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Applying the TEKS for the STAAR

UNDERSTANDING COMPLEX C READING Literature & Informational Text by Theme LE

P M A S N O I T A C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A R . 9 9 . 888

STER. A M E ACKLIN L B A S NOT OK TO BE I T I . GHTED OR THIS BO I R Y P O IVEN F Y WAY. K IS C G O T O O B MPLE SSION IS N UCED IN AN A S S I I D TH PERM REPRO


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Focus on Specific STAAR Skills

S TA A R

NEW!

Specific Focus on Reading & Writing D

Understanding Complex Reading

Understanding Persuasive Text

Understanding Poetry

Understanding Drama

Literature & Informational Text by Theme

Reading & Argumentative Writing

Reading to Analyze and Interpret

Reading to Analyze and Interpret

ALIGNED TO THE READINESS & SUPPORTING TEKS GRADES 3-8

ALIGNED TO THE READINESS & SUPPORTING TEKS GRADES 3-8

ALIGNED TO THE READINESS & SUPPORTING TEKS GRADES 3-8

ALIGNED TO THE READINESS & SUPPORTING TEKS GRADES 3-8

Five Parts for Focused Instruction Part A: Understanding How to Read Complex Passages with rigorous passages and questions

Teaches students how to understand and analyze persuasive texts and how to write persuasive essays. Students will analyze a range of persuasive texts including editorials, letters, speeches, historical texts, and responses to literature. Students learn about the purpose and structure of persuasive texts, and then practice the techniques used to persuade readers.

Teaches students how to understand and analyze different types of poetry, such as lyrical, free verse, limerick, and more. Students will learn the structural elements of poetry such as rhyme, meter, and stanzas.

Teaches students how to understanding and analyze dramatic literature. Students will learn to draw conclusions and make inferences about the structure and elements of drama. The book also teaches how to interpret interactions between characters, dialogue, and stage directions.

Part B: How to identify a theme Part C: Glossary of Complex Reading Terms Part D: Instruction with complex texts Part E: Independent Practice: Complex Reading Passages of multiple themes with multiplechoice and open-ended questions

Special Features: • Glossary of important terms • Independent practice with five persuasive texts followed by questions

Special Features: • Glossary of poetic terms • Instruction with individual as well as paired poems, followed by questions • Each poem includes key background information to help students understand the text • Independent practice with multiplechoice and open-ended questions

• Independent practice with four writing prompts

Special Features: • Glossary of terms needed to understand dramatic literature • Each dramatic piece is introduced with background information to help students understand the work. • Independent practice with multiple-choice and open-ended questions

. All 4 Books Available in 1 Package! Understanding Complex Reading, Understanding Persuasive Text, Understanding Poetry, Understanding Drama

Class Set includes 15 of each title (total 60 books)

Level C Level D Level E Level F Level G Level H

Reading Level

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Understanding Complex Reading

Understanding the Common Core Standards Class Set Level

RALLY! EDUCATION

Level Level C Level D Level E Level F Level G Level H

Grade 3 4 5 6 7 8

Understanding Persuasive Text

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RALLY! Education 22 Railroad Ave. Glen Head, NY 11545 Website: www.RALLYEDUCATION.com

Understanding Poetry

Understanding Drama

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6375-0 6378-1 6381-1 6384-2 6387-3 6390-3


UNDERSTANDING COMPLEX C READING E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 8 8 8 Literature & Informational Text

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

by Theme


E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

Copyright ©2013 RALLY! EDUCATION. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright may be reproduced in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner. Printed in the U.S.A. 1012 RALLY! EDUCATION • 22 Railroad Avenue, Glen Head, NY 11545 • (888) 99-RALLY

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Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Understanding How to Read Complex Passages . . . . . . . . . . .6 Information and Guidance on Understanding, Analyzing, and Comparing Complex Passages How to Identify a Theme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Information and Guidance on Understanding and Identifying Themes in Complex Passages

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Definitions of the Key Terms Needed to Analyze Complex Passages by Theme Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 One Single Passage and Two Sets of Passages Connected by E KLIN C A a Theme with Background Information and Instruction L B A

NOT

R. MASTE

BE

Birthday Surprise . . . D . .. .IT. .I.S. . . . . . . .O.O. K . . T. O . . . . . . . .18 E B T S H I G H I T Study Time .25 COPY.R. .. .. G.. I..V.. E.. N.. .. F.. O.. ..R.. .. .. .. .. A.. Y.. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .28 S I Get It Together K NY .W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 NOTIs on theINGround A LE 2:BOOWhen S I P Passage Set the Snow M N A O SSIAnts UCED THIS S PERMIThe ODGrasshopper and . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 PRthe Passage 1: Passage Set 1:

