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UNDERSTANDING POETRY E Reading to Analyze and Interpret

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO


RALLY! EDUCATION 22 Railroad Avenue Glen Head, NY 11545 888-99-RALLY Fax: 1-516-671-7900 www.RALLYEDUCATION.com LESLIE@RALLYEDUCATION.com …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

What Are the Skills Needed to Understand Poetry? Understanding Poetry Reading to Analyze and Interpret Grades 3–8 • Part 1: Glossary of poetry terms • Part 2: Poems are presented with background information to help readers better understand the poem. Each poem is followed by comprehension questions. • Part 3: Independent Practice: Poems with comprehension questions for students to answer on their own. Level C D E F G H

Reading Level 3 4 5 6 7 8

25-Pack

100-Pack

6351-4 6354-5 6357-6 6360-6 6363-7 6366-8

6352-1 6355-2 6358-3 6361-3 6364-4 6367-5

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E L P M SA N O I T A C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S S IS DU THI PERM REPRO


E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

ISBN 978-1-4204-6356-9 R 6356-9 Copyright ©2012 RALLY! EDUCATION. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright may be reproduced in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner. Printed in the U.S.A. 0911.MAQ RALLY! EDUCATION • 22 Railroad Avenue, Glen Head, NY 11545 • (888) 99-RALLY

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Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Glossary of Poetic Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Six Poems with Background Information and Instruction

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Independent Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Six Independent Practice Poems

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Introduction Understanding Poetry: Reading to Analyze and Interpret teaches students how to understand and analyze poetry. Students will understand the different forms of poetry, such as lyrical poetry and free verse. Students will understand the structural elements of poetry, such as rhyme, meter, and stanzas, and how the structural elements relate to form. Students will make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry, and use evidence from the text to support their understanding.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L AL Terms 9.RALLY Glossary ofRPoetic 9 . 8 8 8

Understanding Poetry focuses on how poets create meaning and the techniques that are used to do so. These techniques include using stanzas, line length, repetition, rhyme, rhythm, sound effects, word placement and emphasis, sensory language, and figurative language.

STER. A M E LIN students will ACKthat L The glossary of poetic terms gives definitions of theAterms B OT refer toTOthe BEglossary as S Ncan I need to analyze and interpret poetry. Students T K I O . TED HIS BO T they learn to interpret poetry.OPYRIGH R O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A Instruction S S I I D TH PERM REPRO This section contains four individual poems and one set of paired poems. Each poem is introduced with key background information that will help students understand the poem. The form of the poem is identified and explained. Key information is also given on the structural elements and literary techniques used in the poem. The student then answers questions about each poem. This section of the book contains multiple-choice and open-ended questions.

Independent Practice This section contains four individual poems and one set of paired poems. Each poem is followed by several questions. This section of the book contains multiple-choice and open-ended questions.

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Glossary of Poetic Terms Acrostic Poem An acrostic poem is a poem where the first letters of each line form a word. The word might be the subject of the poem, related to the theme of the poem, or the author’s name.

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Alliteration Alliteration is a literary technique where the same consonant sounds are repeated in neighboring words. Example: The sun slowly set.

Character A character is a person in a poem.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B Characterization A NOT O BE a character. Sthe I T T K I O . Characterization refers to how an author tells reader about ED IS BO GItHTcan Hby I T R Y R P It can be by describing a character. also be describing what a O CO NF S E I . V Y I K A G O W T O a character Y O Bwhat character looks P like, feels, or what a character does. N N E A L S I N I M N A D O I S E S C THIS RODU ERMIS P P E R Concrete Poem A concrete poem is a poem where the lines form a shape. The shape is usually related to the subject or the theme of the poem. Couplet A couplet is two lines in a row that rhyme. They may form a stanza on their own or may be part of a stanza. Flashback Flashback is used when an event is described that takes place before the time in the poem.

