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UNDERSTANDING DRAMA E Reading to Analyze and Interpret

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO


E

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO


E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

ISBN 978-1-4204-6380-4 R 6380-4 Copyright ©2012 RALLY! EDUCATION. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright may be reproduced in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner. Printed in the U.S.A. 0911.MAQ RALLY! EDUCATION • 22 Railroad Avenue, Glen Head, NY 11545 • (888) 99-RALLY

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Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Independent Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Introduction Understanding Drama: Reading to Analyze and Interpret teaches students how to understand and analyze dramatic literature. Students will understand the structural elements of drama. Students will draw conclusions and make inferences about the structure and elements of drama, and use evidence from the text to support their understanding.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Understanding Drama focuses on how playwrights create meaning and the techniques that are used to do so. Students will understand how dialogue and interactions between characters are used to create meaning. Students will also understand the purpose of stage directions and how the stage directions affect the reader and audience.

Glossary

STER. A M E IN to The glossary gives definitions of the terms that students will ACKLneed L B A understand to analyze and interpret dramatic literature. O BE can refer S NOT OStudents I T T K I . D to the glossary as they learn to interpret GHTEdrama. HIS BO I T R Y R P O O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B Instruction MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I D MI TH PERfive REPROpieces. Each dramatic piece is This section contains dramatic introduced with key background information that will help students understand the work. The background information will help students identify and understand the major structural elements and techniques that the playwright has used to create meaning. The student then answers questions about each dramatic piece. This section of the book contains multiple-choice and open-ended questions.

Independent Practice This section contains five dramatic pieces. Each dramatic piece is followed by several questions that students will answer on their own. This section of the book contains multiple-choice and open-ended questions.

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Glossary Act Acts are the major sections a play is divided into. The beginning of a new act can be set in a different place and be set further ahead in time.

Actor An actor is a person playing a role in a dramatic work.

Aside

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The term “aside” is used to indicate that a character is speaking only to the audience. The term can also be used with another character’s name to indicate that the person is only heard by the character named and the audience. For example, “James: (aside to Polly)” would indicate that only Polly and the audience hear what James says. TER.

E MAS N I L K C A BLA BE At Rise T O N OK TO to show . IT IS Ior The term “at rise” is used at the start of aDsentence paragraph O E B T S H TH of the play, or when PYRIG Eat OR start that the text describes whatISisCO happening the F N V AY. GI OK W T O Y O B the curtain first goes up. N N E A L AMP D IN ON IS THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R Character A character is a person in a play.

Characterization Characterization refers to how an author tells the reader about a character. It can be by describing a character. It can also be by describing what a character looks like, what a character feels, or what a character does.

Conflict The conflict is the main problem or struggle that takes place in a work.

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Curtain The term “curtain” is used to indicate that an act, scene, or play has ended. It refers to the curtain closing.

Dialogue Dialogue refers to the words spoken by characters in a play.

Drama Drama refers to literature that is written to be performed.

Enter

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The term “enter” is used to indicate that a character walks onto the stage.

Exit

The term “exit” is used to indicate that a character walks off the stage.

Imagery

R.

STE Imagery is the use of details to help the reader imagine something. MAImagery E N I L CK feels. can describe how something looks, sounds, tastes, smells, A BLAor S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO Monologue I R Y P O EN Fcharacter. A monologue is a longOspeech K IS C madeOTbyGIVone O WAY. Y B N N E A L S I P N S SAM ERMISSION RODUCED I I H T Mood P REP

Mood refers to how a text or part of a text makes the reader feel, or the feelings created in the reader.

Narrator The narrator of a work is the person telling the story.

Playwright The playwright is the author of a piece of drama.

Plot The plot is the pattern of events that take place in a work.

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Props Props are items or objects that are on stage during a dramatic work. Props always have a purpose or meaning. They can represent something, be referred to by the characters, or be used by a character.

Repetition Repetition is when words, phrases, or lines are repeated.

Scene Scenes are the minor sections a play is divided into. Each scene often has a different setting.

Setting

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The setting of a play refers to where and when the events take place.

Stage Directions

Stage directions are details given that describe what a character does. STER. A They can describe actions by the characters. They can also describe how M E ACKLINwritten in L characters sound when they speak. Stage directions are usually B A S NOT OK TO BE I parenthesis and are in italics. T I . D O

GHTE OR THIS B I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C Theme G O T O O B IS Nmain idea INofAaNwork. MPLE topic Nthe A A theme isISthe main or D O I S E S C S U I D TH PERM REPRO Tone Tone is how the author feels about the subject.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Instruction Each dramatic piece is introduced with key background information that will help students understand the purpose of stage directions, the meaning of dialogue, and other key elements of understanding dramatic literature.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Introduction: This play is about students competing in a three-legged race. The main characters are Haley and Miguel. Haley is expecting it to be a normal race. She is surprised to learn that it is a three-legged race. Haley and Miguel decide to run together. Haley learns how to work with a partner, and Miguel and her win the race. During the race, the dialogue between Haley and Miguel shows how Haley struggles to work with her partner. As well as using dialogue, the playwright describes how the words are spoken. This is a type of stage direction. The play also has a narrator. A narrator is someone that is not in the play, but describes events that take place.

E L P  A RaceSto  AMWork Together N O I T A C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A R . 9 9 . 888

Characters NARRATOR MIGUEL (a young boy) COACH HALEY (a young girl)

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED onOan HIS BO field. They A group of young students areYR standing athletics I T R P EN FThey are IS COline ofT GaIVrace. . K start are standing near the different O WAYdoing O Y O B N N E A L S I P N I M A exercises. A coach stretching D nearby. ON is standing THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

NARRATOR: The children had spent weeks practicing for the big race. As they stretched their legs, they listened to the final instructions from their coach. COACH: Everyone has practiced very hard for today’s race. Remember to stretch your muscles before you run. MIGUEL: I’ve done all my stretching and I’m ready to race. HALEY: I’m ready to win. COACH: The race begins in three minutes, so it’s time for everyone to prepare by choosing a partner.

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MIGUEL: [sounding confused] A partner? HALEY: I don’t need a partner to run. I’m fast enough to win on my own. COACH: This is a three-legged race, which means you must tie one of your legs to the leg of your partner before you start running. HALEY: [frowning] That’s not fair! My partner’s just going to slow me down. MIGUEL (to Haley): Do you want to run with me?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

HALEY: [frowning at Miguel] Only if you think you’re fast enough to win. I don’t want anyone holding me back. MIGUEL: We’ve practiced together, so I think we can be good teammates. HALEY: Okay, but you’ve got to keep up with me.

NARRATOR: The coach tied Haley’s right leg to Miguel’s left leg. Then, he ER. checked to make sure the other teams were tied together, and said itSTwas A M E KLIN time to begin the race. A BLAC

S NOT OK TO BE I T I . COACH: Ready, set, go! GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P IS CO IVEN F Y WAY. K G O T O O B HALEY: [shouting]PCome Miguel, needN to I ANrun faster. M LE Son, N IS N we A D O I S E S C S U I I TH RM ROD PEmy MIGUEL: I’m trying best. REP HALEY: [shouting] You’re slowing me down, Miguel. Hurry up. MIGUEL: [calmly] We’ll go faster if you work with me, Haley. HALEY: We’ll go faster if you hurry up!

MIGUEL: I can’t go as fast as you. We would do better, and maybe have a chance at winning, if we run at the same speed. NARRATOR: Haley slowed down. She and Miguel began to move their legs together. They quickly moved past the other teams. Soon they were in the lead.

