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Applying the TEKS for the STAAR

UNDERSTANDING COMPLEX E READING Literature & Informational Text by Theme LE

P M A S N O I T A C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A R . 9 9 . 888

TER. S A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO


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Focus on Specific STAAR Skills

S TA A R

NEW!

Specific Focus on Reading & Writing D

Understanding Complex Reading

Understanding Persuasive Text

Understanding Poetry

Understanding Drama

Literature & Informational Text by Theme

Reading & Argumentative Writing

Reading to Analyze and Interpret

Reading to Analyze and Interpret

ALIGNED TO THE READINESS & SUPPORTING TEKS GRADES 3-8

ALIGNED TO THE READINESS & SUPPORTING TEKS GRADES 3-8

ALIGNED TO THE READINESS & SUPPORTING TEKS GRADES 3-8

ALIGNED TO THE READINESS & SUPPORTING TEKS GRADES 3-8

Five Parts for Focused Instruction Part A: Understanding How to Read Complex Passages with rigorous passages and questions

Teaches students how to understand and analyze persuasive texts and how to write persuasive essays. Students will analyze a range of persuasive texts including editorials, letters, speeches, historical texts, and responses to literature. Students learn about the purpose and structure of persuasive texts, and then practice the techniques used to persuade readers.

Teaches students how to understand and analyze different types of poetry, such as lyrical, free verse, limerick, and more. Students will learn the structural elements of poetry such as rhyme, meter, and stanzas.

Teaches students how to understanding and analyze dramatic literature. Students will learn to draw conclusions and make inferences about the structure and elements of drama. The book also teaches how to interpret interactions between characters, dialogue, and stage directions.

Part B: How to identify a theme Part C: Glossary of Complex Reading Terms Part D: Instruction with complex texts Part E: Independent Practice: Complex Reading Passages of multiple themes with multiplechoice and open-ended questions

Special Features: • Glossary of important terms • Independent practice with five persuasive texts followed by questions

Special Features: • Glossary of poetic terms • Instruction with individual as well as paired poems, followed by questions • Each poem includes key background information to help students understand the text • Independent practice with multiplechoice and open-ended questions

• Independent practice with four writing prompts

Special Features: • Glossary of terms needed to understand dramatic literature • Each dramatic piece is introduced with background information to help students understand the work. • Independent practice with multiple-choice and open-ended questions

. All 4 Books Available in 1 Package! Understanding Complex Reading, Understanding Persuasive Text, Understanding Poetry, Understanding Drama

Class Set includes 15 of each title (total 60 books)

Level C Level D Level E Level F Level G Level H

Reading Level

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Understanding Complex Reading

Understanding the Common Core Standards Class Set Level

RALLY! EDUCATION

Level Level C Level D Level E Level F Level G Level H

Grade 3 4 5 6 7 8

Understanding Persuasive Text

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RALLY! Education 22 Railroad Ave. Glen Head, NY 11545 Website: www.RALLYEDUCATION.com

Understanding Poetry

Understanding Drama

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6351-4 6354-5 6357-6 6360-6 6363-7 6366-8

6375-0 6378-1 6381-1 6384-2 6387-3 6390-3


UNDERSTANDING COMPLEX E READING E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 8 8 8 Literature & Informational Text

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

by Theme


E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

Copyright ©2013 RALLY! EDUCATION. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright may be reproduced in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner. Printed in the U.S.A. 1012.MAQ RALLY! EDUCATION • 22 Railroad Avenue, Glen Head, NY 11545 • (888) 99-RALLY

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Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Understanding How to Read Complex Passages . . . . . . . . . . .6 Information and Guidance on Understanding, Analyzing, and Comparing Complex Passages How to Identify a Theme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Information and Guidance on Understanding and Identifying Themes in Complex Passages

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Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Definitions of the Key Terms Needed to Analyze Complex Passages by Theme Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 One Single Passage and Two Sets of Passages Connected by E KLIN C A a Theme with Background Information and Instruction L B A

NOT

R. MASTE

BE

The Leaping Contest D . .. .IT. .I.S. . . . . . . .O.O. K . . T. O . . . . . . . .18 E B T S H I G H I Map It Out Y. .R. . . . . . . N. . F. O. .R. .T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 COPCartographer S I Classroom K GIVE . . . . N. .Y. .W. A. Y. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 O T O O B N E L 2: TheIStory Passage N ISof Ali . U. .C.E.D. .IN. . A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 AMPSet O S S S S I I H T PRODOut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 PERM The Truth Comes Passage 1: Passage Set 1:

RE

Independent Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Two Single Passages and Three Sets of Passages Connected by a Theme for Students to Complete on Their Own Passage 1: Passage 2: Passage Set 1: Passage Set 2: Passage Set 3:

The Goblin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Nature’s Rare and Stunning Decorations . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Making Glorious Rain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 from Rain in Summer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Boston Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Cape Cod Canal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 The Music from the Little Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 Being Neighborly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93

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Introduction Understanding Complex Reading: Literature & Informational Text by Theme teaches students how to understand, analyze, and evaluate complex passages while focusing on theme. Students will read a range of passages with complex and sophisticated themes, including sets of passages connected by a theme. Students will learn how to use close reading to interpret passages and will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to answer rigorous questions about the passages.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A How to Identify a Theme 9.R 9 . 8 8 8 Understanding How to Read Complex Passages

This section of the book describes the main features of complex passages and gives guidance on how to understand, analyze, and compare complex passages.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B T A teaches This section of the book explains what a theme is E NOand O Bstudents S I T T K I O . D O how to identify themes. It describes aHprocess use B identifying and HISfor IG TE FOto T R Y R P O analyzing themes in passages, IVEN how Yclose K IS Cand OitTshows AY.reading based on a G O W O B N N E passage’s themes A analyze complex passages. L be used NtoISunderstand AMPcan D INand O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

Glossary

The glossary gives definitions of the terms that students will need to understand to analyze complex passages by theme. Students can refer to the glossary as they learn to analyze complex passages.

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Instruction This section contains one single passage and two sets of passages connected by a theme. Each passage or set of passages is introduced with key background information that will help students analyze and evaluate the passage, understand the theme, and make connections between passages. This section of the book contains both literature and informational passages, and the passages and question sets increase in complexity and rigor. Each question set includes multiple-choice, short-response, and extended-response questions.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Independent Practice

This section contains two single passages and three sets of passages connected by a theme for students to complete on their own. This section of the book contains both literature and informational passages, and the passages and question sets increase in complexity and rigor. Each question set includes multiple-choice, short-response, and extended-response questions.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Understanding How to Read Complex Passages Understanding Complex Passages Complex passages often have longer sentences and challenging vocabulary. The first key to understanding complex passages is to understand the language. If a sentence has difficult words, reread the sentence. The meaning of words can often be worked out just by reading the sentence again and thinking about what meaning of the word makes sense. In other cases, the meanings of difficult words may need to be looked up. If the meaning of a sentence or paragraph is unclear, read it again more carefully. Difficult sentences can be broken down into their different ideas. Paragraphs can also be read sentence by sentence. This means making sure that each sentence is fully understood before moving on to the next one. You could also break a R. paragraph down by taking notes and listing its main ideas. MASTE

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

KLINE C A L B BE of NOT Acan be Complex passages are usually longer passages. There S I TaO lot T K I O . D O B The central idea information, but it is all linked together IGHTEby aFOcentral THIS idea. R Y R P O that holds a passage together Y. understand complex K IS Cis theOtheme. GIVENOneNway O WAto T O Y B N E A L S I P IN passages is toSfocus understanding The next section of this CEDtheme. SSION RODUthe IS AM on I H M T R E book explains howPto identifyRthemes and how to analyze a passage based EP on its themes.

Analyzing Complex Passages Complex passages usually require readers to find meaning. Ideas are often not stated directly. Instead, readers draw conclusions and make inferences based on details from the passage. This requires reading the passage closely and making decisions based on what is read. Details from the passage are used to draw conclusions and to make inferences. The key to analyzing complex passages is to look closely at the passage and to always base understanding on information and details from the passage.

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Comparing Complex Passages Complex passages can be connected by a common theme. Questions about passages connected by a theme require using information from both passages. To answer these questions, each passage should first be understood on its own. With a good understanding of each passage, connections can then be made between them. While connected passages are similar in some ways, they are different in other ways. Answering questions about connected passages involves thinking about how they are the same and how they are different.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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How to Identify a Theme Understanding Themes A theme is the central idea of a passage or the lesson or message that the author wants to convey. A theme is different from the subject or the topic of a passage. For example, a story might describe how a player acts badly after losing a tennis match. The subject of the story is the tennis match, but the theme is about being a good sport. An article might describe how Thomas Edison invented the light bulb after trying many times. The topic of the article is Thomas Edison, but the theme is about never giving up. When identifying themes, be exact rather than vague. For example, it is better to identify that the theme of a poem is how friendships require trust than simply identifying that the theme is friendship.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Most passages do not state the theme directly. Instead, passages need to be analyzed to work out what the themes are. Many passages also have moreR. E STcentral A M than one theme. When analyzing a passage, there may be twoLor more E N I LACKimportant. B ideas or messages. In some cases, the themes may be equally In A T BE NO O S I T T K I other cases, there may be one major theme OO minor themes. ED.and one or Bmore

IGHT FOR THIS R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E Identifying MPL Analyzing N IS Themes Aand D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T O RM the story, PEhold In literature, themes or play together. As you read a REPRpoem,

passage, think about what the central ideas are. Themes can be communicated in different ways. In some passages, the theme will be a lesson a character learns or a lesson the reader learns from the events. In some passages, a character’s main problem could reveal the theme. In other passages, the events that take place could reveal the theme. In informational texts, the theme can be the central topic of the text. For example, an article about how to recycle paper could have the main theme of recycling. It could also have themes based on opinions given in the text or messages suggested by the text. For example, it could have themes about creating too much waste or about taking care of the environment.

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To identify and analyze themes, follow the three steps below.

Part 1: Overview Before looking at a passage closely, look at the passage overall. Here are some questions that can help guide you. • What is the title? Does the title suggest a main idea or theme? • Is there a subtitle? If so, what does the subtitle suggest? • What genre is the passage? Does this give any clues about what the theme might be or how to identify the theme?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L Part 2: Reading R the A Passage L A R . 9 9 888.

• Is there any art? Does the art give any clues about the theme?

Once you have looked at the passage overall, you will probably have some clues about the theme. You will also have some ideas about what to look for to identify the theme.

TER. S A M E KLINabout C Now you can read the passage. As you read the passage,BLthink what A A T E O B you are reading. Think about the events that IS Noccurring TO what the K and IT are O . D O E B T S characters are saying and doing. Think what is given and YRIGH about R THIinformation P O O F C N S E I . to take notes as V be a good what the author wantsOyou WAYidea Y OTItGIcan B OK to know. N N E A L S I P N think about as you read. you read the passage. Here are AM D Ito ON some things THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R • What is the passage mainly about? What is happening in the passage? • What are the main events? Do these events reveal a theme? • Who is the main character? What is the main character like? • Is there a main problem or conflict? How is it solved? • Is there a turning point? Does something or someone change in some way? • Does the passage have a main lesson or an important message about life?

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• What important ideas are in the passage? What does the author most want readers to know? • What is the overall purpose of the passage? • How does the author feel about the topic? How does the author make you feel about the topic? • What does the author seem to believe? By considering these questions, you should have identified one or more themes.

Part 3: Close and Careful Reading

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Now that you have identified some themes, you should read the passage closely. This time, focus on the themes you have identified. Read the passage and take notes on each theme. Identify details from the passage that relate to the theme. Focus on what the passage says about the theme and how the passage gives information on the theme. You might record key events, important details, or key sentences from the passage. By close . ER STand A M reading, you will analyze the passage to identify what the themes are E N ACKLI how they are communicated. T A BL E

IS NO OOK TO B T I . D IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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Glossary Author’s Purpose The author’s purpose is why the author wrote the passage. Authors write passages to entertain, to inform, to instruct, to explain, and to persuade.