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Free Verse Free verse is a form of poetry where there is no set pattern. There is no set rhythm or rhyme. Hyperbole Hyperbole refers to the use of exaggeration to describe something. Example: She asked John a million times. Imagery Imagery is the use of details to help the reader imagine something. Imagery can describe how something looks, sounds, tastes, smells, or feels.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Limerick A limerick is a poem with five lines. Lines 1, 2, and 5 rhyme, and lines 3 and 4 rhyme. Limericks are usually humorous poems. Line Break NE A line break is when a line ends and a new line starts.BLACKLI

R. MASTE

OT A N O BE S I T T K I O . Lyric Poem GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P IS CO poem. VEN Fpoems A lyric poem is a typeOOofK short describe what the speaker ILyric AY. G W T Y O B N N E A L P speakerOfeels. thinks or how N IS AMthe D IN THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

Metaphor A metaphor compares two things, but without using the words “like” or “as.” Example: The kind woman is an angel. Meter Meter is the regular, or repeating, sound pattern of a poem. Mood The mood of a poem is how the poem makes the reader feel, or the feelings created in the reader.

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Narrator The narrator of a work is the person telling the story. Onomatopoeia Onomatopoeia is a term that describes a word that sounds like the object or thing that it names. Example: buzz, fizz, tick-tock, boom Personification Personification is when objects are described as if they are human.

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Example: The trees whispered to each other.

Point of View Point of view refers to the position of the speaker of a work. The point of view can be first person, second person, third person limited, or third person omniscient. R.

MASTE E N I L BLACK E Repetition A T O IS N are TO B T stanzas K I Repetition is when words, phrases, lines, or repeated. O . D O E B T YRIGH N FOR THIS P O C AY. GIVE OK IS W T Rhyme O Y O B N N E A L N N IS the Usame IOhave SAMPtwo words ED Iend S C S RhymeTis sounds. I HISwhen D M O P ER REPR

Rhyme Scheme The rhyme scheme of a poem refers to which lines in the poem rhyme. The rhyme scheme is represented by letters. For example, a poem with two pairs of rhyming lines has the rhyme scheme aabb, while a poem with the second and fourth lines rhyming has the rhyme scheme abcb. Rhythm Rhythm is the pattern of sounds in a poem. Rhyming Poem A rhyming poem has lines that end with words with the same end sounds.

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Simile A simile compares two things using the words “like” or “as.” Example: The snow was as soft as a pillow. Sonnet A sonnet is a poem with 14 lines. There are two main forms of the sonnet. The first has a verse of 8 lines and a verse of 6 lines. The second has three verses of 4 lines followed by one verse with 2 lines. Speaker The speaker of a poem is the person, character, or object that is the voice of the poem.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Stanza Stanzas are the sections that poems are divided into. They are also known as verses.

STER. A M E Symbolism ACKLIN L B A T BE is used to Symbolism is a literary technique where a Iword, orTO event S NOobject, I T K O . D BO symbolize that stand for something else. For example, snow GHTEwhite HIS might I T R Y R P O O something is pure. OOK IS C IVEN F Y WAY. G T O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D Tanka TH PERM REPRO Tanka is a form of Japanese poetry. A tanka poem has 5 lines and 31 syllables in the pattern 5-7-5-7-7. The themes of tanka poems are often about nature, seasons, love, or friendship. Theme A theme is the main topic or the main idea of a poem. Tone The tone of a poem is how the author feels about the subject.

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Instruction Six Poems with Background Information and Instruction

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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S Poem 1 S Introduction: “View from Afar” is written in free verse. The lines in a free verse poem do not follow a set pattern. There is no pattern for either rhyme or rhythm. The speaker of the poem is describing what she sees when she is riding in a helicopter. The word “afar” in the title of the poem means “far away.” The word “altitude” in the first line means height. In the third stanza of “View from Afar,” the speaker says that she soars “above balconies and bluffs.” A “balcony” is a small porch that is usually high off the ground. A “bluff” is a cliff. The poet repeats the term “chop-chop-chopping” in the poem. This term describes the blades of the helicopter spinning through the air. It also mimics the sounds the blades would make. This is an example of onomatopoeia, which is when a word sounds like the object or thing that it names. The poet also uses alliteration, which is the repeating of consonant sounds. The poet also uses a number of similes in the poem. A simile compares two things or ideas using the words “like” or “as.”