RE

Independent Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Two Single Passages and Three Sets of Passages Connected by a Theme for Students to Complete on Their Own Passage 1: Passage 2: Passage Set 1: Passage Set 2: Passage Set 3:

Each in Its Own Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Make Your Own Memory Timeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 The Pet Donkey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Designer Dogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Ancient Greece . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Coretta Scott King . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 The Fisherman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Nature’s Gifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77

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Introduction Understanding Complex Reading: Literature & Informational Text by Theme teaches students how to understand, analyze, and evaluate complex passages while focusing on theme. Students will read a range of passages with complex and sophisticated themes, including sets of passages connected by a theme. Students will learn how to use close reading to interpret passages and will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to answer rigorous questions about the passages.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A How to Identify a Theme 9.R 9 . 8 8 8 Understanding How to Read Complex Passages

This section of the book describes the main features of complex passages and gives guidance on how to understand, analyze, and compare complex passages.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B T A teaches This section of the book explains what a theme is E NOand O Bstudents S I T T K I O . D O how to identify themes. It describes aHprocess use B identifying and HISfor IG TE FOto T R Y R P O analyzing themes in passages, IVEN how Yclose K IS Cand OitTshows AY.reading based on a G O W O B N N E passage’s themes A analyze complex passages. L be used NtoISunderstand AMPcan D INand O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

Glossary

The glossary gives definitions of the terms that students will need to understand to analyze complex passages by theme. Students can refer to the glossary as they learn to analyze complex passages.

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Instruction This section contains one single passage and two sets of passages connected by a theme. Each passage or set of passages is introduced with key background information that will help students analyze and evaluate the passage, understand the theme, and make connections between passages. This section of the book contains both literature and informational passages, and the passages and question sets increase in complexity and rigor. Each question set includes multiple-choice, short-response, and extended-response questions.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Independent Practice

This section contains two single passages and three sets of passages connected by a theme for students to complete on their own. This section of the book contains both literature and informational passages, and the passages and question sets increase in complexity and rigor. Each question set includes multiple-choice, short-response, and extended-response questions.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Understanding How to Read Complex Passages Understanding Complex Passages Complex passages often have longer sentences and challenging vocabulary. The first key to understanding complex passages is to understand the language. If a sentence has difficult words, reread the sentence. The meaning of words can often be worked out just by reading the sentence again and thinking about what meaning of the word makes sense. In other cases, the meanings of difficult words may need to be looked up. If the meaning of a sentence or paragraph is unclear, read it again more carefully. Difficult sentences can be broken down into their different ideas. Paragraphs can also be read sentence by sentence. This means making sure that each sentence is fully understood before moving on to the next one. You could also break a R. paragraph down by taking notes and listing its main ideas. MASTE

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

KLINE C A L B BE of NOT Acan be Complex passages are usually longer passages. There S I TaO lot T K I O . D O B The central idea information, but it is all linked together IGHTEby aFOcentral THIS idea. R Y R P O that holds a passage together Y. understand complex K IS Cis theOtheme. GIVENOneNway O WAto T O Y B N E A L S I P IN passages is toSfocus understanding The next section of this CEDtheme. SSION RODUthe IS AM on I H M T R E book explains howPto identifyRthemes and how to analyze a passage based EP on its themes.

Analyzing Complex Passages Complex passages usually require readers to find meaning. Ideas are often not stated directly. Instead, readers draw conclusions and make inferences based on details from the passage. This requires reading the passage closely and making decisions based on what is read. Details from the passage are used to draw conclusions and to make inferences. The key to analyzing complex passages is to look closely at the passage and to always base understanding on information and details from the passage.

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Comparing Complex Passages Complex passages can be connected by a common theme. Questions about passages connected by a theme require using information from both passages. To answer these questions, each passage should first be understood on its own. With a good understanding of each passage, connections can then be made between them. While connected passages are similar in some ways, they are different in other ways. Answering questions about connected passages involves thinking about how they are the same and how they are different.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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How to Identify a Theme Understanding Themes A theme is the central idea of a passage or the lesson or message that the author wants to convey. A theme is different from the subject or the topic of a passage. For example, a story might describe how a player acts badly after losing a tennis match. The subject of the story is the tennis match, but the theme is about being a good sport. An article might describe how Thomas Edison invented the light bulb after trying many times. The topic of the article is Thomas Edison, but the theme is about never giving up. When identifying themes, be exact rather than vague. For example, it is better to identify that the theme of a poem is how friendships require trust than simply identifying that the theme is friendship.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Most passages do not state the theme directly. Instead, passages need to be analyzed to work out what the themes are. Many passages also have moreR. E STcentral A M than one theme. When analyzing a passage, there may be twoLor more E N I LACKimportant. B ideas or messages. In some cases, the themes may be equally In A T BE NO O S I T T K I other cases, there may be one major theme OO minor themes. ED.and one or Bmore

