home to 900 retail brands, a hotel and Designopolis, the mall of Arabia targets a partially due to its much bigger scale bes

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 3 | 58


Behavioural aspects and analysis:

Cultural context:

Looking at the site of the project and analyzing the surroundings and location, we can conclude that there are several user target groups. The first target group would be the 6th of October residents who surround the area of the site and range from middle to high user class. The second target group would be the craftsmen/artists that will work in the spaces to be designed offering some kind of service to the first target group. The third target group would be the investors or businessmen who seek to make profit out of these spaces. Finally the last target group would be the sub division target group who intend to use or own only part of the building for a single specific use being residential, retail or workspace.

History and evolution of surrounding

Case study

The 6th of October city was initiated in the year 1979 by former president Anwar El Sadat. At this time the city did not develop on the residential level. However it started evolving on the industrial level with the construction of several factories and industrial areas. At this point the connection between the city and Cairo was weak since there was no demand on the city. Many years later the city started developing on many other levels as entertainment centers, universities and schools started appearing. It was then that the residential layer did initiate and eventually dense up. It can be stated that the flourishing of the 6th of October city occurred in the past 10 years. Today the city is about 400 km2 and it occupies around 500,000 occupants.

Wekalet El Ghoury: The ‘wekala’ is a place where merchants gathered for trade, while it also served as residence for the merchants and their families. It was built in such a manner that there existed a court in the center surrounded by several stories of rooms and spaces. The first floor was where the trade took place and the upper levels were the living space. The ground floors served as warehouses and storage areas.

Patterns of use of spaces (Interior) Combined use (Live-work-sell)

Single use

In the combined use, the different spaces of the building are all used by the same users serving one main function. Here exist a number of scenarios/patterns for the interaction between spaces & a number of scenarios/patterns for the interaction between client and provider.

In the single use, the different spaces of the building are divided into clear zones used by different owners. In each building there would be different people owning and using every single space. There would be a family living in the apartment for instance, a mid-sized company in the workspace and a showroom in the retail space.

Site Analysis| Interaction between spaces: The relationship between spaces here may differ vastly since it would be the owner of the spaces decision to define the zones based on his business’ needs. For instance the owner may choose that the workspace at which the products are created would be a private zone where no clients can access or view. On the other hand he may choose to make it a public or semi-public zone where clients are able to view craftsmen in action or maybe interact with them for the sake of learning the profession (workshop).

2003

2005

Analysing all aspects effecting the design of the land in 6th of October site (SODIC development) Architectural, social and behavioural analysis (Not to Scale)

h of October Site analysis

a allocations

Interaction between client and provider: The client here may choose to interact in several manners being visually, personally or educationally. On the visual level client may choose to observe the different types of products and view the craftsmen or artists in action only for the sake of satisfying their curiosity. On the personal level the client may choose to interact in person with the salesman or the craftsmen for the sake of clarification or negotiation or simply pleasure.

d analysis:

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Patterns of use of spaces Looking at the different kinds of users that the space may attract it can be observed that their needs in the exterior zone of the space are unified. This goes back to our cultural and human psychology background of the intended users. People who will visit the project will seek outdoor interaction spaces where they could meet, socialize, view each other and maybe enjoy a refreshing beverage or meal. As stated before there are several users that will visit the space; some will visit to spend the day out with no other intention rather than having some fun. Others may visit the space to purchase a product. Other users may visit to attend a workshop in order to learn a skill or two. Anyway it can be concluded that the exterior zone should provide services that complete the project in terms of satisfying all users’ needs. It should offer what the interior spaces does not provide and more.

2003

2003

2003

the center of western Cairo in the near future.

to the residents of the surrounding compounds.

- The site geometry is restrictive when - The site is allocated in an already be inhabited area with infrastructure and it comes to the design and must Single use manipulated well to produce a dyservices available. namic environment. adjacent a commercial nt spaces of the building- The aresite allisused byto the same users serving one In the single use, the different spaces of the building are divided into clear zones - The site is exposed to the harsh destrip mall which can help to attract ber of scenarios/patternsthefor the interaction spaces & this a needs used sert environment, special by different owners. In each building there would be different people ownattention of this mall users.between treatment in the design. ing and using every single space. There would be a family living in the apartment r the interaction between client and provider. - The site is located on a major street instance, a mid-sized company in the workspace and a showroom in the retail - The site is within very close for proximwith a direct access from it. ity to a residential area whichspace. imposes alot of design restrictions when it - The existant landscaping patterns here may differ vastly since it would be the owner of the spaces comes to noise and glare. and styles could be extended and employed in the designthe owner may choose that Patterns of use of spaces ed on his business’ needs. For instance

ucts are created would be a private zone where no clients can d he may choose to make it a public or semi-public zone where n in action or maybe interact with them for the sake of learning the

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- The area is highly residential which allows for greater pool of potential customers. - The area has a great solar exposure with clear skies which poses great conditions for solar energy generation.

- The new developments with modern style architecture would en- Due to the site’scourage remote location, the design to be modern and innovative but still in context. the user group might be restricted

(high income reisdents) blue collar workers would have to employed from surrounding neighbourhoods.

- Due to the close proximity to beverly hills the site maybe associated with beverly hills compound.

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- The piece of land on the other side of dahshour road opposite to our site is privately owend so it is hard to speculate its development.

Top left: West town perspective view over the commercial area ackTop right: Designopolis shopping mall - Due to the demographics of the area Middle left: Haram city r arts Middle right: Haram (high income reisdents) bluecitycollar Bottom left: Mall of arabia shopping center Bottom to right:employed West town central area (west el balad) workers would have from surrounding neighbourhoods. hich tial - Due to the close proximity to beverly hills the site maybe associated with beverly hills compound. sure at - The sodic development has planned afor a traditional style market place in it’s westtown development which holds similar characteristics to the odproposed project.

n t.

terior)

2008

The 6th of October city was initiated in the year 1979 by former president Anwar El Sadat. At this time the city did not develop on the residential level. However it started 2007 2008 evolving on the industrial level with the construction of several factories and industrial areas. At this point the connection between the city and Cairo was weak since there was no demand on the city. Many years later the city started developing on many other levels as entertainment centers, universities and schools started appearing. It was then that the residential layer did initiate and eventually dense up. It can be stated that the flourishing of the 6th of October city occurred in the past 10 years. Today the city is about 2007 2008 400 km2 and it occupies around 500,000 occupants.

2009 2009 Economical aspects:

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Commercial and economical context

A closer look at Designopolis would reveal that it is aimed towards serving the higher crust of society, possibly only the highest. Its modern and simplistic architecture and provided services are aimed at “changing the cultural and economic scene in Cairo”, which can be considered the intended message for this specific project. Although the project provides other leisure services than home furnishing such as dining spaces, children’s play area and a gallery wall ( to be incorporated within the next phase of construction), its home furnishing shops are what mainly defines the refined economical and social scene for the area.

2035

3.5 3 2.5 2 Inhabitants in millions 1.5 1 0.5 0 2010

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Demographic studies and aspects

2005

Studies of the demographics of 6th of October city can be another valuable tool in the assessment its economical aspects. Although the current population of the city is around 500,000. Upon completion of all residential projects in the area the population is expected to boom up to 3.7 to 5.5 million inhabitants. 2005 With the exception of very few large scale projects, the majority of the residential projects located in 6th of October provide middle to high income housing. While a large number of these residential compounds provide exclusively single family villas and townhouses (such as Allegria) and only target Egypt’s elite. Although not as widely recognized as the higher class residential spots, there exist a few lower income housing projects in the city of 6th of October, including but not limited to Haram city, this project can variably change the economic demographics of the area. While the average pric2008between a couple ing of a villa in the 6th of October ranges to several million LE, the price of a unit in Haram city is set at 62,000- 85,000 LE.

2007

2035

Job capabilities

Political and socio economical impact

As previously mentioned, the majority of the residents of 6th of October city are middlehigh to high income people with a somewhat small percentage of residents being of any lower economical status. The economical state of an area’s residents is significant in the sense that it makes up the most likely consumers and service providers in any retail project. In the case of the specific project in hand, the surrounding context provides enough potential for white collar employees, shop owners and target audience. However, it might be lacking with respect to blue collar workers due to the nature of the surrounding housing projects. Although quite remote from areas like Nasr city and New Cairo, the city of 6th of October is considered quite close to Giza and Al haram districts, which house low income areas such as Al Warraq and Imbaba. The majority of blue-collar workers which hold jobs in 6th of October are most likely to reside in these areas and in outskirts of the city.

Although an initial foreign look would presume a high political value of the city of 6th of October due to its name which commemorates the 1973 military operations, the city’s composition is highly residential and commercial. As it is located remotely from the city hub, it is quite distant from and holds no relation to international affairs institutions such as embassies and consulates. In addition, it also holds no connection to local governmental institutions such as ministries, the people’s assembly or the supreme constitutional court. The city’s remoteness from almost all local and international political affairs institution implies its isolation from the disturbances which may occur in such places. For example, during the 2011 uprising in Egypt, the downtown area (which represents the local political focal point) witnessed almost constant disturbance due to the political and governmental nature of the institutions located there. In this sense, the downtown area and 6th of October city would be located at the opposite sides of the ‘political impact’ spectrum. On another hand, the city of 6th of October houses, or is in very close adjacency to, Egypt’s Smart village; the technology hub and headquarters of the major Information Technology companies in the region with 20% ownership to the ministry of communications and information technology and 80% private ownership. This marks the area as Egypt’s centre for the IT business community.

2005

2008

Top right: Wekalet el ghoury Left: West town development perspective Bottom right: Zewail city for sciences and technology

2008

1.Creation of various subzones of varying exCommunity posure to the outdoor climate throughout the translated into the interaction of spaces on the site (as opposed to having only 2 separate insingle cell level as well as the interaction of door and outdoor entities). This recommenda- the cells together through the whole complex 2007 to create the united and communal pattern of 2008 tion is based on the sometimes harsh “desert” climate of the area. life. 2.Incorporate the surrounding vegetation patterns within the project to help integrate the new design within the surroundings and possibly act as buffers and purifiers for the internal environment. 3.Breaking the strictly linear setting of the chosen site through the introduction of geometrically irregular parking zones and outdoor features so as to retain a more sight catching scenery for on-lookers and passer- bys. 4.Base the design on a node concept to create meeting and interactive points of various 2009 Dynamic 2010 levels to support the function of the complex, the design and its geometry should respond creating a sustainable living community and a to the dynamic patterns and interactions that balanced experience for visitors it will be housing as well as the dynamic way of 5.Due to the linear setting of the site, landlife of its permanent users by having complex marks and defining features should be considinteractions of spaces and dynamic structures 2009 that could be experienced and perceived dif2010 ered within the design to make the designed place more user-oriented. ferently for users and to not create stagnant 6.In response to the area demographics, the and standardized spaces. design geometry should allow for spaces that keep the various family members occupied Commercial and economical context during the visit (i.e. children’s play-area for toddlers, sitting areas overlooking these area 2009 2010 for nannies and mother to keep an eye theirof October city is relative new (its full spring began in the As the densification ofon6th kids, etc..) last decade or so), an analysis of the surrounding commercial context of the site would 7.Creating a vehicular entrance to the site that is off the highwayto which reduces/ prebemain limited a few examples and yet can still be quite informative. The two major retail Cultural Consideration vents congestion caused by visitor’s drop-off spaces surrounding the site areUsing Designopolis, retail area for office and home historic and localprimarily references forathe and service trucks visiting the site. ( to avoid work live cell concepts (such as to the 300 wekala) the crowding phenomena by projects furnishing andcaused interior relatedrather concepts and home international and local retail that international examples in order such as downtown mall in road 90) stores, and Mall of Arabia, thetosecond largest mallnorms in the Middle East which is home to be able to extend cultural and to 8.Design of geometries which provide proper the users with the right charterer of to high end retailprovide stores. servicehigh-middle access, suitable visitor’s access to “clispaces ent zones” and ease of movement in between

Flexibility & Efficiency of spaces

the understanding and consideration within the design of the different activities and behavioral use patterns of spaces to provide for multi options and configuration of spaces to fit more than just one activity based on the users’ needs and preferences in order to use the land efficiently. design will be a major deciding factor for its success.

2009

2010

Economical aspects:

Sensibility

the design should provide alternating levels of privacy within each cell as well as the whole complex while providing the user with enough options and areas of interactions (to see and to be seen). This sensibility of the design will be a major deciding factor for its success.

As part of the initial phase of research for a project, an economical analysis of the surrounding context is essential as it draws up a clear picture of what activities or services can be provided in the area, which social class is being addressed, the kind of labor that will be available for hiring and possibly the political message to be conveyed through the project, if any. The following section is aimed at recognizing the economical scene by which the chosen plot of land is surrounded which helps in recognizing the aspects of design and operation which were previously mentioned.

the various work-live-sell elements for site A owners. closer look at Designopolis would reveal that it is aimed towards serving the higher property 9.Creation of multi-levels of privacy within aonly the highest. Its modern and simplistic architecture and crust of society, possibly single unit which cater to the nature of the are aimed projectprovided (as it containsservices both live and work spac- at “changing the cultural and economic scene in Cairo”, es). This can be achieved through concepts which can be considered like the intended message for this specific project. Although the adjacency of elements, building protrusions project provides leisureLearning services than home furnishing such as dining spaces, and cut-outs, vegetation barriersother and orientathe design should make sure to provide the tion of children’s openings. play area and a gallery wall ( to be incorporated within the next phase of condifferent targeted users the spaces and envi10.Due to the very close proximity of the site struction), its home furnishing shops not areonly what mainly defines the refined economical ronmental for social and commercial with a residential neighborhood, special care but for learning opportunities and should and be given to sustainable methods social scenedesign for the area. interaction sharing of ideas. so as to ensure the elimination of noise pollu-

6 2008

Wekalet El Ghoury: The ‘wekala’ is a place where merchants gathered for trade, while it also served as residence for the merchants and their families. It was built in such a manner that there existed a court in the center surrounded by several stories of rooms and spaces. The first floor was where the trade took place and the upper levels were the living space. The ground floors served as warehouses and storage areas.

As part of the initial phase of research for a project, an economical analysis of the surrounding context is essential as it draws up a clear picture of what activities or services can be provided in the area, which social class is being addressed, the kind of labor that2009 will be available for hiring and possibly the political 2010message to be conveyed through the project, if any. The following section is aimed at recognizing the economical scene by which the chosen plot of land is surrounded which helps in recognizing the aspects of design and operation which were previously mentioned.

Design recommendations:

man psychology background of the intended users. People who will visit the project will seek outdoor interaction spaces where they could meet, socialize, view each other and maybe enjoy a refreshing beverage or meal. As stated before there are several users that will visit the space; some will visit to spend the day out with no other intention rather than having

Oct

2007

2007

- The sodic development has planned for a traditional style market place in it’s westtown development which holds similar characteristics to the proposed project.

Case study

2008

The second major commercial outlet in the area is the Mall of Arabia, the biggest shopping centre in Egypt which spreads over an area of over 1 million square meters and is home to 900 retail brands, a hotel and a 2007 compound. As opposed to the prestigious Designopolis, the mall of Arabia targets a wider array of economic classes, which can be partially due to its much bigger scale besides its objective audience.