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HALEY: [with joy] We’re nearly there and we can win! MIGUEL: Stay calm, though, and keep working with me. NARRATOR: Together, Haley and Miguel crossed the finished line in first place. COACH: Haley, Miguel, I’m so proud of both of you. You won the race. MIGUEL: I can’t believe we get medals!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

HALEY: I’m excited that we won, but we got more than medals. We got a wonderful lesson about working together, and that’s the most important reward.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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1

What is the setting of the play? A An athletics field B A school gymnasium C A park D A sports stadium

2

What is the main purpose of the narrator? A To describe actions taking place

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B To give an opinion on the characters C To describe the setting of the events D To emphasize important points

3

Read this line from the play.

STER. A M E MIGUEL: [sounding confused] A partner? ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I What is the purpose of the words in parenthesis? T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P A They tell the actor what Owords toIVEsay. NF K IS C AY. G O W T O Y O B N N E A L S say the words. B They tell the P actor how Ito IN IS SAM ERMISSION RODUCED H T P audience about C They tell the REP an action. D They tell the audience how Miguel feels.

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4

Read this line from the play. HALEY: [shouting] You’re slowing me down, Miguel. Hurry up. Why does the playwright include a note showing that Haley is shouting? A To help show that Haley is feeling annoyed B To show that Haley and Miguel were far apart C To explain that Haley was faster than Miguel D To suggest that Haley was excited

5

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

At which point in the play does Haley feel excited? A When she learns it is a three-legged race B When Miguel asks to be her partner

C When her and Miguel start running together

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . TED thatTHHaley IS BOis unhappy about GHshows I Describe two ways the playwright R Y R P O IS CO IVEN F Y WAY. having to run with aOKpartner. G T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D 1. TH PERM REPRO D When her and Miguel are nearing the finish line

6

2.

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Introduction: This play is based on a fable. The play is divided into two scenes. Scenes are sections that a play is divided into. This is similar to how a book is divided into chapters. Different scenes often have different locations. Each scene starts with a paragraph beginning with the words “AT RISE.” This is a term used in drama that describes what is happening at the start of the scene, or when the curtain first goes up. Each scene ends with the word “CURTAIN.” This is a term used to show that it is the end of the scene, or when the curtain closes. The events of the play are described by using dialogue, or what the characters say, and by describing actions.

E L P M the Weasels  The Bat  SAand N O I T A C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A R . 9 9 . 888 Adapted from an Aesop’s Fable

Characters WILLIAM, a weasel BRUTUS, a bat ARTHUR, a weasel

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B IN AN MPLE SSION IS NSCENE A D 1 S E C S U I I D TH PERM REPRO

AT RISE: WILLIAM, a weasel, is sitting in a clearing in the woods. BRUTUS, a bat, flies into the clearing, spots WILLIAM, and then tries to fly away. WILLIAM quickly pounces on BRUTUS and grabs him. BRUTUS (shrieking): Let me go! WILLIAM: I am sorry, but I simply cannot do that. BRUTUS (pleading): Please let me go. WILLIAM: I’m sorry but you are a mouse. And I am a sworn enemy of mice. I have to eat every mouse I find. It is just the way it is.

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BRUTUS (cheerfully): But I am not a mouse! WILLIAM: You look like a mouse. BRUTUS: Don’t be silly! Look at my wings. Can mice fly? I am only a bird! Please let me go! (BRUTUS flaps his wings up and down. WILLIAM watches BRUTUS thoughtfully, and then lets him go.) WILLIAM: I suppose I cannot argue with that. You surely must be a bird, so go on your way now.

E L P SAMCURTAIN ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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SCENE 2 AT RISE: ARTHUR, a weasel, is sitting in front of a cave. BRUTUS, a bat, exits from the cave. ARTHUR quickly pounces on BRUTUS and grabs him. BRUTUS (sternly): Hey! Let me go! ARTHUR: Never! You are a bird. I eat all the birds that I find. BRUTUS: I am not a bird! How dare you call me a bird!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

(BRUTUS flaps his wings wildly.)

ARTHUR: I know you are a bird because you have wings. Look at you flapping those things. BRUTUS: But look at my skin. Birds have feathers, but I have no feathers. I R. cannot possibly be a bird. MASTE

LINE K C A L (ARTHUR looks closely at BRUTUS.) OT A B TO BE N S I T BOOK TED. I S H I G H I T R ARTHUR: Well, what are you Cthen? OPY N FOR S E I V I K AY. G O W T O Y O B N N E A L IS P AaMpause): D IaNmouse with wings. BRUTUS (after I amON a mouse. I am THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

ARTHUR (nodding): All right. Since you are not a bird, you can go. (ARTHUR lets go of BRUTUS. BRUTUS giggles as he flies off.)

CURTAIN

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7

Why does the first paragraph begin with the phrase “AT RISE”? A To show that it is what is happening at the start of the scene B To show that the events take place in the morning C To inform the audience members that they should stand D To indicate that an exciting event is about to take place

8

How is the second scene different from the first scene? A It features a weasel.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B It has a new setting.

C The bat is caught by a weasel. D The bat is able to escape.

9

Read these lines from the play.

STER. A M E BRUTUS: I am not a bird! How dare you call me a bird! ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I (BRUTUS flaps his wings wildly.) T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P Brutus most likely flapsIShis Owings toIVshow EN F thatWhe Y.is— K C A G O T O Y O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A scared A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO B angry C amused D hungry

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10 Why does Brutus most likely giggle at the end of the play? A He is excited that he is able to fly. B He is happy that he does not have feathers. C He is pleased that he has tricked the weasel. D He is thinking about arriving safely home.

11 Read this line from the play. BRUTUS (sternly): Hey! Let me go!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The word “sternly” indicates that Brutus speaks as if he is— A telling a joke

B asking a question

C begging or pleading D giving an order

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Introduction: This play is about two boys who are jogging together. One boy finds a purse lying beside the path. The boys then argue about sharing the money in the purse. Mike thinks that only he should have the money, while Kieran disagrees. This play is a good example of how important the actions of the characters can be. The actions are described by the stage directions. The stage directions are in italics. There are two types of stage directions in this play. The first type describes a character’s actions. The second type describes a character’s tone of voice, or how they speak. The way Mike acts tells as much about him as what he says. From the way he acts, you can tell that he does not want to share with Kieran. At the end of the play, Kieran stretches his legs and then jogs off. This action helps show how he feels.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E  The Find Y ! Y L L L L RA A R . 9 9 . 888

ER.

Two young boys, MIKE and KIERAN are jogging along the footpath. MAST E N I L MIKE suddenly stops, bends down, and picks up Ta Apurse. BLACKKIERAN O O BE S Nto his side. I T T realizes that MIKE has stopped and jogs back K I O . D O

GHTE OR THIS B I R Y P IS CO in the VEN F Y WAY. MIKE: I just found a purse Igrass. K lying G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I H D KIERAN:TShow me!PERMI REPRO

(MIKE takes a step back from KIERAN and pulls the purse close to his chest.) KIERAN: Is there any money in it? (MIKE opens the purse, peeks inside, and quickly closes it again.) KIERAN: Well, is there any money in it? MIKE (shrugging): There is a little bit of money in it. KIERAN: Is there anything else in it?

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MIKE: Nope. And there are no details to show who owns it. I guess I get to keep the money for myself. (KIERAN looks at MIKE for a few seconds. MIKE looks uncomfortable.) KIERAN: But we always jog together. MIKE: So? KIERAN: Well since we always share jogging, don’t you think we should share something we find while we’re jogging?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

MIKE: But you didn’t find the purse. You ran right past it. KIERAN: But you did find it on my street. MIKE: So?

KIERAN: You wouldn’t even have been running down this street if it wasn’t TER. for me! E MAS

ACKLIN L B A MIKE: So? S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P KIERAN: So I helped you find the O purse.IVEN F K IS C AY. G O W T O Y O B N N E A L P ION IS ODUCED IN MIKE: So?HIS SAM S S I M T P ER REPR

KIERAN: So we should share what’s in it. (MIKE shakes his head.) MIKE: No, I found it so I should have what’s in it. KIERAN: But that’s not fair! MIKE: I don’t care. I found it and I’m keeping it. And, actually, I think that it is fair.

