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UNDERSTANDING DRAMA F Reading to Analyze and Interpret

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO


RALLY! EDUCATION 22 Railroad Avenue Glen Head, NY 11545 888-99-RALLY Fax: 1-516-671-7900 www.RALLYEDUCATION.com LESLIE@RALLYEDUCATION.com …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

What Are the Skills Needed to Understand Drama? Understanding Drama Reading to Analyze and Interpret Grades 3–8 • Part 1: Glossary of drama terms • Part 2: Drama selections are presented with background information to help readers better understand drama. Each selection is followed by comprehension questions. • Part 3: Independent Practice: Drama selections with comprehension questions for students to answer on their own.

Level C D E F G H

Reading Level 3 4 5 6 7 8

25-Pack 6375-0 6378-1 6381-1 6384-2 6387-3 6390-3

100-Pack 6376-7 6379-8 6382-8 6385-9 6388-0 6391-0

NYC Contract NYSTL/FAMIS Approved NYC Vendor #RAL-040000 NYC Contract #7000-617

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F

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S S IS DU THI PERM REPRO


E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

ISBN 978-1-4204-6383-5 R 6383-5 Copyright ©2012 RALLY! EDUCATION. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright may be reproduced in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner. Printed in the U.S.A. 1011.MAQ RALLY! EDUCATION • 22 Railroad Avenue, Glen Head, NY 11545 • (888) 99-RALLY

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Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Independent Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Introduction Understanding Drama: Reading to Analyze and Interpret teaches students how to understand and analyze dramatic literature. Students will understand the structural elements of drama. Students will draw conclusions and make inferences about the structure and elements of drama, and use evidence from the text to support their understanding. Understanding Drama focuses on how playwrights create meaning and the techniques that are used to do so. Students will understand how dialogue and interactions between characters are used to create meaning. Students will also understand the purpose of stage directions and how the stage directions affect the reader and audience.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Glossary Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

.

The glossary gives definitions of the terms that students will need to M understand STER to A E LINglossary as they analyze and interpret dramatic literature. Students can referLto ACKthe B A learn to interpret drama. IS NOT TO BE

T BOOK TED. I S H I G H I T R Instruction LE BOOK IS COPYNOT GIVEN FOARNY WAY. AMP fiveISdramatic D IN dramatic piece is introduced ION IS pieces. EEach S C This section U D M THIS Scontains O R will help students understand the work. PERinformation REPthat with key background

The background information will help students identify and understand the major structural elements and techniques that the playwright has used to create meaning. The student then answers questions about each dramatic piece. This section of the book contains multiple-choice and open-ended questions.

Independent Practice This section contains five dramatic pieces. Each dramatic piece is followed by several questions that students will answer on their own. This section of the book contains multiple-choice and open-ended questions.

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Glossary Act Acts are the major sections a play is divided into. The beginning of a new act can be set in a different place and be set further ahead in time.

Actor An actor is a person playing a role in a dramatic work.

Aside

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The term “aside” is used to indicate that a character is speaking only to the audience. The term can also be used with another character’s name to indicate that the person is only heard by the character named and the audience. For example, “James: (aside to Polly)” would indicate that only Polly and the audience hear what James says.

STER. A M E INshow that ACKLto The term “at rise” is used at the start of a sentence or paragraph L B A OT play, or Twhen the text describes what is happening at the start of O BE the curtain S Nthe I T K I O . first goes up. GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B Character SAMPLE N IS N UCED IN AN O I S S S I I TH is a person A character PERMin a play.REPROD

At Rise

Characterization Characterization refers to how an author tells the reader about a character. It can be by describing a character. It can also be by describing what a character looks like, what a character feels, or what a character does.

Conflict The conflict is the main problem or struggle that takes place in a work.

Curtain The term “curtain” is used to indicate that an act, scene, or play has ended. It refers to the curtain closing.

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Dialogue Dialogue refers to the words spoken by characters in a play.

Drama Drama refers to literature that is written to be performed.

Enter The term “enter” is used to indicate that a character walks onto the stage.

Exit

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The term “exit” is used to indicate that a character walks off the stage.

Hyperbole

Hyperbole refers to the use of exaggeration to describe something. Example: She asked John a million times.

Imagery

R.

Imagery is the use of details to help the reader imagine something. EImagery MASTE can N I L describe how something looks, sounds, tastes, smells, or feels. BLACK

OT A N O BE S I T T K I O . Irony GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P F CO difference Irony occurs when thereOisK aISmajor what IVEN between AY. is expected and what G W T O Y O B N N E A L occurs. This type is O Irony also occurs when there N N IS situational I called SAMPof irony ED Iirony. S C S S U I I H D M T O R is a major difference what PEbetween REPRis said and what is meant. This type of irony is

called verbal irony.

Example of situational irony: A person studying so hard for a test that they are very tired and fall asleep during the test. Example of verbal irony: saying “nice weather” when the weather is actually very poor

Metaphor A metaphor compares two things, but without using the words “like” or “as.” Example: The kind woman is an angel.

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Monologue A monologue is a long speech made by one character.

Mood Mood refers to how a text or part of a text makes the reader feel, or the feelings created in the reader.

Narrator The narrator of a work is the person telling the story.

Personification

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Personification is when objects are described as if they are human. Example: The trees whispered to each other.

Playwright

The playwright is the author of a piece of drama.

STER. A M E IN The plot is the pattern of events that take place in a work.BLACKL A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . Props GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O on stage N F a dramatic IS Care Props are items or objects IVEduring Kthat AY. work. Props always G O W T O Y O B N N E A L have a purpose N IS can represent IOThey SAMorP meaning. ED IN something, be referred to by the S C S S U I I H D M T O characters, or be used PERby a character. REPR

Plot

Repetition Repetition is when words, phrases, or lines are repeated.

Scene Scenes are the minor sections a play is divided into. Each scene often has a different setting.

Setting The setting of a play refers to where and when the events take place.

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Stage Directions Stage directions are details given that describe what a character does. They can describe actions by the characters. They can also describe how a character sounds when they speak. Stage directions are usually written in parenthesis and are in italics.

Symbolism Symbolism is a literary technique where a word, object, or event is used to stand for something else. For example, white snow might symbolize that something is pure.

Theme

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A theme is the main topic or the main idea of a work.

Tone

Tone is how the author feels about the subject.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Instruction Each dramatic piece is introduced with key background information that will help students understand the purpose of stage directions, the meaning of dialogue, and other key elements of understanding dramatic literature.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Introduction: This play is about a woman named Belinda who is spending the afternoon relaxing in her garden. The first paragraph gives the setting of the play. The second paragraph gives details about what is happening in the setting. Belinda’s servant Betty is setting up a hammock in the garden. The actions of the characters are very important in this play. The actions are described in stage directions. The stage directions are in italics and describe what the characters are doing. The stage directions work with the dialogue to communicate the events of the play to the reader and the audience. For example, while Belinda is describing how she asked the people at the stores if the hammock would hold her weight, she is described as “looking at it anxiously.” This combination of dialogue and action shows that she is nervous about getting into the hammock.

E L P M A S N O I / The Hammock \ T A C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A R . 9 9 . 888 Adapted from Belinda by A.A. Milne

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED ofOsummer—in HIS BO BELINDA’S I T R [It is a lovely April afternoon—a foretaste Y R P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O garden.] T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I servant, D TH [BETTY, a middle-aged PERM REPROis fastening a hammock—its first

Characters BELINDA TREMAYNE BETTY

appearance this year—between two trees at the back. In front of these there is a solid oak garden table, with a comfortable chair on the right of it and a straight-backed one on the left. There are books, papers, and magazines on the table. BELINDA is on the other side of the open windows which look on to the garden, talking to BETTY.] BELINDA (from inside the house): Are you sure you’re tying it up tightly enough, Betty? BETTY (coming to front of hammock): Yes, ma’am; I think it’s firm. BELINDA: Because I’m not the tiny young thing I used to be.

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BETTY (trying the knots at the other end of the hammock): Yes, ma’am; it’s quite firm this end too. BELINDA: It’s not the ends I’m frightened of; it’s the middle where the weight’s coming. (She comes into the garden.) It looks very nice. BETTY: Yes, ma’am. BELINDA (trying the middle of it with her hand): I asked them at the stores if they were quite sure it would bear me, and they said it would take anything up to—I forget how many tons. I know I thought it was rather rude of them. (Looking at it anxiously) How does one get in?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

BETTY: I think you sit in it, ma’am, and then (explaining with her hands) throw your legs over. BELINDA: I see. (She sits gingerly in the hammock, and then, with a sudden flutter of white, does what BETTY suggests.) Yes. (Regretfully.) I’m afraid that was rather wasted on you, Betty. We must have some spectators next time. .