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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S View from Afar by Tyra Thomas

At this high altitude, we hover: the helicopter chop-chop-chopping the air. I admire the geography, how the highways look like lines on a map, how the cars look like pebbles rolling to the sea.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A Like a hawk, I soar above IS NOT O BE T T K I O . balconies and bluffs. GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O A bewildering IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C blur, G O T O O B E be— MPILmust N IS N UCED IN AN A O I S S S S I I TH RM as a Rcloud, as PEquiet EPROD Do the people down there watch me?

as tiny as a hummingbird, chop-chop-chopping the air.

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1

What is the point of view in the poem? A First person B Second person C Third person limited D Third person omniscient

2

The poet uses onomatopoeia by describing the “chop-chop-chopping” of the helicopter’s blades. How does the onomatopoeia create meaning?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A It informs the reader that the blades move quickly. B It suggests to the reader that the helicopter is unstable. C It helps the reader imagine what the helicopter sounds like. D It shows the reader that the helicopter is high in the air.

3

A B C D

4

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A “I admire the geography” S NOT OK TO BE I T I . “how the cars look” GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C “A bewildering blur,” G O T O O B LE MPas N IS N UCED IN AN A O I S S “as quiet a cloud,” S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

Which line from the poem contains alliteration?

The poet compares herself to a hawk to show that she is— A looking for prey B high in the sky C not afraid of anything D elegant and graceful

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5

Which word from the poem describes how the helicopter moves? A “altitude” B “hover” C “rolling” D “blur”

6

Identify two similes the poet uses in the poem. 1.

2.

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STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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S Poem 2 S Introduction: This poem is called an acrostic poem. The first letters of each line of the poem form a word. The word is the subject of the poem. The title of this poem is “Horizon.” In this poem, the poet describes the horizon. The horizon looks like a line in the distance where the surface of the earth and the sky appear to meet. The poet chooses words that emphasize that the horizon can never actually be reached. It is always a line far in the distance. This poem also includes rhyme, but where two words in the same line rhyme instead of words at the end of lines.

E L P SAM ATION C U S! Horizon S D E Y L L Y L A L R A R . 9 9 . 888 by Andrew Evans

STER. A M E Hurdle in the distance, ACKLIN L B A Oasis in the form of a straight S NOT line,OK TO BE I T I . TED sky and ReflectionRIof IS BO GHthe Hsea. T Y R P O S CO beyond IVEN Fit is Ythe K IInvisible AY. G O W T O O B N N E A L IS of theCEunknown. Zone AMP D IN U ISSION starting D THIS S PERMOfficial O REPR line of the future, Never quite close enough to touch.

7

Which line from the poem contains rhyme? A “Hurdle in the distance,” B “Reflection of the sky and sea.” C “Zone of the unknown.” D “Never quite close enough to touch.”

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8

The word “oasis” is mainly used to suggest that the horizon— A cannot be reached B is far away C is a source of water D looks beautiful

9

Why is the first letter of each line bold? A To mimic the way a horizon looks

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B To emphasize that the letters spell out a word

C To show that the first word of each line should be stressed D To emphasize the shape of the poem

10 Read these lines from the poem.

STER. A M E Invisible beyond it is the ACKLIN L B A Zone of the unknown. S NOT OK TO BE I T I . ED HIS BO What do these lines mean?PYRIGHT T R O IS CO IVEN F Y WAY. K G O T O O B A HorizonsPare IN AN M LE everywhere N IS Nyou Ulook. A D O I S E S C S S I I H B TNobody knows PERM how aRhorizon EPROD forms. C The horizon is a dangerous place to go. D You cannot see what lies past the horizon.

11 Based on the poem, when would you be most likely to see a horizon? A When looking along a running track B When looking out to sea C When looking out at a desert D When looking up into the sky

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S Poem 3 S Introduction: “Cactus” is a rhyming poem. This poem’s rhyme scheme is abcb. This means that the second and fourth lines in each stanza rhyme. A cactus is a plant that grows in deserts. A cactus often has spines to keep animals from eating it. The author uses the word “coarse” in the first stanza. Something that is coarse is not smooth. The focus of the poem is what the poet thinks of the cactus. The author is addressing, or speaking to, the cactus in the poem. The poet is amazed and curious about the cactus. You can tell this from the way the poet wonders about the cactus and asks questions about it. The author also uses personification throughout the poem. She gives the cactus human qualities.