- The site geometry restrictive when dy someisfun. Others may visit the space to purchase a product. Other users may visit to attend a workshop in order to learn a skill or two. Anyway it can be concluded that the exterior zone should provide servicesbe that complete the project in terms of satisfying all users’ needs. It should offer what the interior spaces does not provide and more. and must e and it comes to the design manipulated wellElements to produce a dyof composition: Analyzing the behavioral aspects of the different users of the space we can conclude that there would exist a number of elements that compose the space and its design. namic environment. rcial Visual Interaction Commercial Interaction Personal Interaction Educational Interaction Opening spaces and creating Making retail zones a point of Assuring that there is adequate space Assuring that at least some of the - The site is exposed toupthe harsh de- direct visual connection bect tween different entities being ‘interior to exterior’ or ‘exterior to attraction and direct relation to for users of all different kinds to socialize workspaces of the buildings are availasert environment, this needs special exterior’ or ‘interior to interior’. This can be translated to minimain spine of project. User should and interact on a personal space supble for users to interact with and learn mal use of barriers and the creation of good nodes that connect access retail spaces and find them ported and encouraged by the design of from. The creation of a workshop spirit treatment in the design. spaces together. easily. the space. is essential. reet - The site is within very close proximPeople per feddan ity to a residential area which impos60 es alot of design restrictions when it ns comes to noise and glare. d

After

2007evolution of surrounding History and

high-middle to high end retail stores.

lopbe to the residents of the surrounding e Pattern of use of spaces (Exterior) compounds. Looking at the different kinds of users that the space may attract it can be observed that their needs in the exterior zone of the space are unified. This goes back to our cultural and hu-

Before

Top right: Wekalet el ghoury Left: West town development perspective Bottom right: Zewail city for sciences and technology

2003 2009 2010 of October city is relative new (its full spring began in the Looking at the different kinds of users that the space may attract it can be As the densification of 6th last decade or so), an analysis of the surrounding commercial context of the site would observed that their needs in the exterior zone of the space are unified. This goes be limited to a few examples and yet can still be quite informative. The two major retail and home back to our cultural and human psychology background of the intended users. Peo-spaces surrounding the site are Designopolis, primarily a retail area for office 2003 and interior related concepts and home to 300 international and local retail ple who will visit the project will seek outdoor interaction spaces where they could furnishing stores, and Mall of Arabia, the second largest mall in the Middle East which is home to 2003 meet, socialize, view each other and maybe enjoy a refreshing beverage or meal.

As stated before there are several users that will visit the space; some will visit to provider: spend the day out with no other intention rather than having some fun. Others teract in several manners being visually, personally or education- The piece of land on the other side characteristic style of in the area y choose to observe the- No different types products view ofand dahshour roadthe opposite tomay our visit the space to purchase a product. Other users may visit to attend a workwhich gives you freedom when apsite is privately owend hard toin order to learn a skill or two. Anyway it can be concluded that the exterior y for the sake of satisfying theirthe curiosity. On the personal level theso it isshop proaching design. speculate its development. person with the salesman or the craftsmen for the sake of clarifica- zone should provide services that complete the project in terms of satisfying all - The current developments are lack- Due to the demographics ofusers’ the area needs. It should offer what the interior spaces does not provide and more. asure. ing any interactive retail zones for arts and crafts.

2005

2005

Cultural context:

oject andFoot analyzing the surroundings and location, we can conclude that there are several user target groups. The first target group Print ping r residents 40% who surround the area of the site and range from middle to high user class. The second target group would be the ork in the spaces to be designed offering some kind of service to the first target group. The third target group would be the invesek to make profit out of these spaces. Finally the last target group would be the sub division target group who intend to use or own Services - Location inside a booming develop- - Due to the site’s remote location, a single being residential, retailtheoruser workspace. 20% specific use ment group might be restricted area which is expected to be

terior)

2005

tion (or any other sort of inconvenience to the residents) that might be major resulting from specific The second commercial outlet in the area is the Mall of Arabia, the biggest shopAffordability application installations. ping centre inmaterials Egypt (such which over the aneconomical area of and over 1 million square meters and understanding financial 11.Using the site available as spreads the targeted group (unbalanced sand) or create finishes isrecycled homematerials to 900toretail brands, asituation hotelofand a compound. As opposed to the prestigious incomes and non regular incomes and life patand building components to respond to be Designopolis, the mall of Arabia targets a wider array of economic classes, which can be terns) will be a key in the choice of materials, leading in environmental awareness design in finishes, structures and its components. partially due to its much bigger scale besides objective audience. the area.

Demographic studies and aspects

Job capabilities

Political and socio economical impact

Studies of the demographics of 6th of October city can be another valuable tool in the assessment its economical aspects. Although the current population of the city is around Environmental engagement 500,000. Upon ofwith all the residential projects in the not only completion provide the project environmental components but providingto components area the population is expected boom up to 3.7 to 5.5 that could engage the user to interact and use million inhabitants. them in order to have a better environmental

As previously mentioned, the majority of the residents of 6th of October city are middlehigh to high income people with a somewhat small percentage of residents being of any lower economical status. The economical state of an area’s residents is significant in the sense that it makes up the most likely consumers and service providers in any retail project. In the case of the specific project in hand, the surrounding context provides enough potential for white collar employees, shop owners and target audience. However, it might be lacking with respect to blue collar workers due to the nature of the surrounding housing projects. Although quite remote from areas like Nasr city and New Cairo, the city of 6th of October is considered quite close to Giza and Al haram districts, which house low income areas such as Al Warraq and Imbaba. The majority of blue-collar workers which hold jobs in 6th of October are most likely to reside in these areas and in outskirts of the city.

Although an initial foreign look would presume a high political value of the city of 6th of October due to its name which commemorates the 1973 military operations, the city’s composition is highly residential and commercial. As it is located remotely from the city hub, it is quite distant from and holds no relation to international affairs institutions such as embassies and consulates. In addition, it also holds no connection to local governmental institutions such as ministries, the people’s assembly or the supreme constitutional court. The city’s remoteness from almost all local and international political affairs institution implies its isolation from the disturbances which may occur in such places. For example, during the 2011 uprising in Egypt, the downtown area (which represents the local political focal point) witnessed almost constant disturbance due to the political and governmental nature of the institutions located there. In this sense, the downtown area and 6th of October city would be located at the opposite sides of the ‘political impact’ spectrum. On another hand, the city of 6th of October houses, or is in very close adjacency to, Egypt’s Smart village; the technology hub and headquarters of the major Information Technology companies in the region with 20% ownership to the ministry of communications and information technology and 80% private ownership. This marks the area as Egypt’s centre for the IT business community.

and sustainable awareness

With the exception of very few large scale projects, the majority of the residential projects located in 6th of October provide middle to high income housing. While a large number of these residential compounds provide exclusively single family villas and townhouses (such as Allegria) and only targetInnovation Egypt’s elite. being a place of crafts and arts, the design should respond to its function by providing the

Although users not with as widely asusers the higher class the spacesrecognized that motivate the be creative. Providing well equipment and residentialto spots, there exist a few lower income housthought out spaces for artistic and crafts activiing projects ties.in the city of 6th of October, including but not limited to Haram city, this project can variably change the economic demographics of the area. While the average pricing of a villa in the 6th of October ranges between a couple to several million LE, the price of a unit in Haram city is set at 62,000- 85,000 LE.

/// Mona Serag, Moaz Sameh, Sherif Goubran, Hassan Safwat

Design recommendations: 1.Creation of various subzones of varying exposure to the outdoor climate throughout the site (as opposed to having only 2 separate indoor and outdoor entities). This recommendation is based on the sometimes harsh “desert” climate of the area.

Community

translated into the interaction of spaces on the single cell level as well as the interaction of the cells together through the whole complex to create the united and communal pattern of life.

Flexibility & Efficiency of spaces

the understanding and consideration within the design of the different activities and behavioral use patterns of spaces to provide for multi options and configuration of spaces to fit more than just one activity based on the users’

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 3 | 59


A closer look at Designopolis would reveal that it is aimed towards serving the higher crust of society, possibly only the highest. Its modern and simplistic architecture and provided services are aimed at “changing the cultural and economic scene in Cairo”, which can be considered the intended message for this specific project. Although the project provides other leisure services than home furnishing such as dining spaces, children’s play area and a gallery wall ( to be incorporated within the next phase of construction), its home furnishing shops are what mainly defines the refined economical and social scene for the area.

Site Analysis|

With the exception of very few large scale projects, the majority of the residential projects located in 6th of October provide middle to high income housing. While a large number of these residential compounds provide exclusively single family villas and townhouses (such as Allegria) and only target Egypt’s elite. Although not as widely recognized as the higher class residential spots, there exist a few lower income housing projects in the city of 6th of October, including but not limited to Haram city, this project can variably change the economic demographics of the area. While the average pricing of a villa in the 6th of October ranges between a couple to several million LE, the price of a unit in Haram city is set at 62,000- 85,000 LE.

providers in any retail project. In the case of the specific project in hand, the surrounding context provides enough potential for white collar employees, shop owners and target audience. However, it might be lacking with respect to blue collar workers due to the nature of the surrounding housing projects. Although quite remote from areas like Nasr city and New Cairo, the city of 6th of October is considered quite close to Giza and Al haram districts, which house low income areas such as Al Warraq and Imbaba. The majority of blue-collar workers which hold jobs in 6th of October are most likely to reside in these areas and in outskirts of the city.

or the supreme constitutional court. The city’s remoteness from almost all local and international political affairs institution implies its isolation from the disturbances which may occur in such places. For example, during the 2011 uprising in Egypt, the downtown area (which represents the local political focal point) witnessed almost constant disturbance due to the political and governmental nature of the institutions located there. In this sense, the downtown area and 6th of October city would be located at the opposite sides of the ‘political impact’ spectrum. On another hand, the city of 6th of October houses, or is in very close adjacency to, Egypt’s Smart village; the technology hub and headquarters of the major Information Technology companies in the region with 20% ownership to the ministry of communications and information technology and 80% private ownership. This marks the area as Egypt’s centre for the IT business community.

Analysing all aspects effecting the design of the land in 6th of October site (SODIC development) Architectural, social and behavioural analysis (Not to Scale)

The second major commercial outlet in the area is the Mall of Arabia, the biggest shopping centre in Egypt which spreads over an area of over 1 million square meters and is home to 900 retail brands, a hotel and a compound. As opposed to the prestigious Designopolis, the mall of Arabia targets a wider array of economic classes, which can be partially due to its much bigger scale besides its objective audience.

Design recommendations:

nified. This goes back to our cultural and humeet, socialize, view each other and maybe ith no other intention rather than having way it can be concluded that the exterior zone ovide and more.

pose the space and its design.

e alize pn of

Educational Interaction Assuring that at least some of the workspaces of the buildings are available for users to interact with and learn from. The creation of a workshop spirit is essential.

People per feddan

50

6 2008

2015

2035

2020

2025 Years

2030

2035

1.Creation of various subzones of varying exposure to the outdoor climate throughout the site (as opposed to having only 2 separate indoor and outdoor entities). This recommendation is based on the sometimes harsh “desert” climate of the area. 2.Incorporate the surrounding vegetation patterns within the project to help integrate the new design within the surroundings and possibly act as buffers and purifiers for the internal environment. 3.Breaking the strictly linear setting of the chosen site through the introduction of geometrically irregular parking zones and outdoor features so as to retain a more sight catching scenery for on-lookers and passer- bys. 4.Base the design on a node concept to create meeting and interactive points of various levels to support the function of the complex, creating a sustainable living community and a balanced experience for visitors 5.Due to the linear setting of the site, landmarks and defining features should be considered within the design to make the designed place more user-oriented. 6.In response to the area demographics, the design geometry should allow for spaces that keep the various family members occupied during the visit (i.e. children’s play-area for toddlers, sitting areas overlooking these area for nannies and mother to keep an eye on their kids, etc..) 7.Creating a vehicular entrance to the site that is off the main highway which reduces/ prevents congestion caused by visitor’s drop-off and service trucks visiting the site. ( to avoid the crowding phenomena caused by projects such as downtown mall in road 90) 8.Design of geometries which provide proper service access, suitable visitor’s access to “client zones” and ease of movement in between the various work-live-sell elements for site property owners. 9.Creation of multi-levels of privacy within a single unit which cater to the nature of the project (as it contains both live and work spaces). This can be achieved through concepts like adjacency of elements, building protrusions and cut-outs, vegetation barriers and orientation of openings. 10.Due to the very close proximity of the site with a residential neighborhood, special care should be given to sustainable design methods so as to ensure the elimination of noise pollution (or any other sort of inconvenience to the residents) that might be resulting from specific application installations. 11.Using the site available materials (such as sand) or recycled materials to create finishes and building components to respond to be leading in environmental awareness design in the area.

Community

Flexibility & Efficiency of spaces

Dynamic

Sensibility

Cultural Consideration

Environmental engagement

Learning

Innovation

translated into the interaction of spaces on the single cell level as well as the interaction of the cells together through the whole complex to create the united and communal pattern of life.

the design and its geometry should respond to the dynamic patterns and interactions that it will be housing as well as the dynamic way of life of its permanent users by having complex interactions of spaces and dynamic structures that could be experienced and perceived differently for users and to not create stagnant and standardized spaces.

Using historic and local references for the work live cell concepts (such as the wekala) rather that international examples in order to be able to extend cultural norms and to provide the users with the right charterer of spaces

the design should make sure to provide the different targeted users the spaces and environmental not only for social and commercial interaction but for learning opportunities and sharing of ideas.

the understanding and consideration within the design of the different activities and behavioral use patterns of spaces to provide for multi options and configuration of spaces to fit more than just one activity based on the users’ needs and preferences in order to use the land efficiently. design will be a major deciding factor for its success.

the design should provide alternating levels of privacy within each cell as well as the whole complex while providing the user with enough options and areas of interactions (to see and to be seen). This sensibility of the design will be a major deciding factor for its success.

not only provide the project with the environmental components but providing components that could engage the user to interact and use them in order to have a better environmental and sustainable awareness

being a place of crafts and arts, the design should respond to its function by providing the users with the spaces that motivate the users to be creative. Providing well equipment and thought out spaces for artistic and crafts activities.

Affordability

understanding the economical and financial situation of the targeted group (unbalanced incomes and non regular incomes and life patterns) will be a key in the choice of materials, finishes, structures and components.

/// Mona Serag, Moaz Sameh, Sherif Goubran, Hassan Safwat

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 3 | 60


Design Mood-board|

Inspirations and mood of design in the form of pictures, colors and keywords (Not to Scale)

This design is one where various users of

Behavioural Use:

different backgrounds are supposed to

interact. The spaces are to house

innovation in the form of arts and crafts, through

Design through Circulation and behavioural use patterns

communal

interaction and as well as through

environmental engagement. The

sensitivity

towards the

cultural behaviour of the artists as

well as the visitors of the spaces, understanding their

needs

and

Design Through Negative Spaces

aspirations

and their economic standards, will be key to the

affordable, flexible, efficient and sustainable spaces

creation of

that support a and communal

Contextual Sensitivity:

dynamic united

pattern of life. A community

learning and sharing of ideas, while providing a high

that cherish

standard of living.

Geometric Translations

Understanding the surroundings and the continuation of patterns and the integration of geometries.