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(A lady suddenly appears. She is walking quickly along the path toward the boys. A policeman is following behind her. The lady stops when she sees the boys. Then she points at the purse.) Lady (shrieking): There’s my purse. That boy stole my purse! MIKE (pointing to the edge of the path): I did not. I just found it lying right there. Lady: You did not. You found it on my front step—where I left it for just a second before leaving for the shops.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

(The policeman looks sternly at MIKE.)

MIKE: Tell them, Kieran. Tell them that we found the purse lying right there. KIERAN: We didn’t find the purse. You found the purse.

STER.

A Policeman (to KIERAN): Can you tell me where your friend found LINE Mthe purse?

BLACK E A T O N he found IS said TO Bit in the grass KIERAN: I just turned around and he had it. THe K I O . D O E B THIS RIGitHTin theFOgrass. just beside the path. But I didn’t Ysee R P O C GIVEN NY WAY. OK IS T O O B N E A L S I MIKE: Kieran!SAWhy up for IN me? MP aren’tSSyou N sticking D O I E C S U I I TH PERM EPROD R KIERAN: Well, you found the purse. You even told me that you found the purse and I had nothing to do with it. And you said that it’s now your money. MIKE: So? KIERAN: So this is now your problem. (KIERAN turns around, stretches each leg for a few seconds, and then jogs off.)

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12 Read this line from the play. MIKE: Tell them, Kieran. Tell them that we found the purse lying right there. If a direction was added about how Mike sounded, which of these would best fit? A (sounding urgent) B (sounding amused) C (sounding surprised)

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

D (sounding confused)

13 Read this line from the play.

(KIERAN turns around, stretches each leg for a few seconds, and then jogs off.)

STER. A M E CKLIN A L B A nervous S NOT OK TO BE I T I . relaxed GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O upset IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S overjoyed S I I D TH PERM REPRO

This line suggests that Kieran is— A B C D

14 Read this line from the play. (MIKE takes a step back from KIERAN and pulls the purse close to his chest.) The playwright most likely describes this action to suggest that Mike— A does not want to share his find B stole the purse C does not know what is in the purse D wishes he had not found the purse

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15 What does Mike’s repetition of “So?” suggest? A That he does not understand what Kieran is saying B That he does not want to discuss sharing the purse C That he knows that he is doing the wrong thing D That he thinks Kieran’s reaction is amusing

16 What is the main message of the play? A It is wrong to steal.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B Decisions should be made quickly. C Fitness has many benefits.

D Friends should not be selfish.

17 The playwright describes how Mike “opens the purse, peeks inside, and R. quickly closes it again.” What does this action suggest aboutE Mike? MASTE

ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Introduction: This play is set in the office of a struggling magazine. It has four characters, but they are in the play at different times. The term “EXIT” is used to indicate that a character is leaving the stage. The term “ENTER” is used to indicate that a character walks onto the stage. When a new character enters a play, playwrights often give a description of the character. This description can include what the character looks like, what they are wearing, their age, and other details that provide information about them. This play also includes a character, Edward Willis, who is talked about by the other characters but does not actually appear in the play. The events of the play are based around a conversation between Oscar Tripp and a woman visiting from Idaho. She wants to see Edward Willis because she was moved by his poetry. She is quite different to the other city people from the play and Oscar is confused by her.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L The People Y  L L RA A R . 9 9 . 888

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B Adapted from The People by Susan Glaspell A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y Characters P O EN F IVcalled KofISa Cmagazine AY. G O W T O EDWARD WILLIS, LEditor The People Y O B N N E A AMP ION IS ODUCED IN S TOM HOWE, S I M THIS SPrinter P ER EP R OSCAR TRIPP, Associate EditorR THE WOMAN [The office of a magazine called The People. The room contains a desk and a table on which are manuscripts and magazines. Wads of paper are thrown about on the floor. It is the office of a publication that is poor. OSCAR is at one end of the table writing. Enter TOM HOWE with papers in his hand.] TOM: Why are you writing? OSCAR: [Cheerfully] Because I am a writer.

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TOM: But I thought you said there wasn’t going to be another issue of The People. OSCAR: I am still writing. TOM: There’s a woman here with a suitcase. OSCAR: What’s in it? TOM: She wants to see the Editor.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

OSCAR: [After writing a minute] All right.

[Exit TOM, enter WOMAN with suitcase. She is middle-aged, wears plain clothes not in fashion. Her manner is a little shrinking. She stands in the doorway looking about the bare room. Her face is the face of one who has come a long way and reached a wonderful place.]

STER. A M E ACKLIN OSCAR: Um-hum. L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . D I came THE WOMAN: [In an anxious but excited GHTEway] HIStoBOsee the author of I T R Y R P O those wonderful words. OK IS CO IVEN F Y WAY. G T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I H D OSCAR: T[Rising] Which words? PERMwonderful REPRO THE WOMAN: This is the office of The People?

THE WOMAN: About moving toward the beautiful distances. OSCAR: Oh. Those are Mr. Willis‘s wonderful words. [Begins to write as if he has lost interest.] THE WOMAN: Could I see him? OSCAR: He isn’t here yet. He’s just back from California. Won’t be at the office till a little later. THE WOMAN: [With excitement] He has been to California? He has just ridden across this country?

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OSCAR: Yes. Long trip. He was very cross over the phone. THE WOMAN: [Pained] Oh no. I think you’re mistaken. OSCAR: Anything you care to see me about? THE WOMAN: [After considering] I could see him a little later, couldn’t I? OSCAR: Yes, if it’s important. Of course he’ll be very busy. THE WOMAN: It is important. At least, I think it is. Yes, it is important.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

OSCAR: Very well then. Come back later in the morning.

THE WOMAN: [Thinking aloud] I will stand down on the street and watch the people go by. OSCAR: What?

R. THE WOMAN: The people. It’s so wonderful to see them. There are S soTEmany A M E of them. Don’t you often just stand and watch them? LACKLIN

OT A B TO BE N S I OSCAR: No, madam, not often. I am tooTEbusy aBmagazine about them. D. ITediting OOK S H I G H I T R COPY GIVEN FOR S I Y. magazine? [Looks K Athis THE WOMAN: Of course you are busy. You helpNYedit O W T O O B N E A L SAMP MISSION IS ODUCED IN about at the THISposters.] P ER REPR OSCAR: I am associate editor of The People. THE WOMAN: That’s a great thing for you. And you are so young. Does Mr. Willis write in this room? OSCAR: That is his desk. THE WOMAN: [Looking at the desk] It must be a wonderful thing for you to write in the same room with him. OSCAR: Well, I don’t know. Perhaps it is a wonderful thing for him too. I am Oscar Tripp, the poet.

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THE WOMAN: [Wistfully] It would be beautiful to be a poet. [Pause.] I will come back later. [Picks up suitcase.] OSCAR: Just leave that if you aren’t going to be using it in the meantime. THE WOMAN: [Putting it down near the door] Oh, thank you. I see that you are a kind young man. OSCAR: That is not the general opinion. THE WOMAN: I wonder why it is that the general opinion is so often wrong? [Stands considering it for a moment, then goes out.]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

OSCAR: I don’t quite understand that woman.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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18 What is the purpose of the first paragraph at the start in square brackets? A To explain who the main characters are B To show when the events took place C To tell what the magazine is about D To describe where the events take place

19 Which sentence from the first paragraph provides the most important information about The People?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A “The room contains a desk and a table on which are manuscripts and magazines.” B “Wads of paper are thrown about on the floor.” C “It is the office of a publication that is poor.” D “OSCAR is at one end of the table writing.”