E L P SAM ATION C U S Cactus D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 by Mia Cohen

STER. A M E Prickly as a porcupine, ACKLIN L B A you wear your coarse disguise. S NOT OK TO BE I T I . ED GHTpins, HIS BO Thorny skin ofPY sticky I T R R O IS CO veryTwise. IVEN F Y WAY. Kyou’re I think G O O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D arms jutting TH Cactus, PERM withRyour EPROthick all around your middle, you’re like a big green mystery, a spiky, sturdy riddle. How do you stay so juicy fresh, so wet, so green, so strong? When there’s no morning dew, no rain, no shade the whole day long? I watch you in the summer sun, like a camel in a dune, saving up each drop you find in a secret, safe lagoon.

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12 What is the rhyme pattern of each stanza of the poem? A The first and last lines rhyme. B The second and fourth lines rhyme. C The first two and the last two lines rhyme. D The four lines all rhyme with each other.

13 Which words does the poet use to show that she is curious about the cactus?

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A Coarse, disguise B Mystery, riddle C Prickly, sticky D Secret, safe

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A How it gets water S NOT OK TO BE I T I . How it has spines GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P IS CO IVEN F Y WAY. How it growsBO soOKlarge G T O PLE Mtastes N IS N UCED IN AN A O I S S How it so good S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

14 What does the poet find most amazing about the cactus? A B C D

15 Read these lines from the poem. Cactus, with your thick arms jutting all around your middle, What does the word “jutting” mean? A Waving B Growing C Hanging down D Sticking out

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16 Which word best describes the tone of “Cactus”? A Playful B Modest C Doubtful D Admiring

17 Give one example of personification from the poem and explain why the poet used it.

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STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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S Poems 4 and 5 S Introduction: These two poems are paired, which means they are grouped together based on a common theme. “Ice Breaker” is a tanka poem. This type of poem has lines with syllables in the pattern 5-7-5-7-7. Tanka poems are usually about nature, the seasons, love, or friendship. “Ice Breaker” is about a large iceberg that cracks and breaks. The author uses imagery in the poem to help the reader imagine the iceberg. Poets use imagery when they give details that help the reader imagine something. Imagery can involve any of the senses: sight, sound, smell, taste, or touch. “Fair Weather Friends” is written in free verse. The lines in a free verse poem do not have to rhyme. In this poem, the author compares a friendship to changing weather. The author uses symbolism, which is where something stands for something else. In this poem, summer represents being close to a friend and winter represents fighting with a friend.

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STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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S Ice Breaker by Yuki Makita

Vast icebergs shimmer on ancient arctic water. An immense hush falls: quiet calm before the crack of frozen hearts dividing.

E L P M A S N O I S Fair Weather Friends T A C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A R . 9 9 . 888 by Alexie Lee Morris

THIS

Closeness, like summer, warms me. STER. A M E Fighting stings like snow on bare skin. ACKLIN BL A will T O I try to guess how our days together be. N O BE S I T T K I O . D I fear the battles, look to S BOfun. GHTEforward HIthe I T R Y R P O But, like IS COweather, VEN F notYfixed. Iwe’re K the AY. G O W T O O B N N E A L wind, N ISchangeUCdirection IOwe SAMPLike M ED IN without warning. S S I D O R Friendship isRaEP thunderstorm in spring, P ER bright flashes and loud clashes, sudden, unexpected lightning, pounding rain, and then rainbows. Clouds part like arms in a wide, familiar hug, to let in the warmth of the sun.

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18 Read this line from “Ice Breaker.” An immense hush falls: The phrase “immense hush” emphasizes how quiet it is. Why does the poet most likely want to emphasize how quiet it is? A To help create a sense of mystery B To help stress how loud the iceberg cracking sounds C To help the reader imagine how large the iceberg is D To help show that everyone is waiting for the iceberg to break

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19 In the first poem, what feelings does the image of “frozen hearts dividing” create? A Relief B Hope

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B D Anger A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P IS CofO “IceTBreaker” IVEN F most Kline AY. the reader What does the first help G O W O Y O B N N E A L AMP understand? D IN ON IS THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R C Sadness

20

A What the iceberg looks like B How the iceberg feels

C What the iceberg is made of D How the iceberg sounds

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21 Read these lines from the second poem. Friendship is a thunderstorm in spring, bright flashes and loud clashes, sudden, unexpected lightning, pounding rain, and then rainbows. What is the weather described symbolic of? A How new friendships can occur anytime