Character A character is a person in a story, poem, or play.

Characterization

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Characterization refers to how an author tells the reader about a character. It can be by describing a character. It can also be by describing what a character looks like, how a character feels, or what a character does.

Close Reading

Close reading refers to reading a passage carefully and paying attention to the details of the passage. Close reading involves looking closely at what TER. S A M the passage says, thinking about the details of the passage, and KLINEanalyzing C A L B the passage based on the details. Close reading is used BE details to NOT A to Kidentify O S I T T I support conclusions, inferences, and predictions, OOidentify what the HTED. R Tand IS Bto G H I R Y themes are and how they are Ccommunicated. OP N FO

K IS GIVE O WAY. T O Y O B N N E A L S I P IN Conflict THIS SAM RMISSION UCED D O R E REPor struggle that takes place in a passage. The conflict is the Pmain problem The conflict can reveal the theme of the passage.

Details Details are facts or pieces of information given. Two or more details can be used to draw conclusions or to make inferences. The details in a passage are the evidence used to support conclusions, inferences, predictions, and decisions made about the main ideas and themes.

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Draw Conclusions Drawing conclusions refers to making decisions based on facts and details in a passage. For example, a text might describe how it is late at night and how a character is yawning. These details could be used to conclude that the character is tired.

Fact A fact is a piece of information that can be proven to be true.

Genre Genre refers to the form of a passage. There are many genres, and passages in each genre have common features. Knowing the genre of a passage can help you determine the passage’s purpose. It can also help you analyze the passage’s meaning and identify the passage’s themes.

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Examples:

• Fables have the main purpose of teaching a lesson. The theme of a fable can be determined by focusing on what lesson the fable is meant to teach. TER.

MAS E N I L K • Adventure stories are exciting stories that involve AC sort of BLsome A T E O N a character danger. The theme could be revealed by IShow TO Bovercomes T K I O . D O or avoids danger. IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C a series GIVofENevents. O WAY.meaning is often • Narrative poems describe The T O Y O B N N E A L S I P IN SAMwhy the based SION are Oimportant UCED to the poet or what the poet ISevents D M THIS on R R E P REP wants to express by describing them.

• Odes are poems written to praise something. The theme of an ode is often what is being praised or what makes the object being praised special. • Biographies tell about a person’s life. Biographies may include lessons about life or have themes like making a difference or overcoming challenges.

Lesson In literature, a lesson is a truth about life a character learns or a truth about life a reader learns from the passage.

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Main Idea The main idea of a passage is what the whole passage is about. A passage may include several ideas, but the main idea is the most important idea of the whole passage. A main idea may be stated, or you may have to infer what the main idea is.

Make Inferences Making inferences refers to making a guess about something based on facts and details from a passage. Inferences are made based on the information in a passage, but can also use what you already know. Inferences can be made about how characters feel, why something happens, or what a character learns. Inferences can also be made about what an author thinks, what an author’s purpose is, and what the author’s message is.

Make Predictions

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A prediction is a guess made about what will happen in the future. When making predictions, details from the text should be used to support the prediction.

TER. S A M Mood KLINE C A L B T Areader Ofeel, Mood refers to how a text or part of a text makesNO the S I T BE or the T K I O . D O feelings created in the reader. IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B Narrator N E L IS NA Nperson AMa Pwork D Ithe O I S E S C S S U I The narrator of is the telling story. I H D T PERM REPRO Opinion An opinion is a statement that cannot be proven to be true, or a personal view of something.

Plot The plot is the pattern of events that takes place in a passage.

Point of View Point of view refers to the position of the speaker of a work. The point of view can be first person, second person, third person limited, or third person omniscient.

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Position The author’s position refers to how the author feels about a topic, or the author’s viewpoint. The author’s position or viewpoint can reveal the theme.

Setting The setting of a story, poem, or play refers to where and when the events take place.

Structure The structure of a passage is how the passage, or part of the passage, is organized. Common structures include chronological order or sequence of events, cause and effect, problem and solution, main idea and supporting details, compare and contrast, question and answer, and order of importance.

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Style

The style of passages refers to how authors express themselves, or how authors write.

TER. S A M Subtitle KLINE C A L B A subtitle is a second part of a title. Subtitles give O T A information BE about a N more O S I T T K I passage. They can show the passage’s focus, OO idea, message, HTED. purpose, IS Bmain G H I T R Y R or theme. IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O B IS NO CED IN ANY Examples:AMPLE N O I S S U IS THIS PERMWonderREPROD • Seeds: Nature’s This subtitle suggests that seeds are amazing. • Storms: How to Stay Safe This subtitle shows the main purpose of the article. • The Piano: Practice Makes Perfect This subtitle states the message of the story.

Summarize A summary is a short description of a passage that gives the main points. When summarizing a passage, only the important events, details, and ideas should be included.

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Supporting Detail Supporting details are details included to support a main idea.

Symbolism Symbolism is a literary technique where a word, object, or event is used to stand for something else. For example, white snow might symbolize that something is pure. Symbolism can be used to create meaning and can be used to help communicate a theme.

Theme A theme is the central idea of a passage or the lesson or message that the author wants to convey. In literature, themes hold the story or poem together. In informational texts, the theme can be the central topic of the passage or can be a message, thought, or idea communicated by the passage.

Title

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A title is what a passage is called. Some titles are straightforward and state the topic of the passage or the main idea of the passage. Other titles are less straightforward and need to be analyzed to work out their meaning. Titles TER. S A M can be used as clues to understand passages and their themes. CKLINE

BLA A T O Examples: IS N TO BE T K I O . D O IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y • My First Airplane Flight P O IS C of the IVEN Ktopic Gstory. O WAY. T O This title states the Y O B N N E A L S I P IN IS SAMLiveERWell ISSION PRODUCED M THWell, • Eat P RE This title states the main idea of the article.

• Too Little Too Late This title gives a clue about the theme of the story.

Tone Tone is how the author feels about the subject.

Topic The topic of a passage is what the passage is about or the subject of the passage.

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Instruction Each passage or set of passages is introduced with key background information that will help students analyze and evaluate the passage, understand the theme, and make connections between passages with common themes.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passage 1: Single Passage Introduction: This passage is a fairy tale that will be analyzed on its own. Like most fairy tales, this passage has a moral or a lesson about life to teach readers. The plot of the story is based on a leaping contest held between three animals. The main characters in the story are animals, but they are described as if they have human qualities. The actions of these characters and the final outcome both offer a lesson for readers. As you read the fairy tale, think about how the characters act and how this affects the results of the leaping contest, and see if you can work out what the main message is.

E L P / TheSLeaping \ AM Contest N O I T A C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888. Adapted from a Fairy Tale by Hans Christian Andersen

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A flea, a grasshopper, and a leapfrog once wanted to see who could jump the highest. They invited the whole world and everybody else besides . TERwho S A M chose to come to see the festival. They were three of the world’s KLINE most C A L B famous jumpers, and the event caused excitement E land. NOT Aall across Bthe

K TO IT IS O . D O E B T S THIhighest,” “I will give my daughter to whoever exclaimed the YRIGH jumps Rthe P O O F C N S E I . V Y I K A G thanNtoY W O no greater King. “There could marry my daughter, so NOTprize A LE BObe S I P N I M N A S whoever the highest ISSIO isPworthy DUCEDof being her husband.” THIS jumps O R PERM E R

On the day of the contest, everyone gathered to witness the event. The flea was the first to step forward onto the stage. He had exquisite manners and bowed to the company on all sides. He put on quite a show with his bows. He then explained that he was from a royal family, and so had royal blood. He claimed that he was the most noble and the only one worthy of marrying the King’s daughter. The people watching listened to him, but were mainly amused by him. They were not sure if his claims of royal blood were true. They were keener to see him prove his greatness by jumping than have him continue to go on and on about his own importance.

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The grasshopper stepped onto the stage next. He was considerably larger and heavier than the flea, but he also had very good manners. He wore a green uniform that he was very proud of. He explained to the crowd that it was a great honor to be given a green uniform, and that he had been given it the day he was born. He claimed that he was from a royal family also, but one with a greater history. He said that he belonged to a very ancient Egyptian family. He was loved by all his people and shown great respect. He reminded people that his green uniform was proof of how he was respected. Then he walked around to show the crowd how beautiful and green he was. The fact was, he had just been brought out of the fields and put in a cardboard house. He knew this, but he was sure the people did not know this. He was right in this for the people did not know his history. Many thought his story of his Egyptian family could be true, but none were quite as impressed as he had hoped they would be. As he marched around, the people tired of watching him walk and started to wish that he would just show the crowd his leap.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

R.

STE A The flea and grasshopper had now explained themselves. They had M E N LACKLI to marry a both told how they thought they were magnificent enough B A T NO O BE princess. It was then the leapfrog’s turn T ISenter. D. Ito OOK T IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O N smiled politely SC He entered quietly and fuss. to the crowd, K Iwithout GIVEHe O WAY. T O Y O B N N E A L S I P bowed toSthe and D IN silently took his place ON daughter, UCEand IS AM King ISSIhis H D M T O R R E P and the Rgrasshopper. alongside the flea The people in the crowd EP

thought it a brave thing to do. They decided that only someone sure enough of their own good character would not feel the need to say it. They decided he must be great, but also humble. They decided that the leapfrog must certainly be good enough to marry a princess. 7

It was then time for the trial to take place. The judge explained that the flea, the grasshopper, and the leapfrog would each jump once. The one who jumped the highest would be declared the winner and would marry the princess.

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The flea was asked to go first. He took his place, readied himself, and jumped. He jumped so high that he reached the ceiling, and so fast that nobody saw him get there. The King immediately decided that the flea had cheated, which was not an honorable thing to do, and so could not marry his daughter.

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The grasshopper went next. He stretched and did a grand spin to ready himself. Those watching shook their heads at this unnecessary action. Then he jumped as high as he could. He was so keen to impress the princess that he jumped toward her and landed on the King’s face, who was standing next to her. The King decided that this was a very rude thing to do, and nothing that a princess’s husband would ever do.

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The leapfrog was finally asked to complete his jump. He stood quietly to prepare. As he stood, the people in the crowd began to worry that the leapfrog would not jump at all. They quietly began to wish that everything was all right. Then finally, the leapfrog jumped. He did not make a large jump. In fact, he only jumped a few feet. However, he did land right in the lap of the princess. It was clear that the leapfrogThad ER. S A M not jumped the highest, but this did not matter in theCend. KLINE

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

BLA A T O N explained. ISKing TO BE“Therefore “There is nothing above my daughter,” the T K I O . D O B TE that can IGHjump THISbe R to bound up to her is the highest made. For this, one Y R P O O F C N S E I . V Y I K A O must possess great NY Wis brave, smart, and NOT GThe leapfrog A LE BOunderstanding. S I P N I M N A CED he is not above my daughter. great, IS SmodestERenough ISSIO to Pknow DUthat THyet O R P M E R He is clearly the only one worthy of my daughter.”

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The leapfrog was declared the winner and married the princess.

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“It’s all the same to me,” said the flea. “She can have the old leapfrog, for all I care. I jumped the highest, but in this world merit seldom meets its reward. A fine appearance is what people look for these days.”

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“Yes, a fine appearance is all that people care about,” the grasshopper agreed.

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The flea and the grasshopper left mumbling about how they did not want to marry the princess anyway.

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Which qualities of the flea and the grasshopper cause people to dislike them? A They are impolite. B They are dressed poorly. C They show off too much. D They are dishonest.

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The author most likely included the last sentence of the passage to — A make the reader feel sorry for the flea and the grasshopper

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

B suggest that the leapfrog was the right choice to marry the princess C show that the flea and the grasshopper were treated unfairly D explain why the leapfrog won the jumping contest

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Read this sentence from the passage.

ER.