20

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A OT BE Operson’s S Ndescribes I T Which information in parenthesis and italics a T K I O . GHTED OR THIS BO I R action? Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B A [Cheerfully] MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I D MI excited Eway] THan anxious B [In PERbut R PRO C [Rising]

D [Pained]

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21 What does the opening conversation between Tom and Oscar suggest? A Oscar is not really paying attention to what is being said. B Oscar is upset that the magazine may close down. C Oscar is bored with his job. D Oscar is excited about what the woman wants.

22 Which character appears on stage throughout the whole play? A Edward Willis

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B Tom Howe

C Oscar Tripp

D The Woman

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Introduction: This play is about a king and how he treats the people that he rules. The play starts by describing the setting in detail. The king is described as sitting in a golden chair wearing a golden crown and holding a golden walking stick. His servant is also fanning him with an enormous fan of peacock feathers. These items that are part of the scene are known as props. These props are important because they give the audience an impression of the king. Before the king says a word, the audience can determine what sort of king he is. Throughout the play, a beggar outside keeps calling out asking for bread. The beggar does not appear in the play until near the end, but he is important in the play. The play uses the term “aside” to describe some of the dialogue. This term is used to describe words that are not heard by all characters. An “aside” can be a character speaking only to the audience, or a character speaking to another character and the audience.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L Y  L L RAL Bread A R . 9 9 . 888

STER. A M E LIN ACKParkhurst L B Adapted from The Beggar and the King by Winthrop A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y Characters P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O THE KING OF A GREAT COUNTRY O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S HIS SERVANT I D TH ERMI P REPRO A BEGGAR [A chamber in the palace overlooks a courtyard. The season is midsummer. The windows of the palace are open, and from a distance there comes the sound of a man’s voice crying for bread.] [THE KING sits in a golden chair. A golden crown is on his head, and he holds in his hand a walking stick made of gold. A SERVANT stands by his side, fanning him with an enormous fan of peacock feathers.] THE BEGGAR: (outside) Bread. Bread. Bread. Give me some bread.

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THE KING: Who is that crying in the street for bread? THE SERVANT: (fanning) O king, it is a beggar. THE KING: Why does he cry for bread? THE SERVANT: O king, he cries for bread in order that he may fill his belly. THE KING: I do not like the sound of his voice. It annoys me very much. Send him away.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

THE SERVANT: (bowing) O king, he has been sent away. THE KING: If that is so, then why do I hear his voice?

THE SERVANT: O king, he has been sent away many times, yet each time that he is sent away he returns again, crying louder than he did before. THE KING: He is very unwise to annoy me on such a warm day.

STER. A M E [THE BEGGAR’S voice suddenly cries out loudly.] ACKLIN L B A O BE S NOTbread. I T T K I O . THE BEGGAR: (outside) Bread. Bread. Give me some GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P F CO IVENvoice K ISout G THE KING: Ah! He is Bcrying again. His seems O WAY. to me louder than it T O Y O N N E A L S AMP D IN ON I was before. THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R THE SERVANT: Hunger is as food to the lungs. THE KING: His lungs seem quite full. Ha, ha! THE SERVANT: But alas! His stomach is quite empty. THE KING: That is not my business. THE SERVANT: Should I not perhaps fling him a crust from the window? THE KING: No! To feed a beggar is always foolish. THE BEGGAR: (outside) Bread. Bread. Give me some bread.

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THE SERVANT: He seems very hungry, O king. THE KING: Yes. So I should judge. THE SERVANT: Doubtless he craves only a small crust and he would be content. THE KING: Doubtless he craves only to be a king and he would be very happy indeed. THE SERVANT: Do not be hard, O king. This fellow is extremely hungry. Why don’t you command me to fling him just one small crust from the window?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

THE KING: My commands I have already given you. See that the beggar is driven away. THE SERVANT: But alas! O king, if he is driven away he will return again . even as he did before. ASTER

LINE M K C A L THE KING: Well, propose a solution then. OT A B TO BE N S I T BOOK TED. I S H I G H I T R THE SERVANT: A solution, O king? COPY GIVEN FOR S I K AY. O W T O Y O B N N E A L P [He stops fanning.] AM D IN ON IS THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

THE KING: That is what I said. And do not stop fanning me. I am very warm. THE SERVANT: (fanning vigorously) A crust of bread, O king, dropped from your window. That might prove a solution. THE KING: (angrily) I have said I will not give him a crust of bread. If I gave him a crust today he would be just as hungry again tomorrow, and my troubles would be as great as before. THE SERVANT: That is true, O king. Your mind is surely filled with great learning.

THE KING: Ha! I have it. I have it. I myself will order him to stop.

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THE SERVANT: O king! THE KING: Ha! I rather fancy the fellow will stop his noise when the king commands him to. Ha, ha, ha! Now go fetch him. [THE SERVANT rushes out.] THE SERVANT: (returning) O king, here is the beggar. [A shambling creature hung in filthy rags follows THE SERVANT slowly into the royal chamber.]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

THE KING: Ha! Are you the beggar who has been crying aloud in the streets for bread? THE BEGGAR: (in a faint voice, after a slight pause) Are you the king? THE KING: I am the king.

R.

E a THE SERVANT: (aside to THE BEGGAR) It is not proper for a beggar MAtoSTask E N I L question of a king. Speak only as you are spoken to. A BLACK

S NOT OK TO BE I T I . THE KING: You are the beggar, I understand, IS BO cries aloud in the GHTED Owho Hoften I T R Y R P CO annoys N F greatly.AYTherefore, streets for bread. Now, your do not beg IVEme K ISvoice G O W . T O Y O B N N E A L S any more. SAMP ION I ODUCED IN S S I M THIS P ER REPR

THE BEGGAR: O king, you have commanded me not to beg in the streets for bread, for the noise of my voice offends you. I likewise command you to remove your crown from your forehead and throw it from your window into the street. For when you have thrown your crown into the street, then I will no longer be forced to beg. THE KING: Fft! You command me! You, a beggar from the streets, command me, a king, to remove my crown from my forehead and throw it from my window into the street! THE BEGGAR: That is what I said. THE BEGGAR: I ask you, will you throw your crown from your window?

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THE SERVANT: (aside to THE KING) Perhaps it were wise to humor him, O king. After you have thrown your crown away I can go outside and bring it to you again. THE BEGGAR: Well? Well? (He points to the window.) Well? THE KING: No! I will not throw my crown from that window. No, nor from any other window. What! Shall I obey the orders of a beggar? Never! THE BEGGAR: (preparing to leave) Truly, that is spoken like a king. You are a king, so you would prefer to lose your head than that silly circle of gold that so foolishly sits upon it. But it is well. You are a king. You could not prefer otherwise.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

[THE BEGGAR calmly walks out. THE SERVANT, struck dumb, stares after him. THE KING sits in his chair, dazed.] [THE BEGGAR’S voice is heard outside.]

STER. A M E THE BEGGAR: Bread. Bread. Give me some bread. ACKLIN L B A BE NOT O S I T T K I O . THE KING: Ah. GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O F IVENhalf-frightened. K IS Cthe window, AY. Then raises G O [THE KING turns toward W T O Y O B N N E A L N the point of tossing it out AMP ION IS and ED Ion his Hhands his crown, seems S C S U I D M T IS S toward O PER he replaces REPRit and presses it firmly on his head.] the window. Then THE BEGGAR: (outside) Bread. Bread. Give me some bread. THE KING: (with terrible anger) Close that window! [THE SERVANT stands stupidly, and the voice of THE BEGGAR grows louder as the curtain falls.]