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B How friendships can change suddenly C How good friends are rarely found

D How a friend makes life more enjoyable

22 Read this line from the second poem.

STER. A M E IN fixed” mean? ACKLnot As it is used in the poem, what does the phrase A“we’re L B NOT O BE S I T T K I O . A We can change. GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P B We are broken. K IS CO IVEN F Y WAY. G O T O O B N PLE from IN AN Mlearn C We can each N IS other. A D O I S E S C S S U I I D TH RM REPRO D We are notPEalways together. But, like the weather, we’re not fixed.

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23 In the second poem, the author compares clouds parting to a hug. Explain the meaning of this simile.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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S Poem 6 S Introduction: This is a rhyming poem. It describes a butterfly that is in a cocoon. A cocoon is a silk covering that an insect spins around itself to protect it while it goes to sleep and undergoes a change. When a caterpillar comes out of a cocoon, it is a butterfly. In the first line of this poem, the author compares a cocoon to a little hammock in a tree. A hammock is a kind of bed hung by cords from each end. The author also calls the cocoon a “pod,” which is a type of egg case for a plant or an animal. The word “sod,” used in the eighth line of this poem, means “grass.” The poet starts the poem by describing the cocoon. The poet then thinks about what is inside the cocoon. The poem ends with a description of the cocoon breaking open and a butterfly coming out. This change is described as bittersweet, which means that the poet has mixed feelings about it. It is sad that the caterpillar has gone, but it is good that a butterfly has been created.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . S The 8 8 8 Cocoon S

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . by Steven GHTEDRogers HIS BO I T R Y R P O O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B N in AN tree, INthe MPLE SSLittle N IShammock A D O I S E C S U I I TH PRODthread so daintily, PERM woundREwith I almost didn’t see you there, hung with such amazing care. Don’t worry, though. I won’t touch. I know inside you is so much. The memories within your pod sleep safe as seeds in thick, dark sod. Suddenly, you shake your leaf so desperately, yet small and brief. Breaking through your silken strings: a flash of eyes, and skin, and wings. Bittersweet, this small goodbye as you become a butterfly.

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24 What type of poem is “The Cocoon”? A Free verse B Acrostic poem C Rhyming poem D Limerick

25 What is a main theme of the poem? A How living things should be protected

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B How living things change

C How there are many different types of living things D How people can learn from living things

26 Why does the poet most likely refer to the cocoon as a “hammock” and TER. a “pod”? E MAS A B C D

ACKLIN L B A To suggest that the cocoon is a relaxing Nand place O BE S OT warm I T T K I O . ED cocoon To emphasize the small size GofHTthe HIS BO I T R Y R P O IS CO is changing . cocoon IVEN Fwhile Kinsect To show thatBO the inAYthe G O W T Y O N N E A L IN a short time in the cocoon N IS spends IOinsect SAMP that EDonly S C the S U I HISexplain D M TTo O P ER REPR

27 Which of these is used throughout the poem? A Rhyme B Symbolism C Repetition D Metaphor

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28 Read this line from the poem. sleep safe as seeds in thick, dark sod. The alliteration in this line helps create a feeling of— A joy B wonder C excitement D calm

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Independent Practice Six Independent Practice Poems

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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S Poems 1 and 2 S

S A Mighty Tree by Latisha King

The little sapling in the breeze gently shakes its few green leaves. The trunk does sway as if to say I’m small but strong as I believe.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A R . S To a Tulip 9 9 . 888

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A by Ricardo Ortega S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P F A tulipOK bud IS CisOblooming IVENblue AY. G W T O Y O B N N E A L AMPwith purple IONatISits Otips. ED IN S C S U I D M THIS S APsweet ER bouquet REPRis looming in the wind that stings and whips. Oh, flower colored like a jewel, stand solemn as a judge. Cling faithfully to stem and root, delicate, yet hard to budge.