Understanding the Cultural aspirations and needs of the artists and the users and shaping spaces for to serve these needs

Modern & Historic interaction

Using the historic reference in understanding the essence of the project’s program and their translation and integration in modern geometrical forms

Choice of Materials: Environmental Engagement

Site Available Material (Sand)

Desert Vegetation Recycling Materials (Bottles)

Design Mood Board |

Sherif Nader A. Goubran

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 3 | 61


WALL DESIGN A PLACE TO REMEMBER | Sherif Goubran Wall Section| Sherif Nader Goubran | WALL DESIGN A PLACE REMEMBER | Sherif Goubran AENG 453 - TO Design III | Dr. Basil Kamel

walls using the mesh for a south an innovative fixation usesUsing depending on space and sysFacade. Allowing for indirect (low for the water bottles to allow usertem needs. incidence) lighting. (Efficient) them to be placed in a mesh conPlastic Bottles waste figuration that allows for various A Fully shaded Scenario the Providing the user with the flexibility Providing the user with the flexStarting with the brainstorm ofofdifferent ideas and simple uses. Just by havUsing the building mass to create uses depending on space and walls using the mesh for a south user ibility to shape and alter some ingshape the bottles using them a usable building block with rugged earth to crenegative spaces that could be used Using anneeds. innovative fixation systo and and alter some of as the(low Facade. Allowing for indirect tem for the water bottles to allow of the usable spaces provided ate wall provided components. The(Efficient) development from different levels within the project spaces within the wall (or of the flexible use mesh component incidence) lighting. them to be placed in a mesh conwithin the wall (or double wall and the wall integration of the vegetation and solar panels within the design. and that is enclosed or defined using double component of the building) figuration that allows for various component of the building) by water mass bottles Providing the user the flexibility Providing the user with the flexStartingbywith the brainstorm ofshaded different ideas Using thethe building tomesh create(semi transparintegrating usesCombining dependingand on space and difthe use ofwith recyclable and easilyand A semi Scenario offound thesimple uses. Just by havthe use ofand recyclable and easily ent). The shading effect of such mesh environmental aspects userferent needs. ibility to shape alter some ing the bottles and using them as a building block with rugged earth to crenegative spaces that could be used to shape and alter some of the usable walls using the mesh for a south Plastic Bottles Regular materials materials was analysed andthe calculated within the design, such as use of of thefound usable spaces provided ate wall provided components. The development of more the flexible from different levels within project Based on Facade. Allowing direct use mesh component spaces within the wall (orfor fixation options (too dense Different uses of the mesh: daily averages using Ecotect. 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Allowing for more direct within the building allows fixation options (too dense Different useswater) of the mesh: daily averages using Ecotect. Analysis tem for the water bottles to allow drain water toheat cooland down buildsalted incident lighting. different environmental for application -Semitransparent be used was made based on the conceptional ing components, gardens them to be placed in a mesh conadaptability inroof different seasons. -Using mud member to fill thetomesh and to be with high trees vegetations and mass model shown. figuration that allows for various as partitioning used as vertical vegetation elements.-the creating intermediate spaces A fully exposed Scenario of the dependingfixation on space -Lighting enhancing (by the use of the mesh Usinguses an innovative sys-and within the building that allows for - Using ruggedAeng-453 earth tothe close walls using mesh for a south user needs. Design III tem for the water bottles to allow saltedand water) different heat and environmental Facade. directperlighting create a wall withContinuous a high light Differentinuses of theseasons. mesh: them to be placed in a mesh conPlastic Bottles waste adaptability different throughout -Using mud to fill theexposure mesh and to be the day Use of bottles and salted -Semitransparent member meability. Development: Analysis (Ecotect): figuration that allows for Concept: various A Fully shaded Scenario of the used as vertical vegetation elements.-to be used as partitioning A fully exposed Scenario of the water for lighting effect uses depending on space and the user with the flexUsing the building mass to create Providing Starting with the brainstorm of different ideas and simple uses. Just by havwalls using the mesh for a south -Lighting enhancing (by the - Using ruggedwalls earth tothe close the using mesh for amesh south user needs. Design III rugged earth to creUsing an innovativeibility fixation negative spaces that could be used to shapesysand alter some ing the bottles andAeng-453 using them as a building block with Facade. Allowing for indirect (low use of salted water) Facade. Continuous direct lighting from different levels within the project of the usable spaces provided atecreate wall components. The development the flexible use mesh component and a wall with a highof light perDifferent uses of the mesh: tem for the water bottles to allow incidence) lighting. (Efficient) Plastic Bottles waste -Using mud to fill the mesh throughout the day within the design. and that is enclosed or defined using within the wall (or double wall and the integrationexposure of the vegetation and solar panels Use of bottles and salted -Semitransparent member meability. Using an innovative fixation system for the water bottles to allow them to be placed in a mesh configuration that allows for them to be placed in a mesh conConcept: Development: Analysis (Ecotect): the water bottles mesh (semi transparcomponent of the building) by and to be used as vertical A Fully shaded Scenario of the to be used as partitioning water for lighting effect ent). The shading effect of such mesh and user needs. the for use of recyclable and easily figuration thatProviding allows various vegetation elements. uses depending on space Using the building mass to create the user with the flexStarting with the brainstorm of different ideas and simple uses. Just by havwalls using the mesh for a south -Lighting enhancing (by the was analysed and calculated Based on found materials Usinguses an innovative fixation sysnegative spaces that could be used ibility to shape and and alter some ing the bottles and using them as a building block with rugged earth to cre-using rugged earth to close depending on space daily averages using Ecotect. Analysis Facade. Allowing for indirect (low use of salted water) from different levels within the project of the usable spaces provided ate wall components. The development of the flexible use mesh component the mesh and create a wall tem for theneeds. water bottles to allow user was made based on the conceptional -Using mud to fill the mesh incidence) lighting. (Efficient) and that is enclosed or defined using within the wall (or double wall and the integration of the vegetation and solar panels within the design. mass model shown. with a high light permeabil Using innovative fixation system for the water bottles to allow them to be placed in a mesh configuration that allows for various them to be placed in a mesh conthe wateran bottles mesh (semi transparcomponent of the building) by and to be used as vertical ity. an innovative fixation sysent). The shading effect of such mesh and user needs. the for use Using of recyclable and easily figuration that allows various vegetation elements. uses depending on space tem for the water bottles to allow was analysed and calculated Based on found materials -using rugged earth to close uses depending on space and A Fully shaded Scenario of them to be placed in a mesh condaily averages using Ecotect. Analysis the mesh and create a wall figuration that allows for various userwith needs. wasand made based on theuses. conceptional Combining and integrating difA semi shaded Scenario of the Usingusing the building Providing the user the flexStarting with the brainstorm of different ideas simple Just by hav- the walls the meshmass for to create uses depending on space and mass model shown. with a high light permeabil ferentsome environmental aspects walls using the mesh for a south needs. fixation sysPlastic Bottles Regular negative spaces thatfor could be used ibility to shape and alter ing the bottles and using them as a building block with rugged earth to cre- a south Facade. Allowing ity. Using anuser innovative within the design, asbottles use toofallow Facade. Allowing for more direct Plastic Bottles tem for such the water fixation options (toowaste dense

LAYOUT DESIGN

6720

04

0

16

5760

02

Concept:

Development: Aeng-453 Design III

14

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

12

Oct

4800

Nov

Analysis (Ecotect):

Dec

3840

10

2880

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

Hr

CAIRO, EGY

Wh/m² 3800

08

1920

22

3420

06

960

20

3040

04

0

18

2660

02

Concept:

Jan

Feb

16 Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Development:

Aug

Sep

14

Oct

Nov

Dec

1900

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly12

CAIRO, EGY

Wh/m²

1520

Hr

3800

AENG 453 - Design III | Dr. Basil Kamel DESIGN STATEMENT

Analysis (Ecotect):

2280

10

1140

22

3420

08

760

20

3040

06

380

18

2660

04

0

16

2280

02

14

1900

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

12

1520

10

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

CAIRO, EGY

1140

Hr

Wh/m² 14800

08

760

22

13320

06

380

20

11840

04

0

18

10360

Hr Hr

02

This design is one where various users of DESIGN STATEMENT different backgrounds are supposed to interact.

innovation communal innovation communal

This design is one where various users of The spaces are to house in the different backgrounds are supposed to interact. form of arts and crafts, through in the The spaces are to house and as well as through form of arts and crafts, through environmental engagement. The and as well as through sensitivity towards the cultural behaviour environmental engagement. The and behavioural use of the artists as well sensitivity towards the cultural behaviour as the visitors of the spaces, understanding and behavioural use of the artists as well their needs and aspirations and their as the visitors of the spaces, understanding economic standards, will be key to the their needs and aspirations and their creation of affordable, flexible, efficient and economic standards, will be key to the sustainable spaces that support a dynamic creation of affordable, flexible, efficient and and communal pattern of life. A sustainable spaces that support a dynamic and sharing of community that cherish and communal pattern of life. A

interaction interaction

ideas, while providing a high

standard of living.

learning community that cherish learning and sharing of

CLUSTER DESIGN CLUSTER DESIGN

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

CAIRO, EGY CAIRO, EGY

Wh/m² Wh/m² 9600 9600

8880

Dec

22 22

7400

CAIRO, EGY

20 20

Wh/m²

12

18 18

10

4440

13320

20

08

18

06

16

04

14

02

11840

2960

10360

1480

8880

0

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Aug

Jul

Sep

Oct

Nov

5760 5760

Wall Section| Sherif Nader Goubran | 2960

16 16

1480

14 14

08

06

Inspirations

Concept: of the usable spaces provided

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

06 06

960 960

5760 5760

04 04

02 02

12 12

0 0

4800 4800

3840 3840

Jan Jan

10 10

Feb Feb

Mar Mar

Apr Apr

May May

Jun Jun

Jul Jul

Aug Aug

Sep Sep

Oct Oct

Nov Nov

Dec Dec

2880 2880

Dec

08 08

1920 1920

06 06

Hr Hr

04 04

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

3800 3800

0 0

3420 3420

20 20

Jan Jan

Feb Feb

Mar Mar

3040 3040

Apr Apr

18 18

May May

Jun Jun

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

CAIRO, EGY

Jul Jul

Aug Aug

Sep Sep

Oct Oct

Nov Nov

Dec Dec

2660 2660

Analysis (Ecotect):

16 16

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

various

Wh/m² Wh/m²

CAIRO, EGY CAIRO, EGY

960 960

22 22

02 02

Hr Hr

1920 1920

6720 6720

02

Wall Section| Sherif Nader Goubran | Aeng-453 Design III Concept: Development: Wall Section| Sherif Nader Goubran | Aeng-453 Design III

2880 2880

7680 7680

08 08

04

0

3840 3840

8640 8640

18 18

4440

4800 4800

9600 9600

10 10

5920

10

Wh/m² Wh/m²

12 12

20 20

Dec

CAIRO, EGY CAIRO, EGY

14 14

7400

Jan

6720 6720

16 16

Hr Hr

22 22

12

7680 7680

5920

14800

standard of living. Inspirations

8640 8640

14

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

Hr

22

Wall Section| Sherif Nader Goubran |

Design Project| united united

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

16

Jan

ideas, while providing a high

2280 2280

Wh/m² Wh/m²

CAIRO, EGY CAIRO, EGY

14 14

3800 3800

Wh/m²

Hr

9600

1900 1900

A place to remember: Incorporating the designed wall section and site analysis outcomes into design of units, clusters and layout. Design, layout, elevations and sections. Design features and perspective shots (Not to Scale) 22 22

12 12

22

3420 3420

8640

20 20

20

18

Development:

7680

18 18

6720

16

10 10

1520 1520

3040 3040

08 08

1140 1140

2660 2660

760 760

Analysis (Ecotect):

5760

16 16

14

06 06

2280 2280

4800

14 14

12

04 04

380 380

indirect (low incidence) lightfrom different levels within the project ate wall components. The development of the flexible use mesh component A Fully Ashaded Scenario to be placedbuildin a mesh condrain water tothem cool down Fully shaded Scenario of of the incident lighting. figuration that allows for various ing. (Efficient) walls using the mesh for south for application Combining and difand that isamass enclosed defined within the the user wall with (or double wallintegrating andwith thethe integration of the vegetation and solar panels within design. Aorsemi shadedusing Scenario of the Using the building Providing the Starting brainstorm of different ideas and simple uses. Just the by having flexcomponents, roof gardens the walls using the mesh for to create Using anon innovative fixation sysuses depending space and Facade. Allowing for indirect (low ferent environmental aspects tem for the water to allow walls using transparthe mesh for a south with highby trees vegetations andbottles user needs. the water bottles mesh (semi component of the building) Plastic Bottles Regular negative spaces that could be used ibility to shape and alter some ing the bottles and using them as a building block with rugged earth to cre- a south Facade. Allowing for incidence) lighting. (Efficient) them to be in a mesh conwithinthe thecreating such as use ofplacedfixation Facade. Allowing for more direct Plastic Bottles waste ent). The shading of such mesh theusable use ofspaces recyclable anddesign, easilyintermediate incidence) lightfiguration spaces that allows for various options (too dense from different levels within effect the project of the provided ate wall components. The development of the flexible use mesh componentAindirect A(low semi shaded Scenario ofincident drain water the to cool downthat buildFully shaded Scenario of the lighting. uses depending on space and within building allows for ing. (Efficient) walls using the mesh for a south for application was analysed and calculated Based on found materials and that is enclosed or defined using within the wall (or double wall and the integration of the vegetation and solar panels within the design. ing components, roof gardens user needs. fixation systhe walls using the mesh for Using an innovative different heat and environmental Facade. Allowing for indirect (low tem for the water bottles to allow daily averages using Ecotect. Analysis with high trees vegetations and the water bottles mesh (semi transparcomponent of the building) by incidence) lighting. (Efficient) a south Facade. Allowing for adaptability inthem different seasons. to be placed in a mesh concreating was made based the mesh conceptional ent). The shading effect ofon such the use of recyclablethe and easilyintermediate figuration spaces that allows for various more direct incident lighting. A semi shaded Scenario of Combining integrating difuses depending on and space and within the building that allows for A semi shaded Scenario of the was analysed and calculated onfully exposed Scenario of the found materials mass model shown. Based A ferent environmental aspects user needs. the walls using the mesh for walls using the mesh for a south Plastic Bottles Regular different heat and environmental walls using the mesh for a south within the design, such as use of Facade. Allowing for using more direct daily averages Ecotect. Analysis fixation options (too dense a south Facade. Allowing for adaptability in different Using an innovative fixation sys- seasons. drain water to cool down buildincident lighting. Facade. Continuous direct lighting for application Different uses of the made based on the conceptionalexposure throughout the day ing mesh: components, roof gardens morewas direct incident lighting. tem for the water bottles -Semitransparent to allow Combining integrating difwithand high trees vegetations and A semi shaded Scenario of the Use of bottles and salted member A fully exposedUsing Scenario the mass model shown. theofbuilding mass to create negative spaces that could be ferent environmental aspects the creating intermediate spaces walls using the mesh for a south Plastic Bottles Regular them to be placed in a mesh walls using the mesh for a south to beconused partitioning withinas the design, as use water for lighting effect within the such building thatof allows for Facade. Allowing for more direct A fully exposed Scenario of fixation options (too dense used from different levels within the project and that is enclosed Using an innovative fixation water to cool down buildfiguration that allows forsysvarious incident lighting. different heat and environmental Facade. Continuous direct lighting -Lightingdrain enhancing (by the The introduction of the tilting effect of the wall component within the cluster for application Different uses of the ing mesh: components, roofingardens the walls using the mesh for a adaptability different seasons. or defined using the water bottles mesh (semi transparent). The exposure throughout the day temuses for the water bottles to allow use of salted water) depending on space and with high trees vegetations Use and adds of bottles and salted -Semitransparent member to the value of the project with a clear visual and historic reference to Facade. direct Using theshading buildingeffect massoftosuch create negative spaces that be mesh was analysed andcould calculated Based Inspirations the creating intermediate spaces Asouth fully exposed ScenarioContinuous of the -Using mud to fill the mesh them to be placed in a mesh conuser needs. to be used aswithin partitioning for lighting elements effect that were use: both adding to the value of the the building that allowswater for islamic walls using the mesh for a south A fully exposed Scenario ofthroughout used from Mashrabeya lighting exposure levels within project and that is enclosed ondifferent daily averages using the Ecotect. Analysis was made based on the and enhancing to be used asand vertical figuration that allows for various different heat environmental Facade. Continuous direct lighting -Lighting (by the The introduction of the tilting effect of the wall component within the cluster Different usesPlastic of the mesh: Bottles waste the walls using the mesh elements. in different seasons. or defined using the water (semi transparent). The the day exposure throughout the dayfor a conceptional massbottles modelmesh shown. interior space. ofvegetation salted adaptability water) Use of bottles and salted -Semitransparent member uses depending on spaceuse and Inspirations adds to the value of the project with a clear visual and historic reference to -using rugged earth close Facade. direct to beto used as partitioning shading effect of such analysed and calculated Based A mesh Fully was shaded Scenario of the Asouth fully exposed ScenarioContinuous of the water for lighting effect -Using mud to fill the mesh user needs. -Lighting enhancing (by the walls using theexposure mesh for a south create a wall and tothe bemesh used and as vertical islamic Mashrabeya elements that were use: both adding to the value of the lighting throughout on daily averages using Ecotect. was based on the walls usingAnalysis the mesh formade a south use of salted water) Facade. Continuous direct lighting withsysaelements. high light permeabil Different uses of the mud mesh:to fill the Using an innovative fixation Plastic Bottles waste vegetation -Using mesh the day exposure throughout the day conceptional mass model shown. interior space. Facade. Allowing for indirect (low Use of bottles and salted -Semitransparent and to be member used as vertical Inspirations -usingity. rugged earth to close INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

