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Food & Drink

RHUBARB AND ALMOND TRIFLE Cass Titcombe, Brassica Restaurant

B

ack in the sixteenth century, trifle as a pudding was a term used for something a bit more like a fool. By the eighteenth century, with the inclusion of jelly and topped with a frothy syllabub, the trifle had developed into the dessert we know today. It usually (but not exclusively) contains layers of fruit, sponge soaked in alcohol and further layers of custard and whipped cream. Jelly is the common development, although I prefer to make trifle without the jelly and adapt the pudding according to whichever fruit is in 54 | Bridport Times | March 2019

season. When soaking the sponge, it tends to be better if it is a few days old as it will absorb the fruit juices and alcohol to a greater degree. With rhubarb, my alcohol of choice is Amaretto. However, if you don’t have this or prefer to switch the rhubarb to raspberries, then Madeira or a sweet sherry will be a perfect substitute. If you are a keen baker then you can make some Victoria sponge specifically for this or maybe use a different cake - gingerbread would work very well or even something with almonds, which will

Profile for Sherborne & Bridport Times

Bridport Times March 2019  

Featuring Kim and David Squirrell of Ink on Page + What's On, Arts & Culture, History, Wild Dorset, Outdoors, Archaeology, Food & Drink, Bod...

Bridport Times March 2019  

Featuring Kim and David Squirrell of Ink on Page + What's On, Arts & Culture, History, Wild Dorset, Outdoors, Archaeology, Food & Drink, Bod...