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Wild Dorset

GET DORSET BUZZING! Sally Welbourn, Dorset Wildlife Trust

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his year Dorset Wildlife Trust (DWT) is embarking on its biggest ever campaign to get over 1,000 people in Dorset doing at least one thing to help pollinators in their garden and help Get Dorset Buzzing. Why are we so concerned? It’s widely known that bees are in decline, yet they are arguably one of the most important insect groups on earth, helping to carry out the process of pollination which is responsible for one in three mouthfuls of the food we eat, including chocolate, coffee and strawberries. It’s not just bees that you will see flitting between flowers in your garden; butterflies, hoverflies, moths and some beetles also carry out the pollination process, so it’s important that we create much needed space for them all to thrive. One of the main reasons for the decline of bees and other pollinators is loss of habitat. Wildflower meadows used to provide prime pollinator habitat but we’ve lost 97% of these meadows since the 1930s. The good news is that there’s something we can do to help. Our gardens and local green spaces are potential mini-nature reserves so, if we can provide the space and the food, they will come! Everyone who signs up to the Get Dorset Buzzing campaign, sponsored by our friends at the Gardens Group and Wessex Water, will receive a free pack with everything they need to get started, or try new things if they’re already welcoming wildlife into their garden. The pack will include wildflower seeds, an information booklet and a wall-planner with inspiration 30 | Bridport Times | March 2019

and advice on what to grow and when. We’ll also send you personalised emails with discount vouchers and links to videos and blogs from our wildlife gardening experts at DWT, Dr George McGavin, our President, and Kate Bradbury, who writes for BBC Gardeners’ World. We can’t wait to welcome people into our new community and hear about the progress everyone is making to Get Dorset Buzzing.

FACTS/KEY TERMS • Nectar and pollen: Nectar is a sugar-rich fluid produced by the flower to attract pollinators. Pollen is a dry powder which sticks to pollinators who transfer it to other plants to complete the reproduction cycle. • Self-pollination: Flowers which can be pollinated by their own pollen from the same flower or from a flower from the same plant. • Cross-pollination: The transfer of pollen from one flower to another using a pollinator such as a bee. In some cases, the wind or water (rain) will help move the pollen from one plant to another.

Visit our website and sign up to receive your pack and help Get Dorset Buzzing. dorsetwildlifetrust.org.uk/gdb-signup

Profile for Sherborne & Bridport Times

Bridport Times March 2019  

Featuring Kim and David Squirrell of Ink on Page + What's On, Arts & Culture, History, Wild Dorset, Outdoors, Archaeology, Food & Drink, Bod...

Bridport Times March 2019  

Featuring Kim and David Squirrell of Ink on Page + What's On, Arts & Culture, History, Wild Dorset, Outdoors, Archaeology, Food & Drink, Bod...