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1

What type of poem is “A Mighty Tree”? A Free verse B Acrostic poem C Concrete poem D Limerick

2

Which of the following is used in “A Mighty Tree”? A Personification

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B Onomatopoeia C Repetition D Metaphor

3

Which line from the second poem contains alliteration? A B C D

4

STER. A M E “A tulip bud is blooming blue” ACKLIN L B A “A sweet bouquet is looming” S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I “Oh, flower colored likePYaRjewel,” CO IVEN F Y WAY. KtoISstem G O T O “Cling faithfully and root,” O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

Read this line from the second poem. delicate, yet hard to budge. What does the word “budge” mean? A Understand B Break C Shake D Move

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5

In the second poem, the poet compares the flower to a jewel to emphasize— A how rare it is B how colorful it is C how hard it is D how useful it is

6

What is similar about the tree described in “A Mighty Tree” and the tulip described in “To a Tulip”? Use details from both poems to explain your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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S Poem 3 S

S Solo S by Salma Joshi

I watch the musician rehearse her violin song. Later, this auditorium will be filled. But for now, I am a tiny audience of one. STER. She bends her head A M E ACKLIN L toward the strings B A S NOT OK TO BE I to ask a question: T I . TED to dance? GHlike HIS BO I T R Would you Y R P O O F

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E A L MP N ISa melody, Then aINtwo-part A D O I S E S C S S U I I D TH PERM harmony REPRO of person and instrument, begins. I can see the music, feel the rhythm, each graceful note, a step in a beautiful ballet.

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7

What is the point of view in the poem? A First person B Second person C Third person limited D Third person omniscient

8

Read these lines from the poem. each graceful note, a step in a beautiful ballet.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Which literary device does the poet use in these lines? A Personification

STER. A M E ACKLIN C Hyperbole L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T D Simile I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B E AN IS Nmusician’s INquestion MtoPLthe Nthe A According poem, is directed at— D O I S E S C S S U I I D TH O R P PERM RE B Metaphor

9

A the audience B the poet C herself D her violin

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10 Which feature most affects the rhythm of the poem? A The way each line is short. B The way some words are repeated. C The way rhyme is used. D The way a question is asked.

11 Which word best describes the mood of the poem? A Dreamy

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B Nervous C Serious D Playful

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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S Poem 4 S

S Sick Day by Abdul Asir

Here I sit in my pajamas in my comfy, cozy bed, a rumble in my belly and a fever in my head.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 It’s just past ten, so at my school recess has begun, and all my lucky classmates are probably having fun.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A I wonder what they’re serving S NOT OK TO BE I T I . in the cafeteria line, GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P F CO teacher and if Omy IVEN returned K ISscience AY. G W T O Y O B N N E A L AMPthe projectONheISassigned. D IN THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R I wonder if the grammar test was harder than I thought, and if I would have taken it, what score I would have got.

Being absent makes me think of all the things I missed, while waiting for my teachers, friends, and class to be dismissed.

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12 Which statement is most likely true about the speaker? A He wishes he was at school. B He is enjoying his day off. C He is glad he is missing a test. D He is upset that his friends haven’t visited.

13 Which lines from the poem explain why the speaker is not at school? A “Here I sit in my pajamas / in my comfy, cozy bed,”

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B “a rumble in my belly / and a fever in my head.”

C “I wonder what they’re serving / in the cafeteria line,” D “Being absent makes me think / of all the things I missed,”

14 What is the setting of the poem? A B C D

STER. A M E The speaker’s bedroom ACKLIN L B A The speaker’s classroom S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I The cafeteria line R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O The school playground O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

15 Which detail best supports the conclusion that the speaker is upset about having to stay home? A He refers to his bed as comfy and cozy. B He realizes that it is recess time at school. C He describes his classmates as lucky. D He thinks about a test being harder than he thought.

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16 What is the rhyme pattern of each stanza of the poem? A The first and last lines rhyme. B The second and fourth lines rhyme. C The first two and the last two lines rhyme. D The four lines all rhyme with each other.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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S Poem 5 S

S School Spirit S by Cody Campbell

Bonfire at twilight in the rippling dusk while the stars are just beginning to appear.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 Fountain of sparks fills the air, and the crowd cheers for the heroes in red.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A Our mascot IS NOT O BE T T K I O . gracefully GHTED jogs HIS BO I T R Y R P O O F the IVENfield, K IS C down AY. G O W T O Y O B N N E A L N AMP ON IS waving CEtoD Ithe U D THIS S PERMISSI Estudent O bodies R PR in the stands. Like a choir, we chant out the rhymes we’ve rehearsed together. Our school spirit unites us. It moves like a wave through the night.