CURTAIN

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23 Read this line from the play. THE SERVANT: (fanning) O king, it is a beggar. What does the word “fanning” tell about the servant? A How he feels B What he says C How he sounds D What he is doing

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

24 Read this line from the play.

THE SERVANT: (aside to THE KING) Perhaps it were wise to humor him, O king. After you have thrown your crown away I can go outside and bring it to you again. The phrase “aside to THE KING” shows that the servant is— A B C D

TER. S A M E speaking only to the king ACKLIN L B A speaking only to the audience S NOT OK TO BE I T I . speaking only to the beggar GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P CO IVEN F Y WAY. K ISdoes G O speaking so the king not hear T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

25 Which line best shows that the servant feels sorry for the beggar? A “O king, he cries for bread in order that he may fill his belly.” B “Should I not perhaps fling him a crust from the window?” C “But alas! O king, if he is driven away he will return again even as he did before.” D “That is true, O king. Your mind is surely filled with great learning.”

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26 Which word best describes the king? A Wise B Selfish C Determined D Generous

27 What can you tell from the way the beggar speaks to the king? A He is amused by him.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B He is afraid of him.

C He does not respect him. D He has met him before.

28 The second paragraph of the play describes the king. Describe two props TER. that are described and what impression of the king they create. E MAS 1.

2.

ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Independent Practice E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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 The Visitor  Adapted from Pictures by Horace Holley Characters SILVIA JOE MR. WENTWORTH

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

[An art studio in France. There is a small entrance hall, kitchenette, and a balcony before which curtains are drawn. It is a winter afternoon, and a young man is busy at an easel placed close beside the north light. A young woman arranges tea things on the table.] SILVIA: Joe.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A SILVIA: Joe! S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R JOE: Um—um! Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B AN and shows him the time.] S N fromEDhis PLE drawsSIOhis IN pocket, Mover, [She walks N Iwatch A S C S S U I I D TH PERM REPRO

JOE: Um.

SILVIA: It’s nearly four o’clock.

JOE: Just a minute—the light’s fine, and I want to finish. SILVIA: Yes, I know, but he may be here any minute. JOE: Tea on? SILVIA: Yes. JOE: Well, that’ll keep him while I get ready. That’s mostly what they come for, anyhow. SILVIA: But he’s different. He isn’t a tourist—

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JOE: No, he’s a relative! SILVIA: You wouldn’t say that if one of your family members dropped in. Besides, I’ve never even seen him. And he’s something of a collector, Joe. He buys pictures. JOE: So I hear. SILVIA: And when he sees your latest things! JOE: Um... There, it’s all done.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

SILVIA: I’m crazy to see it, Joe, but run up and get ready.

[A knock at the door. Joe runs upstairs to the balcony. Silvia opens the door and admits Mr. Wentworth, rather stout and with gold spectacles.]

STER. A M E LIN coat. The ACKyour SILVIA: Yes. Joe and I have been expecting you. Let me take L B A S NOT OK TO BE I studio’s rather upset just now— T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O F atmosphere MR. WENTWORTH: Delightful! IGlove of work in a IVEN the K IS C How AY. O W T O Y O B N N E A L P studio! I usedSto a bitIOmyself, N IS youUCknow. AMpaint ED IN S S I D M THIS O P ER REPR MR. WENTWORTH: Mrs. Carson?

SILVIA: Did you? Father never mentioned that.

MR. WENTWORTH: Oh, I guess everybody has forgotten it by now. An early adventure with life! Goodness only knows what might have happened, though, if the business hadn’t fallen on me to look out for. I might have been a great artist. Ha! SILVIA: I’m sure you would, Mr. Wentworth. You’ve always been interested in art, haven’t you? MR. WENTWORTH: Yes indeed. Of course I have been very busy, until lately. But I always followed the best English magazines.

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SILVIA: My husband’s upstairs getting the paint off his hands. He will be down in a minute. Then we’ll have some tea. MR. WENTWORTH: You don’t paint, do you, Silvia? I may call you Silvia, may I not? SILVIA: Of course. No, I don’t paint. I just fly around amongst the artists and see what’s going on. Are you staying in Paris very long? MR. WENTWORTH: A couple of weeks more, at least. I am enjoying the galleries and museums here.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

SILVIA: Here comes Joe. Joe, I want you to meet my cousin, Mr. Wentworth. Mr. Wentworth—Mr. Carson. JOE: Very glad to meet you, Mr. Wentworth.

MR. WENTWORTH: It’s a great pleasure for me to meet a real artist, . Mr. Carson. ASTER

LINE M K C A L SILVIA: Excuse me a moment. I’ll bring on the tea. OT A B TO BE N S I T BOOK TED. I S H I G H I T R JOE: Oh, as for that—I’m working along. COPY GIVEN FOR S I K O WAY. T O Y O B N N E A L S I your pictures P I want to see MR. WENTWORTH: IN very much. I was just telling IS SAM ERMISSION RODUCED H T Silvia how I delightP in the Louvre. REP I go there with a class for lectures every morning. I suppose you often copy the old masters? JOE: Copy the old masters? I should say not. I’m not out to be a camera. It’s all I can do to work out my own ideas. MR. WENTWORTH: Oh, I see. But— SILVIA: The tea’s ready. Joe, bring up that chair for Mr. Wentworth. Mr. Wentworth, do you take cream and sugar? MR. WENTWORTH: If you please. Yes, two lumps. There’s nothing like the atmosphere of a studio, is there? I love it. I feel I have missed so much. Still, the instinct for beauty, fragile as it is, does persist.

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SILVIA: Another cup, Mr. Wentworth? Joe, pass the cake. MR. WENTWORTH: No, thank you, Silvia. Yes, the cake if you please. Why, it’s real English plumcake! SILVIA: English things are getting very popular over here. Joe, won‘t you show us the new picture? He finished it just before you came, Mr. Wentworth. MR. WENTWORTH: Indeed! I should like to see it very much. JOE: There isn’t very much light.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

SILVIA: No, the light is poor. But your colors will still stand out, Joe. MR. WENTWORTH: Really, Mr. Carson, I counted on seeing some of your work. I have heard nice things about you. JOE: There. If you stand just here...

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A JOE: What? S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P SILVIA: It’s our little cottage! That’s where we lived last CO so glad! IS I’m IVEN F Y WAY. K G O T O O B summer, Mr. Wentworth. Joe IN AtoN paint it. Joe, it’s splendid! MPLE SSI Ialways N IS Nwanted A D O S E C S U I I D Don’t you TH think so,PEMr. RM Wentworth? REPRO SILVIA: Oh, Joe!

MR. WENTWORTH: Yes. Yes. Very interesting... SILVIA: Don’t you love the bright colors and the firm, flowing lines? MR. WENTWORTH: Of course, it isn’t exactly what I have been used to. SILVIA: But you must like it very much? MR. WENTWORTH: It’s not very much like anything in the Louvre. JOE: Maybe it’s the light. It would look better in bright light. It is getting late.

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MR. WENTWORTH: Dear me, so it is! What time is it? Good gracious! I have an engagement. SILVIA: You can‘t stay for a little dinner, Mr. Wentworth? MR. WENTWORTH: I’m afraid I can’t, Silvia. It’s been a great pleasure to meet you both, I assure you. SILVIA: Oh, that’s all right. JOE: Here’s your coat, Mr. Wentworth.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

MR. WENTWORTH: Thank you. Thank you for the delicious tea, Silvia. If I weren’t leaving town so soon... Good night. SILVIA: Good night. The stairs are rather dark... (He goes out.) JOE: I can hardly believe it.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A JOE: Upsetting? It’s heartbreaking! S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P SILVIA: Some day, Joe... O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S JOE: Some day—yes. S I I D TH PERM REPRO SILVIA: Yes, I know, Joe. It’s upsetting...