T They were keener to see him prove his greatness by jumpingNthan MAShave E I L K AC him continue to go on and on about his own importance. T A BL

IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D This sentence best supports the Iidea to be — GHTEthat OitRisTimportant HIS B R Y P O F K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. A patient O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S B humble S U I I H D T PERM EPRO R C intelligent D entertaining

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Read these sentences from the passage. As he stood, the people in the crowd began to worry that the leapfrog would not jump at all. They quietly began to wish that everything was all right. Why are these sentences important to the passage? A They reveal that the leapfrog is the best performer. B They imply that the leapfrog is not good enough to marry a princess. C They show that everyone is on the leapfrog’s side.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

D They suggest that the contest was unfair.

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At the end of the passage, the grasshopper complains that he was judged by his appearance. Explain whether the grasshopper was judged by his appearance or his actions. Use details from the passage to support your answer.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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How does the King’s response to each jump support the idea that his mind was made up before each character jumped? Use at least two details from the passage to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

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Compare how the flea, the grasshopper, and the leapfrog act at the start of the contest and how this influences the events of the passage. Describe the main lesson that readers can learn from the characters in the passage. Use details from the passage to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • compare how the flea, the grasshopper, and the leapfrog act • explain how the way they act influences the events of the passage • describe the main lesson that readers can learn from the characters in the passage • use details from the passage to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passages 2 and 3: Passages Connected by a Theme Introduction: The next two passages are connected by some common ideas. The first passage is called “Map It Out.” The author mainly wrote this passage to teach readers about maps. It includes details about the purpose of maps, the uses of maps, and the features of maps. The second passage is called “Classroom Cartographer” and is also on the topic of maps. It includes some common ideas about maps, as well as some new ideas. Read both passages and try to determine what ideas about maps are present in both passages.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO ©iStockphoto/Doug Cannell

/ Map It Out \ 1

The world is a pretty big place! There is so much to see and do. Not every place you visit is going to be familiar to you, so sometimes you will need help finding your way. Maps are the best tools for helping us go in the right direction.

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2

There are many different types of maps. Some show highways and roads in countries, states, and towns. These maps are important for people who are planning trips by car. Imagine trying to drive from New Jersey to Florida without a map! You could just use the road signs, but a map is a much better tool to use to plan your trip and to make sure that you are going the right way. Maps also help people who are not going very far, but are driving to an area where they have never been before. You might only be going to a nearby town or a different area of your town. But if you have never been there before, a map will make sure you get to where you are going without getting lost.

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Have you ever asked a friend for directions? Sometimes people will describe how to get somewhere. They might say to go down that road, turn left, keep going past a school, turn right, go through a set of lights, and then turn right again. It’s easy to forget these directions or to get confused. It can be much easier if the person draws a map for you. Maps often make things much simpler!

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Maps don’t show just roads and buildings. They can also showASTER. E M will NJersey I L mountains and rivers and lakes. A map of the state of New K C A A BLYork there OTNew N show the Atlantic Ocean along its shoreline. In S I TO BE are the T K I O . D O E show Catskill Mountains. These types IS B to get to some place IGofHTmaps THhow R Y R P O O F C the geography or provide information K ISabout AY.area. When the GIVEN NYofWan O T O O B N E A L S I P famous explorers N Clark Ujourneyed CED IN across America in the early IS SAM ERLewis ISSIOand H D M T O R P to areas that 1800s, they went REP few people had been to. They created over 100 maps while on their journey. These provided everyone that was to journey after them with important information. People were able to use these maps to plan their own routes and make other decisions. There are other maps that provide different kinds of information. You have probably seen weather maps on television. Those maps show the temperatures in different parts of the country. Sometimes they use colors to show temperatures: red means hot, green is cool, and blue is cold. Weather maps can also show where there is rain or snow. Small slanted lines on the map mean it is raining, and white dots mean snow. Just like maps of an area’s geography, they give people important information.

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Have you ever been looking for a certain store at a shopping mall? If you have, you may have looked at a map of the shopping mall. The map probably showed the location of each store, as well as things like food places and restrooms. Many places that people visit have maps. Many amusement parks give visitors a map as soon as they enter. The people who run the amusement parks know that people will want to be able to quickly get to their favorite rides. Museums and art galleries give maps to their visitors as well. A museum map can help you find the dinosaur bones, while an art gallery map can help you find your favorite painting.

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There are also maps that show bus and train routes. You can look at one of these maps to find out which bus or train stops nearest the place you want to go. Then you could switch to a map of the city streets to walk the rest of the way to your destination.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Have you ever visited a large hotel? Maps are used to help people find their room, or to help people find the restaurants and the pool. On the higher levels of the building, there are other maps displayed. These ones serve a more important purpose. They show the locations of fire exits. TER. S A M If there is an emergency, people can glance at the map and KLINEknow C A L B A exactly where to go. IS NOT TO BE

ED. IT THIS BOOK T H G I OR Fdifferent As you can see, maps are used purposes. They COPYRfor Gmany N S E I . V Y I K A O W T O provide important IS NO helpCEpeople PLE B information, N ANYfind their way in many I M N A D O I S S IS DU information easy to understand. THIS situations, different difficult PERM and make REPRO

People who make maps are called cartographers. They have a very important job. A map must be correct. The name of every street must be correct. The map must show where one street ends and the other begins. Drivers need to know how to get from one place to another. People walking around a city need to know how to find certain streets. Can you imagine how confusing things would be if cartographers made mistakes? People would be walking down the wrong street, drivers would be making wrong turns, and delivery people would not be able to deliver pizza. And those are just a few of the problems that one incorrect map could cause. So cartographers are very careful.

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Two important tools on a map are a compass and a legend. A compass shows directions. It shows north, south, east, and west. A legend is a list that tells you what the different map symbols or colors mean. An airplane symbol could show where an airport is, a square with a red cross could stand for a hospital, and a star next to a city’s name could mean that it is the state capital. All of these would be listed on the legend so that anyone using the map would know what they meant. This is another way that maps provide a lot of useful information with just a glance.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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/ Classroom Cartographer \ 1

A cartographer is a person who makes maps. Maps are important tools that people use to find their way in many different situations. The most common maps are of countries, states, and towns. They provide information about geography and show things like rivers, mountains, and valleys. Maps of towns or areas within towns show the locations of roads, railway lines, and buildings. They often mark important buildings like schools, hospitals, and train stations.

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People will rely on these maps to get from place to place, so it is important that the maps are accurate. It takes a professional cartographer to make these kinds of maps. Making maps is a special skill and takes years of training. Cartographers usually have a college degree. They use photographs taken from the air and other data collected to map an area. Cartographers today usually have computer programs to help them make maps, but they may also create their own drawings.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M Making maps is actually an ancient skill. There were mapmakers KLINE in C A L B NOT AMany ancient China, ancient Egypt, and ancient IGreece. O BE were S Tmaps T K I O . D O B Maps were created created as people explored newRareas first IGHTEfor the THIStime. Y R P O O F N an area as a simple way of showing K IS C all people GIVEwhat O WAY.was like. Sailors T O Y O B N N E A L S I P N they traveled to new areas. continuedSAthis by creating maps Ias IS M process ISSION PRODUCED H M T R E P Many sailors created maps R ofE different coastlines as they sailed alongside new lands. Juan de la Cosa was a cartographer who traveled with Christopher Columbus along the coast of America. As America was explored by Europeans for the first time, Juan de la Cosa created a map of the coastline. The map he created gave new information to those sailing in the same area after that. Back then, it took as much skill as it does today to make maps. After all, the mapmakers of the time did not have the use of photographs taken from the air or computers to help them.

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These types of maps take great skill to prepare, but other maps are simpler. Now imagine that you have just been hired as a cartographer! Imagine that your class is going on a trip to the zoo and you are going

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to draw a map of the zoo so all your classmates can find their way around. The zoo is not a real zoo. It is one that you make up. But your map has to show exactly where everything is. To make your map, you will need: • • • • 5

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a large piece of paper pens colored pencils a ruler

Before you start drawing your map, try to imagine it. Look at the blank piece of paper and see the map in your mind before starting. A good map takes careful planning. It is no good if your map is going to be so messy that nobody will be able to understand it. Start by drawing a draft map. This is a messy sketch of what the zoo looks like. You can use this to help you decide the basic layout of your zoo and the locations of the main features. Then you will use this information to make your final neater version. Now that you have your sketch, it EisR. MAST time to begin making your real map. KLINE 1.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

BLAC A T E long O IS Nruler OtoOKdraw TO Bone Across the bottom of your paper, use your T I . D HTE another IS B line. This is the road IGdraw THlong R line. About an inch above it, Y R P O O F IS C up aT name K Make AY. and write it GIVEN for Nthe O Wroad in front of the zoo. O Y O B N E A L S I P IN AM between where SSIONDecide UCED the entrance to the zoo will be. D THIS S thePEtwo O RMIlines. R REP Draw a square that rests on the top line of the road and write the word “ZOO” in the square.

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2. In the top left-hand corner, draw a square that is about two inches on each side. This is where you will draw your compass. You will draw two lines that are the same length. First draw a line down. Write N for north at the top of the line and S for south at the bottom. Now draw another line across the middle of the first line to make a cross shape. Write W for west on the left side of the line and E for east on the right.

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3. Put your ruler at the bottom of the square and draw a line across the top of the page. Write the word “LEGEND” in that space. This is where you will write the meaning of the symbols you use on your map.

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4. The rest of the page will be the zoo. Now draw shapes to represent the main animal houses of your zoo. Decide what kind of animal will be in each house. However, you are not going to write the animal’s name in the square. People will be able to see the locations of the animals more easily if you use symbols. If you are good at drawing, you can draw the actual animal, but most people are not skilled enough artists to do this for all the animals. You can probably do this for unique animals like giraffes or snakes, but other animals will be harder. For these animals, you can draw a symbol that represents the animal. For example, you could draw a banana in one square to show that it is the monkey house. Put a symbol in each location to show what kind of animal is found there.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

5. Once you have drawn the symbols, you will need to add them TEtoR.the S A M legend. Draw the symbol again in the area for theLAlegend KLINE and write C B A down the animal it represents next to it. IS NOT TO BE 6.

ED. IT THIS BOOK T H G I PYR to your OR Your. zoo might have a Fmap. You can now add other COitems N S E I V I K O theseNOitems WAY and color them. It is T G on your Y BODraw N E park or aMpond. map A L S I P IN A ION UCofEDjust writing the words “park” and D THIStoS drawPEthese best O RMISSitemsREinstead R P

“pond.” People using your map will know with just a glance that a large green space is a park and a large blue oval is a pond! 12

7. Now add other symbols to show other locations that visitors might need to find. Visitors will probably want to know where to find food, where to find a restroom, and where the gift shops are. You can use a knife and fork symbol to show food places, a man and a woman symbol to show restrooms, and a picture of a wrapped present to show gift shops. Add these symbols and their meanings to your legend.

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8. Visitors will need to find their way around, so also include the paths between the different places on your map. You can decide whether the paths have names. If they do, write them on as if they are street names.

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You have now done what many mapmakers in history have done. You have created a map of a place that nobody has ever been to before!

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How does the map shown in “Map It Out” support the activity in “Classroom Cartographer”? A It shows that maps need to include a compass. B It shows suitable street names for the roads of the zoo. C It shows that a messy map will be difficult to understand. D It shows that symbols help people locate things quickly.

9

Which paragraph of “Map It Out” describes maps most similar to the one created in “Classroom Cartographer”?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

A Paragraph 4 B Paragraph 5 C Paragraph 6 D Paragraph 7

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B Maps need to be accurate. NOT A K TO BE S I T I Maps are difficult to make. HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y COP technology. Maps today are made EN FO WAY. IS using V I K G O T O O B IS Nand PLE be N ANY I Maps should attractive colorful. M N A D O I S E S C IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

10 Which of these is a main idea in both passages? A B C D

11 How is the information in “Map It Out” different from the information in “Classroom Cartographer”? A It provides more details on the history of mapmaking. B It includes more examples of different types of maps. C It describes the author’s own experience of using maps. D It encourages readers to create their own map.