3840

Wh/m²

CAIRO, EGY

Hr

10

9600

08

8640

2880

12 12

22

1900 1900

02 02

0 0

1520 1520

1920

20

7680

06

10 10

Jan Jan

Feb Feb

Mar Mar

Apr Apr

May May

Jun Jun

Jul Jul

Aug Aug

Sep Sep

Oct 1140Oct 1140

960

Nov Nov

Dec Dec

18

6720

04

08 08

0

16

5760

02

Hr Hr

06 06

14

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

4800 Sep

Aug

12

3840

Oct

Nov

760 760

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

Wh/m² Wh/m²

CAIRO, EGY CAIRO, EGY

14800 14800

380 380

Dec

22 22

04 04

13320 13320

0 0

10

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

2880

Hr

CAIRO, EGY

02 02

Wh/m²

20 20

11840 11840

3800

08

1920

22

Jan Jan

06

Feb Feb

Mar 3420 Mar

Apr Apr

18 18

May May

Jun Jun

Jul Jul

Aug Aug

Sep Sep

Oct Oct

Nov Nov

Dec Dec

10360 10360

960

20

3040

04

16 16

0

18

02

Hr Hr

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

16

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

Dec

CAIRO, EGY

Wh/m²

1900

20 20

8880 8880

Wh/m² Wh/m²

CAIRO, EGY CAIRO, EGY

2660

2280

22 22

14

12

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

Hr

14800 14800

14 14

7400 7400

13320 13320

12 12

5920 5920

1520

11840 11840

10 10

3800

10

4440 4440

1140

22

3420

08

18 18

760

20

10360 10360

08 08

2960 2960

3040

16 16

06

18

8880 8880

380

06 06

2660

1480 1480

04

16

2280

0

14 14

1900

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

12 12

Oct

Nov

02 02

1520

Inspirations

10 10

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

0 0

Dec

12

10

7400 7400

04 04

02

14

CAIRO, EGY

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

Jan Jan

14800

760

22

08 08

CAIRO, EGY

Feb Feb

Mar Mar

Apr Apr

May May

Jun Jun

Aug Aug

Jul Jul

4440 Oct 4440 Oct

Sep Sep

22

13320

Nov Nov

9600

Dec Dec

2960 2960

8640

06

380

20

06 06

11840

04

1480 1480

20

0

18

7680

10360

04 04

02

0 0

16

8880

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

02 02

CAIRO, EGY

12

Hr

Wh/m²

Jan Jan

Feb Feb

Mar 5920 Mar

4440

13320

Apr Apr

May May

Jun Jun

Aug Aug

Jul Jul

16

Sep Sep

Oct Oct

Nov Nov

6720

Wh/m² 9600

Dec Dec

5760

22

8640

14

08

4800

2960

11840

20

06

18

CAIRO, EGY

Hr

14800

7680

1480

10360

Inspirations

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

7400

10

22

18

Dec

14

20

12

3840

04

16

0

8880

18

6720

02

14

10

7400

Jan

12

Wh/m²

Hr

Wh/m²

1140

Hr

08

5920 5920

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

2880

Dec

16

5920

5760

08

10

4440

1920

14

08

4800

2960

06

06

960

1480

12

Inspirations

3840

04

0

04

0

02

10

tem for the water bottles to allow to be used as partitioning water for lighting effect vegetation elements. -Lighting enhancing (by the mesh and create a -using wall rugged earth to close them to be placed in the a mesh conuse of salted water) the mesh and create a wall withsysa high light permeabil Using an innovative fixation -Using mud to fill the mesh figuration that allows for various and with a high light permeabil ity. to be used as vertical temuses for the water bottles to allow ity. vegetation elements. depending on space and -using rugged earth to close them to be placed in a mesh conuser needs. the mesh and create a wall figuration that allows for various with a high light permeabil ity. uses depending on space and user needs.

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

2880

Dec

02

08

Jan

SITE ANALYSIS & Outcomes LAYOUT DESIGNSITE ANALYSIS & Outcomes

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

1920

Nov

06 960

04 0

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

A Fully shaded Scenario of the incidence) lighting. (Efficient) walls using the mesh for a south Facade. Allowing for indirect (low incidence) lighting. (Efficient)

Dec

CAIRO, EGY

Hr 02

Wh/m² 3800

Jan

Feb

22Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

ANALYSIS

3420

20 3040

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly 18

CAIRO, EGY

Wh/m²

2660

Hr 3800

16 2280

22 3420

14 1900

20

WINDOWS AND SHADING

3040

12 1520

18 2660

Combining and integrating different environmental aspects Plastic Bottles Regular within the design, such as use of Combining and integrating diffixation options (too dense drain water to cool down buildferent environmental aspects forRegular application Plastic Bottles ing components, roof gardens within the design, such as use of fixation options (too dense with high trees vegetations and drain water to cool down buildthe creating intermediate for application ing components, roof gardensspaces within the building that allows for with high trees vegetations and different intermediate heat and environmental the creating spaces adaptability in that different seasons. within the building allows for

10 2280

08 1900

06

760

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov 380

04

INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

Ground Floor:

0

1140

02

06

Dec

CAIRO, EGY

0

Hr

- Sun-protected due to depth -Consideration: Circulation -Window/Floor: 0.7

Wh/m² 14800

02

22 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

13320

Dec

20 11840 INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION - Total Monthly

18

16

20

14

18

12

16

10

14

Wh/m²

8880

8880

7400

5920

04

08

10360

13320

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Aug

Jul

Sep

Oct

1480

04 0

02

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Referring to use pattern in design while blending both modern and historic to create contextual sustainable ar-

First Floor:

4440

- Unprotected, (workshop’s need of sun light) generally. Wall component -Consideration: Function -Window/Floor: 0.5

2960

1480

Facade.Scenario Continuous direct lighting A fully exposed of the exposure throughout the day walls using the mesh for a south Facade. Continuous direct lighting exposure throughout the day 0

2960

Jan

Feb

5920

A fully exposed Scenario of the both Referring to use pattern in design while blending walls using the contextual mesh for asustainable south modern and historic to create ar-

4440

02

Jan

7400

10360

06

06

14800

11840

08

12

Different uses of the mesh: Use of bottles and salted -Semitransparent member Inspirations to beof used partitioning Different uses the as mesh: water for lighting effect -Lighting enhancing (by the Use of bottles and salted -Semitransparent member Inspirations of salted water) to beuse used as partitioning water for lighting effect -Using mud to fill(by thethe mesh -Lighting enhancing to bewater) used as vertical use and of salted vegetation elements. -Using mud to fill the mesh rugged earth to close and -using to be used as vertical Community: translated into the interaction of spaces on the the mesh and create a wall vegetation elements. single cell level as well as the interaction of the cells together -using rugged close with a highearth light to permeabil through: translated the whole complex to create the united on andthe communal Community into the interaction of spaces the mesh ity. and create a wall of as life. singlepattern cell level well as the interaction of the cells together with a high light permeabil through the whole complex to create the the economical united and communal Affordability : understanding and financial ity. pattern of life. of the targeted group (unbalanced incomes and non situation Affordability : understanding economical and financial regular incomes and lifethe patterns) will be a key in the choice of situation of the targeted (unbalanced incomes and non materials, finishes,group structures and components

CAIRO, EGY

Hr

22

10

Nov

Dec

Ground Floor:

- Sun-protected by shading devices -Consideration: Circulation -Window/Floor: 0.7

Flexibility & Efficiency of spaces: the understanding and considera-

tion within the design of the different activities and behavioural use patterns of spaces toof provide for: the multi options and configuration Flexibility & Efficiency spaces understanding and considera-of spaces to fit the more than of just activityactivities based on thebehavioural users’ needs tion within design theone different and useand pat-preferences in ordertotoprovide use thefor land efficiently. design will be a major deciding terns of spaces multi options and configuration of spaces to factor for itsjust success fit more than one activity based on the users’ needs and preferences in order to use the land efficiently. design will be a major deciding factor for its success

regular incomes and life patterns) will be a key in the choice of materials, finishes, structures and components Dynamic: the design and its geometry should respond to the dynamic patterns and interactions that Dynamic : the design and geometry should respond to the it will be housing as its well as the dynamic way of life of its perdynamic patterns andbyinteractions that interactions of spaces and manent users having complex it will dynamic be housing as well asthat thecould dynamic way of life of and its perstructures be experienced perceived manent users by for having complex of spacesand andstandarddifferently users and to interactions not create stagnant dynamic izedstructures spaces that could be experienced and perceived differently for users and to not create stagnant and standardized spaces Cultural Consideration: Using historic and local references for the work live cell concepts (such as the wekala) rather that Cultural Consideration : Using historic and local international examples in order to be able to references extend cultural for thenorms work live concepts aswith the wekala) that of andcell to provide the(such users the rightrather charterer international spaces examples in order to be able to extend cultural norms and to provide the users with the right charterer of spaces

LAYOUT STUDIES

SUSTAINABLE GADGETS

each cell as well as the whole complex while providing the user with

landscaping & Exterior

Environmental engagement: not only provide the project with the

environmental components but providing components that could engage

Environmental engagement: notthem only provide project with the the user to interact and use in orderthe to have a better environmental environmental components but providing components that could engage and sustainable awareness the user to interact and use them in order to have a better environmental and sustainable awareness

Innovation: being a place of crafts and arts, the design should respond to its function by providing the users with the spaces that motivate the users to be creative. Providing well equipment and thought out spaces for to its function by providing the users with the spaces that motivate the artistic and crafts activities. General Sitefor Layout 1:200 users to be creative. Providing well equipment and thought out spaces artistic and crafts activities.

Innovation: being a place of crafts and arts, the design should respond

Ground Floor Plan 1:100 Ground Floor Plan 1:100

Land use landscaping & Exterior

services

built

COOLING USING WASTE WATER 3D SHOTS Using roof gardens drain water to coil in sandwich wall panels in order to act as a heat exchange with the building mass. The system will be efficient in lowere heating and cooling demands of the structure around all the year.

40% 52% 8%

Addition of the learning center to add to the awareness of the users especially of the young age. Limiting leisure activities and attractions to ensure the attracted visitor is the targeted.

services

built

ROOF GARDENS AND PLATING BALCONIES All units’40% roofs have designed within them roof gardens 52% that are for private use by 8% the user of the unit. The garden roofs can be used Addition of thesmall learning center for planting vegetation to(no adddeep to the awareness roots) that canof the users especially of the young be fruitful or productive age. Limiting leisure activities and thus support the and attractions to ensure the user economically. attracted visitor is theSome targeted. balconies also include vegetation that help in solar filtration and air enhancement.

each cellsibility as wellofas thedesign wholewill complex while deciding providingfactor the user the be a major for with its success. enough options and areas of interactions (to see and to be seen). This sensibility of the design will be a major deciding factor for its success.

Learning: the design should make sure to provide the different targeted users the spaces and environmental not only for social and commercial interaction but for learning opportunient targeted users the spaces and environmental not only for ties and sharing of ideas. social and commercial interaction but for learning opportunities and sharing of ideas.

STAIRWELL AS A WIND CHIMNEY Depending on its orientation within the site, the stair well available for each unit will be used as a wind chimney or win catcher to better ventilate all the spaces (all floors).

Land use

Sensibility: the design should provide alternating levels of privacy within Sensibility : the options design should provide alternating (to levels privacy enough and areas of interactions seeof and to bewithin seen). This sen-

Learning: the design should make sure to provide the differ-

LAYOUT STUDIES

380

1520

04

10

08

VEGETATION AND FINISHING MATERIALS The choice of vegetation within the site is very important for the conservation of water. Palm trees is the choice that fits most the contextual status of the project with the addition to a number of fruitful trees (orange & fig). The building finishes will use sand from site to create coatings (commonly existing in acrylic). General Site Layout 1:200

STRUCTURAL The use of pre-stressed, precast elements that are 1, 2 or 3 Dimensionally pre-casted. This will ease the building process due to the modularity of the units. The Dense concrete core will support the remaining structure by canteliver. Each cluster has to be designed structurally due to the support of the all the units to one another.

760

12

different heat and environmental adaptability in different seasons.

DESIGN

A semi shaded Scenario of the walls using the mesh for a south Facade. Allowing for more direct A semi shaded Scenario of the incident lighting. walls using the mesh for a south Facade. Allowing for more direct incident lighting. 1140

16

14

GRAY WATER SYSTEM Using the grey water generated from use and treating it against chemicals and harmful Basement 1:400 materials to be used in toilet flushing or in vegetation. The draining of roof and balcony vegetation will be recycled in the grey water system to ensure that all water leaving the complex is no longer usable (Black water)

Basement 1:400

3D SHOTS

WINDOWS & DOUBLE SKIN Use and implementation of intermediate spaces (semi-outdoor) act as double skin for a large portion of the project wall areas. The additional of controlled 2 layer windows adds to the quality, flexibility and stainability of the spaces.

DC SUN & WIND ELECTRIC GENERATION HYBRID SYSTEM Having the wiring for a two way grid (in and out) DC electric supply for all the project. This will cut on electric energy wasted from DC-AC transformation and will provide units with needed power demands in an equal manner. Stair well will be used placement of PC & roofs for small ruebines

Main Plaza Space Calculation for available Photovotaic cells:

Main Plaza Space

First Floor 1:400

Interaction of user & wall component on ground level

Stair well walls on roof: Stair well roof: Total PC: Output/m2: then total output:

Interaction of user & wall component on ground level

First Floor 1:400

20.0m2/unit then total: 680m2 11.5m2/unit then total: 400me 1080 m2 (0.47 ratio to footprint) 1KW 1080KW

Possible wind electric energy: 30 turbines with output 8KW Then total: 240KW

General Site Layout 1:200

STUDIES

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS First Floor Plan 1:100 First Floor Plan 1:100

Second Floor 1:400

Assorted Perpectives

View At Pedestrian Entrance

40% 52% 8%

Addition of the learning center to add to the awareness of the users especially of the young age. Limiting leisure activities and attractions to ensure the attracted visitor is the targeted.

Basement 1:400

Sectional Elevation 1:100

Interaction of user & wall component on ground level

Section 1:100 Section 1:100

LAYOUT PROGRESS View At Pedestrian Entrance

Assorted Perpectives

2 1

A Place to remember

Second Floor 1:400

Project Checklist

Sustainable Sites

Possible Points: 21

?

1

Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3.1 Credit 3.2 Credit 3.3

Site Selection Development Density and Community Connectivity Alternative Transportation—Public Transportation Access Alternative Transportation—Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms Alternative Transportation—Parking Availability

Water Efficiency Prereq 1 Credit 1

5

Prereq 1 Prereq 2 Prereq 3 Credit 1.1

1 2 1

Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4 Credit 2

1

Credit 3

1

Y 1 2 2 2 1 2 2

Prereq 1 Credit 1.1 Credit 1.2 Credit 2 Credit 3.1 Credit 3.2 Credit 4 Credit 5

1

Credit 6

1

Credit 7

Storage and Collection of Recyclables Tenant Space—Long-Term Commitment Building Reuse Construction Waste Management Materials Reuse Materials Reuse—Furniture and Furnishings Recycled Content Regional Materials Rapidly Renewable Materials Certified Wood

9

5

2

Y

N

?