STER A M E BETTY: Yes, ma’am. ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . BELINDA: Cushions. (She arranges them HatTEher withSBETTY’S help. With a sigh of I BO G D back H I T R Y R P O comfort) There! Now then, Betty, Oabout callers. IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A BETTY: Yes, ma’am. S S I I D TH PERM REPRO BELINDA: You are to tell the callers that I’m not at home. BETTY: What if Mr. Baxter calls? BELINDA (giving BETTY a quick look): You’ll say, “Not at home.” BETTY: What if somebody calls for something important? BELINDA: To anybody who calls, I’m not at home. (Trying to secure book on table and nearly falling out of the hammock.) Oh, just give me that little green book. (Pointing to books on the table.) The one at the bottom there—that’s the one. (BETTY gives it to her.) Thank you. (Reading the title.) “The Lute of Love,” by Claude Devenish. (To herself as she turns the pages.) It doesn’t seem much for half-a-crown when you think of the Daily Telegraph.

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BETTY: Is that all, ma’am? BELINDA: That’s all. (BETTY prepares to go.) Oh, what am I thinking of! (Waving to the table.) I want that review; I think it’s the blue one. (As BETTY begins to look.) It has an article by Mr. Baxter on the “Rise of Lunacy in the Eastern Counties”—yes, that’s the one. I’d better have that too; I’m just at the most exciting place. You shall have it after me, Betty. BETTY: Is that all, ma’am? BELINDA: Yes, that really is all.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

[BETTY goes into the house.]

BELINDA (reading to herself): “It is a matter of grave concern to all serious students of social problems—” (Putting the review down in hammock and shaking her head gently.) But not in April. (Lazily opening the book and reading.) “Tell me where is love”—well, that’s the question, isn’t it? (She puts the book down, gives a sigh of happiness, and lazily closes her eyes.) .

STER A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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1

Which event from “The Hammock” is most likely meant to be humorous? A Betty checking that the hammock’s knots are tied well B Belinda getting into the hammock C Betty helping Belinda arrange the cushions D Belinda asking Betty to pass her a book

2

Read this sentence from the play. (She sits gingerly in the hammock, and then, with a sudden flutter of white, does what BETTY suggests.)

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The playwright probably describes “a sudden flutter of white” to A suggest that Belinda feels embarrassed

B show that Belinda wanted to impress Betty

C explain that Belinda moved slowly and gracefully

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A NOT O BE S I T T K I O . Read this sentence from the play. TED GH HIS BO I T R Y R P O O [It is a lovely AprilOafternoon—a foretaste IVEN ofF summer—in K IS C AY. BELINDA’S G W T O Y O B N N E A L garden.] AMP D IN ON IS THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R This description suggests that the garden setting is— D create an image of Belinda struggling to get into the hammock

3

A uncomfortably hot B peaceful and warm C uncared for and overgrown D small and charming

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4

Read this sentence from the play. BETTY: I think you sit in it, ma’am, and then (explaining with her hands) throw your legs over. What is the purpose of the words in parenthesis? A They tell the actor what words to say. B They tell the actor how to say the words. C They tell the actor about an action. D They tell the actor how Betty feels.

5

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

What is the most likely reason Belinda wants Betty to tell callers that she is not at home? A She plans to go out soon.

B She wants to spend the afternoon relaxing. C She is expecting an important call.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . BO GHTED says HISafraid I T After getting into the hammock, Belinda “I’m that was rather R Y R P O O F C N S E I . V Y wasted on you, Betty. have Y WA next time.” Do you think OT GIsomeINspectators BOOKWe must N N E A L S I P M N details from that Belinda A means this?OUse D the play to support your answer. THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R D She does not want to have to get out of the hammock.

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Introduction: This play is based on a fable and is set in the past. The miller and his son are on their way to the fair to sell a donkey. One way that you can tell that the play is set in the past is by how the characters speak. They use a style of speech and words that are uncommon today. On the way to the fair, the miller and his son come across several sets of characters. In dramatic works, the term “enter” is used to indicate that characters walk onto the stage, and the term “exit” is used to indicate that characters leave the stage. Each set of characters have an opinion on the miller and his son, and disapprove of what they are doing. This is shown by the dialogue between each set of characters. It is also shown by how the characters act. The miller and his son try to follow each person’s advice. However, by trying to please everyone, they end up accidentally causing their donkey to fall off the bridge and into a stream. This event causes the miller and his son to realize their mistake and learn a life lesson.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E His Son, !Miller, /ALThe \ Y L Y L L R and Their A R . Donkey 9 9 . 8 88

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . TIME: this morning HTED R THIS BO Gfar I R Y P PLACE: a bridge, near a town and not from CO N FaOfair AY. S E I V I K G O T BO NY W Adonkey SareNOdriving I PLEand N I M N A [The MILLER his SON their across the bridge. D O I S E UC ISS HIS D M TThey O R R E P P are on their way to the REfair.] SON: Do you expect to get a good price for our donkey, father? MILLER (nodding): Aye, lad. The fair is the place to take your wares. SON: Our donkey is not so young, though. MILLER: Neither is he so old, though. SON: But he is not so fat, though. MILLER: Neither is he so lean, though. SON: Truly he might be worse.

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MILLER: Better or worse, he must be sold. [THREE MAIDS enter the bridge. They are on their way to the fair.] FIRST MAID (pointing to the MILLER and his SON): Look there! Did you ever see such geese? SECOND MAID: As I live! Walking when they might ride! THIRD MAID (to the MILLER): You’ll get a laugh at the fair, old man! [The Maids exit.]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

MILLER: This may be true. Get you upon the beast, lad.

[The boy mounts the donkey. Enter THREE OLD MEN. They talk together earnestly. They are on their way to the fair.] FIRST OLD MAN (pointing to the MILLER and his SON): Look you there! That proves what I was saying. .

STER A M E N in these days. KLIage SECOND OLD MAN (nodding): Aye! There’s no respect shown ACold L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . THIRD OLD MAN (nodding): Aye! There’s ED youngTHrogue IS BOriding while his old GHTthat I R Y R P O O father has to walk! IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B PLE exit.] SION IS N IN AN MMen A D S E [The Old C S S U I I D TH PERM REPRO MILLER: Get down, lad. It would indeed look better should I ride. [The lad dismounts; the MILLER mounts. Enter THREE GOODIES. They are on their way to the fair.] FIRST GOODY (angrily, pointing to the MILLER and his SON): Look, Goodies, look! Did you ever see anything so cruel? SECOND GOODY (to the MILLER): You lazy old fellow! How can you ride while your own child walks in the dust? THIRD GOODY (to the SON): You poor, poor child! [The Goodies exit, shaking their heads and their canes angrily.]

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MILLER: Come, lad, get up behind me. SON: Why, father, I’m not tired! MILLER: I know, but we must try to please them. Come. [The lad mounts, sitting behind his father. Enter the MAYOR and his CLERKS. They are on their way to the fair.] MAYOR (turning to his CLERKS; pointing to the MILLER and his SON): Look, will you! (He turns to the MILLER.) Pray, honest friend, is that beast your own?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

MILLER: Yes, my lord Mayor.

MAYOR: One would not think so from the way you load him. Say you not so, my Clerks? FIRST CLERK (bowing): Just so, my lord Mayor.

SECOND CLERK (bowing): Even so, my lord Mayor.

STER. A M E N better able to THE MAYOR (to the MILLER and his SON): Why, you two fellows ACKLIare L B A OT Clerks?TO BE carry the poor donkey than he you! Say you not so, S Nmy I T I . BOOK TED S H I G H I T R OPYlord Mayor. FIRST CLERK (bowing): Just so, Cmy N FOR S E I V I K AY. G O W T O Y O B N N E A L S IN AMP ION Iso, EDMayor. SECONDHCLERK Even myDlord S C S U I M T IS S (bowing): O P ER REPR MILLER: Come, my son, to please them, we’ll carry the donkey. [They dismount and try to lift the donkey. This frightens the poor beast. He tries to get away, and falls over the bridge into the deep river.] MILLER (weeping): I have tried to please everyone! I have pleased no one! SON (weeping): And we have lost our donkey in the bargain!

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7

Read this line from the play. [The Goodies exit, shaking their heads and their canes angrily.] The playwright most likely describes this action to suggest that the Goodies are— A annoyed B impatient C amused D excited

8

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Who is a main character in the play? A Mayor B Miller C Clerk

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A OT O BE S Nthe I T Which statement describes the main theme of play? T K I O . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P A Young people should CO their EN F IVelders. K ISrespect AY. G O W T O Y O B N N E A L B You cannot IS all the time. P please everybody IN IS SAM ERMISSION RODUCED H T P way when you can. C You shouldPdo things the REeasy D First Maid

9

D Animals should be cared for well.