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12 Why did Juan de la Cosa and Lewis and Clark most likely use maps to represent the areas they explored? Use details from both passages to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

13 Explain why maps use symbols to represent places and how this helps maps achieve their purpose. Use details from both passages to support ER. T S A M your answer. LINE

LACK B A T IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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14 Maps have been in use since ancient times and continue to be used today. Write an essay explaining why maps have always been important. Explain what makes maps so useful and include examples of what they are used for. Use details from both passages to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • explain why maps have always been important • describe what makes maps useful • include examples of what maps are used for • use details from both passages to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passages 4 and 5: Passages Connected by a Theme Introduction: The next two passages are connected by a common theme. The first passage is a play, while the second passage is a poem. In the play, a merchant is asked to look after some olives for a friend, but then learns that the olive jar really contains gold. The merchant shows his true nature by what he does after he makes this discovery. It is not as clear what the poem is about at first, but the title and the ending of the poem give important clues about its theme. Just like in the play, the speaker’s character is revealed by what she does in the poem. Now read both passages and see if you can work out in what ways the merchant and the speaker are similar, and in what ways they are different.

E L P SAM ATION / The Story of Ali \ C U D E ! Y L L LY RA SCENE.IRAL 9 9 . 8 88

1 2

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE TIME: one evening long ago S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G PLACE: the house of a merchant I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O LE Bhis wife [The Merchant are IS NatOsupper.] Pand N ANY I M N A D O I S E S C IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

WIFE: Our neighbors bought some fine olives today. It has been a long time since we have had olives. I am quite hungry for them.

3

MERCHANT: Now you speak of olives, you put me in mind of the jar which Ali left with me.

4

WIFE (pointing to a jar in another part of the room): There is the very jar waiting for him against his return.

5

MERCHANT: Certainly he will not return at all, since he has not returned in all this time. Give me a plate. I will open the jar, and if the olives be good, we will eat them.

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6

WIFE: Pray, husband, do not commit so base an action. You know nothing is more sacred than what is left to one’s care and trust.

7

MERCHANT: But I am certain Ali will never return.

8

WIFE: And I have a strong feeling that he will. What will he think of your honor if he finds the jar has been opened? And even if he does not, it is not right to take what is not yours.

9

MERCHANT: Surely a jar of olives is not to be guarded so carefully, year after year.

10

WIFE: That is Ali’s affair, not ours. Besides, the olives can’t be good after all this time.

11

MERCHANT (taking a plate): I mean to have a taste of them, at least.

12

WIFE (indignantly): You are betraying the trust your friend placed in you! I will not remain to witness it.

13

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

.

TER [She leaves the room. The Merchant crosses and takes the cover from E MASthe jar.]

16

KLIN C A L B A olives are MERCHANT (looking in jar): My wife was right. NOTThe S I TO BE covered T K I O . D O B with mold, but those at the bottom HISgood. IGHTEmayFOstill Tbe R Y R P O SC EN K Ishakes GIVolives. O WAY.gold pieces fall out.] T O Y O B [He turns the jar up and out the Several N N E A L S I P AM D IN ON THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE MERCHANT: What is this?RGold pieces! As I live! Gold! Gold!

17

[He shakes the jar again and a shower of gold pieces falls out.]

18

MERCHANT (dropping the jar in astonishment): There’s a thousand pieces at least! The top of the jar only was laid with olives! (He puts the gold into his pockets.) Tonight, when my wife is asleep, I will fill the jar entirely with fresh olives, for these show they have been disturbed. And I will make up the jar so that no one will know they have been touched.

14

15

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SCENE II TIME: one month later PLACE: a court 19

[The Officer presents the Merchant and Ali before the Judge.]

20

JUDGE: Ali, what charge have you to make against this Merchant?

21

ALI (bowing): Sir, when I journeyed here seven years ago, I left with this Merchant a jar. Now, into this jar I had put, with some olives, a thousand pieces of gold. When I opened the jar, I found that it had been entirely filled with olives, and the gold had disappeared. I beseech your honor that I may not lose so great a sum of money!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

22

JUDGE: Merchant, what have you to say to this charge?

23

MERCHANT: I confess that I had the jar in my house, but Ali found it exactly as he had left it. Did he ever tell me there was gold in the jar? TEIR. No. He now demands that I pay him one thousand pieces of M gold. S A NE KLIinstead C wonder that he does not ask me for diamonds and Bpearls of A L A T E O B N truth. K TO gold. I will take my oath that what I sayITisISthe

25

HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y P come Eto O oath,. I should be glad to N Fyour JUDGE: Not so fast! Before IS COyou V I K G O WAY T O Y O brought B Ali, have N N E A L S see the jar Aof olives. you the jar? I P M N D IN O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM EPRO ALI: No, I did not think ofRthat.

26

JUDGE: Then go and fetch it.

27

[Ali goes to fetch the jar.]

28

JUDGE (to the Merchant): You thought the jar contained olives all this time?

29

MERCHANT: Ali told me it contained olives at the first. I had no reason to think that it didn’t.

24

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30

JUDGE: And you did not question why you were holding olives so long?

31

MERCHANT: Ali asked me to hold his jar of olives, and I did. I did not question my friend for that was his business. I will take oath that what I say is the truth.

32

JUDGE: We are not yet ready for your oath.

33

[Ali enters. He sets the jar before the Judge.]

34

JUDGE: Ali, is this jar the same you left with the Merchant?

35

ALI: Sir, it is the same.

36

JUDGE: Merchant, do you confess this jar to be the same?

37

MERCHANT: Sir, it is the same.

38

JUDGE: Officer, remove the cover. (The Officer removes the cover.) These are fine olives! Let me taste them. (The Judge eats an olive.) They Sare TER. A M LINE and be so excellent! But I cannot think that olives will keep seven Kyears C A L B E hear good. Therefore, Officer, bring in Olive Merchants, NOT A and O Bme S I Tlet T K I O . D O E what is their opinion. THIS B RIGHT

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

40

COPY GIVEN FOR S I K WAY. Y OTtwo Olive BOO Forward, OFFICER (announcing): Merchants! N N E A L S I P AM D IN ON THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R themselves.] [Two Olive Merchants present

41

JUDGE: Are you Olive Merchants?

42

OLIVE MERCHANTS (bowing): Sir, we are.

43

JUDGE: Tell me how long olives will keep.

44

FIRST OLIVE MERCHANT: Let us take what care we can, they will hardly be worth anything the third year.

45

SECOND OLIVE MERCHANT: It is true, for then they will have neither taste nor color.

39

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46

JUDGE: If it be so, look into that jar and tell me how long it is since those olives were put into it.

47

[Both Olive Merchants examine and taste the olives.]

48

FIRST OLIVE MERCHANT: These olives are new and good.

49

JUDGE: You are mistaken. Ali says he put them into the jar seven years ago.

50

SECOND OLIVE MERCHANT: Sir, they are of this year’s growth. There is not a merchant in all the land that will not say the same.

51

JUDGE: Merchant, you stand accused. You must return the thousand pieces of gold to Ali.

52

MERCHANT: Sir, I protest—

53

JUDGE (interrupting): Be silent! You are a rogue. Take him to prison, Officer.

54

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M [The Officer takes the Merchant away. The Merchant continues KLINtoE shout that C A L B he is innocent as he is led away.] NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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/ The Truth Comes Out \ by Bianca Davies

1

The teacher spoke about magma. She said it swirled around under the surface of the earth.

2

I felt my own thoughts swirling around as I looked over at innocent Emma.

3

4

5

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

The teacher explained how pressure built up over years, centuries, and more.

TER. S A M KLINE I felt the pressure C A L B NOT A K TO BE building up S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO over seconds, minutes, G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. and more. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S S IS DU THIlooked Emma over PERM REPRO and smiled. She had no idea what was bubbling beneath.

6

The teacher said volcanoes looked still, but underneath the magma builds up.

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7

Then finally. A hiss, a spark, a jet of ash and smoke, a trickle of lava.

8

Then a blast, and the hidden magma is out in the open; a river of lava flowing freely.

9

I sighed. And then I shouted. “I did it, Emma. It was me.”

10

11

12

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

“I broke your glasses, and then blamed your dog. I’m sorry, I am, but it was all me.”

TER. S A M KLINE C A L “I know,” laughed Emma. B NOT A K TO BE S I “I knew it all along.” T I TED. IS BOO H T I sighed and half-smiled; OPYRIGH R C EN FO WAY. ISgone. V I K G O at least the pressure was T O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S S IS DU THall RMIopen, It was out inPEthe REPRO where it belonged.

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15 Which statement describes the main reason the poem has a greater sense of mystery than the play? A The poem does not reveal what the lie is until the end. B The poem is about a lie more serious than one about olives. C The poem is set in a modern and familiar setting. D The poem shows the main character’s emotions.

16 How is the magma described in the poem most relevant to both the poem and the play?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

A It represents how lies break up friendships.

B It represents how lying makes people feel inside. C It represents how everyone lies sometimes.

D It represents how lies cannot be hidden forever.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B Patience will pay off. NOT A K TO BE S I T I Money makes people greedy. TED. H IS BOO G H I T R Y R Lies will get foundKout. IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. O O E Btrusted.N IS NO PLbe N ANY I Friends can M A D O I S E S C IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

17 Which of these is a main theme in the play and the poem? A B C D

18 How is the tone of the poem different from the tone of the play? A It is more solemn. B It is more lighthearted. C It is more meaningful. D It is more tense.

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19 At the end of the poem, the speaker describes how the truth is out in the open where it belongs. Does the Merchant feel the same way about the truth when his lie is found out? Use details from both the play and the poem to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

20 Compare how the truth comes out in the play and the poem, and R. TE Smorals. A M explain what this shows about the speaker’s and the Merchant’s E N KLI Use details from both the play and the poem O toT support A BLAC your E answer.

IS N TO B T K I O . D O IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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21 The Merchant in the play and the speaker in the poem both lie to a friend. How are the reasons for the two lies different? How does this affect whether the lies can be forgiven? Use details from both the play and the poem to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • compare the reasons the Merchant and the speaker in the poem lie • explain how the reasons affect whether the lies can be forgiven • use details from both the play and the poem to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Independent Practice This section contains two individual passages with questions for students to complete on their own, and three pairs of passages connected by a theme with questions for students to complete on their own.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passage 1: Single Passage

/ The Goblin \ Adapted from a Japanese Folktale

1

Long ago there was a large plain in Japan. It was said to be haunted by a goblin who took the form of an old woman. From time to time, travelers disappeared and were never heard of again. It was said that the woman lured travelers to her cottage and then feasted on them.

2

One day as the sun was setting, a man named Hisaki came to the plain. He was a weary traveler who had lost his way. He had walked the whole day and was now tired and hungry. The evenings were chilly, and he began to be very anxious to find some house where he could obtain a night’s lodging. At last, after wandering about for some hours, he saw a glimmer of light in the distance. R.

3

4

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

STE A M E N CKLI “Surely that is some cottage where I can get a night’s Hisaki LAlodging,” B A T E O B exclaimed. IT IS N BOOK TO . D E T THIS RIGH as Fhe Yquickly Rcould P O O C He dragged his aching feet as the spot, and N S E . KI AYtowards GIV O W T O Y O B N N E A he saw that it was in soon came to N IS As heUCdrew AMPaL littleIScottage. D INnear O I S E S S I H D T condition. terrible PERMThe bamboo REPROfence was broken, and weeds and grass

pushed their way through the gaps. The windows and doors were full of holes. The posts of the house were bent with age. The hut was open, and by the light of an old lantern he saw an old woman. He paused for a moment. Something about the cottage’s condition worried him, and he thought about just moving along. But his aching feet reminded him he needed rest, so he pushed his concerns out of his mind.

5

“Good evening,” Hisaki called across the bamboo fence. “Please excuse me, but I have lost my way and do not know what to do, for I have nowhere to rest tonight. I beg you to be good enough to let me spend the night under your roof.”

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6

“I am very sorry for you, but I have no bed to offer a guest in this poor place,” the old woman replied.

7

“If you will be good enough just to let me lie on the kitchen floor I shall be grateful,” said Hisaki.