CURTAIN

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1

Read this line from the play. MR. WENTWORTH: Delightful! How I love the atmosphere of work in a studio! I used to paint a bit myself, you know. If a direction was added about how Mr. Wentworth sounded, which of these would best fit? A (with concern) B (with anger) C (with amusement)

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

D (with excitement)

2

What is the setting of the play? A The Louvre

B An art studio

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B D An art school A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P CO why GisIVJoe EN Fmost likely K ISplay, AY. not in a rush to get At the beginning Bof the O W T O Y O N N E A L IS AMPWentworth’s ready for Mr. D IN ON arrival? THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R C A museum

3

A He is nervous about people seeing his work.

B He does not like meeting new people. C He wants to finish his latest painting. D He expects to argue with Mr. Wentworth.

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4

Read this line from the play. JOE: Copy the old masters? I should say not. I’m not out to be a camera. It’s all I can do to work out my own ideas. Why does Joe say that he is “not out to be a camera”? A To remind Mr. Wentworth that he is not a photographer B To explain that he paints using his own style C To show that he dislikes technology D To suggest that his work is not very good

5

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

How would the passage most likely be different if it were written as a story instead of a play? A There would be less dialogue.

B The setting would be different.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B D The characters would talk more. A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P F CO andGIMr. IS Silvia VENWentworth K of How are the reactions O WAY. to Joe’s new T O Y O B N N E A L S AMP painting different? D IN ON I THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R C There would be more characters.

6

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 Pinocchio  Adapted from The Adventures of Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi TIME: In the evening SETTING: A bedroom [PINOCCHIO is lying in bed. He has the covers pulled up to his chin. The FAIRY enters the room carrying a small container of medicine.]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

FAIRY (handing a container of medicine to Pinocchio): Drink this, and in a few days you’ll be up and well. (Pinocchio looks at the glass and pulls a face.)

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A FAIRY: It is bitter, but it is good for you. S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O PINOCCHIO: If it is bitter, IISdon’t IVit.EN F Y WAY. K C want G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S FAIRY: Drink it! S I I D TH PERM REPRO

PINOCCHIO (whining): Is it sweet or bitter?

PINOCCHIO: I don’t like anything bitter. FAIRY: Drink it and I’ll give you a lump of sugar to take the bitter taste from your mouth. PINOCCHIO: Where’s the sugar? FAIRY (taking a lump of sugar from a bowl): Here it is. PINOCCHIO: I want the sugar first, and then I’ll drink the bitter water. FAIRY: Do you promise?

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PINOCCHIO: Yes. (The Fairy gives Pinocchio the sugar. Pinocchio eats it and grins.) PINOCCHIO: If only sugar were medicine! I should take it every day. FAIRY: Now keep your promise and drink these few drops of water. They’ll be good for you. (Pinocchio takes the glass in both hands and sticks his nose into it. He lifts it to his mouth and sticks his nose into it again.)

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

PINOCCHIO: It is too bitter, much too bitter! I can’t drink it. FAIRY: How do you know, when you haven’t even tasted it? PINOCCHIO: I can imagine it. I smell it. I want another lump of sugar, and then I’ll drink it.

TE (The Fairy hands Pinocchio the glass and another lump of sugar.) E MAS

R.

ACKLIN L B A PINOCCHIO: I can’t drink it like that. S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P FAIRY: Why? O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B AN INmy MPLE that N IS Npillow A D O I S E PINOCCHIO: Because feather on feet bothers me. S C S S U I I D TH O R P PERM RE (The Fairy takes away the pillow.) PINOCCHIO: It’s no use. I can’t drink it even now. FAIRY: What’s the matter now? PINOCCHIO: I don’t like the way that door looks. It’s half open. (The Fairy closes the door.)

PINOCCHIO: I won’t drink it. I won’t drink this awful water. I won’t. I won’t! No, no, no, no! FAIRY: My boy, you’ll be sorry.

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PINOCCHIO: I don’t care. FAIRY: You are very sick. PINOCCHIO: I don’t care. FAIRY: In a few hours the fever will take you far away to another world. PINOCCHIO: I don’t care. FAIRY: Aren’t you afraid?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

(Pinocchio pauses for a few seconds.)

PINOCCHIO: Not a bit. I’d rather have a fever than drink that awful medicine.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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7

Why are words in the first paragraph in capital letters? A To indicate the names of characters B To indicate important details C To indicate words that are to be spoken D To indicate how the words should be said

8

The way Pinocchio keeps repeating “I don’t care” suggests that he— A is tricking the fairy and is not really ill

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B is worried that he will begin to feel sicker

C has made up his mind not to take the medicine D wants the fairy to do more kind things for him

9

What is the most likely reason Pinocchio “pauses for a few seconds” at TER. the end of the play? E MAS A B C D

ACKLIN L B A He is drinking water. S NOT OK TO BE I T I . He is feeling angry. GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C He is not listening. G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S He is thinking. S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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10 What is the main purpose of the first paragraph at the start in square brackets? A To explain who the main characters are B To show when the events occurred C To give details about the setting D To describe where the events take place

11 Which word best describes the fairy?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A Childish B Mean C Patient D Stern

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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 The Crow and the Fox  Adapted from an Aesop’s Fable PLACE: A forest TIME: Late afternoon AT RISE: A crow sits in a tree. A fox runs toward the tree and stops at the base of it. The crow looks down at the fox. He looks a little scared.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

FOX (with excitement): Have you heard the wonderful news? CROW (calmly): What news?

FOX: Your family and mine and all other animals have agreed to forget TER.on. Snow A their differences. We are going to live in peace and friendship from M E KLIN Just think of it! A BLAC

S NOT OK TO BE I T I . HTEDnothing. IS BOstares up at (CROW looks down at FOX, but Gsays HFOX I T R Y R P O COplayfulGgrin CROW with a friendly IVENonF hisYface.) K ISbut O WAY. T O O B N N E A L S N AMP ON I Ito ED IDo S C S U I D M THIS S cannot FOX: I simply wait embrace you! come down, dear friend, O P ER REPR and let us celebrate the joyful event.

CROW: How grand! I certainly am delighted at the news. (CROW stretches and seems to be looking at something in the distance.) FOX (anxiously): What is it you see? CROW: Why, it looks to me like a couple of dogs coming this way. They must have heard the good news and… (FOX looks into the distance. He appears scared.)

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CROW: What are you worried about? According to you, all animals are now friends. The dogs are friends of yours now! They’ll no longer hurt you. (There is silence for a few moments.) CROW: Well, what are you afraid of? FOX: Um... well... you see... CROW: Well what?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

FOX: Um... the dogs might not have heard the news. Besides, I have a very important errand that I had almost forgotten about. (FOX runs off in the opposite direction that CROW said the dogs were coming from.) CROW: An enemy that tries to trick you is easily tricked.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

(CROW tucks his head in his feathers and goes to sleep.)

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12 Why does the first paragraph begin with the phrase “AT RISE”? A To indicate that the paragraph tells what is happening at the start of the scene B To show that the events of the passage take place in the morning C To inform the audience members that they should stand up D To indicate that the lines of the play will be sung

13 Read this line from the play.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

FOX (anxiously): What is it you see?

The word “anxiously” shows that Fox is— A concerned B surprised C angry

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . ED HIS BO Read this line from the play.PYRIGHT T R O IS CO IVEN F Y WAY. K G O T O O B FOX: Um... IS N IN AN MPLEwell...SSyou N see... A D O I S E C S U I I H ERM likely Rstammer? WhyTdoes Fox P most EPROD D confused

14

A He wants to stop Crow from flying away. B He does not understand what is happening. C He does not know how to explain why he is running away. D He realizes that Crow knows that he is lying.

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15 Read this line from the play. (CROW tucks his head in his feathers and goes to sleep.) Which word best describes the mood of this line? A Hopeless B Peaceful C Lonely D Joyful

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

16 Which line spoken best shows the main theme of the play? A “Have you heard the wonderful news?”

B “We are going to live in peace and friendship from now on.” C “According to you, all animals are now friends.”