Y Y 1 1

Prereq 2 Credit 1 Credit 2

1

Credit 3.1

1 1

Credit 4.2

1 1 1

Possible Points: 14

Credit 6.1 Credit 6.2 Credit 7.1

1 1

Credit 7.2 Credit 8.1 Credit 8.2

1

1 1 1 1 1

Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4

Minimum IAQ Performance Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring Increased Ventilation Construction IAQ Management Plan—During Construction Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy Low-Emitting Materials—Adhesives and Sealants Low-Emitting Materials—Paints and Coatings Low-Emitting Materials—Flooring Systems Low-Emitting Materials—Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products Low-Emitting Materials—Systems Furniture and Seating Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control Controllability of Systems—Lighting Controllability of Systems—Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort—Design Thermal Comfort—Verification Daylight and Views—Daylight Daylight and Views—Views for Seated Spaces

Credit 1.5 Credit 2

Regional Priority Credits

1 1 1 1

Credit 1.1

69 23 9

Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4

Total

1 1 1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 4

Regional Priority: Specific Credit Regional Priority: Specific Credit Regional Priority: Specific Credit Regional Priority: Specific Credit

Sectional Elevation 1:100

Certified 40 to 49 points

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 to 2 1

Possible Points: 6

Innovation in Design: Vegitation Innovation in Design: Structural Innovation in Design: Finishing material Innovation in Design: recycling gray water Innovation in Design: recycble materials LEED Accredited Professional

4

28-5-2012

Possible Points: 17

Innovation and Design Process Credit 1.1

1 1 1 to 2 1 to 2 1 to 2 1 1 to 2 1 to 2 1 1

Credit 4.4 Credit 5

1

5

Credit 4.3 Credit 4.5

1 1 1

1 to 5 1 to 3 5 to 10 1 to 4 5 2 to 5 5

Credit 3.2 Credit 4.1

1

Possible Points: 37

Indoor Environmental Quality Prereq 1

1

6 to 11

Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems Minimum Energy Performance Fundamental Refrigerant Management Optimize Energy Performance—Lighting Power Optimize Energy Performance—Lighting Controls Optimize Energy Performance—HVAC Optimize Energy Performance—Equipment and Appliances Enhanced Commissioning Measurement and Verification Green Power

Materials and Resources

1 to 5 6 6 2 2

Possible Points: 11

Water Use Reduction—20% Reduction Water Use Reduction

Energy and Atmosphere

Credit 4

12 1

SPACE NATURAL LIGHTING ANALYSIS The average Value for the day lighting is 290 LUX, with a two window configuration for one of the workshops (1st floor). The lighting exceed that required by code of building and by LEED (average accepted 80 LUX). The design of large windows was efficient

First Floor 1:400

Facade 1:100 Facade 1:100

3 3 5

LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors 1

1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 110

Silver 50 to 59 points

Gold 60 to 79 points

Platinum 80 to 110

CLUSTER PROGRESS

Second Floor 1:400

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 3 | 62 Second Floor

Main Plaza Space

SHADE & SHADOW PATTERN ANALYSIS Shade pattern of the building through the year show the shading of most of the courtyard spaces and the access to the sun of some more open ares. Each unit has access to natural lighting through out the year

SUN EXPOSURE ANALYSIS: Assorted the Ecotect analysis for sun Perpectives exposure proved that the 10 4 Y N choice of placement of the 2 2 PV cells on the roof (at the 4 2 highest point) to be most 2 2 efficient due to its exposure to 90+Kh/m2. 9 The projects’ walls and Y 9 building mass help create a selfshading pattern that 24 8 protects most of the building Y Y facade from high solar Y exposure minimizing need 3 2 2 for isolation and cooling in 7 1 1 2 summer

2

S

LEED

Second FloorFloor PlanPlan 1:1001:100 Second View At Pedestrian Entrance

1

built

4

services

3

Land use landscaping & Exterior

Phase 1


ANALYSIS WINDOWS & DOUBLE SKIN Use and implementation of intermediate spaces (semi-outdoor) act as double skin for a large portion of the project wall areas. The additional of controlled 2 layer windows adds to the quality, flexibility and stainability of the spaces.

DC SUN & WIND ELECTRIC GENERATION HYBRID SYSTEM Having the wiring for a two way grid (in and out) DC electric supply for all the project. This will cut on electric energy wasted from DC-AC transformation and will provide units with needed power demands in an equal manner. Stair well will be used placement of PC & roofs for small ruebines

Design Project| Calculation for available Photovotaic cells: Stair well walls on roof: Stair well roof: Total PC: Output/m2: then total output:

20.0m2/unit then total: 680m2 11.5m2/unit then total: 400me 1080 m2 (0.47 ratio to footprint) 1KW 1080KW

WINDOWS AND SHADING Ground Floor:

WINDOWS AND FirstSHADING Floor:

A place to remember: Incorporating the designed wall section and site analysis outcomes into design of units, clusters and layout. Design and integration of Sustainable features and performing sustainable and environmental analysis (LEED) (Not to Scale)

STRUCTURAL The use of pre-stressed, precast elements that are 1, 2 or 3 Dimensionally pre-casted. This will ease the building process due to the modularity of the units. The Dense concrete core will support the remaining structure by canteliver. Each cluster has to be designed structurally due to the support of the all the units to one another.

- Unprotected, (workshop’s need of

sun light) generally. Wall component Ground Floor: - Sun-protected due to depth -Consideration: Function -Consideration: Circulation -Window/Floor: 0.5 -Window/Floor: 0.7

First Floor:Ground Floor:

- Unprotected,-(workshop’s need of by shading devices Sun-protected sun light) generally. Wall component -Consideration: Circulation -Consideration: Function -Window/Floor: 0.7 -Window/Floor: 0.5

Possible wind electric energy: 30 turbines with output 8KW Then total: 240KW

Ground Floor:

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

- Sun-protected by shading devices -Consideration: Circulation -Window/Floor: 0.7

SUSTAINABLE GADGETS

LEED LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors 10 4 Y

2

1

N

?

2

1

4 2

Credit 2 Credit 3.1

2

Credit 3.2

2

Credit 3.3

9

Water Efficiency Prereq 1 Credit 1

24 8 Y Y Y 3 2 7 1 3 3 5

5

Prereq 2 Prereq 3

2 1 2 2 1

Credit 1.1

1 2 1

Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4 Credit 2

1

Credit 3 Credit 4

1

Y 1 2 2 2 1 2 2

SPACE NATURAL LIGHTING ANALYSIS The average Value for the day lighting is 290 LUX, with a two window configuration for one of the workshops (1st floor). The lighting exceed that required by code of ANALYSIS 1 building and by LEED (average accepted 80 LUX). The design of large windows was efficient

Credit 1.2

Credit 1.1 Credit 1.2 Credit 2 Credit 3.1 Credit 3.2 Credit 4 Credit 5 Credit 6

1

Credit 7

Possible Points:

21

9

5

2

Y

N

?

1 to 5 6 6 2 2

Y Y 1 1

Prereq 2 Credit 1 Credit 2

1

Credit 3.1

1

11

1

Possible Points:

Credit 4.2

1

WINDOWS AND SHADING

5 3 10 4

1 1

5

1 1 1 1 1

14 1 1 to 1 to 1 to 1 1 to 1 to 1 1

5

2 2 2 2 2

Credit 4.4 Credit 5 Credit 6.1 Credit 6.2 Credit 7.1

1 1 to 1 to 5 to 1 to 5 2 to 5

Credit 4.3 Credit 4.5

1 1 1

Possible Points:

Storage and Collection of Recyclables Tenant Space—Long-Term Commitment Building Reuse Construction Waste Management Materials Reuse Materials Reuse—Furniture and Furnishings Recycled Content Regional Materials Rapidly Renewable Materials Certified Wood

1 1

37

Credit 3.2 Credit 4.1

1

6 to 11

Indoor Environmental Quality Prereq 1

1

Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems Minimum Energy Performance Fundamental Refrigerant Management Optimize Energy Performance—Lighting Power Optimize Energy Performance—Lighting Controls Optimize Energy Performance—HVAC Optimize Energy Performance—Equipment and Appliances Enhanced Commissioning Measurement and Verification Green Power

Materials and Resources Prereq 1

Possible Points:

Water Use Reduction—20% Reduction Water Use Reduction

Energy and Atmosphere Prereq 1

28-5-2012

Site Selection Development Density and Community Connectivity Alternative Transportation—Public Transportation Access Alternative Transportation—Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms Alternative Transportation—Parking Availability

Y 9

12 1

LAYOUT PROGRESS

Sustainable Sites Credit 1

Credit 7.2 Credit 8.1 Credit 8.2

1

Innovation and Design Process Credit 1.1 Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4 Credit 1.5 Credit 2

4

Regional Priority Credits

1 1 1 1

Credit 1.1

69 23 9

Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4

Regional Regional Regional Regional

COOLING USING COOLING USING WASTE WASTE WATER WATER Using gardens drain water to coilwall in sandwich wall Using roof roof gardens drain water to coil in sandwich panels in order to act as heatas exchange the building panels in order toaact a heatwith exchange with the building mass. The system will be efficient in lowere heating and heating and mass. The system will be efficient in lowere cooling demands of the structure around all the year.

6

Possible Points:

1 1 1 1 1 1

cooling demands of the structure around all the year.

Possible Points: 4

Priority: Specific Credit Priority: Specific Credit Priority: Specific Credit Priority: Specific Credit

1 1 1 1

Total Silver 50 to 59 points

Gold 60 to 79 points

Platinum 80 to 110

Ground Floor:

- Sun-protected due to depth -Consideration: Circulation -Window/Floor: 0.7

First Floor:

4

- Unprotected, (workshop’s need of sun light) generally. Wall component -Consideration: Function -Window/Floor: 0.5

3

Ground Floor:

then total output: Then total: 240KW

1

2

- Sun-protected by shading devices -Consideration: Circulation -Window/Floor: 0.7

1

GARDENS AND PLATING BALCONIES All units’ roofs have designed within them roof gardens that are for private use by the user of the unit. The garden roofs can be used for planting small vegetation (no deep roots) that can be fruitful or productive and thus support the user economically. Some balconies also include vegetation that help in solar filtration and air enhancement.

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

2

2

Alternatives for layout

1

Phase 2 COOLING USING WASTE WATER Using roof gardens drain water to coil in sandwich wall panels in order to act as a heat exchange with the building mass. The system will be efficient in lowere heating and cooling demands of the structure around all the year.

LEED

STAIRWELL AS A WIND CHIMNEY Depending on its orientation within the site, SUN EXPOSURE ANALYSIS: the stair well available for each unit will be LEED 2009 Ecotector analysis for sun to Project Checkli used as a wind the chimney win catcher proved that better ventilateexposure all the spaces (allthe floors). 10 4 1 Sustainable Si Y N ? choice of placement of the 2 2 1 Credit 1 Site Sele PV cells on the roof (at the Credit 2 Developm 4 Credit 3.1 Alternat 2 highest point) to be most Credit 3.2 Alternat 2 Credit 3.3ANAL Alternat 2 efficient due to its exposure to SUN EXPOSURE the Ecotect analysis fo 90+Kh/m2. 9 Water Efficien The projects’ walls and exposureY proved Prereq 1 that Water U Credit 1 Water U 9 building mass help create choice of placement o a selfshading pattern that 24 8 5 Energy and At PV cells on the roof (a GRAY WATER SYSTEM protects most of the building Prereq 1 Fundame Y highest point) to2 beMinimum m Prereq Y Using the grey facade water from generated from use and high solar Prereq 3 Fundame Y treating it against chemicals andneed harmful efficient due to exp Creditits 1.1 Optimize exposure minimizing 3 2 Credit 1.2 Optimize 2 1 materials to befor used in toilet flushing isolation and cooling in or in90+Kh/m2. 7 1 2 Credit 1.3 Optimize vegetation. Thesummer draining of roof and balcony 1 2 1 Credit 1.4 Optimize The projects’ walls an Credit 2 Enhance 3 2 vegetation will be recycled in the grey water Measure 3 1 1 Credit 3 Credit 4 help cre Green Po 5 system to ensure that all water leaving thebuilding mass complex is no longer usable (Black water) a selfshading pattern 12 1 1 Materials and

30 turbines with output 8KW Then total: 240KW

Section 1 ROOF

SHADE & SHADOW PATTERN ANALYSIS Shade pattern of the building through the year show the shading of most of the courtyard spaces and the access to the sun of some more open ares. Each unit has access to natural lighting through out the year

SPACE NATURAL LIGHTING ANALYSIS The average Value for the day lighting is 290 LUX, with a two window configuration for one of the workshops (1st floor). The lighting exceed that required by code of building and by LEED (average accepted 80 LUX). The design of large windows was efficient

SHADE & SHADOW PATTERN ANALYSIS Shade pattern of the building through the year show the shading of most of the courtyard spaces and the access to the sun of some WINDOWS & DOUBLE SKIN more open ares. Use and intermediate Each unitimplementation has access to of natural lighting through out spaces (semi-outdoor) act as double skin the year

DC SUN & WIND ELECTRIC GENERATION HYBRID SYSTEM Having the wiring for a two way grid (in and out) DC electric supply for all the project. This will cut on electric energy wasted from DC-AC transformation and will provide units with needed power demands in an equal manner. Stair well will be used placement of PC & roofs for small ruebines

20.0m2/unit then total: 680m2 11.5m2/unit then total: 400me 1080 m2 (0.47 ratio to footprint) 1KW 1080KW

1080KW

Possible wind electric energy: ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

SUSTAINABLE GADGETS Phase 1

Calculation for available Photovotaic cells:

WINDOW Use and spaces for a lar areas. T window and stai

DC SUN & WIND ELECTRIC GENERATION HYBRID SYSTEM Having the wiring for a two way grid (in and out) DC electric supply for all the project. This will cut on VEGETATION AND DC SUN &wasted WINDfrom ELECTRIC GENERATION HYBRID electric energy DC-AC transformation and will provide SYSTEM units with needed power demands STRUCTURAL FINISHING MATERIALS The use of pre-stressed, in preHaving the wiring for a two way grid (in and out) DC electric supply for all the project. will on an equal manner. The This choice of cut vegetation within cast elements that are 1, Stair 2 electric or well 3 willenergy be used wasted placementfrom of PC DC-AC & roofs for small ruebines and will provide units with needed the site is very important for transformation power demands Dimensionally pre-casted. This the conservation of water. in an equal manner. will ease the building process Palm trees is the choice that Calculation for available Photovotaic cells: Stair well will be used placement of PC & roofs for small ruebines due to the modularity of the fits most the contextual status Stair well walls on roof: 20.0m2/unit then total: 680m2 units. The Dense concrete core of the project with the addition Stair well roof: 11.5m2/unit then total: 400me will support the remaining to a number of fruitful trees Calculation for available Photovotaic cells: Total PC: 1080 m2 (0.47 ratio to footprint) structure by canteliver. Each (orange & fig). Output/m2: 1KW Stair well walls on roof: 20.0m2/unit then total: 680m2 cluster has to be designed The building finishes will then total output: 1080KW Stair well roof: 11.5m2/unit then total: 400me structurally due to the support use sand from site to create Total PC: of the all the units to onePossible coatings (commonly existing in wind electric energy: 1080 m2 (0.47 ratio to footprint) another. acrylic). 1KW 30Output/m2: turbines with output 8KW

Possible Points: 110

Certified 40 to 49 points

Phase 2

ROOF GARDENS AND PLATING BALCONIES All units’ roofs have designed within them roof gardens that are for private use by the user of the unit. The garden roofs can be used for planting small vegetation (no deep roots) that can be fruitful or productive and thus support the user economically. Some balconies also include vegetation that help in solar filtration and air enhancement.