8

“Very well, I will let you stay here,” she said. “Come in now and I will make a fire, for the night is cold.”

9

Hisaki was only too glad to do as he was told. He took off his sandals and entered the hut. The old woman then brought some sticks of wood and lit the fire.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

10

“You must be hungry after your long journey,” said the old woman. “I will go and cook some supper for you.”

11

After Hisaki had finished his supper, the old woman sat down by the fireplace, and they talked together. Hisaki thought to himself that he had been very lucky to come across such a kind old woman. At last the wood gave out, and as the fire died slowly down he began to shiver TER. S A M NE with cold just as he had done when he arrived. LACKLI

12

13

OT A B TO BE N S I OK and gather some “I see you are cold,” said the old woman. go Oout ED. IT “I will B T S H I G H I R must stay wood, for we have usedISitCall. OPYYou FOR Tand take N E . care of the house V Y I K A G O W T O while I am gone.” PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM said Hisaki. REPRO “I cannot think of letting you go out “Let me go instead,” to get wood for me this cold night!”

14

“You must stay quietly here, for you are my guest,” the old woman said.

15

She left, but then she suddenly returned.

16

“You must sit where you are and not move,” she said. “And whatever happens don’t go near or look into the back room. Now mind what I tell you!”

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17

“If you tell me not to go near the back room, of course I won’t,” said Hisaki, rather bewildered.

18

The old woman then went out again, and Hisaki was left alone. The fire had died out, and the only light in the hut was that of a dim lantern. It caused dark shadows to dance on the cottage’s shabby walls. Hisaki began to feel that he was in a weird place, and the old woman’s words stayed in his head. What hidden thing could be in that room that she did not wish him to see? For some time, the promise he had made her stopped him from doing anything. He wanted to avoid making her angry. But then he wondered to himself why he was afraid of the old woman. There was something about her and her cottage that bothered him. He shook off the thought. After all, all she had done was be kind to him. But then again, maybe something was wrong. All his mind could do was wonder what dreadful secret was in the back room.

19

20

21

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

“She will not know that I have looked unless I tell her, so I will just have a peep before she comes back,” said Hisaki quietly.

TER. S A M E forbidden With these words he got up on his feet and crept towards KLINthe C A L B A spot. With trembling hands he pushed back N the door OT sliding BE and looked O S I T T K I in. What he saw froze the blood in OO was full of ED. veins.TThe HThis IS Broom G H I R Y R bones. He fell backwards COP horror. EN FO WAY. IS with V I K G O T O Y O B IS N“What PLE he N ANden I M N A D O I S E “How horrible!” cried out. awful have I come to in my S C IS DU THIS O R P PERM E R travels? Is it possible that the old woman is really the goblin? When she comes back she will show herself in her true character and eat me up in one mouthful!”

22

With these words, he rushed out of the cottage and ran away into the dark night. He had not gone far when he heard steps behind him and a voice crying out for him to stop. He pretended not to hear and kept running.

23

“Stop, you wicked man. Why did you look into the forbidden room?”

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24

Hisaki quite forgot how tired he was, and his feet flew over the ground faster than ever. Fear gave him strength, for he knew that if the goblin caught him he would soon be one of her victims. The old woman chased him, her hair flying in the wind, and her face changing with rage into the goblin that she was.

25

At last, when Hisaki felt he could run no more, the dawn broke, and with the darkness of night the goblin vanished and he was safe. Hisaki now knew that he had met the wicked goblin, the story of whom he had often heard but never believed to be true.

26

He felt that he owed his escape to the little voice in his head that had told him that something in the cottage was not quite right. He shivered as he thought about what might have happened if he had not peeked into the back room.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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1

Which sentence from the passage shows that Hisaki feels bad for not trusting the old woman? A What hidden thing could be in that room that she did not wish him to see? B But then he wondered to himself why he was afraid of the old woman. C There was something about her and her cottage that bothered him. D After all, all she had done was be kind to him.

2

Read this sentence from paragraph 18.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

It caused dark shadows to dance on the cottage’s shabby walls. The author included this image mainly to make the cottage seem — A quiet B creepy

C exciting

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I Read this dialogue from the passage. HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y P FO S COare ENmove,” Iyou V Y. “And whatever I K G “You must sit where and not she O WAsaid. T O Y O B N N E A L S I P M D INback room. Now mind what I goISnear SIONor lookODinto UCEthe HIS SA don’t M Thappens R R E tell you!” P REP D aged

3

How would the old woman most likely sound when she says this? A Calm B Casual C Joyful D Forceful

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4

The main message of the passage is about — A doing as you are told B listening to your heart C being kind to strangers D traveling safely

5

At what point in the passage is it revealed that the old woman is the goblin? How does this affect the reader? Use details from the passage to support your answer.

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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6

Identify two examples of times when Hisaki feels that something is wrong but ignores his feelings. Use details from the passage to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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7

The author involves the reader in the passage by creating suspense. Explain how the information given in the first paragraph and the setting are important factors in creating suspense. Use details from the passage to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • explain how the information given in the first paragraph creates suspense • explain how the setting contributes to the suspense • use details from the passage to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passage 2: Single Passage

/ Nature’s Rare and \ Stunning Decorations 1

During the fall months, many people decorate their homes by creating jack-o’-lanterns. People carve faces into pumpkins, place them on porches with candles inside them, and watch as they give off a faint warm glow. Although humans are responsible for making jack-o’-lanterns from pumpkins, nature also makes a glowing orange decoration. These are jack-o’-lantern mushrooms. These mushrooms do not have faces carved into them, but their coloring is very similar to that of a pumpkin. In addition, just like the jack-o’-lanterns made from pumpkins, jack-o’lantern mushrooms glow in the dark! The underside, known as the gills of the mushrooms, gives off a faint green glow. It’s quite amazing that TER. S A M nature has produced this fascinating little mushroom. CKLINE

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 8 8 8 Nature’s Glowing Decoration 2

BLA A T O IS N TO BE T K I O . D O IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O . grows wild in the The jack-o’-lanternOmushroom isTaGtype IVEN of fungus K IS C O WAYthat Y O B N N E A L S I P IN N America. woods Iof AM partsISofSIONorth UCED Jack-o’-lantern mushrooms grow H S Ssome D M T O R R E P or decaying in clusters on old REP hardwood trees, on tree roots, or at the bases of hardwood trees. These mushrooms most often grow between July and October, and they thrive in wet or rainy conditions.

3

Jack-o’-lantern mushrooms range in color from yellow to bright orange. The caps of jack-o’-lantern mushrooms are usually three to eight inches wide, are flat, and have a sunken center. The stalks of the mushrooms are usually curved. The mushrooms give off a pleasant fruity scent. Do not be fooled though because these mushrooms are not safe to eat! Jack-o’-lantern mushrooms are poisonous, and people who eat them get very ill.

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4

In fact, many mushrooms that grow in the wild are not safe to eat. Unless a person is an expert, he or she should never eat wild mushrooms. Many people think that anything produced naturally could not do much harm. These people are very wrong. It’s a big mistake to underestimate what nature can do. It can create amazing living things and harmful living things. The jack-o’-lantern mushroom is the perfect example of this, as it is both amazing and harmful!

5

The jack-o’-lantern mushroom is often confused with another mushroom called a chanterelle mushroom. Because of this common mistake, people sometimes call the jack-o’-lantern mushroom the “false chanterelle.” Both chanterelle and jack-o’-lantern mushrooms are a bright yellow or orange, both are shaped like a trumpet, and both grow in the forest. People who are not mushroom experts often find it difficult to tell the difference between these two mushrooms. Unlike jack-o’-lantern mushrooms, true chanterelles are safe to eat. However, only experts should consider eating mushrooms found in the wild. Even if you think it is a chanterelle, it is always best to be safe. Nature can be TER. S A very tricky sometimes. M E

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 8 8 8 Going after the Glow

6

KLIN C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y P interesting Jack-o’-lantern mushrooms EN FOorganisms. IS COare . Many people V Y I K A G O W T O O themselves. want to see M their glow IS Nfor PLE Bnatural N ANY To find jack-o’-lanterns I N A D O I S E S C U IS HIStheir glow, and Tsee firstDlocate areas of forest that contain PERMyou must REPRO

such hardwood trees as oak, ash, and maple. The best time to locate clusters of jack-o’-lanterns is during the day when there is still sunlight. After finding a cluster of the orange mushrooms, pick the cluster and put it in a plastic bag.

7

After picking the fungi, hurry home so the glow of the mushrooms does not fade. When at home, go into a completely dark closet with the bag of mushrooms. Because your eyes need to adjust to darkness, you will have to wait between five and ten minutes to see the faint glow.

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Where Does the Light Come From? 8

The light the jack-o’-lantern mushrooms produce is different from sunlight or a light bulb in your home. Both the sun and light bulbs produce heat while producing light. Glowing organisms, such as the jack-o’-lantern mushroom, do not give off any heat. Their glow is the result of chemical reactions inside the organism. The chemical reactions that produce light are different in every creature. Scientists believe that the element oxygen is always present in these chemical reactions.

The Bright Side of Nature 9

10

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

The jack-o’-lantern mushroom is not alone in its ability to glow. Scientists have identified at least 30 other varieties of fungi that also glow. Although the jack-o’-lantern mushroom glows only from its gills, some types of mushrooms glow throughout their entire structures. Some of these fungi live inside of decaying trees and seem to make the bark of the tree glow!

.

Many other organisms give off their own light, too. DifferentMvarieties STER A E N I glowing. of worms and insects from around the world are A capable LACKLof B T E firefly. IS NOorganism One of the best-known examples of a glowing TOis Bthe T K I O . D O E fascinating IGHTthis Another well-known creature with THIS B ability is the R Y R P O O F C . some people take K ISare GIVEN in Ncaves, glowworm. Glowworms often found O WAYand T O Y O B N E A L S I P IN AM cave tours SIONglowworm UCEinD action. Fish and other creatures D MISthe THIS S just PtoERsee O R EP no light from the sun, so they create that live deep in the oceanRhave their own light. The light that these deep sea fish give off helps them by drawing in other fish to eat and by scaring off predators that may want to hurt them.

Researching Weird Science 11

Scientists are still carefully studying mushrooms and other organisms that produce their own light. Although they understand how mushrooms glow, it is still unclear what purpose the glowing serves.

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12

Scientists are also testing the chemicals in these fungi to see if they could be beneficial to human health. Some of the early findings show that some of the chemicals may help fight certain diseases. Sadly, the chemicals are also harmful to the human body. More testing is needed to see if any of these chemicals can be reproduced to be less harmful while still being effective in fighting diseases. Some day in the future, these glowing mushrooms may do more than just amuse people. They may even save lives.

8

Based on the passage, which feature of jack-o’-lantern mushrooms most likely makes people mistake them as being good to eat?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

A Their large size

B Their faint glow

C Their bright colors

9

TER. S A M D Their pleasant scent KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I O ED. HTbest IStoBOshow G H I T R Which section of the passage could be used that the Y R FO COP N S E I . V Y I K A W that unique? jack-o’-lantern mushroom’s is NYnot NOT Gto glow A LE BOO ION ISability P N I M A ISS DUCED THIS Safter Pthe O A Going R ERMGlow P E R B Where Does the Light Come From? C The Bright Side of Nature D Researching Weird Science

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10 According to the passage, what is the main difference between a jack-o’lantern pumpkin and a jack-o’-lantern mushroom? A The time of year they are often seen B Whether or not they occur naturally C The color they each are D The reason people like them

11 Which sentence from the passage best reveals the author’s appreciation for nature?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

A It’s quite amazing that nature has produced this fascinating little mushroom. B Many people think that anything produced naturally could not do much harm. C Nature can be very tricky sometimes.