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10 Read this line from the play. THIRD OLD MAN (nodding): Aye! There’s that young rogue riding while his old father has to walk! Based on this line, which word would the man most likely use to describe the son? A Dishonest B Rude C Practical D Clever

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

11 Which line spoken by the miller best shows that the play is set in the past? A “Aye, lad. The fair is the place to take your wares.” B “Better or worse, he must be sold.” C “Come, lad, get up behind me.”

D “I have tried to please everyone! I have pleased no one!”LINE

12

R. MASTE

BLACK E A T O T IS N BOOK TO B I . D E HT THISof people on their way to The miller and his son pass three groups YRIGdifferent R P O O F C EN thinkWof IS groupT ofGIVpeople AY.the miller and his son. the fair. Describe Bwhat OK each O Y O N N E A L AMP D IN ON IS THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

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Introduction: This play is a humorous play describing a situation where a husband and wife come home to find a thief in their home. The humor is created by the way the thief responds to being caught in their home. The first paragraph begins with the words “AT RISE.” This is a term used in drama that describes what is happening at the start of the play, or when the curtain first goes up. This paragraph describes how the thief is searching for items to steal. He then realizes that the owners of the home have come home early. The humor of the play starts when the thief greets the homeowners as if nothing is wrong. This continues throughout the play, where he speaks casually. He even complains to the owner’s about not being neat enough and about having had their phone cut off. The play uses irony, which is where there is a contrast between what happens and what is expected to happen. The playwright uses two types of stage directions in the play. The first type describes a character’s actions. The second type describes a character’s tone of voice, or how they speak. The dialogue and stage directions show the interaction between the thief, the wife Clara, and the husband Charles. The wife Clara tries to stand up to the thief and tries to get her husband to do something. In the end, the thief leaves with nothing. The final humor is added when Charles remarks that he couldn’t help but like the thief. .

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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/ Thief \

Based on the play Sham by Frank G. Tompkins [AT RISE: A darkened room. After a moment the door opens, admitting a streak of light. A man peers in cautiously. As soon as he is sure that the room is unoccupied, he steps inside and feels along the wall until he finds the switch which floods the room with light. He is dressed in perfect taste— obviously a man of culture. From time to time he bites on a ham sandwich as he looks about him, apparently viewing the room for the first time. Nothing pleases him until a vase over the mantel catches his eye. He picks it up, looks at the bottom, puts it down hard, and mutters, “Imitation.” Other articles receive the same treatment. The whole room is beneath his notice. He starts to sit down before the fire and enjoy his sandwich. Suddenly he pauses to listen, looks about him hurriedly for some place to hide, thinks better of it, and takes his stand opposite the door, smiling pleasantly. The door opens and a young woman enters with a man at her STER. A heels. As she sees the thief she stifles a scream and retreats, backing the M E IN again, ACKLopens man out behind her. The thief smiles and waits. SoonAthe door L B E OT They stand O Bopposite S Nhim. I and the man enters with the woman clinging to T T K I O . BO TED they ought the thief and stare at him, notYsure RIGHwhat R THISto say or do.]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

COP N FO S E I V I K AY. G O W T O Y O B N N E A L THIEF [pleasantly]: Good evening! [Pause.] Good evening, good evening. You IN MP N IS A D O I S E S C S S U I I THme. Can’tPEsay surprised RMI expected RODhome so soon. Was the play an awful bore? EPyou R [Pause.] We-e-ell, can’t one of you speak. I CAN carry on a conversation alone, but the question-and-answer method is usually preferred. If one of you will ask me how I do, we might get a step further. CLARA [breathlessly]: You—you—[With growing confidence.] You’re a thief! THIEF: Exactly. And you, madame? The mistress of the house, I presume. Or are you another thief? The traditional one that it takes to catch the first? CLARA: This—this is OUR house. Charles, why don’t you do something? Don’t stand there like a—Make him go away! Tell him he mustn’t take anything. [Advancing toward the THIEF and speaking all in one sentence.] What have you taken? Give it to me instantly. How dare you! Charles, take it away from him.

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CHARLES [apparently not afraid, a little amused, but uncertain what to do, finally adopting the bullying tone]: I say, old man, you’d better clear out. We’ve come home. You know you can’t—come now, give it up. Be sensible. I don’t want to use force— THIEF: I don’t want you to. CHARLES: If you’ve got anything of ours—We aren’t helpless, you know. [He starts to draw something black and shiny from his overcoat pocket. It is the case for his glasses.] THIEF: Let’s see those glasses. Give them here. [Takes them from the uncertain CHARLES.] Perhaps they’re better than mine. Fine cases. [Tries them.] Humph! Window glass! Take them back. Your glasses in the bottom of your bureau drawer were no better. Bad shape, those bureau drawers were in. Nice and neat on top; rat’s nest below. Shows up your character in great shape, old man. Always tell your man by his bureau drawers. Didn’t it ever occur to you that a thief might drop in on you some night? What would he think of you?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

CHARLES: I don’t think—

ER.

ST up a THIEF: You should. I said to myself when I opened that drawer: “They MAput E N I L LACK everything they great surface, but they’re shams. Probably streak that runs Bthrough A T O N sort ofKthing O BEis just a form Sother I T do.” You ought to begin with real neatness. This T I O . HTED R THIS BO of dishonesty. PYRIG O

O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B N ANhouse! CLARA: You! Talking about INour MPLE to US N IShonesty—in A D O I S E S C S S U I I D TH PERM REPRO

THIEF: Just the place for honesty. Begin at home. Let’s—

CLARA: Charles, I won’t stand for this. Grab hold of him. Search him. You hold him. I’ll telephone. THIEF: You can’t. CLARA: You’ve cut the wires. THIEF: Didn’t have to. Your telephone service has been cut off by the company. I found that out before I came. I suspect you neglected the bill. You ought not to, makes no end of trouble. Inconvenienced me this evening. Better get it put in right away.

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CLARA: Charles, do I have to stand here and be insulted? THIEF: Sit down. Won’t you, please! This is your last ham sandwich, so I can’t offer you any, but there’s plenty of food in the fridge, if you care for it. I don’t recommend it, but perhaps you’re used to it. CLARA [almost crying]: Charles, are you going to let him preach to us all night! I won’t have it. Being lectured by a thief! CHARLES: You can’t stop a man’s talking, my dear, especially this sort of man. CLARA: Oh, Charles! Do something. You’re a good deal bigger than he is.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

THIEF: Maybe I’ll jiu-jitsu him.

CLARA: He’s insulting you now, Charles. Please try. I’ll hold his feet. THIEF: No doubt you would. But that wouldn’t stop my talking. You’d be taking an unfair advantage, too; I couldn’t kick a lady, could I? Besides, there are two of you. You leave it to Charles and me. Let’s have fair play, at least. TER.

E MAS N I L K C CLARA: Fair play? I’d like to know— A BLA BE T O N . IT IS IS BOOK TO D E T H THIEF: Ple-e-ase, don’t screech! My head aches and Tyour H voice pierces so. Let’s sit YRIG R P O O F C N IS situationT like down quietly and discuss people, AY. and when we’ve GIVEwell-bred OKthe W O Y O B N N E A L come to some MP Aunderstanding, D IN ONI’llISgo. THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R CLARA: Yes, after you’ve taken everything in the house and criticized everything else you can’t take. CHARLES: But he isn’t taking anything now, is he? Let the poor chap criticize, can’t you? I don’t suppose he often meets his—er—customers socially. He’s just dying for a good old visit. Lonesome profession, isn’t it, old man? CLARA: If you WON’T do anything, I’ll call the neighbors. THIEF: I’ve got to be getting out of here! Can’t stay a minute longer! [The THIEF exits.]

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CHARLES: Thank goodness. CLARA: What relief! CHARLES [chuckling]: But he wasn’t a bad fellow, was he? I couldn’t help liking him in spite of his cheek. [Curtain.]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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13 Why does the first paragraph begin with the phrase “AT RISE”? A To show that it describes what is happening at the start of the scene B To show that the events take place early in the morning C To inform the audience members that they should stand D To indicate that an exciting event is about to take place

14 Read these sentences from the play. Nothing pleases him until a vase over the mantel catches his eye. He picks it up, looks at the bottom, puts it down hard, and mutters, “Imitation.” Other articles receive the same treatment.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Why is the man most likely looking at items in the room? A He is passing the time until the homeowners return. B He is trying to work out who owns the items. C He is looking for valuable items to steal.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . ED BO ISexample GHTthe I Which of the following actions from play isTH an of irony? R Y R P O O F C N S E I . V Y OOKsandwich OT GI IN ANY WA N A A thief eats aB ham E L S I P M ION S SA UCED D O B TAHIthief gives honest RMISS on being R P PEadvice RE D He is looking for a hidden key.