IGHT FOR THIS R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E Identifying MPL Analyzing N IS Themes Aand D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T O RM the story, PEhold In literature, themes or play together. As you read a REPRpoem,

passage, think about what the central ideas are. Themes can be communicated in different ways. In some passages, the theme will be a lesson a character learns or a lesson the reader learns from the events. In some passages, a character’s main problem could reveal the theme. In other passages, the events that take place could reveal the theme. In informational texts, the theme can be the central topic of the text. For example, an article about how to recycle paper could have the main theme of recycling. It could also have themes based on opinions given in the text or messages suggested by the text. For example, it could have themes about creating too much waste or about taking care of the environment.

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To identify and analyze themes, follow the three steps below.

Part 1: Overview Before looking at a passage closely, look at the passage overall. Here are some questions that can help guide you. • What is the title? Does the title suggest a main idea or theme? • Is there a subtitle? If so, what does the subtitle suggest? • What genre is the passage? Does this give any clues about what the theme might be or how to identify the theme?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L Part 2: Reading R the A Passage L A R . 9 9 888.

• Is there any art? Does the art give any clues about the theme?

Once you have looked at the passage overall, you will probably have some clues about the theme. You will also have some ideas about what to look for to identify the theme.

TER. S A M E KLINabout C Now you can read the passage. As you read the passage,BLthink what A A T E O B you are reading. Think about the events that IS Noccurring TO what the K and IT are O . D O E B T S characters are saying and doing. Think what is given and YRIGH about R THIinformation P O O F C N S E I . to take notes as V be a good what the author wantsOyou WAYidea Y OTItGIcan B OK to know. N N E A L S I P N think about as you read. you read the passage. Here are AM D Ito ON some things THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R • What is the passage mainly about? What is happening in the passage? • What are the main events? Do these events reveal a theme? • Who is the main character? What is the main character like? • Is there a main problem or conflict? How is it solved? • Is there a turning point? Does something or someone change in some way? • Does the passage have a main lesson or an important message about life?

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• What important ideas are in the passage? What does the author most want readers to know? • What is the overall purpose of the passage? • How does the author feel about the topic? How does the author make you feel about the topic? • What does the author seem to believe? By considering these questions, you should have identified one or more themes.

Part 3: Close and Careful Reading

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Now that you have identified some themes, you should read the passage closely. This time, focus on the themes you have identified. Read the passage and take notes on each theme. Identify details from the passage that relate to the theme. Focus on what the passage says about the theme and how the passage gives information on the theme. You might record key events, important details, or key sentences from the passage. By close . ER STand A M reading, you will analyze the passage to identify what the themes are E N ACKLI how they are communicated. T A BL E

IS NO OOK TO B T I . D IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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Glossary Author’s Purpose The author’s purpose is why the author wrote the passage. Authors write passages to entertain, to inform, to instruct, to explain, and to persuade.

Character A character is a person in a story, poem, or play.

Characterization

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Characterization refers to how an author tells the reader about a character. It can be by describing a character. It can also be by describing what a character looks like, how a character feels, or what a character does.

Close Reading

Close reading refers to reading a passage carefully and paying attention to the details of the passage. Close reading involves looking closely at what TER. S A M the passage says, thinking about the details of the passage, and KLINEanalyzing C A L B the passage based on the details. Close reading is used BE details to NOT A to Kidentify O S I T T I support conclusions, inferences, and predictions, OOidentify what the HTED. R Tand IS Bto G H I R Y themes are and how they are Ccommunicated. OP N FO

K IS GIVE O WAY. T O Y O B N N E A L S I P IN Conflict THIS SAM RMISSION UCED D O R E REPor struggle that takes place in a passage. The conflict is the Pmain problem The conflict can reveal the theme of the passage.

Details Details are facts or pieces of information given. Two or more details can be used to draw conclusions or to make inferences. The details in a passage are the evidence used to support conclusions, inferences, predictions, and decisions made about the main ideas and themes.

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Draw Conclusions Drawing conclusions refers to making decisions based on facts and details in a passage. For example, a text might describe how it is late at night and how a character is yawning. These details could be used to conclude that the character is tired.

Fact A fact is a piece of information that can be proven to be true.