D Many people want to see their natural glow for themselves.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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12 Why is the information in paragraphs 4 and 5 most important to the passage? Use details from the passage to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

13 The title of the passage describes jack-o’-lantern mushrooms as “rare and stunning.” Is this an accurate description of jack-o’-lantern mushrooms? Use at least two details from the passage to support R. STE A M your answer. E N LI

LACK B A T IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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14 Living things can be admired for their positive features, but people should also be cautious of their negative features. Explain how the jacko’-lantern mushroom shows that nature can be both helpful and harmful. Include at least two examples of the jack-o’-lantern mushroom’s positive and negative features in your answer. In your response, be sure to • explain how the jack-o’-lantern mushroom shows that nature can be both helpful and harmful • include at least two examples of the jack-o’-lantern mushroom’s positive features • include at least two examples of the jack-o’-lantern mushroom’s negative features

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passages 3 and 4: Passages Connected by a Theme

/ Making Glorious Rain \ 1

2

3

Why do you like to dance? There are probably many different reasons why people think dancing is a fun activity. Some people like to move to the music when their favorite song plays on the radio. Some people take a dance class and learn ballet. In the popular fairy tale, Cinderella dances with Prince Charming at a ball. You may have seen dancers perform on stage in a show, or you may have danced in a show yourself! But have you ever danced to change the weather?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Changing the weather was exactly the reason the Native Americans used to do their rain dance. A rain dance was part of their culture. It was a special dance for the spirits. These Native Americans believed that spirits controlled the weather. They thought a rain dance would make . TERrain S A the spirits give them rain. They would ask the spirits to send them M E ACKtoLINreceive the L at the right times. It was very important for theirAcrops B OT BE None S I TO dances, proper amount of water. If it didn’t rain after of their they T K I O . D O E B T S H I G H I believed they had made aCmistake R T performance. OPYR duringFOtheir

K IS GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E A IN world Many different from have rain dances. These N IS all over AMPL cultures Dthe O I S E S C S S U I I H D M T O R R E P that people are not just dances REP do to amuse themselves or pass the

time. They are important events that mean a lot to everyone involved. It might seem silly to you to think that dancing could make it rain, or to think that someone would take a dance so seriously. However, you have to remember how important rain was to the people in these cultures. If it did not rain, the crops would not grow and there would be little food available. People would not simply be able to pop down to the shops to pick up some extra food. Food grown by the people was usually what they relied on. If there was no rain, the people would be in for a long and difficult few months.

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4

What would you do if you wanted to know if there would be much rain coming this season? You would probably look up a weather report and read about the weather predicted for the season. People in the past did not have this luxury. They did not have any real way to guess what the conditions might be like. They just had to hope that rain would come their way. With rain so important, it was probably quite upsetting that there was so little they could do. Perhaps this is why rain dances are so common in so many cultures. It might have given people a sense that they did have some control over their futures.

5

Rain is probably not as important to you as it was to older cultures. You will probably still be able to get enough food even if it does not rain. However, there are times when you probably wish that you could control the weather. After a long hot summer, you might hope for rain so that your yard changes from brown and dry to the soft green grass that looks and feels better. You might want rain so that your vegetable garden grows well, or just so you don’t have to water it yourself. You might want a cool rain shower to refresh you on a sweltering day. You R. a TEon S A might just want it to rain because you like the sound of raindrops M LINE KWhatever C A L tin roof. Or you might want to play outside in the rain! the B E OT A B N O S I reason you would like it to rain, you D should OK T it happen! . IT try to Omake

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

6

IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O IS C KRain GIVEN NY WAY. O T O Make Your Very Own Stick! O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D RainTsticks are P musical that were used to call up the rain ERM instruments REPRO

spirits. Just as the Native Americans would dance for the spirits, people who lived in the deserts of northern Chile would make rain sticks. The rain sticks in Chile are made from cactus tubes. The tubes are filled with hundreds of cactus needles and tiny lava pebbles. When you turn the tube upside down, the pebbles fall through the cactus needles inside. This makes a sound like a rainstorm. You can make your own rain stick to try the next time you wish for a rainy day.

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7

Don’t worry – you do not need a real cactus to make this rain stick! To make your rain stick you will need: • a paper towel tube or any other long cardboard tube • aluminum foil • unpopped popcorn or uncooked rice • construction paper • glue • scissors • crayons or markers

8

9

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

1. Place the end of your tube on a piece of construction paper and trace around it. 2.

ER. T S A M Draw a bigger circle around KLINE C A L B that circle. Then draw spokes NOT A K TO BE S I T I between the two circles. (Hint: TED. H IS BOO G H I T R Y R Pretend the smaller circle IS COPis aT GIVEN FO WAY. K O O sun. The spokes S NO ED IN ANY Ilook PLE B should M N A O I S S like be DUC THISsunrays.PEThey O RMISshould R P E R

shaped like triangles. The rays should reach from the smaller circle to the bigger circle.) 10

3. Now cut out the entire shape from the construction paper. Then cut along the sunrays.

11

4. Put glue on the spokes. This is the cap for one end of your rain stick. Glue the cap onto one end of your tube.

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12

5. Cut two long, skinny pieces of aluminum foil. They should each be longer than your tube.

13

6. Roll the foil into long, thin shapes. The foil pieces should look like snakes. Then twist your snakes so they look like a spring. They should look a bit like a telephone cord.

14

7. Put the springs into your tube. Then pour some popcorn or rice into the tube. You should not fill the tube with very much popcorn. You only need a little bit to make an interesting sound. Different amounts of popcorn or rice will make different sounds.

15

8.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I Repeat steps one, two, three, HTED. IS BOO G H I T R Y R and four to cover the COP EN FO WAY. IS other V I K G O T O B Now you end of your IS NO CED IN ANY PLEtube. M N A O I S S S DU THIready are toPdecorate ERMIS your REPRO rain stick and make it your very own!

16

The next time you want rain, take out your rain stick. Combine it with a rain dance and see if your effort can bring the rain you are hoping for.

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/ from Rain in Summer \ by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 1

How beautiful is the rain! After the dust and heat, In the broad and fiery street, In the narrow lane, How beautiful is the rain!

2

How it clatters along the roofs, Like the tramp of hoofs How it gushes and struggles out From the throat of the overflowing spout!

3

Across the window-pane It pours and pours; And swift and wide, With a muddy tide, Like a river down the gutter roars . The rain, the welcome rain! RIGHTED

4

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B E OT A IT IS N BOOK TO B Y R THIS P O O F C N S E GIV OK Ichamber WAY. Y OTlooks BOhis N N E The sick man from A L S I P IN S SAM brooks; ISSION PRODUCED M THItwisted At the R E P RE He can feel the cool Breath of each little pool; His fevered brain Grows calm again, And he breathes a blessing on the rain.

5

From the neighboring school Come the boys, With more than their wonted noise And commotion; And down the wet streets

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Sail their mimic fleets, Till the treacherous pool Ingulfs them in its whirling And turbulent ocean. 6

In the country, on every side, Where far and wide, Like a leopard’s tawny and spotted hide, Stretches the plain, To the dry grass and the drier grain How welcome is the rain!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

15 Which sentence from “Making Glorious Rain” describes the same reason for liking rain as the first stanza of the poem? A You might want rain so that your vegetable garden grows well, or just TERso. S A M you don’t have to water it yourself. KLINE

BLAC IT OOK T of raindrops ED. you B T S H I You might just want it to rain because like the sound G H I OPYR IVEN FOR T Y. on a tin roof. OOK IS C OT G IN ANY WA B N E L S I P N outside inEDthe rain! AM OrHyou toIO play T IS SmightPEwant RMISS REPRODUC

OT Aon a sweltering B You might want a cool rain shower to refresh O BE day. IS Nyou C D

16 Which idea about rain is supported by both the poem and the article? A It can be dangerous. B It is essential for life. C It can be predicted. D It is usually welcome.

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17 Which idea in “Making Glorious Rain” is most relevant to the poem? A Having fun indoors B Respecting other cultures C Appreciating nature D Using dance to express joy

18 Which lines from the poem describe the most important purpose of rain described in the article? A After the dust and heat, / In the broad and fiery street,

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

B His fevered brain / Grows calm again,

C And down the wet streets / Sail their mimic fleets,

D To the dry grass and the drier grain / How welcome is the rain!

19 Compare how the poem and the article describe the sound of rain. Use . details from both the poem and the article to support your answer. ASTER

NE M I L K C A L OT A B TO BE N S I ED. IT THIS BOOK T H G I COPYR GIVEN FOR S I K WAY. Y OT BOO N N E A L S I P AM D IN ON THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

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20 Which passage’s title best reveals how the author feels about rain? Use details from both the poem and the article to support your answer.

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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21 Compare why rain was important to people in the past with why rain is important to people today. Explain why rainfall is not as serious a matter today as it was in the past. Use details from both the poem and the article to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • describe why rain was important to people in the past • describe why rain is important to people today • explain why rainfall is not as serious a matter today as it was in the past • use details from both the poem and the article to support your answer

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passages 5 and 6: Passages Connected by a Theme

/ Boston Light \ 1

I remember sitting at my grandmother’s feet as she recalled the first time the Boston Harbor Lighthouse, or Boston Light, lit up the harbor. Of all the stories my grandmother had told about her childhood, this was the one that fascinated me the most.

2

“I was just a young girl at the time,” my grandmother recalled. “I remember that Boston had developed into a bustling port city. The city officials had decided to construct a lighthouse in Boston Harbor to caution and guide ships sailing through the Atlantic Ocean. I just felt that it was a special moment. When I was a child, many things were changing. Boston seemed like it was becoming a busier place and a scarier place. To me, the lighthouse meant that everyone would be R. STEinto looked after even as the world changed. I begged my father EtoMA sail ACKLIN the lighting L the harbor so that my family and I could observeAfirsthand B BE pleading, NOTbegging S I TOand of the first light station in America. After much T K I O . D O B HTE IGSeptember THIS1716, R my father finally agreed, and on 14, he navigated our Y R P O O F C N S E I . V Y I K A small vessel through Harbor shores NY W of Georges Island. I NOT G to the A LE BOOBoston S I P N I M N A IO remember aSblanket around DUCEDmy shoulders and inhaling the THIS S wrapping O R ERMIS P P E salty sea air. My family andR I gazed at the tall cylindrical building perched on Little Brewster Island. We waited quietly and patiently. Then suddenly, a brilliant light shone from the top of the building. It was the most spectacular sight I had ever witnessed.”

3

My grandmother’s eyes sparkled as she recalled this special memory. I could suddenly imagine her as a young girl on the shores of Georges Island.

4

From then on, Boston Light became a friendly glow greeting weary travelers who entered the harbor from the waters of the Atlantic Ocean. Like most historical sites, the lighthouse experienced its share of

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tragedies over time. There was a fire that caused significant damage to the inside of the lighthouse. It was struck by lightning many times. 5

The lighthouse stood by in 1773 when annoyed colonists dumped shipments of tea from British vessels into Boston Harbor to protest new taxes. When the American Revolution began, the British controlled the lighthouse. It suffered damage on several occasions, but it maintained its post and continued to alert ships to dangerous rocks. It continued to do its job of leading sailors and their ships safely into the harbor.

6

By the spring of 1776, George Washington and his fellow patriots had removed the British from Boston. However, many British soldiers remained on ships in the harbor. Then one day in June, they finally departed. Sadly, they did not leave as quietly as many had hoped. I heard the news about what had happened as they left before Grandma did. My family had just returned from town. In the town, reports about the lighthouse on Little Brewster Island were spreading quickly. Everyone was talking about what had happened.

7 8

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TER. S A M “Grandma!” I cried. KLINE C A L B A NOITwanted O BbeE the one to S I Tto I searched the house to find my grandmother. T K I O . D O TE grandmother IGHmy THIS B humming a happy R reveal the sad news to her.OIPheard Y R O F EN IS C Gently K steps. GIVpushing O WAY.her bedroom door, I tune. I scurried Eup the open T O Y O B N N A L S I P IN SAM in front saw her UCEDShe was carefully pinning her hair ISSIOofNthePRmirror. D M THISpoised O R E P RE

into a tidy gray bun. She looked like a delicate bird making a comfortable nest for her fragile eggs. I moved to her side, clutched her hand in mine, and led her to the rocking chair in the corner. I focused my gaze on the floor in front of her feet, knowing that if our eyes met, I would not be able to hold back the tears.