15

C A thief states that the phone has already been cut off D A thief is caught out when the owners return home early

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16 Read this line from the play. CLARA: Oh, Charles! Do something. You’re a good deal bigger than he is. If a direction was added about how Clara sounded, which of these would best fit? A [sounding frustrated] B [sounding amused] C [sounding calm]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

D [sounding excited]

17 Which words best describe how the thief sounds throughout the play? A Worried and fearful

B Angered and aggressive C Confused and puzzled

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . BO TEDplaywright GHthe HIScreates I T Give two examples that showPY how humor in the play. R R O O F C N S E I . V Y OT GI IN ANY WA BOOK N 1. E L S I P M A D ON THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R D Calm and polite

18

2.

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Introduction: “The Boy Who Called Wolf” is a well-known fairytale. This play tells this story in dramatic form. The play is divided into three scenes. A scene is a section of a play that occurs at a specific time and in a specific place. Each scene starts by giving details on the time and place. In this play, the place is the same for each scene but the time of the scene is different. The events of the play are quite simple, and its main purpose is to teach a moral lesson. The playwright uses dramatic techniques to teach this lesson. Repetition is used in the first two scenes, where lines used in Scene I are repeated in Scene II. Repetition is also used because the dialogue of all the villagers uses the same sentence structure. In the third scene, repetition is used again when the sentence “No one comes or answers” is repeated. These techniques emphasize the consequences of the boy’s trick.

E L P M A S N O I The Shepherd Boy T A C U D E ! Y / Who Called Wolf \ L L Y L A L R A R . 9 9 . 8 88 SCENE I

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P TIME: middle of the afternoon IS CO VEN F Y WAY. I K G O T O O B PLACE: a hillsidePnear M LE theSSvillage N IS N UCED IN AN A O I S S I I D TH PERM Characters REPRO SHEPHERD BOY MASTER PASTOR MERCHANT BAKER BUTCHER [The SHEPHERD BOY watches a flock of sheep.] SHEPHERD BOY: I am tired of watching sheep! I will play a joke on some one! I will play a joke on every one! (He calls in a loud voice.) Wolf! Wolf! Wolf! Wolf! [Enter the VILLAGERS with clubs.]

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MASTER: Where is the wolf? SHEPHERD BOY: Ha, ha, ha! There is no wolf! PASTOR: I do not like to leave my church! MERCHANT: I do not like to leave my store! BAKER: I do not like to leave my dough! BUTCHER: I do not like to leave my ox!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! SCENE II Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 888

SHEPHERD BOY: Ha, ha, ha! There is no wolf! Ha, ha, ha!

MASTER: You must not play that joke again! Do you hear? You must never play that joke again!

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . Characters GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O SHEPHERD BOY IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B VILLAGERS SAMPLE N IS N UCED IN AN O I S S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

TIME: a week later PLACE: a hillside near the village

[The SHEPHERD BOY watches his sheep.]

SHEPHERD BOY: I will play that joke again. I like to see them come running. (He calls in a loud voice.) Wolf! Wolf! Wolf! Wolf! [The VILLAGERS come with clubs.] MASTER: Where is the wolf? SHEPHERD BOY: Ha, ha, ha! There is no wolf! PASTOR: I do not like to leave my church!

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MERCHANT: I do not like to leave my store! BAKER: I do not like to leave my dough! BUTCHER: I do not like to leave my ox! SHEPHERD BOY: Ha, ha, ha! There is no wolf! Ha, ha, ha! MASTER: Boy, boy, you must not joke about a wolf! Do you hear? You must never joke about a wolf!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 SCENE III

TIME: a week later PLACE: a hillside near the village Characters SHEPHERD BOY

STER. A M E [The SHEPHERD BOY watches the sheep. A wolf comes and LIN to kill ACKbegins L B A the sheep.] S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R SHEPHERD BOY: Wolf! Wolf! Wolf! Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B [No one comes MPLE or answers.] N IS N UCED IN AN A O I S S S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

SHEPHERD BOY: Master! Pastor! Merchant! Baker! Butcher! [No one comes or answers.] SHEPHERD BOY: Come! Come! Wolf! Wolf! Wolf! Wolf! [No one comes or answers.]

SHEPHERD BOY: What shall I do? They think I am playing a joke again. What shall I do? I cannot save my sheep! I must run to save myself!

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19 Read this line from the play. MASTER: You must not play that joke again! Do you hear? You must never play that joke again! How would the master most likely sound when saying this line? A Impressed B Amused C Stern D Relaxed

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

20 The main theme of the play is about the consequences of being— A dishonest B cowardly C selfish

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A OT O BE in Scene S Nmost I T Why are the words “No one comes or answers” likely repeated T K I O . GHTED OR THIS BO I III? R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B A To suggest shepherd E nobodyN can IS Nhear the IN AN boy MPLthat A D O I S E S C S S U I I H show thePEimportance OD able to help yourself B TTo RM EPRbeing Rof D childish

21

C To symbolize that the shepherd boy does not need help D To emphasize that the shepherd boy is alone

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22 Which of the following is different about the three scenes? A Who the main character is B Where the scene is set C The time of the scene D The presence of sheep

23 In Scene I, how do the villagers most likely feel when they realize that there is no wolf?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A Amused by the boy’s joke

B Annoyed that the boy has tricked them

C Frightened that the wolf may be hiding D Embarrassed that they believed the boy

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Introduction: This play describes a group of travelers on a journey. They are tired and far from any town. They stop to rest and many complain about the situation. The play uses props, which are items that are on the stage during a play. Props are different from scenery because they either have a specific meaning or are used by the characters in the play. The first prop in the play is a signpost that shows how far it is to each town. The characters are also carrying suitcases, bundles, and trunks. These are props that are used by the characters. Throughout the play, the characters complain about their situation. The character Charlie is different because he remains cheery and tries to make the best of the situation. In the end, he helps the characters appreciate what they have. The play uses the term “aside” to describe some of the dialogue. This term is use to describe words that are not heard by all characters. An “aside” can be a character speaking only to the audience, or a character speaking to another character and the audience.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! / The Journey \ Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 888

STER. A M E CKLIN A L B A Characters BE NOT O S I T T K I O . CHARLIE GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P VICTOR O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B TROY N N AMPLE ISSION IS DUCED IN A OLIVERTHIS S PERM REPRO Adapted from A Dollar by David Pinski

HELEN

[A cross-roads at the edge of a forest. One road extends from left to right; the other crosses the first diagonally, disappearing into the forest. The roadside is bordered with grass. On the right, at the crossing, stands a signpost, to which are nailed two boards giving directions and distances.] [The afternoon of a summer day. A troupe of stranded strolling players enters from the left. They are ragged and weary. CHARLIE walks first, holding a suitcase in each hand, followed by VICTOR carrying over his arms two huge bundles wrapped in bed sheets. Immediately behind these TROY and OLIVER are carrying together a large heavy trunk.]

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CHARLIE: (stepping toward the signpost, reading the directions on the boards, and explaining to the approaching fellow actors) That way (pointing to right and swinging the suitcase— to indicate the direction) is thirty miles. This way (pointing to left) is fortyfive and that way is thirty-six. Now choose for yourself the town that you’ll never reach today. The nearest way for us is back to where we came from. VICTOR: (exhausted) Who will lend me a hand to wipe off my perspiration? It has a nasty way of streaming into my mouth. CHARLIE: Stand on your head, then, and let your perspiration water a more fruitful soil. VICTOR: Oh!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

[VICTOR drops his arms, the bundles fall down. He then sinks down onto one of them and wipes off the perspiration, moving his hand wearily over his face. TROY and OLIVER approach the post and read the signs.] TROY: (in a dramatic voice) It’s hopeless! It’s hopeless!