D “An enemy that tries to trick you is easily tricked.”

17

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A E O BFox? S NOTnot believe I How does the playwright show that Crow does T T K I O . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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 A Chat between Poets  Adapted from The Genius by Horace Holley Characters THE BOY THE MAN [The front porch of a small farmhouse in New England. Stone flags lead to the road. The yard is a careless, comfortable lawn with two or three old maples. It is autumn.]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

[A BOY of sixteen or so, carrying a paper parcel, walks to the porch. As he stands there a MAN comes out of the house. The man is in his early forties. He stoops a little, but not from weakness. His expression is one of deep calm.]

STER. A M E LINa walk, THE MAN: I wonder if you have seen my dog? I was going ACKfor L B A but Rex seems to have grown tired of waiting. S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O F ShallY.I go look? THE BOY: Your dog? No, sir, seen IVENhim. K IS IChaven’t G O T O Y WA O B N N E A L S I P N I M N comeUCback. SA never mind. ED Rex and I understand each SIOHe’ll THE MAN: D THISNo, O R ERMIS P P E me. other. He has his little moods,Rlike THE BOY: If you were going for a walk—? THE MAN: It doesn’t matter at all. I can go any time. You don’t live in this country? THE BOY: No, sir. I live in New York. I wish I did. It’s beautiful here. THE MAN: You may have come a long road this morning, let’s sit down. THE BOY (sitting down): Thank you. I’m not interrupting anything?

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THE MAN: Bless your heart! No indeed. What is there to interrupt? All we have is life, and this is part of it. THE BOY: I came to see you because I read your poems. THE MAN: You liked them? THE BOY: It was more than that. How can a fellow like the ocean, or a snow storm? THE MAN: Is that what you thought they were like?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

THE BOY: They were wonderful! They seemed to pick up mountains and cities and toss them all about like toys. They made me feel that what I was looking for was able to conquer what I didn’t like... I said to myself I don’t care if he does laugh at me, I’ll go and ask him where all that power is! And so I came... THE MAN (pointing): There’s Rex now—over across the road. He’s wondering STER. A M E LINjealous. Dogs who you are. He sees we are friends, and he’s pretendingLAto CKbe B A are funny, aren’t they? But you were speaking Iabout O BEYou must S NOT myOpoems. T T K I . be about the same age I was whenRIIbegan GHTED writing—when HIS BO I wanted above T Y R P O O and Iwhen IS Cthat, anything to write a book a Abook VEN F such Y. seemed the most Klike G O W T O Y O B N N E A L IN the Atlantic. impossible thing N IS tryingCto SAMPI could do. ED swim SIOLike

THIS

IS PERM

U EPROD R THE BOY: It seemed impossible? I should think it would be the most natural thing in the world, for you—like eating dinner.

THE MAN: That’s the wonderful thing—not the book, but that I should have come to write it! THE BOY: But who else could write it? THE MAN: Here’s Rex! Rex, meet my good friend. I know you will like him. Rex always cares for the people I do, don’t you, Rex? THE MAN: Look, the sun has gone round the corner of the house. Is that lunch you have in the parcel?

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THE BOY: Yes. THE MAN: Would you like to make it a picnic? I’ll get something from the house, and then we can walk to the woods. THE BOY: I’d love to! THE MAN: All right, I’ll be ready in no time. Come, Rex!

END

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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18 The man mentions swimming the Atlantic to give an example of— A something he has written poems about B something that seems impossible C something he has achieved D something he dreams of doing one day

19 Read this line from the play. THE BOY: It seemed impossible? I should think it would be the most natural thing in the world, for you—like eating dinner.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

How would the boy most likely sound when saying this line? A Joyful

B Surprised C Calm

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . TED the boy S BO to the man? GHway HIspeaks I What can the reader tell from the T R Y R P O IS CO IVEN F Y WAY. K G O T O O B A He does not N IN AN MPLEunderstand N IShim. A D O I S E S C S S U I I D THadmires Phim. B He ERM REPRO D Uninterested

20

C He has known him a long time. D He is jealous of him.

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21 Which words spoken by the man best show that he is friendly? A “He has his little moods, like me.” B “You may have come a long road this morning, let’s sit down.” C “All we have is life, and this is part of it.” D “Look, the sun has gone round the corner of the house.”

22 Read this line from the play. THE BOY (sitting down): Thank you. I’m not interrupting anything?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

What is the purpose of the words in parenthesis? A They tell the actor what words to say.

B They tell the actor how to say the words. C They tell the actor about an action.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

D They tell the actor how the boy feels.

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 The Golden Fish  Adapted from a Russian folk tale TIME: Long, long ago SETTING: A small island. A small old cottage stands in the middle of the island. Near the door of the cottage sits a broken washtub. The sea surrounds the island.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 Scene 1

AT RISE: YURI is standing at the edge of the island trying to catch fish in a net. NATASHA is sitting in a rocking chair inside the cottage knitting. She can be seen through the window. YURI (To himself): All day I have fished, yet I have not caught one A thing STER. M E LINtime pulls in my net. What am I going to do? (Casts the net again and ACKthis L B A E and up a beautiful golden fish with sparkling eyes) Finally! for O Bme S NOTDinner I T T K I O . O ED my Natasha. THIS B RIGHT

COPY GIVEN FOR S I K AY. O W T O Y O B N N E GOLDEN FISH: M Please, old man. I’m much too small to make a proper A L P IN N IS A D O I S E S C S S U I I TH you andPyour dinner for ERM wife. RThrow EPRODme back into the sea, and I will give

you whatever you ask for.

YURI (Looking surprised): In all my years as a fisherman, I have never seen a talking fish. (Carefully removing the fish from the net) You are rather small for a meal. I will toss you back into the sea. GOLDEN FISH: Oh, thank you, kind man! Remember, whatever you ask for, you shall receive. (The GOLDEN FISH disappears.) YURI (Turning toward the cottage and shouting): Natasha! Natasha! NATASHA (Opening the door of the cottage): What is it, Yuri?

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YURI: You will never believe what just happened. (Pauses to catch his breath) I caught a golden fish that could talk and promised to give me whatever I wanted if I tossed him back into the sea. NATASHA: We have no food and you threw back the only fish you caught? You could have at least asked for a loaf of bread so we wouldn’t starve tonight. (Walks into the cottage and slams the door) YURI (Walking back toward the sea): She’s right. I guess it wouldn’t hurt to ask the fish for some bread. After all, he was supposed to be my dinner and my stomach is roaring. (Stands at the edge of the sea) Golden Fish! Golden Fish, can you hear me?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

GOLDEN FISH: Yes, kind man, have you thought of something you desire? YURI: You see, my wife is very angry that I let you go because we have no food in our house and need some dinner. If we could just have a few loaves of bread— ER.

MAST E N I L GOLDEN FISH (Interrupting): Say no more! When youAreturn BLACK to your T O O BE S Ndinner.O(Disappears) I T cottage, you will find a bounty of bread for your T K I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P IS CO (Returns YURI: Thank you, Golden Y. finds a basket full IVtoENtheF cottage K Fish! G O WAand T O Y O B N N E A L S I at what P of bread on theSAsteps) IONlook ED IINhave brought you! (Holds the S C S U IS M ENatasha, I H D M T O basket by the window) P RI have gotten REPR us some food for dinner. Come join me outside for a picnic. NATASHA (Stepping outside): At least we won’t go hungry tonight. (Stage goes dark.)