9 10

“Abigail, what is it, child?” she inquired. “The British soldiers who were occupying Boston Harbor left today,” I reported.

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11

“Well that’s hardly terrible news, Abigail. In fact, I might say that it’s cause for celebration,” she said.

12

“That’s not all, Grandma,” I said, my voice trembling. “As they were leaving the harbor, they set off an explosion on Little Brewster Island.”

13

My grandmother closed her eyes and gripped the arms of her rocking chair to brace herself. She seemed to know exactly what I was about to say.

14

“Grandma,” I said sadly. “I’m sorry but the Boston Harbor Lighthouse was destroyed.”

15

My grandmother shuddered. She sat for a moment with her eyes closed. For a second, she looked defeated. Then she shook her head slightly, inhaled deeply, and opened her eyes.

16

“It will be rebuilt,” she said.

17

Then she stood up proudly, as if she intended to sail to the island that . very day and begin rebuilding it herself. ASTER

18

19

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NE M I L K C A Less than a month later, news of the lighthouse A BL E been OTexplosion Bhad N O S I T T K I replaced by other news. The UnitedTEStates had signed the H D. RofTAmerica IS BOO G H I R Y Declaration of Independence. event that America was now O EN Fmeant IS COP The V I K AY. G O W T O Y O B Great Britain. independent P from N N E A L S I IN M N HIS SA PERMISSIO EPRODUCED T Several years later, I led myR grandmother across the dock to my father’s boat. The boat bobbed gently as we stepped aboard and huddled under blankets on its damp wooden seats. A light breeze rippled the water, and my grandmother pulled her shawl tightly around her shoulders. My father sailed the boat through the bustling harbor, and set a course straight for Georges Island.

20

When we arrived at the island, I spread a blanket on the ground and rested myself comfortably there. We gazed toward Little Brewster Island and the newly built Boston Harbor Lighthouse. Somewhere inside the 75-foot tower, the lighthouse keeper was preparing to light up the harbor for the first time in seven years.

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21

Suddenly, a ray of light burst forth from the top of the lighthouse. It cast a brilliant shimmer across the surface of the choppy water. We sat motionless for what seemed like forever and gazed at the lighthouse. It would now once again safely lead sailors into the harbor for a peaceful night’s sleep. I will never forget that sight. I will also never forget the sparkle in my grandmother’s crinkled smiling eyes.

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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/ Cape Cod Canal \ 1

Cape Cod is one of the most famous sights in Massachusetts. It is almost an island, but it is connected to the mainland by a narrow strip of land. Cape Cod reaches out from the eastern coast like a giant arm welcoming ships in from the sea.

2

Many ships have made use of Cape Cod throughout the centuries, but other ships have found Cape Cod troublesome. Sailors would have to travel all the way around the cape to pass along the coast. Almost four hundred years ago, people began considering a canal on Cape Cod to allow ships to pass through.

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The unusual shape of the land of Cape Cod formed many thousands of years ago. At this time, glaciers moved across the continent. These glaciers pushed dirt and sand ahead of them and sometimes dropped these materials into huge piles that formed new lands. One of these . lands was the long, narrow region that is now known as Cape Cod. ASTER

NE M I L K C A BL Cod.EHowever, Native Americans were the first people to liveNO on T ACape S I TO B French, T K I O . the area quickly caught the attention of sailors from Europe. D O IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O Spanish, and English explorers all noticed Some sailors EN the landform. IS C . V Y I K A G O W T O O called it Cape preferred LE BJames,IOwhile IS Nothers PSt. N ANY Cape Harbor. The name I M N A D S E S C IS was given IS DU an Englishman named Bartholomew CapeTHCod PERM to theRland EPROby Gosnold in 1602. In 1620, Pilgrims from England landed on Cape Cod. They met with the native people there and began organizing new settlements. The Pilgrims’ towns grew slowly through the 1600s. The people there quickly used up much of the land’s natural resources. Forests were cut down for firewood. Farming was difficult on the thin soil. Luckily, the area did have one other useful resource. The waters surrounding Cape Cod made it perfect for fishing. In the mid-1800s, Cape Cod became a center of fishing.

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6

The fishing and whaling businesses made Cape Cod famous. Ship traffic filled the surrounding waters. Soon, it became clear that these ships needed a passageway to sail quickly along the coast without having to navigate around the long and jagged land of Cape Cod. By the late 1800s, people finally acted on the idea to create the Cape Cod Canal.

7

Although construction did not begin until 1909, the idea for a canal at Cape Cod had been around for hundreds of years. Pilgrim leaders first suggested a canal in 1623. These leaders sent a party of workers to explore the area. They found one low-lying area between two nearby rivers that seemed suitable for a canal. However, they never began building the canal.

8

In 1697, the government of Massachusetts revived the canal idea. Leaders reviewed some ideas to build the canal, but again, they did not take action. Later, in 1776, George Washington himself considered the idea. For almost a hundred years after that, many people pondered the canal plan. Still, little was actually achieved.

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10

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TER. S A M Only by the end of the 19th century did planners and workers KLINE meet C A L B and begin designing and digging a canal. However, early BE efforts NOT A these O S I T T K I O of the . the great were quickly halted by lack of money HTEDand IS BOsize G H I T R Y R undertaking. It seemed Ialmost people could dig a S COP unbelievable EN FO that . V Y I K A G O W T O canal manyMmiles IS NO CED IN ANY PLE Blong. N A O I S S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

In 1909, a company headed by August Belmont, Jr., finally collected the money, resources, and manpower needed to take on such a project. Following a design by William Barclay Parsons, Belmont’s company created the first canal in 1914. It was an amazing feat, although the results of the work were far from perfect. Belmont’s canal was, at its largest point, just one hundred feet wide and twenty-five feet deep. This was not big enough for the large ships of the day. Several ships sank while trying to navigate the narrow twisting passage. These sunken ships made it harder for other sea traffic to pass, and news of the accidents made ship operators wary of the canal. Many

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people chose not to use the canal. Belmont, who had been collecting tolls from passing ships, did not make much money. 12

However, fortunes changed for the Cape Cod Canal. In World War I, fighting between ships in the Atlantic Ocean made the sea a dangerous place. Ships needed a safe passageway along the coast. The area of Cape Cod was just right. The United States government purchased Belmont’s canal in 1928. Starting in 1935, army engineers went to work making the canal much larger. Its broadest point was made more than five times as wide as that of the original. Soon, it was the widest canal in the world.

13

Today, the Cape Cod Canal is more than 17 miles long and separates Cape Cod from the mainland. However, Cape Cod is by no means cut off. Three large bridges connect it to the rest of the state. Two bridges are intended for automobiles, and the third is reserved for trains.

14

Whether getting around by car, train, or boat, thousands of people work in and visit Cape Cod each year. Cottages, hotels, and restaurants Ehave T R. S A M sprung up to greet these people. About 230,000 people Klive LINEin Cape Cod C A L B year-round, but many more people visit, especially summer. Cape BE NOT A in Kthe O S I T T I Cod is well known for its mild summers. OO there to enjoy HTED. Tourists IS Bhead G H I T R Y R sailing, whale watching,ISsports, many kinds COP and EN FO other . of entertainment. V Y I K A G O W T O Many artistsMand ANY beaches and lighthouses IS NO visitCEthe PLE Bphotographers Nscenic I N A D O I S S U IS IS THregion. in the PROD PERM

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15

The Cape Cod area has become so popular, in fact, that in 1961, President John F. Kennedy declared much of the coast the Cape Cod National Seashore. This unique park allows visitors to enjoy beautiful forests, ponds, and beaches. Visitors can also see historic sites such as Marconi Station, an important location in the history of radio. Meanwhile, the Cape Cod Canal itself is so popular that traffic lights had to be added to keep the passing ships in order.

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22 How are the passages “Boston Light” and “Cape Cod Canal” similar? A They both describe the history of a structure. B They both combine facts with a personal story. C They both focus mainly on the dangers of shipping. D They both refer to the events of the American Revolution.

23 How is the canal different from the lighthouse described? A It was created mainly to help sailors. B There were greater delays in getting it built.

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C The building of it was not supported by many people. D It has not changed much since it first opened.

24 Which idea is best supported by both passages? A Progress is a positive part of life. B C D

TER. S A M The past should never be forgotten. KLINE C A L B Life today is changing too fast. NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO Good things take time to achieve. G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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25 Read this sentence from “Boston Light.” From then on, Boston Light became a friendly glow greeting weary travelers who entered the harbor from the waters of the Atlantic Ocean. Which sentence from “Cape Cod Canal” shows that Cape Cod plays a similar role? A Cape Cod is one of the most famous sights in Massachusetts. B It is almost an island, but it is connected to the mainland by a narrow strip of land. C Cape Cod reaches out from the eastern coast like a giant arm welcoming ships in from the sea.

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D Many ships have made use of Cape Cod throughout the centuries, but other ships have found Cape Cod troublesome.

26 Boston Light and the Cape Cod Canal were both influenced by war. Compare whether the influence of war on each structure was positive TER. or S A M INE negative. Use details from both passages to support your LACKLanswer.

OT A B TO BE N S I ED. IT THIS BOOK T H G I COPYR GIVEN FOR S I K WAY. Y OT BOO N N E A L S I P AM D IN ON THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

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27 Read these sentences from “Boston Light.” Boston seemed like it was becoming a busier place and a scarier place. To me, the lighthouse meant that everyone would be looked after even as the world changed. How does the main idea of these sentences relate to “Boston Light” and “Cape Cod Canal”? Use details from both passages to support your answer.

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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28 Compare and contrast the way in which each author presents historical information. How does the way information is presented affect the meaning of each passage? Use details from both passages to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • describe how the author of “Boston Light” presents information • describe how the author of “Cape Cod Canal” presents information • explain how the way information is presented affects the meaning of each passage • use details from both passages to support your answer

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passages 7 and 8: Passages Connected by a Theme

/ The Music from the Little Room \ 1

Asad carried two more boxes upstairs. After he put down the heavy load, he paused for a moment. His old bed sat in the corner, while the rest of his possessions were in boxes scattered across the floor. His parents promised that Asad would feel at home in his new room once he unpacked everything. However, Asad still felt like the room belonged to someone else.

2

The only thing he liked about this room was that there was a smaller room attached to it. It was once used to store things, but Asad planned to turn the room into a private library where he could read and write without his little sister Chandra bothering him. Asad had never had many friends, and he did not expect his life in this new town to be any TER.he S A different. He was used to spending long weekends alone. Sometimes M KLINE exciting ACnothing L longed for adventure, but he was used to the ideaAthat B T BE about NOby S I TOstories would ever happen to him. He made Dup for it writing T K I O . O IS Bideas for short stories, IGHTEthinking THup R imagined adventures. He was always Y R P O O F C IVEN K IS to AY. Gbook. O T and someday he wanted write a O O B N E ANY W L

3

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IN N IS AMP O I S S S S UCED I I H D M T O R R E P door andRstarted After he shut the putting things away, Asad heard EP

what sounded like a piano playing. The sound seemed to be coming from the little room, but that was impossible. He opened the door again and the music suddenly stopped. Supposing that someone was listening to the radio, Asad continued to unpack. 4

When everything was finally in place, Asad went downstairs to talk to his parents about the furniture he wanted to put in the little room. When Asad mentioned that he could hear the radio all the way upstairs, his parents exchanged a funny look. They hadn’t been playing any music. Asad looked a little uneasy, but his parents figured that the music had come from their neighbor’s house.

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5

After his parents helped him arrange the library, Asad excitedly sat down to write, but soon after he closed the door, the mysterious music started playing again. It distracted him so much that he barely wrote a page of his story.

6

The music continued every afternoon. Asad abandoned writing to search for the sound, but he never discovered where it was coming from. He even asked the neighbors about it and was surprised to find that not one of them owned a piano. Gradually, Asad became used to the music. He still had no idea where it could be coming from, but the soft sounds of a piano playing became just like another background noise to him. He sat in his little room typing out a new story as the music quietly played in the background.