STER. A M E [TROY lets go of his end of the trunk.] ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . OLIVER: (lets go of his end of the trunk) Mmmm. O GHTED OAnother HIS Bstop. I T R Y R P O IVEinNaFtragicY pose, K IS Con theOtrunk AY. knees wide apart, G O [TROY sits himself down W T O B N N E A L IS hand onCEleft D INleg, head slightly bent toward right knee, IONleft SAMPon right S S U I D M THIS elbow O PER puts down the right. CHARLIE REPRthe suitcase. OLIVER also sits down upon the trunk, head sunk upon his breast.] VICTOR: Thirty miles to the nearest town! Thirty miles! CHARLIE: It’s an outrage how far people move their towns away from us. VICTOR: We won’t strike a town until the day after tomorrow. CHARLIE: Hurrah! That’s luck for you! There’s yet a day-after-tomorrow for us. VICTOR: And Helen is still far behind us. Crawling! CHARLIE: Crawling but catching up. Quite the hare, she is.

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VICTOR: Neither your tongue nor your feet ever get tired. You get on my nerves. Sit down and shut up for a moment. CHARLIE: Me? Ha ha! I’m going back there to the lady of my heart. I’ll meet her and fetch her hither in my arms. [CHARLIE spits on his hands, turns up his sleeves, and strides rapidly off towards the left.] VICTOR: Clown! OLIVER: How can he laugh and play his pranks even now? We haven’t a cent to our souls, our supply of food is running low, and our shoes are ruined.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

TROY: (with an outburst) Stop it! The tale of our misfortunes is too great. [From the left is heard the laughter of a woman. Enter CHARLIE carrying in his arms HELEN, who has her hands around his neck and holds a satchel in both hands behind his back.]

STER. A M E CHARLIE: (letting his burden down upon the grass) Sit down, myClove, A KLIN and rest up. L B A We go no further today. Your feet, your tender littleNfeet acheByou. O E How S OT must I T T K I O . unhappy that makes me! At the first opportunity O you an automobile. GHTED ORI shall HIS Bbuy I T R Y P S COnight There? IVEN F Y WAY. K Ithe G O HELEN: And are we to pass O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I MI at “Hotel THNo, we shall OD OLIVER: PERstop REPRNeverwas.” CHARLIE: Don’t you like our night’s lodgings? (Turning over toward HELEN) See, the bed is broad and wide, and certainly without vermin. Just feel the high grass. Such a soft bed you never slept in. And you shall have a cover embroidered with the moon and stars, a cover such as no royal bride ever possessed. (Pointing to TROY and OLIVER sitting on their suitcases) And look at everyone, already seated comfortably on their chairs. VICTOR: You’re laughing, and I feel like crying. CHARLIE: Crying? You should be ashamed of the sun which favors you with its setting splendor. Look, and be inspired!

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VICTOR: Yes, look and expire. CHARLIE: Look, and shout with ecstasy! [VICTOR, TROY, and OLIVER look at the sunset. There is complete quiet. They seem to relax. HELEN sniffs quietly and wipes her eyes.] CHARLIE: (aside to HELEN) What. You are crying? HELEN: I’m sad. I’m tired. And yet, such beauty. We will have a lovely night in this bed of grass. We are very lucky.

E L P SAMCURTAIN ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

CHARLIE: We are lost. We are tired. Yet, we are lucky.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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24 Read this line from the play. CHARLIE: (aside to HELEN) What. You are crying? The phrase “aside to HELEN” shows that Charlie is speaking— A only to Helen B only to the audience C only to himself D so that Helen does not hear

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

25 Which information in parenthesis and italics describes how a person sounds when they speak? A (pointing to left) B (exhausted)

C (lets go of his end of the trunk)

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A NOT O BE T Read these sentences from the play. D. IT IS K O GHTE OR THIS BO I R Y P O [TROY sits himself down trunk pose, Y. knees wide apart, IVENinFa tragic K IS C on the A G O W T O Y O B right elbow left E right knee, AN head slightly bent toward the S Nhand on IN leg, MPLon N Ileft A D O I S E S C S S U I I the suitcase. OLIVER also sits down upon the H CHARLIE D Tright. PERMputs down REPRO D (Turning over toward HELEN)

26

trunk, head sunk upon his breast.]

The character’s actions emphasize that they are— A nervous B exhausted C lost D joyous

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27 Read this line from the play. CHARLIE: It’s an outrage how far people move their towns away from us. Why does Charlie most likely say this? A He is making a joke. B He is feeling grumpy. C He is actually angry. D He is feeling confused.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

28 The signpost is one prop in the play. What is the main purpose of the signpost? A It symbolizes that the characters have a decision to make. B It provides a place for the characters to rest.

C It shows that the characters are far from all towns.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

D It acts as a meeting point for the characters.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Independent Practice E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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/ A Strange Day \

Excerpt from Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

ACT I SCENE ONE Alice’s home. Lewis Carroll is discovered, playing chess. Golden-haired Alice, in a little blue dress, a black kitten in her arms, stands watching him.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

ALICE: That’s a funny game, uncle. What did you do then?

CARROLL: A red pawn took a white pawn; this way. You see, Alice, the chessboard is divided into sixty-four squares, red and white, and the white army tries to win and the red army tries to win. It’s like a battle!

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A OT fightingTOfor.BEThat’s the Red S Nare CARROLL: Yes, here are the Kings and QueensITthey I . BOOK TED S H I G Queen and here’s the White Queen. H I T R COPY GIVEN FOR S I K AY. O W T O Y O B N N E A ALICE: How funny they look! L AMP D IN ON IS THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R heads, and look at their big feet. CARROLL: See the crowns on their ALICE: With soldiers?

ALICE: It’s a foot apiece, that’s what it is! Do they hump along like this? CARROLL: Here! You’re spoiling the game. I must keep them all in their right squares. ALICE: I want to be a queen! CARROLL: Here you are [he points to a small white pawn] here you are in your little stiff skirt! ALICE: How do you do, Alice!

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CARROLL: And now you are going to move here. ALICE: Let me move myself. CARROLL: When you have traveled all along the board this way and haven’t been taken by the enemy you may be a queen. ALICE: Why do people always play with kings and queens? Mother has them in her playing cards too. Look! [ALICE goes to the mantel and takes a pack of playing cards from the ledge.]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Here’s the King of Hearts and here’s his wife; she’s the Queen of Hearts—isn’t she cross-looking? Like she wants to bite one’s head off. [CARROLL moves a pawn.]

You’re playing against yourself, aren’t you?

TER.

CARROLL: That’s one way of keeping in practice, Alice; I have friends E MinASthe N I L K C A university who want to beat me. T A BL

O BE S NO I T T K I O . ED think S BO want to cheat! ALICE: But if you play against yourself GHI Tshould HIyou’d I T R Y R P O O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B CARROLL: Does aPLnice girl Ilike AN she plays against herself? INwhen M E little N S N youUcheat A D O I S E S C S S I I TH ERM EPRODhard. I always pretend I’m two people too. ALICE: Oh! I never Pdo! I’d scoldRmyself It’s lots of fun, isn’t it? Sometimes when I’m all alone I walk up to the looking glass and talk to the other Alice. She’s so silly, that Alice; she can’t do anything by herself. She just mocks me all the time. When I laugh, she laughs, when I point my finger at her, she points her finger at me, and when I stick my tongue out at her she sticks her tongue out at me! Kitty has a twin too, haven’t you darling? [ALICE goes to the mirror to show Kitty her twin.] CARROLL: I’ll have to write a book some day about Alice—Alice in Wonderland, “Child of the pure unclouded brow and dreaming eyes of wonder!” or, Alice Through the Looking Glass!

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ALICE: Don’t you wish sometimes you could go into looking-glass house? See! [ALICE stands on an armchair and looks into the mirror.] There’s the room you can see through the glass; it’s just the same as our livingroom here, only the things go the other way. I can see all of it—all but the bit just behind the fireplace. Oh! I do wish I could see that bit! I want so much to know if they’ve a fire there. You never can tell, you know, unless our fire smokes. Then smoke comes up in that room too—but that may be just to make it look as if they had a fire—just to pretend they had. The books are something like our books, only the words go the wrong way. Won’t there ever be any way of our getting through, uncle?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

CARROLL: Do you think Kitty would find looking-glass milk digestible? ALICE: It doesn’t sound awful good, does it; but I might leave her at home. She’s been into an awful lot of mischief today. She found sister’s knitting and chased the ball all over the garden where sister was playing croquet with the neighbors. And I ran and ran after the naughty little thing until I was all out of breath and so . STERtired! A M E I am tired. KLIN

BLAC A T O N armchair.] O BE T [She yawns and makes herself comfortable inISthe T K I O . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O N F and consults CARROLL: [Replaces the playing K IS Ccards OonT GtheIVEmantel AY. his watch.] O W O Y B N N E A L IS P ION before SAMyou ED IN S C S U I Take a nap. have time tea. D M THIS Yes, O P ER REPR ALICE: [Half asleep.]