Genre Genre refers to the form of a passage. There are many genres, and passages in each genre have common features. Knowing the genre of a passage can help you determine the passage’s purpose. It can also help you analyze the passage’s meaning and identify the passage’s themes.

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Examples:

• Fables have the main purpose of teaching a lesson. The theme of a fable can be determined by focusing on what lesson the fable is meant to teach. TER.

MAS E N I L K • Adventure stories are exciting stories that involve AC sort of BLsome A T E O N a character danger. The theme could be revealed by IShow TO Bovercomes T K I O . D O or avoids danger. IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C a series GIVofENevents. O WAY.meaning is often • Narrative poems describe The T O Y O B N N E A L S I P IN SAMwhy the based SION are Oimportant UCED to the poet or what the poet ISevents D M THIS on R R E P REP wants to express by describing them.

• Odes are poems written to praise something. The theme of an ode is often what is being praised or what makes the object being praised special. • Biographies tell about a person’s life. Biographies may include lessons about life or have themes like making a difference or overcoming challenges.

Lesson In literature, a lesson is a truth about life a character learns or a truth about life a reader learns from the passage.

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Main Idea The main idea of a passage is what the whole passage is about. A passage may include several ideas, but the main idea is the most important idea of the whole passage. A main idea may be stated, or you may have to infer what the main idea is.

Make Inferences Making inferences refers to making a guess about something based on facts and details from a passage. Inferences are made based on the information in a passage, but can also use what you already know. Inferences can be made about how characters feel, why something happens, or what a character learns. Inferences can also be made about what an author thinks, what an author’s purpose is, and what the author’s message is.

Make Predictions

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

A prediction is a guess made about what will happen in the future. When making predictions, details from the text should be used to support the prediction.

TER. S A M Mood KLINE C A L B T Areader Ofeel, Mood refers to how a text or part of a text makesNO the S I T BE or the T K I O . D O feelings created in the reader. IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B Narrator N E L IS NA Nperson AMa Pwork D Ithe O I S E S C S S U I The narrator of is the telling story. I H D T PERM REPRO Opinion An opinion is a statement that cannot be proven to be true, or a personal view of something.

Plot The plot is the pattern of events that takes place in a passage.

Point of View Point of view refers to the position of the speaker of a work. The point of view can be first person, second person, third person limited, or third person omniscient.

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Position The author’s position refers to how the author feels about a topic, or the author’s viewpoint. The author’s position or viewpoint can reveal the theme.

Setting The setting of a story, poem, or play refers to where and when the events take place.

Structure The structure of a passage is how the passage, or part of the passage, is organized. Common structures include chronological order or sequence of events, cause and effect, problem and solution, main idea and supporting details, compare and contrast, question and answer, and order of importance.

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Style

The style of passages refers to how authors express themselves, or how authors write.

TER. S A M Subtitle KLINE C A L B A subtitle is a second part of a title. Subtitles give O T A information BE about a N more O S I T T K I passage. They can show the passage’s focus, OO idea, message, HTED. purpose, IS Bmain G H I T R Y R or theme. IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O B IS NO CED IN ANY Examples:AMPLE N O I S S U IS THIS PERMWonderREPROD • Seeds: Nature’s This subtitle suggests that seeds are amazing. • Storms: How to Stay Safe This subtitle shows the main purpose of the article. • The Piano: Practice Makes Perfect This subtitle states the message of the story.

Summarize A summary is a short description of a passage that gives the main points. When summarizing a passage, only the important events, details, and ideas should be included.

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Supporting Detail Supporting details are details included to support a main idea.

Symbolism Symbolism is a literary technique where a word, object, or event is used to stand for something else. For example, white snow might symbolize that something is pure. Symbolism can be used to create meaning and can be used to help communicate a theme.

Theme A theme is the central idea of a passage or the lesson or message that the author wants to convey. In literature, themes hold the story or poem together. In informational texts, the theme can be the central topic of the passage or can be a message, thought, or idea communicated by the passage.

Title

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A title is what a passage is called. Some titles are straightforward and state the topic of the passage or the main idea of the passage. Other titles are less straightforward and need to be analyzed to work out their meaning. Titles TER. S A M can be used as clues to understand passages and their themes. CKLINE

BLA A T O Examples: IS N TO BE T K I O . D O IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y • My First Airplane Flight P O IS C of the IVEN Ktopic Gstory. O WAY. T O This title states the Y O B N N E A L S I P IN IS SAMLiveERWell ISSION PRODUCED M THWell, • Eat P RE This title states the main idea of the article.

• Too Little Too Late This title gives a clue about the theme of the story.