7

8 9

10

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One day, the music was so loud that Asad was certain it was coming from the little room. He jerked the door open and was shocked by what he saw. The room looked like something out of a history book. In the corner where his desk had been, sat a boy playing a small piano. He was dressed . in very old-fashioned clothing and looked about as white as a ghost. ASTER

NE M I L K C A L “Who are you?” asked the frightened boy. NOT A B S I TO BE T K I O . D O IGHTEare you THIS B in my house?” Asad R “Who am I? Who are you and what doing Y R P O O F IS C GIVEN NY WAY. replied quickly. E BOOK T O N N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D RM up from The Tboy quickly PEstood REPROthe piano. “This is not your house. This is my house! I’ve lived here since the day I was born.”

11

Asad walked through the tiny room as the other boy stared at him. Everything was different. Piles of sheet music had replaced all of Asad’s books and papers. There were no longer any lights or outlets, only a few unlit candles on a rickety table. Even when he looked outside the tiny window, all that could be seen were trees. His entire neighborhood had disappeared. Suddenly, Asad had an odd idea.

12

“What’s your name?” Asad asked.

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13

“James,” he said.

14

“What year is it, James?’’

15

James gave him a strange look. “It’s June 17, 1875.”

16

Asad couldn’t believe it! This was just like a movie that he’d seen a few years ago. The little room was like a gateway through time. He tried explaining this to James, but the boy didn’t seem to believe him.

17

Asad grabbed James’s hand and pulled him out of the little room. A stunned James looked around Asad’s bedroom.

18

“This is my room, but where are my things?” James demanded.

19

Asad explained that he’d heard a piano playing ever since he’d moved in. Somehow, the little room had let James’s music drift into the future. The room had somehow allowed the boys to travel through time. They stood in silence for a while before James spoke up.

20

21

22

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.

ER STJames. “I use the little room to practice the piano every afternoon,” said A M E N KLI “Do you like listening to my music?” A BLAC NOT S I TO BE T K I O . D O B Asad replied that he did like the by how often HTE butRwas IGmusic, THISsurprised R Y P O O F EN explained James played. JamesOshrugged K IS C sadly. GIVHe WAY.that he had no T O Y O B N N E A L S I P brothers and and spent N AM sisters, no Ofriends, D IN most of his time alone. THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R “It’s like another world I get to escape to,” James explained. “Well, not a real world like this one I seem to be in now. It’s another world in my mind.”

23

Asad nodded and said that he agreed completely.

24

“You know, I’ve been hearing noises while I play,” James added. “But I didn’t know where they were coming from.”

25

“What sort of noises do you hear?” Asad asked.

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26

“I hear little tapping sounds all the time, and sometimes I hear pages rustling,” James explained.

27

Asad laughed and explained that James must be hearing him flipping through books and typing on his computer. James looked at him strangely, and Asad realized that James had never heard of a computer. Asad grinned suddenly as he realized that he was going to have a lot of fun showing James what the future was like. He had never thought that he would find both friendship and adventure in the little room of his very own house.

28

“James, how would you like to go on a little adventure?” Asad asked.

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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/ Being Neighborly \ An Excerpt from Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

1

“What in the world are you going to do now, Jo?” asked Meg one snowy afternoon, as her sister came tramping through the hall with a broom in one hand and a shovel in the other.

2

“Going out for exercise,” answered Jo with a mischievous twinkle in her eyes.

3

“I should think two long walks this morning would have been enough! It’s cold and dull out, and I advise you to stay warm and dry by the fire, as I do,” said Meg with a shiver.

4

“Never take advice! Can’t keep still all day, and not being a pussycat, I don’t like to doze by the fire. I like adventures, and I’m going to find some.”

5

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M Meg went back to toast her feet and read Ivanhoe, and Jo INE to dig KLbegan C A L B paths with great energy. The snow was light,Nand she E OT Awith her Bbroom O S I T T K I O in when the soon swept a path all round the garden, BOwalk HTED. forR Beth IS to G H I T R Y sun came out. Now, theISgarden house from that COP separated EN FOthe Marches’ . V Y I K A G O W T O B stoodISinNOa suburbINofAthe NY city, which was still of Mr. Laurence. PLE Both M N A D O I S E S C IS andPlawns, DU large gardens, and quiet streets. A THIS country-like, with groves PERM RE RO

low hedge parted the two estates. On one side was an old, brown house, looking rather bare and shabby. On the other side was a stately stone mansion, plainly having every sort of comfort and luxury, from the big coach house and well-kept grounds to the conservatory and the glimpses of lovely things one caught between the rich curtains.

6

Yet it seemed a lonely, lifeless sort of house. No children frolicked on the lawn, no motherly face ever smiled at the windows, and few people went in and out, except the old gentleman and his grandson.

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7

To Jo’s lively fancy, this fine house seemed a kind of enchanted palace, full of splendors and delights which no one enjoyed. She had long wanted to behold these hidden glories, and to know the Laurence boy, who looked as if he would like to be known, if he only knew how to begin. She had planned many ways of making friends with him, but he had not been seen lately. Jo had started to think he had gone away, when she one day spied a brown face at an upper window, looking wistfully down into their garden, where Beth and Amy were snowballing one another.

8

“That boy is suffering for society and fun,” she said to herself. “His grandpa does not know what’s good for him, and keeps him shut up all alone. He needs a party of jolly boys to play with, or somebody young and lively. I’ve a great mind to go over and tell the old gentleman so!”

9

10

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

The idea amused Jo, who liked to do daring things. The plan of ‘going over’ was not forgotten. And when the snowy afternoon came, Jo resolved to try what could be done. She saw Mr. Laurence drive off, and then sallied out to dig her way down to the hedge, where she paused TER. S A M LINE and took a survey. All quiet, curtains down at the lower Kwindows, C A L B NOT Abut Ka Tcurly servants out of sight, and nothing humanIS visible O BE black head T I O . D O E B leaning on a thin hand at the upper RIGHT window.THIS

COPY GIVEN FOR S I K AY. Y Wand OTboy! AllINalone BOO Jo, “Poor N N E “There he is,” thought sick this dismal day. A L S I P N AM D O I S E S C S S U I I H D It’s aTshame! I’llPEtoss and make him look out, and then RM up a snowball REPRO say a kind word to him.”

11

Up went a handful of soft snow, and the head turned at once, showing a face which lost its listless look in a minute, as the big eyes brightened and the mouth began to smile. Jo nodded and laughed, and flourished her broom as she called out.

12

“How do you do? Are you sick?”

13

Laurie opened the window, and croaked out as hoarsely as a raven.

14

“Better, thank you. I’ve had a bad cold, and been shut up a week.”

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15

“I’m sorry. What do you amuse yourself with?”

16

“Nothing. It’s dull as tombs up here.”

17

“Don’t you read?”

18

“Not much. They won’t let me read.”

19

“Can’t somebody read to you?”

20

“Grandpa does sometimes, but my books don’t interest him, and I hate to ask Brooke all the time.”

21

“Have someone come and see you then.”

22

“There isn’t anyone I’d like to see. Boys make such a row, and my head is weak.”

23

“Isn’t there some nice girl who’d read and amuse you? Girls are quiet and like to play nurse.”

24 25 26 27

28

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

ER. T S A M “Don’t know any.” KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S stopped. I “You know us,” began Jo, then laughed. Iand T HTED R THIS BOO G I R Y FO COP “So I do! Will you come, cried ENLaurie. IS please?” V I K G O WAY. T O Y O B N N E A L S I P IN N SAM andMnice, UCEDif Mother will let me. I’ll go ask ISSIObut “I’mTnot I’ll come, HIS quiet D O R R E P REP her. Shut the window, like a good boy, and wait till I come.” With that, Jo shouldered her broom and marched into the house, wondering what they would all say to her. Laurie was in a flutter of excitement at the idea of having company. He flew about to get ready, for as Mrs. March said, he was ‘a little gentleman.’ He did honor to the coming guest by brushing his curly hair, putting on a fresh color, and trying to tidy up the room, which in spite of half a dozen servants, was anything but neat. Presently there came a loud ring, then a decided voice, asking for ‘Mr. Laurie,’ and a surprised-looking servant came running up to announce a young lady.

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29

“All right, show her up, it’s Miss Jo,” said Laurie, going to the door of his little parlor to meet Jo. Jo appeared, looking rosy and quite at her ease, with a covered dish in one hand and Beth’s three kittens in the other.

30

“Here I am, bag and baggage,” she said briskly. “Mother sent her love, and was glad if I could do anything for you. Meg wanted me to bring some of her soup, she makes it very nicely, and Beth thought her cats would be comforting. I knew you’d laugh at them, but I couldn’t refuse, she was so anxious to do something.”

31

It so happened that Beth’s funny loan was just the thing, for in laughing over the kits, Laurie forgot his bashfulness, and grew sociable at once.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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29 How is “The Music from the Little Room” different from “Being Neighborly”? A It describes events in the order they occurred. B The events described have an element of science fiction. C It tells about events that actually happened to someone. D The events are described from a third person point of view.

30 What is the most important similarity between Asad and Laurie? A They spend a lot of their time alone.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

B They like to read to escape from the world. C They have a special room in their houses. D They have just moved to a new home.

31 Which statement best compares Jo and Asad?

ER.

A Jo does adventurous things, while Asad only thinks about MAST E N I L K AC adventurous things. T A BL

O BE IS NO H THI YRIGwhile R does P O O F C Jo does not obey her parents, Asad he is told. N S E . KI AYwhat GIV O W T O Y O B N N E A Asad is more friendly. Jo does MPLlike meeting N ISnew people, Anot D INwhile O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

T things. OKmany . IT is afraid B Jo is not afraid of anything, while TEDAsad S BOof C D

32 Which piece of dialogue from “Being Neighborly” also describes Asad’s main problem in “The Music from the Little Room”? A “That boy is suffering for society and fun,” she said to herself. B “Better, thank you. I’ve had a bad cold, and been shut up a week.” C “Not much. They won’t let me read.” D “There isn’t anyone I’d like to see. Boys make such a row, and my head is weak.”

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33 Laurie and Asad both spend a lot of their time alone. How do they feel about spending so much time alone? Use details from both passages to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

34 Based on what you learn about Jo in “Being Neighborly,” what would she most likely think of how Asad and James spend most of their time? ER. T S A M Use details from both passages to support your answer. LINE

LACK B A T IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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35 How is Asad’s and Laurie’s main problem solved in each passage? Based on the events of the passages, predict how Asad’s and Laurie’s life will be different in the future and how they will feel about the changes. Use details from both passages to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • describe how Asad’s and Laurie’s main problem is solved • predict how Asad’s and Laurie’s life will be different in the future • predict how Asad and Laurie will feel about the changes • use details from both passages to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO


Applying the TEKS for the STAAR—Understanding Complex Reading: Literature & Informational Text by Theme teaches students how to understand, analyze, and evaluate complex passages while focusing on theme. Students will learn how to use close reading to interpret passages, and will develop the necessary critical thinking skills to answer rigorous questions about the passages. The book is divided into five parts: Understanding How to Read Complex Passages Information and Guidance on Understanding, Analyzing, and Comparing Complex Passages How to Identify a Theme Information and Guidance on Understanding and Identifying Themes in Complex Passages

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Glossary Definitions of the Key Terms Needed to Analyze Complex Passages by Theme Instruction One Single Passage and Two Sets of Passages Connected by a Theme with Background Information and Instruction

TER. S A M KLINE C Independent Practice A L B T A for Students NaOTheme Two Single Passages and Three Sets of Passages Connected by S I TO BE to T K I O . D O IGHTE FOR THIS B Complete on Their Own R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

www.rallyeducation.com 22 Railroad Avenue, Glen Head, NY 11545

Understanding Complex Text Grade 5  

Literature & Informational Text by Theme Part A: Understanding How to Read Complex Passages with rigorous passages and question

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