We’re going to have mock turtle soup for supper! I heard mamma tell the cook not to pepper it too much. CARROLL: What a funny little rabbit it is, nibbling all the time! [He leans gently over the back of her chair, and seeing that she is going to sleep puts out the lamp light and leaves the room. A red glow from the fireplace illumines ALICE.] [Dream music. A bluish light reveals the Red Chess Queen and the White Chess Queen in the mirror.]

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RED QUEEN: [Points to ALICE and says in a mysterious voice.] There she is, let’s call her over. WHITE QUEEN: Do you think she’ll come? RED QUEEN: I’ll call softly, Alice! WHITE QUEEN: Hist, Alice. RED QUEEN: Alice!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

WHITE QUEEN: Hush—if she wakes and catches us—

BOTH QUEENS: Alice, come through into looking-glass house! [Their hands beckon her.]

ALICE: [Rises, and talks sleepily. The Queens disappear. ALICE climbs from the arm of the chair to the back of another and so on up to the mantel ledge, where she picks her R. way daintily between the vases.] MASTE

LINE K C A L I—don’t—know—how—I—can—get—through. I’veNtried—before—but OT A B TO BE the glass S I . IT was hard—and I was afraid of cutting—my BOOK TEDfingers— S H I G H I T R COPY GIVEN FOR S I K AY. O W [She feels the Eglass and is amazed to find it like gauze.] T O Y O B N N A L IS P IN IS SAM ERMISSION RODUCED H T Why, it’s soft like gauze; it’s turning P REP into a sort of mist; why, it’s easy to get through! Why—why—I’m going through! [She disappears.]

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1

Which prop is most important in the play? A The white pawn B The mirror C The pack of cards D The fireplace

2

How does Alice most likely feel when she goes through the mirror? A Nervous and shy

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B Sleepy and confused

C Panicked and fearful

D Surprised and excited

3

Read these sentences from the play.

[Dream music. A bluish light reveals the Red Chess Queen and the White STER. A M E N Chess Queen in the mirror.] LACKLI

OT A B TO BE N S I Why does music probably start playingDat Tthis point BinOOthe K play? TE . I S H I G H I T R Y A To show that Alice wakes COPup N FOR S E I V I K AY. G O W T O Y O B N N E A L B To make it P harder to hearISthe queens IN IS SAM ERMISSION RODUCED H T C To create feelings of suspense P REP D To help create a magical feeling

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4

What is the tone of the conversation between Alice and Carroll at the start of the play? A Serious B Reassuring C Lighthearted D Impatient

5

Read these lines from the play.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

BOTH QUEENS: Alice, come through into looking-glass house! [Their hands beckon her.]

What does the word “beckon” most likely mean? A Reach or touch

B Calm or soothe

STER. A M E Signal or gesture ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

C Shake gently D

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/ The Wish-Bird \ TIME: a few years ago PLACE: the palace gardens Characters BIRD PRINCE NURSE

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

[The PRINCE and his NURSE walk in the palace gardens. The WISHBIRD is flying among the trees.] PRINCE: I am tired of the gardens, Nurse.

NURSE: Look at your pretty flowers, dear Prince.

STER. A M E ACKLIN NURSE: Look at your pretty doves, dear Prince. L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . PRINCE: I am tired of my doves. GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P IS CO white IVEN F Prince. Kwhite, AY. G O W T O NURSE: Then lookLat your rabbits, Y O B N N E A IS P IN IS SAM ERMISSION RODUCED H T PRINCE: I am tiredPof my rabbits. REP PRINCE: I am tired of the flowers.

NURSE: Dear me! Dear me! PRINCE: What shall I look at, Nurse? NURSE: I do not know, dear Prince. PRINCE: You must tell me what to look at. NURSE: Dear me! Dear me! PRINCE: I will send you to the king. NURSE: Do not send me to the king, dear Prince!

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PRINCE: Then tell me what to look at. BIRD: Look at me, Prince! Look at me! PRINCE: Where are you? BIRD: I am in the cedar tree. NURSE: It is the Wish-Bird, Prince! BIRD: Make a wish, Prince. I will give you what you ask for. But do not ask too much!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

PRINCE: I wish these flowers were feathers! BIRD: Flowers, flowers, to feathers change!

PRINCE: Look, Nurse, look! The flowers have changed to feathers! Let me wish again, Wish-Bird!

.

STER BIRD: Make a wish. I will give you what you ask for. But do not ask too MAmuch!

LINE K C A L B PRINCE: I wish my rabbits with wings could fly! NOT A O BE S I T T K I O . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y BIRD: Rabbits, rabbits, fly withCwings! P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS G O T O O B N wish again, Wish-Bird! N wings! ILet LE rabbitsIOnow N Ame MPMy PRINCE: Ha,Sha! N IShave A D E S C S S U I I D TH PERM REPRO

BIRD: Make a wish. I will give you what you ask for. But do not ask too much! PRINCE: I wish to have the moon, I do! BIRD: Do not ask too much, Prince! PRINCE: I wish to have the moon, I say! Do you hear, Wish-Bird? I wish to have the moon! BIRD: You ask too much! Feathers, feathers, fly away! NURSE: Prince, Prince, your feather flowers are flying away! BIRD: Rabbits, rabbits, fly away!

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NURSE: Prince, Prince, your pretty rabbits are flying away! PRINCE: I want my pretty flowers, I do! I want my pretty rabbits, too! BIRD: You asked too much, Prince! You asked too much! PRINCE: What will the king say? NURSE: Dear me! Dear me! The king loved the flowers and white, white rabbits. PRINCE: What shall I do, Wish-Bird?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

BIRD: Go plant flower seeds and care for them until they grow to flowers. Go feed your doves and care for them. Go work and work and work and never ask too much. Then some day I will come to you and you may wish again. [The Wish-Bird flies away.]

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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6

The main theme of the play is about— A enjoying nature B taking good care of pets C enjoying what you have D listening to those around you

7

At the beginning of the play, the prince repeats the phrase “I am tired of.” What is the most likely purpose of this repetition?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A To show that the prince has a busy schedule

B To emphasize that the prince does not appreciate what he has C To point out that taking care of animals is hard work D To warn that it can be difficult to entertain a prince

8

Which conclusion can best be drawn from what is said about the king? R. A B C D

9

MASTE E N I L The king spends little time outdoors. BLACK E A T O N The prince and the nurse are afraid of Ithe TO B T ISking. K O . D O E B IGHT FOR THIS The king has many unusual YRpets. P O C IS admire VENking. Y WAY. GIthe OK nurse T O The princeLand the O B N E IN AN MP N IS A D O I S E S C S S U I I D TH PERM REPRO

Read this line from the play. PRINCE: Look, Nurse, look! The flowers have changed to feathers! Let me wish again, Wish-Bird! How would the prince most likely sound when saying this line? A Excited B Alarmed C Concerned D Uninterested

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10 Which sentence spoken best expresses the main message of the play? A “You must tell me what to look at.” B “I will give you what you ask for.” C “Go feed your doves and care for them.” D “Go work and work and work and never ask too much.”

11 Describe the warning the bird gives the prince. What happens when the prince does not listen to the warning?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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/ The Gingerbread Man \ Characters THE LITTLE OLD WOMAN THE GINGERBREAD MAN THE BOY THE FOX CHILDREN MEN THE FARMER

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

SETTING Home of LITTLE OLD WOMAN

LITTLE OLD WOMAN: Now all my housework is done I think I will make some gingerbread. There is nothing quite so good for lunch as warm gingerbread and a glass of milk, or a cup of hot tea. I can make pretty good gingerbread, too, all of R. my E T S A friends say. Here is the flour and butter and molasses and milk. Now LINEitMis all ready to K C A L put into the pan. But I made too much this time. WhatTshall E it? Nothing O A B I doTOwith B N S I must be wasted in a good cook’s kitchen. Oh, . IITknow! I’ll OOK a cunning Bmake TEDnext S H I G H I T R gingerbread man for the little boy who lives door. Where is my knife? Now roll OR OPY F C N S E I . V Y K the round GI head, Nthen the dough very thin, cut Y WAthe neck, now the two OT little BOOout N E A L S I P N I M N last theUlegs arms, nowISthe CED with high heels on the shoes. Well, ISSIOand H SAlittlePfat D Mbody, T O R R E P this certainly is a fine little gingerbread man. I think I’ll make a little hat with a wide RE brim. Now I’ll put two currants for his eyes, two for his nose, three for his cute little mouth, and six for the buttons on his coat. Then I’ll sprinkle sugar and cinnamon over him and put him in the oven to bake. Let me look at the clock. It is half past eleven. At twelve the gingerbread man will be baked, ready for the little boy when he comes home from school. Well, I’ve washed the dishes, and set the table for my lunch, and it is now just twelve o’clock. I’ll open the oven door and see if my gingerbread man is ready. Oh! What was that! Why, it is the gingerbread man! GINGERBREAD MAN: Yes, it is the gingerbread man, and now I’ll go and see the world. LITTLE OLD WOMAN: Go! You mustn’t go! You belong to me.