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17 What does the first stanza mainly describe? A When the events take place B The main theme of the poem C Where the poem is set D Why the events are taking place

18 Read these lines from the poem. Fountain of sparks fills the air, and

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The poet most likely describes the sparks as a fountain to help readers imagine— A the way the sparks look like spray from a fountain B the way the sparks feel cool and refreshing

.

C the way people gather around like they would around a M fountain ASTER

19

LINE K C A L D the way the sparks make a sound like running OT A Bwater N O BE S I T T K I O . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P IS COlikelyTdescribing IVEN F asY “heroes Kmost AY. in red”? Who is the speaker G O W O O B N N E A L IN MP N IS HIS SA PERMISSIO EPRODUCED A TFirefighters R B Teachers

C Football players D School mascots

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20 The speaker compares the chanting crowd to a choir to suggest that the crowd— A are chanting to music B sound loud C work together well D feel excited

21 Which feature of each stanza most affects how the poem sounds when it is read?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A Where the line breaks are

B Where commas are placed C How sounds are repeated

D How rhyming words are used

22

STER. A M E N AisCKaLIsuitable L The poem is titled “School Spirit.” Explain whyAthis title for B T E O B N the poem. . IT IS IS BOOK TO D E T H G H OPYRI IVEN FOR T Y. C S I OT G IN ANY WA BOOK N E L S I P M A D ON THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

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S Poem 6 S

S The Reason for Sorry S by Emi Kanagawa

It’s hard for some to apologize. They squirm and cause a fuss. But when you make a blunder, apologize, you must.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 Little, tiny choices and not-so-big decisions result in giant changes and multiple divisions.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A So be aware of others: S NOT OK TO BE I T I . With their feelings, sincere. GHTED be HIS BO I T R Y R P O N F future,AY. IS COlong Tinto IVEyour K And G O W O O B 1 NYclear. Abe SN I PLE your conscience will N I M N A D O I S E ISS DUC THIS PERM REPRO

1

Your conscience is an inner voice that tells you to do the right thing.

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23 What is the poem mainly about? A How people feel about saying sorry B When you should say sorry C The best way to say sorry D Why it is important to say sorry

24 Read these lines from the poem. But when you make a blunder, apologize, you must.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

By using the word “must” instead of “should,” the poet makes the tone more— A serious

B humorous

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B D comforting A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C of Othe What is the main purpose poem? G O T O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I H tell a story D A TTo PERM REPRO C encouraging

25

B To give advice

C To describe an event D To entertain the reader

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26 Read this line from the poem. They squirm and cause a fuss. The poet most likely uses the word “squirm” to suggest that a person is— A uncomfortable B dishonest C rude D shy

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

27 The structure of the poem is mainly based on— A the number of syllables in each line

B the number of words in each stanza C the use of rhyme in each stanza

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . ED GHTpoem? HIS BO I What is the main message Pof the T R Y R O O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO D the meter of each stanza

28

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO


Understanding Poetry: Reading to Analyze and Interpret teaches students how to understand and analyze poetry. Students will learn different forms of poetry, such as lyrical poetry and free verse. Students will understand the structural elements of poetry, such as rhyme, meter, and stanzas, and how the structural elements relate to form. Understanding Poetry focuses on how poets create meaning and the techniques they use. These techniques include using stanzas, line length, repetition, rhyme, rhythm, sound effects, word placement and emphasis, sensory language, and figurative language. The book is organized into three parts: Part A: Glossary of Poetic Terms The glossary of poetic terms gives definitions of the terms that students will need to analyze and interpret poetry. Part B: Instruction This section has individual poems and paired poems. Each poem is introduced with key background information that will help students understand the poem. The form of the poem is identified and explained. This section of the book contains multiple-choice and open-ended questions.

E L P M SA N O I T A C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY 888.

Part C: Independent Practice This section has four individual poems and one set of paired poems. Each poem is followed by several multiple-choice and open-ended questions.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S S IS DU THI PERM REPRO

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Understanding poetry e sample[1]