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Scene 2 AT RISE: A new day begins. NATASHA is trying to wash clothes in the broken washtub and is not having much luck. YURI sits on the steps of the cottage repairing a net. NATASHA (Throwing the clothes aside and kicking the washtub): Yuri, we need a new washtub! YURI: Maybe I can repair it.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

NATASHA: No, Yuri. I want a new one. Go back to the sea and ask the Golden Fish for a new one. YURI (Hanging his head): Yes, dear. (YURI walks to the edge of the sea.) Golden Fish! Golden Fish, can you hear me? GOLDEN FISH: Yes, kind man, have you thought of something else STER. A M you need? E IN

A CK L L B A T O BE YURI (Mumbling): Well, uh, you see, um— IT IS NO T K O . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P CO man. GOLDEN FISH: Don’t worry, anything you want EN F IVRemember, K IS kind AY. G O W T O Y O B N N E A L shall be yours.AMP D IN ON IS THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R washtub because ours is broken. YURI: My wife really needs a new

GOLDEN FISH: This is not a problem. Go back to your cottage and you will find a new washtub. YURI: Oh, thank you, Golden Fish. You are too kind! (YURI returns to the cottage and finds a brand new washtub by the door.) Natasha! NATASHA (Poking her head out the window): What is it, Yuri? YURI (Proudly pointing at the new washtub): A new washtub, just as you requested.

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NATASHA (Angrily): I would think that you might have thought to ask for a new cottage, too. Ours is practically falling down. Go back at once and tell the Golden Fish that we need a new cottage. (NATASHA slams the window shut. YURI returns to the edge of the sea, ashamed to call upon the GOLDEN FISH again so soon.) YURI: Golden Fish, I’m sorry to bother you again, but if you can hear me, my wife has another request. GOLDEN FISH: Anything you want is yours, kind man.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

YURI: Well in that case, my wife would like to have a new cottage. GOLDEN FISH: Done. (Behind YURI, a new stone cottage rises in place of the old one.) YURI: Thank you, Golden Fish. (YURI turns and stares in awe at the new stone . cottage.) That should please Natasha. ASTER

LINE M K C A L (Stage goes dark.) OT A B TO BE N S I T BOOK TED. I S H I G H I T R COPY GIVEN FOR S I K Scene 3 ANY WAY. O T O O B N E L S IN MP NI HIS SA PERMISSIO EPRODUCED T AT RISE: NATASHA stands R on the steps of the new cottage looking unhappy. YURI stands before her.

NATASHA (To YURI): I want to be a rich and powerful ruler with servants and a carriage to drive around in. YURI: But Natasha, I’ve already asked the Golden Fish for so much. NATASHA: He said you could have anything you asked for. YURI (ASIDE): To think of all that he has given us. Yet still it is not enough. NATASHA: Ask him to make me a rich and powerful ruler. (YURI nods, turns, and walks to the edge of the sea.)

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YURI (Sadly): Golden Fish, if you can hear me, I have another request. GOLDEN FISH: Yes, kind man, what can I do for you today? YURI: Please turn my wife into a rich and powerful ruler with a palace, servants, and a carriage to drive. GOLDEN FISH: Very well. (Behind YURI, a large palace replaces the stone cottage. A carriage and servants also appear.) YURI: Thank you, Golden Fish. I am happy with everything that you have given to Natasha and me.

E L P SAM ATION C U Scene 4 D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

GOLDEN FISH: You are welcome, kind man.

AT RISE: NATASHA stands on the steps of the new palace looking TER. MAS NE head. unhappy. She wears beautiful robes and a jeweled crown Con KLIher

A BLA BE T O N K TObehind the NATASHA (Yelling): Yuri! Yuri, come here! (YURI Ofrom . IT IS appears D O E B T S H I H YRIG andNlooks palace. He still wears his dirty old OR Ttired.) OPclothes F C S E I V AY. GI OK W T O Y O B N N E A L AMP YURI: Yes, INatasha? D IN ON IS TH S S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R NATASHA: I have decided that I do not want to be just the rich and powerful ruler of this island. (YURI closes his eyes and shakes his head.) I want to be Queen of the Sea and rule over all of the fish.

YURI: Yes, Natasha. (Walks to the edge of the sea) Golden Fish, if you can hear me, I have one final request. GOLDEN FISH: What is it that you desire? YURI: I want you to make my wife the Queen of the Sea, and the ruler of all the fish.

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GOLDEN FISH (Exclaiming in disbelief): Queen of the Sea! (Shakes his head) That is not something that I would ever do. Your wife does not know how to control herself, let alone how to control the entire sea. No, I will not make her Queen of the Sea. Instead, I will once again make her a poor, old woman who lives in an old cottage and washes clothes in a broken washtub. (Behind YURI, everything returns to its original state.) Now I will go and you will never see me again. (The GOLDEN FISH disappears. YURI returns to the cottage and wraps his arms around NATASHA.) NATASHA: I’m so sorry, Yuri. You gave me everything I asked for, and I kept asking for more.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L Y L L RAL 9CURTAIN A R . 9 . 888

YURI: It’s okay, Natasha. We lived happily on this island for many years without the Golden Fish to grant our wishes. We can live happily for many more years to come.

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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23 Read this line from the play. YURI (ASIDE): To think of all that he has given us. Yet still it is not enough. The term “ASIDE” indicates that Yuri— A sounds like he is angry B is speaking only to the audience C wishes that Natasha would stop asking for things D is only thinking these words

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

24 Read this line from the play.

NATASHA: We have no food and you threw back the only fish you caught? You could have at least asked for a loaf of bread so we wouldn’t starve tonight. (Walks into the cottage and slams the door) TER.

E MAS N I L K C Why does the playwright most likely describe how slams LA A BNatasha T E O B N the door? . IT IS IS BOOK TO D E T H RIG seem Fexciting OR TH . A To make the events Iof the OPYplay C N S E V AY GI OK W T O Y O B N N E A L B To show that P the cottageISis sturdy IN IS SAM ERMISSION RODUCED H T P NatashaRisEPlucky to have a home C To suggest that D To emphasize that Natasha is angry

25 In Scene 4, Yuri is still wearing his dirty old clothes. What does this suggest about him? A He dislikes the new wash tub. B He does not care about possessions. C He wants his old cottage back. D He is getting annoyed by Natasha.

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26 Which information in parenthesis and italics describes how a person speaks? A (Looking surprised) B (Opening the door of the cottage) C (Stepping outside) D (Angrily)

27 The main theme of the play is about being— A rich B hungry C greedy D kind

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

ER.

28 The play is divided into four scenes. Compare and contrast Ewhat MAST N I L K Natasha asks for in each scene. A BLAC

S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO


Understanding Drama: Reading to Analyze and Interpret teaches students how to understand and analyze dramatic literature. Students will learn to draw conclusions and make inferences about the structure and elements of drama, and use evidence from the text to support their understanding. Understanding Drama focuses on how playwrights create meaning and the techniques they use. Students will understand how dialogue and interactions between characters are used to create meaning. Students will also understand the purpose of stage directions and how the stage directions affect the reader and audience. Part A: Glossary The glossary gives definitions of the terms that students will need to understand to analyze and interpret dramatic literature.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Part B: Instruction This section contains several dramatic pieces. Each dramatic piece is introduced with key background information that will help students understand the work. The background information will help students identify and understand the major structural elements and techniques that the playwright has used to create meaning. The student then answers questions about each dramatic piece. This section of the book contains multiple-choice and open-ended questions. R.

MASTE E N I L BLACK E A T O T IS N BOOK TO B I . D Part C: Independent Practice E HT THIS YRIGEach R P O O F C This section contains several dramatic pieces. dramatic piece isAYfollowed by several . IVEN K IS G O W T O Y O B ANanswer on their own. LE multiple-choice and questions IN will MPopen-ended N IS N thatUstudents A D O I S E S C S S I I D TH PERM REPRO

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Understanding Drama (Grade 5 Sample)