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GINGERBREAD MAN: Ah, ha! Ah, ha! Catch me, if you can! You can’t catch me, I’m a gingerbread man! LITTLE OLD WOMAN: There he goes, out of the door, just as if he were really a little boy, and not made of something good to eat! Come back; come back! GINGERBREAD MAN: Ah, ha! Ah, ha! Catch me, if you can! You can’t catch me, I’m a gingerbread man! LITTLE OLD WOMAN: I know I can’t run as fast as he can. There he goes out of the gate. There are some men who are working in the street. I’ll ask them to catch him. Help! Help me catch the gingerbread man!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

MEN: Yes, ma’am. Where is he? Oh, there he is, the little rascal! We’ll catch him. GINGERBREAD MAN: Ah, ha! Ah, ha! Catch me, if you can! You can’t catch me, I’m a gingerbread man! MEN: Well, there he goes and he does run fast! Come, let us run after him!

STER. A M E LITTLE OLD WOMAN: Oh, I know the men can’t run as fast as LINcan, and they ACKhe L B A will never catch my gingerbread man! Here are the Nchildren O BEfrom school. S OT Ocoming I T T K I . I’ll call them. Children, children! GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P N FWhat did IS CO hereT GweIVEare. Kwoman, AY.you call us for? O CHILDREN: Yes, littleBold W O Y O N N E A L SAMP MISSION IS ODUCED IN S I H T LITTLE OLD WOMAN: PER Oh, myRdear EPRchildren, see the gingerbread man I made for the little boy next door! There he goes running as fast as he can, and I can’t catch him! BOY: And the men are running after him, and they can’t catch him either. Just watch me, little woman, I’ll catch him for you. GINGERBREAD MAN: Ah, ha! Ah, ha! Catch me, if you can! You can’t catch me, I’m a gingerbread man. GIRL: I have my roller skates on. Perhaps I can catch him! LITTLE OLD WOMAN: I’m sure you can, my child. GIRL: I’ll try. Look out, Mr. Gingerbread Man!

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GINGERBREAD MAN: Ah, ha! Ah, ha! Catch me, if you can! You can’t catch me, I’m a gingerbread man! LITTLE OLD WOMAN: There he goes, and none of them can catch him. Now he is near some farmers. I’ll call on them to help me. Farmer, farmer, will you please help me catch the gingerbread man? There he goes over your wheat field. FARMER: Yes, indeed, we’ll help you. Here, you gingerbread man, keep out of my wheat field! Come, men; run after him and catch him. MEN: We’ll catch him before he gets to the fence.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

GINGERBREAD MAN: Ah, ha! Ah, ah! Catch me, if you can! You can’t catch me, I’m a gingerbread man! LITTLE OLD WOMAN: Oh, dear! Oh, dear! There he goes into the wood, and no one can run fast enough to catch him. FARMER: I’m sorry, madam, but we must go back to our work on the farm.

STER. A M E BOY: Hark! Listen! Don’t you hear the little gingerbread man calling? ACKLIN L B A OT BE catch me, Ocan’t Sif Nyou I T T GINGERBREAD MAN: Ah, ha! Ah, ha! Catch me, can! You K I O . GHTED OR THIS BO I R I’m the gingerbread man! Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B N to us Ifrom N AN the wood. I thank you, LITTLE OLD SWOMAN: he MPLE Yes, NisIScalling A D O I E S C S S U I I D M go home. THand nowPwe ERwill children, REPRO GINGERBREAD MAN (in the wood): Ah, ha! And they didn’t catch me! And now I am free to play in the wood. What a pleasant place! MR. FOX: Well, what sort of a funny little man is this? GINGERBREAD MAN: Ah, ha! Ah, ha! Catch me, if you can! You can’t catch me, I’m a gingerbread man! MR. FOX: Can’t I? Well, I have caught you; and now let me see if you are good to eat. First, I’ll try one of your arms. That tastes good! GINGERBREAD MAN: I’m going!

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MR. FOX: And now the other arm! GINGERBREAD MAN: I’m going! MR. FOX: Now for the leg. GINGERBREAD MAN: I’m going! MR. FOX: Really, Mr. Gingerbread Man, I think you are very good eating for a hungry fox. Now I’ll taste the other leg. GINGERBREAD MAN: I’m going!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

MR. FOX: Now for your round little body. GINGERBREAD MAN: I’m going!

MR. FOX: There is not very much left. Just your head for the last mouthful. GINGERBREAD MAN: I’m gone!

STER. A M E MR. FOX: Yes, you’re gone; and a very nice meal, Mr. Gingerbread ACKLINMan. L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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12 What is the setting at the start of the play? A A kitchen B A farm C A school D A forest

13 What is the main purpose of the first paragraph of the play? A To introduce the main character of the play

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B To teach the audience how to make a gingerbread man

C To describe how the woman makes the gingerbread man D To explain how the gingerbread man comes to life

14 Which detail best shows that events in the play could not really happen?

STER. A M E ACKLIN B A gingerbread man walks and talks. L B A NOT O BE Slegs. I T C A gingerbread man has two arms and two T K I O . HTED R THIS BO Gan I R Y D A gingerbread man is baked in oven. P CO N FO S E I V I K AY. G O W T O Y O B N N E A L AMP D IN ON IS THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE Which of the following describes an example of irony from the play? R A A gingerbread man tastes good.

15

A The little old woman not wanting to waste any dough B The boy next door never getting to eat the gingerbread man C The girl wearing roller skates thinking she can catch the gingerbread man D The gingerbread man getting eaten just when he thinks he is safe

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16 Read this line from the play. LITTLE OLD WOMAN: Go! You mustn’t go! You belong to me. If a direction was added about how the little old woman sounded, which of these would best fit? A (sounding stern) B (sounding amused) C (sounding impatient) D (sounding frightened)

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

17 At the end of the play, the gingerbread man says “I’m going” each time the fox eats part of him. What effect do you think this would have on the audience?

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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/ Lazy Kate \ SCENE I TIME: early in the morning PLACE: Kate’s bedroom Characters KATE MOTHER BED

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

[KATE is in bed. Her MOTHER comes in.] MOTHER. Kate, Kate, get up!

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B MOTHER. It is time to go to school. Get up! A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO KATE. By and by, mother, by and by. I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MOTHER. You will IN AN MPLEbe lateSStoIOschool, N IS N I fear. A D S E C S U I I D TH PERM REPRO [The MOTHER goes.] KATE. By and by, mother.

BED. Dear me! Dear me! Kate will not get up. Well, she shall not be late to school. I will see to that. [The BED walks from the room into the street. KATE is frightened.] KATE. Bed, Bed, where are you going? BED. To school, you lazy child.

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SCENE II TIME: five minutes later PLACE: the schoolroom Characters KATE TEACHER BED BOYS AND GIRLS

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

[The BED enters the schoolroom. KATE tries to hide under the covers.] BED. Good morning, teacher. Here is lazy Kate. TEACHER. Ha, ha, ha!

BED. Good morning, boys. Here is lazy Kate.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L BED. Good morning, girls. Here is lazy Kate. B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GIRLS. Ha, ha, ha! GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P EN F IS CO takeTme IVhome! K Please AY. G O W KATE. Take me home, Bed! O Y O B N N E A L SAMP MISSION IS ODUCED IN S I H T BED. Will you get P up ERearly? REPR BOYS. Ha, ha, ha!

KATE. O yes, yes, yes! BED. Every morning? KATE. Every morning, Bed! Every morning! BED. Then I will take you home. Goodbye, teacher! TEACHER. Ha, ha, ha! BED. Goodbye, children! CHILDREN. Ha, ha, ha! [The BED goes with KATE, who still tries to hide under the covers.]

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SCENE III TIME: two minutes later PLACE: Kate’s bedroom Characters KATE MOTHER [KATE is asleep. Her MOTHER comes in.]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

MOTHER. Kate, Kate! You are asleep again! Get up and go to school! KATE. I have been to school.

MOTHER. What are you talking about?