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 to 2 1

Innovation in Design: Vegitation Innovation in Design: Structural Innovation in Design: Finishing material Innovation in Design: recycling gray water Innovation in Design: recycble materials LEED Accredited Professional

1

Credit 1.2

17

Possible Points:

Minimum IAQ Performance Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring Increased Ventilation Construction IAQ Management Plan—During Construction Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy Low-Emitting Materials—Adhesives and Sealants Low-Emitting Materials—Paints and Coatings Low-Emitting Materials—Flooring Systems Low-Emitting Materials—Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products Low-Emitting Materials—Systems Furniture and Seating Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control Controllability of Systems—Lighting Controllability of Systems—Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort—Design Thermal Comfort—Verification Daylight and Views—Daylight Daylight and Views—Views for Seated Spaces

CLUSTER PROGRESS

Stair well walls on roof: Stair well roof: Total PC: Output/m2: then total output:

ROOF PLAT All un withi that a the u garde for pl (no d be fru and t user balco veget solar enha

SUSTAINABLE GADGETS

A Place to remember

Project Checklist

Second Floor

SUN EXPOSURE ANALYSIS: the Ecotect analysis for sun exposure proved that the choice of placement of the PV cells on the roof (at the highest point) to be most efficient due to its exposure to 90+Kh/m2. The projects’ walls and building mass help create a selfshading pattern that protects most of the building facade from high solar exposure minimizing need for isolation and cooling in summer

SHADE & SHADOW PATTERN ANALYSIS Shade pattern of the building through the year show the shading of most of the courtyard spaces and the access to the sun of some more open ares. Each unit has access to natural lighting through out the year

Phase 1

- Sun-protected due to depth -Consideration: Circulation -Window/Floor: 0.7

ANALYSIS

for a large portion of the project wall areas. The additional of controlled 2 layer windows adds to the quality, flexibility and stainability of the spaces.

LAYOUT PROGRESS

Phase 3

Prereq 1

Credit 1.1 Credit 1.2 Credit 2

Credit 3.1 Credit 3.2 Credit 4 Credit 5 Credit 6

1

Phase 1

LEED SUN EXPOSURE ANALYSIS: the Ecotect analysis for sun exposure proved that the

Sherif Goubran | University | Design Studio 3 | 63 LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

A Place to remember

Project Checklist 10

4

1

Sustainable Sites

28-5-2012

Possible Points:

Certified

CLUSTER PROGRE

LAYOUT PROGRESS

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

Credit 7

SPACE NATURAL LIGHTING ANAL The average Value for the day ligh 290 LUX, with a two window config for one of the workshops (1st floo lighting exceed that required by c building and by LEED (average ac 80 LUX). The design of large wind efficient

Possible wind electric energy: 30 turbines with output 8KW Then total: 240KW

Storage protects Ymost of the b Tenant S 1 Building 2 facade from high sola Construc 2 Materialn exposure2 minimizing Material 1 Recycled 2 for isolation and coolin Regional 2 Rapidly R summer 1

21

9

5

2

Indoor Environmental Quality

Possible Points:

17


Study & Analysis of Visual Elements. Urban Form, Grain, Texture, and Fabric. The Phenomenon of Perception. Space, Time, and Function. Space and Path Visual Analysis. Study & Analysis of Historic Urban Squares, Piazzas and similar spaces. Form and space generation in landscape architecture. Elements of Landscape Architecture. Fall - 2012

Urban Design and Landscape Architecture

AENG 468 | Dr. Sami Sabry Shaker


Residential Design|

The American University in Cairo

Design of two of a residential compound Dep.alternatives of Architectural Engineering Project 1:on a 30 Feddan Land with 2 way view AENG 468 | Urban Design & Landscape Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale) Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker

Project 1: Design of a Residential Compound

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Design of a Residential Compound

Project Briefing and Introduction:

Design Development & Process:

The project focuses on a residential subdivision development located on a 25 to 30 feddan land that is overlooking two peripheral natural features. the project is to design single family dwelling units up to 350 meters squared ground floor area with maximum 8 meters height on 600 to 700 meters plots. With no back to back plots permissible and covering 25% of the total land, the challenge is to place and orient the units for best view and natural wind reception.

Cluster development:

The single family dwelling units has to cover 50% of the land area that ranges between 600 and 700 meters squared. The unit should include spacious reception and dining areas, living rooms, office, kitchen with outdoor access, a minimum of 3 bedrooms (one of which is a master bedroom) as well as the services and water circuits needed for the spaces.

The American University in Cairo Dep. of Architectural Engineering AENG 468 | Urban Design & Landscape Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Master plan Development:

Cluster areas (area of the project)

Main feature area (Excluded)

Cluster Design Reference and Research: Design criteria of a residential cluster -

Achieving a clear hierarchy of spaces that succeeds in creating different levels of interaction. Making best use of natural features of site/interaction with surroundings. Privacy is clearly achieved on all different levels. Breaking linearity and creating an experience that reflects diversity intriguing the user.

Hierarchy of spaces:

Spaces of different sizes, programs & locations are created to form interactive zones of different natures. These spaces are outdoor spaces that could act both as transitional or interactive zones. They link different clusters and portions of the project together. They also act as the linking path to the natural feature of the site being the beach. The spaces are linked together based on a certain logic and sequence.

Private

Semi-Public

Cluster formation:

Public

Clusters work on creating an enclosure between a number of plots giving them character and privacy. The clusters will follow the cul-de-sac system that gives the opportunity to shape the project best to achieve hierarchy of spaces. The system will allow the moving of vehicular network to the outskirts of the project and the creation of the public, interactive pedestrian zone in the center.

Alternative 1

Alternative 2

Model Development:

Cluster public space Towards higher hierarchy spaces

Semi-Private Vehicular circulation

Pedestrian network:

Pedestrian Network works on connecting all spaces together in an interesting manor that guarantees good circulation & creates an experience. Networks are enhanced by good lighting systems and landscaping.

Building Orientation:

Pedestrian circulation

Vehicular circulation network:

Vehicular circulation network is designed to take place on the periphery of the site in order not to obstruct the interaction zones where pedestrians and residents of the dwellings would pursue the daily activities. The network being toward the outside has other advantages such as safety Access between vehicular and noise buffering.

Building orientations will consider the climatic data of the area and will allow all dwellings to access fresh wind prevailing from the North & northwestern direction in its main living areas overlooking the sea.

N

and pedestrian

Sherif Goubran | 65


Residential Design| Project 1: Design of a Residential Compound

The American University in Cairo

Design of two of a residential compound Dep.alternatives of Architectural Engineering Project 1:on a 30 Feddan Land with 2 way view AENG 468 | Urban Design & Landscape Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale) Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Design of a Residential Compound

The American University in Cairo Dep. of Architectural Engineering AENG 468 | Urban Design & Landscape Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Goals and Objectives

Prototype Concept & Development The concept and approach to the design used breaking of the facade to create more surface area facing wind direction and to allow for better view for spaces located in the back. On the spatial level, all living and bedroom zones are designed for best wind reception and access to view. The spaces define a large backyard in the plot overlooking the view.

Proposal 1 key plan Category

Environment

Prototype orientation limits

Prototype development sketch

Ground floor plan

Staggering concept sketch

First floor plan 0DVWHU %HGURRP /LYLQJ

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Scale 1:100

Scale 1:100

Proposal 2 key plan Alternative I

Alternative II

Goal

Rlative Weight

Rating

Score

Rating

Score

User has good view to Natural feature (sea view) User is protected from unwanted climatic aspects. Unit has enough open space for interacting with environment and surroundings. Public spaces make good use of climatic and environmental aspects making space user friendly and enjoyable. Space makes best use of natural features of large plot. All units facing wind direction All plots & units are easily accessed both on the pedestrian level and the vehicular level. Parking space are available wherever in need and in appropriate amounts fulfilling or exceeding design codes

9 5

8 9

72 45

7 8

63 40

8

10

80

6

48

7

8

56

8

56

7

8

8

9

9

64 81

6

56 54

8

8

64

6

48

7

9

63

8

56

Clear and definite segrigation between vehucular and pedestrian circulations

10

9

90

8

80

Interactive spaces are spread in the project. There is a clear hierarchy of spaces achieved between spaces. Physical Landscape succeeds in creating connections between different plots, zones & spaces. Design succeeds in creating an experience by breaking linearity and creating invotive interesting spaces Landscape succeeds in creating an experience by placement of trees, lighting, seating in an attractive manner that people would enjoy experiencing. Privacy is achieved in all units on both visual and vocal levels (sound & visual buffer zones available). Public spaces encourage residents to interact and socialize. Services & public zones are easily accessed from all units by walking or Sociocultural vehuular. Reference to old cultural precedents and harra concept Safety is achieved (fire fighting pumps, public zones buffered from vehicular zones‌etc) Number of plots and units make maximimuse of the allowed built up area. Floor area ratio complying with required ratio Economical & land Placement of plots best creates public spaces and allows for minimal loss Buget of space. Units covering the plot area with the required 50% ratio while providing space in land for other aspects.

6 9

8 8

48 72

7 9

42 81

8

9

72

9

72

7

8

56

6

42

8

9

72

8

64

10

8

80

7

70

9

9

81

6

54

7

7

49

7

49

8

8

64

7

56

5

8

40

7

35

10

8

80

7

70

9

9

81

8

72

8

8

64

7

56

9

9

81

9

81

Total Score:

1555

1345

Sherif Goubran | 66


Residential Design| Project 1: Design of a Residential Compound

The American University in Cairo

The American University in Cairo

Design of two of a residential compound three) Dep.alternatives of Architectural Engineering Dep. of Architectural Engineering Project 1:on a 30 Feddan Land with 2 way view (done in Group ofAENG AENG 468 | Urban Design & Landscape 468 | Urban Design & Landscape Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale) Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Master plan Proposal 1

Design of a Residential Compound

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Master plan Proposal 2

Scale 1:2000 0

50

100

Scale 1:2000 0

50

100

Section through entire site

Section through entire site

Scale 1:2000

Scale 1:2000

Sherif Goubran | 67


Residential Design|

The American University in Cairo

The American University in Cairo

Design of two of a residential compound three) Dep.alternatives of Architectural Engineering Dep. of Architectural Engineering Project 1:on a 30 Feddan Land with 2 way view (done in Group ofAENG AENG 468 | Urban Design & Landscape 468 | Urban Design & Landscape Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale) Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker

Project 1: Design of a Residential Compound

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Design of a Residential Compound

Proposal 1 Concept & Development

Proposal 2 Concept & Development

The concept and approach to the design worked on the stretching of the desired plot in order for it to have a large frontage giving better exposure to the natural feature located on two of the project’s peripheral sides. The design worked on creating a main central public space along the main axial direction leading to the sea(natural feature). The climax being the clubhouse would be located at the very beginning of the project 25m above sea level to have best view of the residential development, central green area and sea.

The concept and approach to the design worked on creating a generally pentagonal form that is deep and has a tighter width. The plot is exposed to the sea(natural feature) on two of its sides and part of the third. The design worked on creating main central public space along the main axial direction leading to the sea. The climax would be located in frontage of the project to be in direct relation to the sea.

Design approach:

Design approach:

By starting to define the main spine and public spaces, the secondary semi public spaces were shaped followed by first level spaces. The building clusters were then shaped to enclose the semi private spaces while having access to the main spine and all other public services.

By defining a narrow public path leading to the climax at the frontage of the project and shaping other public or semi public spaces around it. The clusters were shaped having large separations between them defining semi private zones. A main water feature defines and guides the public spaces within the project.

Land use budget:

Land use budget:

Total project area= 255000 m2 135000 m2 outside land budget to be considered open spaces Used project area 28.8 feddans (121000 m2)

Total project area= 265000 m2 139400 m2 outside land budget to be considered open spaces Used project area 29.9 feddans (125600 m2)

Calculations and population density:

Calculations and population density: Total land area = 29.9 feddans = 125600 m2 Plot coverage = 25% = 31400 m2 Ground floor area per dwelling = 350 m2 Number of residential units = 90 units Public services area = 3150 m2 Final number of residential plots = 81 units

Population per unit = 6 people Number of units = 81 units Total population = 486 people Area in Km2 = 0.126 Km2 Nominal density = 486/0.126 = 3850 Pupil/Km2

Pros:

Cons:

- Bigger frontage on the view. - More definition of different spaces and hierarchy. - Provides easy accessibility to the services (Club house/ other services.

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Total land area = 28.8 feddans = 121000 m2 Plot coverage = 25% = 30550 m2 Ground floor area per dwelling = 350 m2 Number of residential units = 87 units Public services area = 2800 m2 Final number of residential plots = 83 units

Plot area = 0.0007 km2 Plot density = 8570 Pupil/Km2

Pros:

- The design doesn’t emphasize continuity. - Club house is not located on the main natural feature.

- Integrates the water feature with the landscape in an interactive manner - The club house is directly located on the main feature. - Provides continuity in the design of clusters.

Proposed right of way:

Population per unit = 6 people Number of units = 83 units Total population = 498 people Area in Km2 = 0.121 Km2 Nominal density = 498/0.121 = 4100 Pupil/Km2 Plot area = 0.0007 km2 Plot density = 8570 Pupil/Km2

Cons:

- Narrow frontage on the natural feature. - The blunt definition of different spaces and hierarchies.

Proposed right of way:

Right of way

Right of way

Sherif Goubran | 68


Residential Design| Project 1: Design of a Residential Compound

The American University in Cairo

The American University in Cairo

Design of two of a residential compound three) Dep.alternatives of Architectural Engineering Dep. of Architectural Engineering Project 1:on a 30 Feddan Land with 2 way view (done in Group ofAENG AENG 468 | Urban Design & Landscape 468 | Urban Design & Landscape Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale) Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Hierarchy of Spaces:

Design of a Residential Compound

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Vehicular Vs. Pedestrian Circulation: Using the design approach described this alternative is able to achieve a clear hierarchy of spaces moving from private to semi private to semi public and finally reaching public spaces. Each having their considerations and activities.

Alternative 1

A total segregation of pedestrian and vehicular networks is achieved through the focusing of pedestrian network on open public spaces limiting pedestrian walkways to sidewalks in areas that have vehicular roads. The pedestrian walkways are continuous even above the water feature located along the main axis of the project by the creation and use of bridges. Both networks cover all land to give access to all areas being public or residential.

Alternative 1

Scale 1:3000 Due to the linearity of the main spine and the large cluster zones, the alternative is lacking a definition for semi public areas while fulfilling the design criteria for semi private and public spaces.

Alternative 2

Scale 1:3000 A total segregation of pedestrian and vehicular networks is achieved. The pedestrian walkways are located around the water feature continuously and do intersect the water feature located along the main axis of the project by the creation and use of bridges. Both networks cover all land to give access to all areas being public or residential. The climax could be reached using both networks through very different paths and routes.

Scale 1:3000

Alternative 2

Scale 1:3000

Sherif Goubran | 69


Residential Design| Project 1: Design of a Residential Compound Solid Vs. Void:

The American University in Cairo

The American University in Cairo

Design of two alternatives of a residential compound three) Dep. of Architectural Engineering Dep. of Architectural Engineering Project 1:on a 30 Feddan Land with 2 way view (done in Group of AENG 468 | Urban Design & Landscape AENG 468 | Urban Design & Landscape Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale) Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

The density of the solid is respectively low leaving a lot of open spaces surrounding each unit allowing for different auxiliary activities and services to be happening on the project area resulting into moderately harsh urban texture. The organization of the plots following the coastal line creates an interesting placement within the project.

Alternative 1

Design of a Residential Compound

Accessibility, Parking & Street Hierarchy:

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

The road network within the network starts with only one main entrance leading to a main round about giving access to the public services including shops and the clubhouse then separating into secondary roads that lead to cluster roads ending by a cul-de-sac, maintaining a clear street hierarchy. Round abouts exist at the end of secondary level roads providing return routes for drivers. Each plot is accessed by vehicle through a driveway and walkways for pedestrian access. Parking areas for public services is available according to design standards and a parking lane is available for each cluster.