KATE. I have been to school. The Bed took me.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A KATE. No, no! The Bed took me to school. The children E OatBme. S NOT laughed I T T K I O . GHTED OR THIS BO I R MOTHER. It was a dream, my dear. Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B N that was not a dream. N up early.INI Aknow IS get KATE. Well, ISpromised Bed MPLE the N to A D O I E S C S S U I I D TH PERM REPRO MOTHER. You have been dreaming, child.

[She jumps out of bed.]

MOTHER. Oh, that is fine then! KATE. I must not be late to school. I promised the Bed.

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18 Read this line from Scene II. [The BED enters the schoolroom. KATE tries to hide under the covers.] Kate most likely hides under the covers because she is— A cold B frightened C embarrassed D puzzled

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

19 Read this line from Scene I.

KATE. By and by, mother, by and by.

What does the phrase “by and by” most likely mean? A Never B Why

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A D Later S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P CO NF IVEthe K ISdifferent AY. G O W T O How is the second scene from first scene? Y O B N N E A L IS P N S SAM RMISSION RODUCED I A TItHIfeatures aPEbed. REP C Hello

20

B It takes place in a different setting. C It has a different main character. D It has a different theme.

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21 Which line spoken by Kate best shows how she changes in the play? A “Bed, Bed, where are you going?” B “Take me home, Bed! Please take me home!” C “No, no! The Bed took me to school. The children laughed at me.” D “I must not be late to school. I promised the Bed.”

22 What is the setting of Scene II? A Kate’s bedroom

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B Kate’s schoolroom C A street

D A library

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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/ Time and the Seasons \ FATHER TIME: I must call my children together and give them orders for the New Year. Open the door, my servants, and let the Seasons appear. SPRING (entering): Here I am, Father Time. What are your commands for your youngest daughter? FATHER TIME: Welcome, my dainty Spring! It is your duty to call the gentle rains to fall upon the thirsting ground. Yours is the pleasant task to paint the blades of young grass a delicate green. You call the birds back from the south and rouse all nature from her winter sleep. The winds blow freshly over the earth; the clouds move here and there, bringing the rain; and the bulbs, hidden under the soil, slowly push their leaves into the sunlight. What flowers will you bring to deck the earth?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

SPRING: O Father Time! Look here upon my pretty flowers! Here is the snowdrop, TER. so white and brave. It pushes its head up through the snow, which isM no Swhiter A E LIN white, and than its own petals. And here I have a bunch of crocuses, B blue, ACKyellow, L A NOT the gorgeous of many colors. Aren’t they pretty amid the grass? O BE tulips, S Then I T T K I O . ED brilliant BO their gay, bright holding their heads so high, makingRthe GHTearth HISwith I T Y R P O F IS CO andT Gsweet colors. I think the golden Y. my favorite flowers, IVEN narcissus Kdaffodils Aare O W O Y O B N N E A L IS children though I amSvery IN spring beauty. AMPfond of what ION the EDcall

ISS PERM

UC PROD E R FATHER TIME: I see, my daughter, that you love all your flower children, and that THIS

is right. All are beautiful, each in its own way. And now tell me what joys do you bring to the little children of the earth? SPRING: All the children love me. They hunt for the first flowers, they welcome the first birds returning from the south, and they prepare the garden for the seeds of flowers and vegetables. The boys play marbles everywhere, and run and laugh, filling their lungs with my life-giving air. The organ grinder plays for the children and they dance on the sidewalks, singing and calling out in delight. The trees put forth their tender leaves. The sun fills the air with golden warmth, and the world seems full of promise.

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FATHER TIME: Well done, my daughter. And now, my daughter Summer, tell me your plans for the year. SUMMER: Dear father, I delay my coming until Spring has prepared the way. The air must be soft and warm to please me, and the earth must be prepared by the rains and the warm rays of the sun. The colors of my flowers are deeper and richer than those of sister Spring. I bring the lilies, the peonies, and the poppies. Best of all, the glowing roses open at my call, and fill the air with perfume. FATHER TIME: And the children, my fair daughter, what do you bring to them?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

SUMMER: The dear children! I think they all like my sunny days and the long time for play. For July and August in many countries are given to the school children for their play time. Then they go to the seashore and play in the water and the sand; or to the country, where the green grass, the farmyard animals, and all the country games delight them. FATHER TIME: Children are so fond of play and the long summer days out-ofdoors that I wonder what they think of you, my older daughter, Autumn? ER.

MAST E N I L K and strong with LACwell AUTUMN: Children do like to play and I am glad they get Bso A T E O OtoBlearn, S NchildrenOlike I T the vacation my sister, Summer, gives them. .Yet all too. We T K I D O E B T S H I G the Obeautiful must not forget that. What joy itPisYR R TH stories that great men and O toI read F C N S E I V K WhatOdelight AinY. learning to write, to women have written B for GI theyNhave Othem. W T O Y N E A L IN clay, and wood. MP to make pretty Aand sing, to draw, ON ISobjects ofDpaper, THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

FATHER TIME: Yes, that is true, but have you no pleasures out-of-doors for them?

AUTUMN: Some people say my days are the most pleasant of the year. The gardens have many beautiful flowers, and the fruits are ripening in the orchards and vineyards. The apples hang red on the boughs, and children like to pick them and eat them, too! I have the harvest moon, the time when the farmers bring home the crops ripened by August suns, and the earth seems to gather the results of the year’s work, the riches of field, orchard, and meadow. The squirrels gather their hoard of nuts and hide them away for their winter’s food. Gay voices of nutting parties are heard in the woods, and all the air is filled with songs of praise and thanksgiving for the bounty of the year.

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FATHER TIME: Your work is surely one of worth and I rejoice with you, my daughter, in your happiness. You are a true friend of men, showing them that honest effort and its work will always bring proper reward. Now, my merry laughing child, what have you to tell us? WINTER: Some people think I am your oldest daughter, Father Time, but they forget that two of my months are always in the New Year. Although my hair and garments are white, the cold is only outside; my heart is warm. I cover the earth with my warmest blanket of softest snow, softer and whiter than ermine, and all the tender flowers sleep cozily and warm until sweet Spring awakes them. The children get out their sleds and skates, and the merry sleigh bells ring. What fun it is to build the snow man, and even if the hands get cold, the eyes shine brighter than in warm days and the cheeks are rosy as the reddest flower. “Hurrah for Winter!” shout the boys. The merriest holidays I have when all hearts are gay and filled with loving care for others. I would not change, dear Father Time, with any of my sisters. I say good-by to the passing year and welcome the new year. If the old year has had troubles and sorrows, all the people turn with hope to the new, and call to one another the wish, “A Happy New Year to all!” ER.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

MAST E N I L FATHER TIME: I am glad you are contented with the work LACKhave to do. And Byou A T E world. May O O Bthe S Ntravels OallK over I now, my daughters, I must send you out upon your T T I . GHTED toOall HIS BO I your coming bring peace, joy, and Yprosperity mankind! T R R P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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23 Which element of nature is described by all the seasons? A Flowers B Snowfall C Fruit D Ocean

24 Which word best describes the tone of the play? A Modest

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B Frantic

C Solemn D Cheery

25 In the third paragraph, which words does Father Time use to emphasize the joy of spring? R. A B C D

MASTE E N I L “dainty” and “freshly” BLACK E A T O “thirsting ground” T IS N BOOK TO B I . D E T “rouse” and “sleep” YRIGH N FOR THIS P O C AY. GIVE OK IS W T O “deck the earth” Y O B N N E A L AMP D IN ON IS THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

26 Which literary technique is used throughout the play? A Symbolism B Hyperbole C Personification D Metaphor

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27 What is the main purpose of the play? A To warn that things always change B To encourage people to play outside C To explain which season is best D To describe the beauty of each season

28 Describe two reasons that Winter gives to show that it is a good season. 1.

2.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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Understanding Drama: Reading to Analyze and Interpret teaches students how to understand and analyze dramatic literature. Students will learn to draw conclusions and make inferences about the structure and elements of drama, and use evidence from the text to support their understanding. Understanding Drama focuses on how playwrights create meaning and the techniques they use. Students will understand how dialogue and interactions between characters are used to create meaning. Students will also understand the purpose of stage directions and how the stage directions affect the reader and audience. Part A: Glossary The glossary gives definitions of the terms that students will need to understand to analyze and interpret dramatic literature. Part B: Instruction This section contains several dramatic pieces. Each dramatic piece is introduced with key background information that will help students understand the work. The background information will help students identify and understand the major structural elements and techniques that the playwright has used to create meaning. The student then answers questions about each dramatic piece. This section of the book contains multiple-choice and open-ended questions.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Part C: Independent Practice This section contains several dramatic pieces. Each dramatic piece is followed by several multiple-choice and open-ended questions that students will answer on their own.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Understanding drama f sample