Alternative 1

Scale 1:3000 The density of the solid is still respectively low over the whole project area however the cluster density is relatively high. The organization of the plots designed to have curvatures that allow for better view within the land creates an interesting geometry and pattern.

The road network starts with a main entrance separating into two leading to different clusters and including round abouts for U-turns. The clubhouse located at the beach front has access through one of the secondary branches and includes a public parking area. Each cluster road ends with a cul-de-sac and includes parking for residents maintaining a plot accessibility.

Alternative 2

Alternative 2 Scale 1:3000

Sherif Goubran | 70


Residential Design| Project 1: Design of a Residential Compound

The American University in Cairo

Design of two of a residential compound on a 30 Feddan Land with 2 way view (done in Group of three) Dep. alternatives of Architectural Engineering AENG 468 | Urban Design & Landscape Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale) Presented to: Dr. Sami Shaker

By: Alaa Khalil, Hassan Safwat, Moaz Sameh & Sherif Gourban

Final Model Pictures

Sherif Goubran | 71


MXD Design|

Design of two alternatives of Mixed use development on a 40 acres Nile front land in Giza (done in Group of four) Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 72


MXD Design|

Design of two alternatives of Mixed use development on a 40 acres Nile front land in Giza (done in Group of four) Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 73


MXD Design|

Design of two alternatives of Mixed use development on a 40 acres Nile front land in Giza (done in Group of four) Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 74


MXD Design|

Design of two alternatives of Mixed use development on a 40 acres Nile front land in Giza (done in Group of four) Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 75


MXD Design|

Design of two alternatives of Mixed use development on a 40 acres Nile front land in Giza (done in Group of four) Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 76


MXD Design|

Design of two alternatives of Mixed use development on a 40 acres Nile front land in Giza (done in Group of four) Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 77


MXD Design|

Design of two alternatives of Mixed use development on a 40 acres Nile front land in Giza (done in Group of four) Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 78


MXD Design|

Design of two alternatives of Mixed use development on a 40 acres Nile front land in Giza (done in Group of four) Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 79


MXD Design|

Design of two alternatives of Mixed use development on a 40 acres Nile front land in Giza (done in Group of four) Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 80


MXD Design|

Design of two alternatives of Mixed use development on a 40 acres Nile front land in Giza (done in Group of four) Final Posters showing development, design, analysis and model (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 81


Cluster Research|

A comprehensive research regarding all factors affecting residential cluster design along with case studies A sample of the research pages showing some aspects of the research

Pre-Design Considerations |

Factors that have to be surveyed & analysed before the design in order to make better cluster design choices these are factors that are considered as constraints and design requirements that cannot be changed.

Land form & Quality

Local Climate:

Local climate has to be surveyed to identify it limitations and design considerations needed for different conditions. This will effect the choice of building types (units), the building orientations, vegetation, slopes and drainage.

The type and location of land will define the character of the development and will have a great implications on the different design decisions.

Site Context & Urban Plan

When designing clusters, the approach from micro to macro or the opposite will depend of the urban context and plan already existing for the area where the design is taking place. Designing in a site that is contextually defined and within an existing urban plan requires the designer to consider the clusters, building types and formations of the surrounding (“The Design of Residential Areas Basic Considerations, Principles, and Methods by Thomas Adams.”)

Landscape, land form and topography could add some limitations to the design and should be considered and studied before the design “Single Family Residential Construction Guide - Introduction.”

Sherif Goubran | 82


Cluster Research|

A comprehensive research regarding all factors affecting residential cluster design along with case studies A sample of the research pages showing some aspects of the research

Different design configurations for walkways, pedestrian paths and biking lanes Time saver standards for landscape

Sherif Goubran | 83


Cluster Research|

A comprehensive research regarding all factors affecting residential cluster design along with case studies A sample of the research pages showing some aspects of the research

Visibility & interaction:

Safety & Privacy:

Use of fencing to cover on private ground, fences should be at least at the eye level of human: 150cm

Use of surveillance systems where there is a lack of occupancy to ensure the safety of all users. Time saver standards for landscape

it is important to study the visibility and interaction of the streets with the surrounding to make sure the privacy is where it is needed and the social exchange spots work well.

(“Single Family Residential Construction Guide - Introduction.�)

Character & Identity:

Enclosure & closure

Ensuring that the cluster designed has its own character and style to be able to give the user the sense of identity Clusters should enclose space, but leave open access to it to give the sense of security. Closing space with buildneeded. This could be achieved by the use of colour and landscaping patterns. the use of landmarks could also ing blocks is not an efficient cluster design be important for way finding and diversity between clusters.

Sherif Goubran | 84


Cluster Research|

A comprehensive research regarding all factors affecting residential cluster design along with case studies A sample of the research pages showing some aspects of the research

Noise Buffering

pollution & Wind Buffering with vegetation Different plants that could be used to filter air from pollutants and wind blocking effect created by the clustering of vegetation. Time saver standards for urban design

Noise cancellation calculation for plots and cluster close to highways Time saver standards for urban design

Conservation Considering the conditions of the lands, the existence of natural features such as forests, lakes or plantations, the existence of sea fronts, wild life. Conserving any monument on site being of historic or cultural value should be considered within the design as well.

conserving the facades of old buildings in new developments or the palm tree vegetation on the nile.

Sherif Goubran | 85


In depth application of advanced CAD concepts. Real time computer graphics. Computer applications for performance animation, virtual reality and interactively. Modelling, texture mapping, environments, navigation, lighting, animation and sound. Generative design and Avatars. Digital tools and methods of design with manual tools within the design process. Computational design methodologies, visualization, digital fabrication, costestimation, scheduling and facility management. Parametric design and Building Information Modelling (BIM). Applications through design studio and workshop on digital fabrication. Fall - 2012

Digital Design Studio and Workshop

AENG 473 | Dr. Christian Bauriedel


AA Pavilion Design|

A Design for the Architecture association Pavilion at AUC to include and provide different functions. Posters showing concept, development, renders, study and final physical model (Not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 87


AA Pavilion Design|

A Design for the Architecture association Pavilion at AUC to include and provide different functions. Posters showing concept, development, renders, study and final physical model (Not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 88


AA Pavilion Design|

A Design for the Architecture association Pavilion at AUC to include and provide different functions. Posters showing concept, development, renders, study and final physical model (Not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 89


AA Pavilion Design|

A Design for the Architecture association Pavilion at AUC to include and provide different functions. Posters showing concept, development, renders, study and final physical model (Not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 90


AA Pavilion Design|

A Design for the Architecture association Pavilion at AUC to include and provide different functions. Posters showing concept, development, renders, study and final physical model (Not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 91


AA Pavilion Design|

A Design for the Architecture association Pavilion at AUC to include and provide different functions. Posters showing concept, development, renders, study and final physical model (Not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 92


AA Pavilion Design|

A Design for the Architecture association Pavilion at AUC to include and provide different functions. Posters showing concept, development, renders, study and final physical model (Not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 93


AA Pavilion Design|

A Design for the Architecture association Pavilion at AUC to include and provide different functions. Posters showing concept, development, renders, study and final physical model (Not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 94


AA Pavilion Design|

A Design for the Architecture association Pavilion at AUC to include and provide different functions. Posters showing concept, development, renders, study and final physical model (Not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 95


AA Pavilion Design|

A Design for the Architecture association Pavilion at AUC to include and provide different functions. Posters showing concept, development, renders, study and final physical model (Not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 96


Studio on the Art of Structure and Technology. This studio’s primary objective is to link the two basic components of architecture- art and engineering. Based on a firm understanding of structural systems and their appropriate application to architectural design, projects will be designed to incorporate both aesthetic beauty and structural thinking. The influence of technology in the form of new materials and methods will be examined through their design potential. Three-Dimensional manual and digital models will play an essential role in the design development processes of this studio. Fall - 2012

Design Studio 4 AENG 454 | Dr. Amr Abd-El-Kawi


Design Project|

A project for the Pavilion spaces with raw materials subtheme in the Cairo 2030 expo. Design booklet presented to jurors to include all drawings and needed information. (not to scale - Group of 3)

Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 98


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 99


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 100


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Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 107


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 108


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 109


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 110


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 111


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 112


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 113


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 114


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 115


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 116


Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 117


Design Story Book|

A Book to document the design and course experience. Insights and glimpses of the design book created with a sarcastic comic type story line (Group of 3)

Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 118


Design Story Book|

A Book to document the design and course experience. Insights and glimpses of the design book created with a sarcastic comic type story line (Group of 3)

Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 119


Design Story Book|

A Book to document the design and course experience. Insights and glimpses of the design book created with a sarcastic comic type story line (Group of 3)

Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 120


Design Story Book|

A Book to document the design and course experience. Insights and glimpses of the design book created with a sarcastic comic type story line (Group of 3)

Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 121


Design Story Book|

A Book to document the design and course experience. Insights and glimpses of the design book created with a sarcastic comic type story line (Group of 3)

Sherif Goubran | Chapter name | 122


Construction details, materials selection, and methods of construction of building finishes: floors, walls, ceiling; stairs, openings, installations, specialty works. Design and detailing of architectural components. Fall 2012

Detail Design and Finishes in Buildings

AENG 428 | Dr. Sameh El Feki


Finishing Details|

Detail drawings of the different parts of a residential building Drawings were prepared and presented in ACAD national standard drawing types. (not to scale) PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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OWNER

PROJECT

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KEY PLAN

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B - THIS DRAWING IS COPY RIGHT PROTECTED AND CAN NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN APPROVAL OF THE ARCHITECT. - ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN METERS UNLESS OTHERWISE MENTIONED, ALL DIMENSIONS MUST BE REVISED BY CONTRACTOR IN SITE. - ALL STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL SYSTEMS & MEASUREMENTS SHOULD BE REVIEWED FROM STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL DRAWINGS. - THIS DRAWING IS NOT VALID FOR ERECTION OR INSTALLATION WITHOUT THE ARCHITECTS STAMP AND FOR CONSTRUCTION STAMP.

01 MARK

25-3-2010

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FOR REVIEW DESCRIPTION

ISSUE: PROJECT NO: CAD DWG FILE: DRAWN BY: Sherif Goubran 900092358 CHECKED BY: DR.SAMEH EL FEKI

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SHEET TITLE

Stairs Design Section

A 501 1 c Copyright 2012, NAME OF ARCHITECTURE FIRM, ADDRESS OF FIRM.

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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Finishing Details|

Detail drawings of the different parts of a residential building Drawings were prepared and presented in ACAD national standard drawing types. (not to scale) PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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OWNER

PROJECT

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CONSULTANTS Sherif Goubran 90092358

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

C

OUTER

KEY PLAN

B

B - THIS DRAWING IS COPY RIGHT PROTECTED AND CAN NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN APPROVAL OF THE ARCHITECT. - ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN METERS UNLESS OTHERWISE MENTIONED, ALL DIMENSIONS MUST BE REVISED BY CONTRACTOR IN SITE. - ALL STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL SYSTEMS & MEASUREMENTS SHOULD BE REVIEWED FROM STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL DRAWINGS. - THIS DRAWING IS NOT VALID FOR ERECTION OR INSTALLATION WITHOUT THE ARCHITECTS STAMP AND FOR CONSTRUCTION STAMP.

A

TOP.RAIL

WALL.CONNECTION

SCALE-1:2

SCALE-1:2

BOTTOM.RAIL

01 MARK

25-3-2010

DATE

A

SHEET TITLE

Window Details

SCALE-1:2 1 c Copyright 2012, NAME OF ARCHITECTURE FIRM, ADDRESS OF FIRM.

FOR REVIEW DESCRIPTION

ISSUE: PROJECT NO: CAD DWG FILE: DRAWN BY: Sherif Goubran 900092358 CHECKED BY: DR.SAMEH EL FEKI

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

INNER

Sherif Goubran | 125


Finishing Details|

Detail drawings of the different parts of a residential building Drawings were prepared and presented in ACAD national standard drawing types. (not to scale) PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

1

2

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OWNER

PROJECT

E

E

CONSULTANTS

D

D

C

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

KEY PLAN

B

B - THIS DRAWING IS COPY RIGHT PROTECTED AND CAN NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN APPROVAL OF THE ARCHITECT. - ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN METERS UNLESS OTHERWISE MENTIONED, ALL DIMENSIONS MUST BE REVISED BY CONTRACTOR IN SITE. - ALL STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL SYSTEMS & MEASUREMENTS SHOULD BE REVIEWED FROM STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL DRAWINGS. - THIS DRAWING IS NOT VALID FOR ERECTION OR INSTALLATION WITHOUT THE ARCHITECTS STAMP AND FOR CONSTRUCTION STAMP.

SECTION SCALE-1:5

WOOD.FIXATION.DETAILS

01 MARK

SCALE-1:2

ISSUE: PROJECT NO: CAD DWG FILE: DRAWN BY: Sherif Goubran 900092358 CHECKED BY: DR.SAMEH EL FEKI

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Wood Floors Details

A517 1 c Copyright 2012, NAME OF ARCHITECTURE FIRM, ADDRESS OF FIRM.

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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Final Project |

The final Project was prepared through the compilation of all details into one building. the set of full details for a villa was created to be submitted and discussed as a complete project. (not to scale) PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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OWNER

PROJECT

E

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

KEY PLAN

B

B - THIS DRAWING IS COPY RIGHT PROTECTED AND CAN NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN APPROVAL OF THE ARCHITECT. - ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN METERS UNLESS OTHERWISE MENTIONED, ALL DIMENSIONS MUST BE REVISED BY CONTRACTOR IN SITE. - ALL STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL SYSTEMS & MEASUREMENTS SHOULD BE REVIEWED FROM STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL DRAWINGS. - THIS DRAWING IS NOT VALID FOR ERECTION OR INSTALLATION WITHOUT THE ARCHITECTS STAMP AND FOR CONSTRUCTION STAMP.

01 MARK

25-3-2010

DATE

FOR REVIEW DESCRIPTION

ISSUE: PROJECT NO: CAD DWG FILE: DRAWN BY: Sherif Goubran 900092358 CHECKED BY: DR.SAMEH EL FEKI

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Proposed First Plan

FIRST.FLOOR.PLAN SCALE-1:100

A 102 1 c Copyright 2012, NAME OF ARCHITECTURE FIRM, ADDRESS OF FIRM.

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Sherif Goubran 90092358

Sherif Goubran | 127


Final Project |

The final Project was prepared through the compilation of all details into one building. the set of full details for a villa was created to be submitted and discussed as a complete project. (not to scale) PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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OWNER

PROJECT

E

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CONSULTANTS

D

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

KEY PLAN

B

B - THIS DRAWING IS COPY RIGHT PROTECTED AND CAN NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN APPROVAL OF THE ARCHITECT. - ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN METERS UNLESS OTHERWISE MENTIONED, ALL DIMENSIONS MUST BE REVISED BY CONTRACTOR IN SITE. - ALL STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL SYSTEMS & MEASUREMENTS SHOULD BE REVIEWED FROM STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL DRAWINGS. - THIS DRAWING IS NOT VALID FOR ERECTION OR INSTALLATION WITHOUT THE ARCHITECTS STAMP AND FOR CONSTRUCTION STAMP.

SECTION.1-1 SCALE-1:50 01 MARK

25-3-2010

DATE

FOR REVIEW DESCRIPTION

ISSUE: PROJECT NO: CAD DWG FILE: DRAWN BY: Sherif Goubran 900092358 CHECKED BY: DR.SAMEH EL FEKI

A

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SHEET TITLE

Section 1-1

A 301 1 c Copyright 2012, NAME OF ARCHITECTURE FIRM, ADDRESS OF FIRM.

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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Description: Historical background of Interior Design Styles. Concepts and principles of interior design. Space planning and design. Aesthetics of Interior Design. Color and lighting. Materials selection. Function, material and layout of furniture and textiles. Design for the disabled. Ergonomics and design. Mood Board design. Design drawing and detailing. Spring 2013

Interior Design AENG 420 | Dr. Mahamad Noman & Dr. Ali Kandil


Individual Project |

Design of a nile front living room for a world class designer A Living Room for Girogio Armani

Sherif Goubran | 130


Individual Project |

Design of a nile front living room for a world class designer A Living Room for Girogio Armani

Sherif Goubran | 131


Individual Project |

Design of a nile front living room for a world class designer A Living Room for Girogio Armani

Sherif Goubran | 132


Individual Project |

Design of a nile front living room for a world class designer A Living Room for Girogio Armani

Sherif Goubran | 133


Individual Project |

Design of a nile front living room for a world class designer A Living Room for Girogio Armani

Sherif Goubran | 134


Individual Project |

Design of a nile front living room for a world class designer A Living Room for Girogio Armani

Sherif Goubran | 135


Individual Project |

Design of a nile front living room for a world class designer A Living Room for Girogio Armani

Sherif Goubran | 136


Individual Project |

Design of a nile front living room for a world class designer A Living Room for Girogio Armani

Sherif Goubran | 137


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 138


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 139


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 140


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 141


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 142


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 143


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 144


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 145


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 146


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 147


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 148


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 149


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

Sherif Goubran | 150


Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

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Group Project|

Design of a cross functional space with a design & life style function Oriental Arts & Crafts and Coffee space - Project completed in a group of 5 students

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Studio on smart buildings and high-tech architecture. Expanding on the 1970’s theme of High-Tech architecture, this studio aims at redefining the role of cutting edge technology in design- both process and product. Digital technology has revolutionized the way we conceptualized, visualize, present and are eventually able to construct our buildings, making impossible designs of the past a reality. Rapid developments in materials, building systems and construction methods have broadened our design horizons. Issues such as virtual architecture and smart buildings will be explored with regards to their viability and role in the future of architecture. Spring 2013

Design Studio 5 AENG 455 | Dr. Christian Bauriedel


Design Project|

Rehabilitation Proposal of the NDP Building in Downtown Cairo - Egypt Design of a modern library - (not to scale)

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Design Project|

Rehabilitation Proposal of the NDP Building in Downtown Cairo - Egypt Design of a modern library - (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 155


Design Project|

Rehabilitation Proposal of the NDP Building in Downtown Cairo - Egypt Design of a modern library - (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 156


Design Project|

Rehabilitation Proposal of the NDP Building in Downtown Cairo - Egypt Design of a modern library - (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 157


Design Project|

Rehabilitation Proposal of the NDP Building in Downtown Cairo - Egypt Design of a modern library - (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 158


Design Project|

Rehabilitation Proposal of the NDP Building in Downtown Cairo - Egypt Design of a modern library - (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 159


Design Project|

Rehabilitation Proposal of the NDP Building in Downtown Cairo - Egypt Design of a modern library - (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 160


Studio on design in critical SettingsDesigning in Historical Contexts. A critical review of works, theories, and polemics in modern architecture. Case studies of buildings within urban settings will be the focus, with an emphasis on adaptive re-use, historic preservation, urban and landscape design practices. Within the context of a historical survey, students will develop a framework to assess and design for contemporary issues in architecture. Fall 2013

Architecture Studio 6 AENG 456 |Dr. Basil Kamel


Research ProjectI|

Analysing Context of new and old AUC campuses visualising layers of architecture, codes and semiotics (not to scale)

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Research ProjectI|

Analysing Context of new and old AUC campuses visualising layers of architecture, codes and semiotics (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 163


Research ProjectI|

Analysing Context of new and old AUC campuses visualising layers of architecture, codes and semiotics (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 164


Project II|

Contextual Analysis and design of Mohamad Mahmoud Street - Cairo Visualization and modelling of the street and 3 elevation designs. (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 165


Project II|

Contextual Analysis and design of Mohamad Mahmoud Street - Cairo Visualization and modelling of the street and 3 elevation designs. (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 166


Project II|

Contextual Analysis and design of Mohamad Mahmoud Street - Cairo Visualization and modelling of the street and 3 elevation designs. (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 167


Project II|

Contextual Analysis and design of Mohamad Mahmoud Street - Cairo Visualization and modelling of the street and 3 elevation designs. (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 168


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 169


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 170


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 171


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 172


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 173


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 174


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 175


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 176


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 177


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 178


Design ProjectIII |

Design of an educational Hospital 220 beds as part of AUC Downtown Campus Concept Development, analysis and design of the hospital (not to scale)

Sherif Goubran | 179


Studio on design in critical SettingsDesigning in Historical Contexts. A critical review of works, theories, and polemics in modern architecture. Case studies of buildings within urban settings will be the focus, with an emphasis on adaptive re-use, historic preservation, urban and landscape design practices. Within the context of a historical survey, students will develop a framework to assess and design for contemporary issues in architecture. Fall 2013

Thesis Project I AENG 490 |Dr. Magda Mostafa


Thesis Project|

The research, Analysis and proposal of development process in Khayala Areas, Cairo Proposal of individual projects and a master plan for the empowerment of the local users.

Branding of the proposed development project

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Thesis Project|

The research, Analysis and proposal of development process in Khayala Areas, Cairo Proposal of individual projects and a master plan for the empowerment of the local users.

Abstract Within the concept of reconciling the city of Cairo presently torn apart by a multitude of divides, this research and development proposal focuses the problem into the concept of “substates”. This new term is used to express the disconnection that exists within the Egyptian cities and districts; it represents the Egyptians’ new affiliations that hinder their connection to the nation and the establishment of Egypt as a national state in the mind of the average Egyptian. The literature supports the existence of such disconnections and establishes the view that most parties involved failed to tackle the problem due to the absence of a holistic approach. This proposal presents a possible new social architecture reproducible model that is empowered by the available resources around the city and that aims to expand the people’s abilities, free their consumed capacities and guide them to a new development path that is based on the rebuilding of connections to overcome the current divisions through the generation of common interest and platforms. The model proposed the establishment of connectors at each location, which can possibly be used to bridge over the current disconnections that exist. The research uses both international and local precedents within its parts for the establishment of methodologies and formulation of an approach that focuses on the empowerment of the intangible aspects, learning from the local users, introduction of new functions that make use of resources and that is focused on the present as the new heritage of tomorrow. Through the development of a quantitative choice methodology focusing on flexibility, land value and future development potentials, a choice of site for the establishment of the model was made. In the process of the research and data collection a participatory method was used to collect data and information about the needs as well as to in the assessment process of the proposals. The project main focus introduces the concept of “Connecting resources to empower people” to introduce five main conceptual progressions each with architectural, infrastructure and business proposals for the eluviation and development of the site. A proposed master plan was developed and chosen between a number of alternatives through a methodology with a street inward mindset where a new parallel living platform is to be created connecting the media center, residential units, creative center, recycling facility and school to be introduced. Each progression proposed tackles a number of programmatic needs identified by the locals and were assessed through survey to indicate their possible performance. The proposed development also introduced a number of developments and upgrades in the area of surrounding aiming to enforce the connection to the surrounding “substates” as well as ease the access to the project location. The upgrades also work on providing the connectors, which the model, when applied on the city level, can use to establish the needed interactions. This project, even though it uses quantitative and qualitative assessments for documenting the current state of the site, has to remain flexible to accommodate any new requirements or variations that may appear through its application

Sherif Goubran | 182


Thesis Project|

The research, Analysis and proposal of development process in Khayala Areas, Cairo Proposal of individual projects and a master plan for the empowerment of the local users.

Local Craft

Users

Various raw materials are used by the workers ranging from Bazalt, Sandstone to Granite and marble. These materials are brought from local quarries located on the western mountain chains of Egypt as well as South Sinai. After the raw materials are delivered to the site by trucks, the workers start sorting the blocks into various sizes to be used by the craftsmen to carve out tiles that measure 15 cm x 15 cm from the locks. The experience of the worker plays a huge factor in the reduction of the waste materials due to the clever selection of the cut line as well as a reduced amount of defected tiles. The rough natural cut lines identifying the tiles add a beauty to the tiling components, this added value is the main distinguishing aspect from mechanically cut stones. However the economical revenue from such manual work is not equivalent to the echanical work due to the close proximity of the pricing of both products.

Upon asking them for the reason of this total separation most of the locals replied stating that there is no common interest or space that they share. IThe locals of the site are enthusiastic to see a change; they want to up-cycle their workspaces and make them a better place to spend half their lives. Although, at the beginning all their needs were focused on matters to be solved by the government such as ownership contracts, and the services such as the sewage, water and electricity which are basic needs but after talking to them about up-cycling the workspaces and adding features to their site they were somehow uplifted up lifted. Upon mentioning some of the suggestions that made their workspace a much better place to work such as the addition of residential units, services, recreational areas and re cycling facilities the locals were very support full.

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Thesis Project|

The research, Analysis and proposal of development process in Khayala Areas, Cairo Proposal of individual projects and a master plan for the empowerment of the local users.

Expand

Connecting Resources to Empower People Social Experiment. Expand and develop

Empower

People

Connecting

Resources

Thesis Statement

Conceptual development

Current Site conditions

Conceptual development Sherif Goubran | 184


Thesis Project|

The research, Analysis and proposal of development process in Khayala Areas, Cairo Proposal of individual projects and a master plan for the empowerment of the local users.

Proposed master plan

Site Conceptual Development

Site Development proposal section

Site Conceptual Development Sherif Goubran | 185


Thesis Project|

The research, Analysis and proposal of development process in Khayala Areas, Cairo Proposal of individual projects and a master plan for the empowerment of the local users.

Site Development proposal sections Sherif Goubran | 186


Arts A compilation of artwork, Photography and photographic edits done with no connection to academic courses. These include different designs, paintings and photos that reflect a the process of development and a certain vision or reflection of life and the surrounding. Starting 2002.


A number of pictures of my own photography along with photo edits done using computer aided graphic programs based on my own or borrowed pictures.

Photography & Edits Own work


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Sherif Goubran | Arts | Photography & Edits | 190


Sherif Goubran | Arts | Photography & Edits | 191


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Sherif Goubran | Arts | Photography & Edits | 193


A number of Scans and photos of different artwork that i have produces over the years using various tools and medias. Some reflecting the development of my work and others reflecting my views and concepts.

Artwork Own Work


Top: Oil colors on Wood. Left: Pastel on Paper. Inverted Sunrise.

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Top: Pencil on paper. Sacre Coeur de Montmartre. Left: Gouache on paper. Self-Portrait (pop art inspired)

Sherif Goubran | Arts | Artwork | 196


1

2 3

4

Top: Gouache on paper. The Fruit Plate. 1: Ink on paper. Saadi Zaghlool (Prepared for an Arabic History Presentation). 2: Pen & colored crayons on paper & Calque. High Rise. 3: Acryclic & Pastel on paper. Two lives. 4: Water colors on paper. Purple Sky.

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Sherif Goubran | Arts | Artwork | 198


A Daily Scene at AUC: Multi medias on 5 A4 Pannels Sherif Goubran | Arts | Artwork | 199


RĂŠsumĂŠ This is a full resume containing contact information, educational history as well as different skills, hobbies, work experiences and travel history.


Sherif Goubran Page 1 E-mail: Address: Telephone:

sherifgoubran@gmail.com, sherifg@aucegypt.edu 21 El-Nadi Street, Maadi, Cairo, Egypt +2 02 235 99 610 (Home) , +2 0122 313 4085 (Mobile)

Objective To gain the most practical experiences in relation to my field of study during my educational phase in order to extend my knowledge and further develop my skills.

Education Bachelor of Science, Architectural Engineering, The American University in Cairo (AUC), 2014 Current GPA: 3.98, Highest GPA Graduating Senior class

Dean’s List 2010-2013

Summer study abroad at McGill University, Montreal, Canada, Completed 6 university credits at McGill University, Achieved GPA: 3.50

2009

Student Teaching Assistant, Architecture & Construction Engineering Department, The American University in Cairo (AUC), Fall 2013

Urban Design and Landscape Architecture: Assisting students in analysis, design and presentation of urban scale housing and mixed use projects. Assisting in faculty in course.

Related Work Experience Student Teaching Assistant, Architecture & Construction Engineering Department, The American

University in Cairo (AUC),

Human Aspect in Design: Supporting faculty & students in course organization and preparing activities for design studio time, in a second year architectural design studio Fall | Spring 2012 | 2013

Internships at NG-Design Office, Cairo, Egypt

Full Design and BOQ development responsibility for renovation of School Yard and Dorm rooms; Meetings with clients and contractors and full supervision of the execution of work. 2013

Design of Private house in Maghagha, Egypt. Execution Supervision for various large and small scale projects through various phases of construction. 2012

Part of a team for research and design of a competition held by the ministry of housing for designing youth housing in Egypt. Collaborated in the initial analysis and design of a private beach house in Gouna, Egypt;met with client for discussion of requirements and designs. Supervised over construction and finishing 2009 | 2011 work in some local small scale projects, basic architectural drafting and initial Design.

Skills

Linguistic:

Excellent knowledge of spoken and written English and Arabic and very good in French

Design: Academic Design Courses and training covering sketching & drawing, initial and environmental analysis, concept development, human aspect in design, form generation, sustainable design, art of structure, housing and urban design, landscaping and advanced computer aided design. Computer: Proficient use of Microsoft Office, Autocad, Revit, Google Sketch-up, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Indesign, Rhino and 3D Max. Good skills in Ecotect Analyis and Fair skills C++ programming language.

- Printed Portfolio: available upon request - Online Portfolio: http://issuu.com/sherifg/docs

Extracurricular Activities Member, Architecture Association (AA), The American University in Egypt (AUC),

2010-2013

Skills development committee teaching and assisting students in various courses’ work.

President of the Student Government, Canadian International School in Egypt (CISE), 2008-2009 Represented the student body before administration as well as agencies and organizations outside the

Current Employment

A compilation of my academic course work, projects as well as art work and photography

2012

Transferred and counting towards the B. Sc. Degree at AUC.

Ontario High School Diploma, Canadian International School in Egypt (CISE), 95,5% score, granted the Governor General Medal for academic achievement

Portfolio

school community, worked on event organization and fund raising.

Robotics Team, BOTBALL Regional & International Competitions Team Leader, responsible for the mechanics, documentation & coordination for the project,

Created the project time plan, organized the team trip to Doha, Qatar

Member, responsible for the mechanical design and building and testing, Won the 2nd place in the middle-east regional competition in Doha, Qatar.

2009 2008

Education in Mathematics and Computing’s contests 2008-2009 Participant, Fermat & Hypatia (2008) and Euclid (2009) International Mathematics Competitions

Hosted by the University of Waterloo, Canada Honoured as school champion in both years and part of the top 25% Participants worldwide

Other Work Experience Summer Day Camp Supervisor, Cairo American College (CAC),

Responsible and coordinator for a group of 20 kids aged 11-13 Assisting teachers in daily classroom activities, organizing creative activities in Language, Mathematics, Arts & crafts and sports

2008

Additional Information General interests include: Photography, sketching, Arts & crafts, Music and cooking. Travel experience in more than 30 cities internationally (in Europe, Middle east and America) and more than 15 cities and destinations within Egypt.

Personal Data

Full Name: Date of Birth: Place of Birth: Citizenship: Military Service:

Sherif Nader Alphonse Goubran July 8, 1991 Cairo, Egypt Egyptian & Permanent Resident of Canada Exempted temporarily

Additional References: References available upon request

Epsilen Account: Online Page:

http://www.epsilen.com/sherifg https://www.facebook.com/sherifgoubranportfolio

Sherif Goubran | Resume | 201


Thank You

Full Academic Portfolio | Sherif Goubran  

A Complete compilation of all architectural academic projects along with artwork and photography.

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