Tone Tone is how the author feels about the subject.

Topic The topic of a passage is what the passage is about or the subject of the passage.

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TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Instruction Each passage or set of passages is introduced with key background information that will help students analyze and evaluate the passage, understand the theme, and make connections between passages with common themes.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

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Passage 1: Single Passage Introduction: This passage is a story that will be analyzed on its own. The main character in the story is Eric. It is Eric’s birthday and he has planned a huge game of hide-and-seek with his friends. However, the game does not go as he had planned. Eric’s main problem gives a clue to the main theme. At the end of the story, the main problem is solved. At this point, Eric learns something about what is important to him. Read the passage and see if you can work out what Eric learns.

/ Birthday Surprise \ E L P M 1

2

3

SA N O I T A C U D E ! Y RALL 99.RALLY 888.

“Ready or not, here I come!” Eric’s voice rang out loud and clear across the quiet backyard. It was a Friday afternoon in June, and it was his birthday. All he had wanted to do on his birthday was have a huge game of hide-and-seek with his friends.

TER. S A M INE Eric KLempty. Eric looked across his big vacant yard. At least, it looked C A L B NOT AbutKcould knew it was really full of kids. He listened closely, S I TO BEhear no T I O . D O S B loud, hoping to hear laughter. “Where should I look first?” said IGHTE Eric THIout R Y R P O O F EN hear aWsound. IS C He Tdid a giggle from a nearby K bush. AY. GIVnot O O Y O B N N E A L S I P AM D IN ON UCEbe ISSIhouse HIS Sthat D M Eric T knew the tree would a good place to hide, so he O R R E P REP decided to check there first. He climbed the ladder quietly, hoping to sneak up on whoever was inside. He excitedly reached the top and pushed himself onto the wooden floor. A look of disappointment came over Eric’s face. All he had found was a squirrel! The squirrel quickly darted onto a branch and disappeared.

4

Eric climbed down the ladder. Eric stopped a moment and studied his backyard. He tried to stay completely silent. Eric wanted to surprise his hidden friends. Maybe someone would make a sound if they thought he wasn’t near. Then his eyes landed on the little blue shed at the other end of the yard. He was so excited he forgot to be quiet. Eric leapt onto

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the grassy lawn at the other end. Grabbing the metal handles, he yanked the shed’s doors wide open. “Surprise!” he yelled. 5

It was Eric who was surprised. His voice echoed through the otherwise quiet shed. No children ran out. Not even a squirrel hid there. Eric was shocked he had not found one single person! He looked in every corner and under every tool just to be sure. Quietly closing the shed door behind him, Eric set out to continue his search.

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Eric circled the yard. He looked behind every bush, behind the doghouse, and even behind the trashcans. Now he was beginning to worry. He had invited 29 friends to play in his birthday hide-and-seek game. He thought he should have found at least one person by now.

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8 9 10

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Eric went around the house to the front yard. He walked to the porch and peeked behind the porch swing. Finding no one hiding there, he sat on the swing to think. He had checked all of his favorite hiding places, and he had not found one person. The only reason he could think of to explain it was that nobody was hiding anywhere. Maybe TER.his S A M E at all. friends had thought hide-and-seek was for babies and not KLINcome C A L B Just then his mother peeked out the front door. BE NOT A

K TO IT IS O . D O E B T IGH jacket! THIS inside and put it on!” “Eric, dear, you aren’t wearing YRyour RCome P O O F C N S E WAY. OOK I IS NOT GIV Y B N E A L P “I’m fine,” M shrugged. AEric D IN ON THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R “It’s very important that you come inside and get your jacket right now,” his mother said firmly.

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Eric got off the swing and followed his mother inside the house.

12

“SURPRISE!”

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Eric could hardly believe his eyes. All 29 of the friends he had invited stood smiling at him! They had been in the house all along! Eric laughed as he remembered yelling “Surprise!” in the empty shed. He never thought he would end up being surprised instead.

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In the middle of the excited crowd, Eric’s sister Monica held a chocolate birthday cake.

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“Make a wish!” his friend Marlon yelled.

16

Eric smiled. He had wanted more than anything to find his friends. Looking around the room, Eric knew his wish had already come true.

17

“I’m glad that game of hide-and-seek is over!” Eric said.

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“Who said it’s over?” Marlon said. “We know hide-and-seek is your favorite game and we wanted to make it the best game ever! Finding us was just the warm-up. Now it’s time for you to find all your presents!”

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

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1

What is the most important surprise in the passage? A Eric finding the squirrel in the tree house B Eric finding that the shed was empty C Eric seeing all his friends inside D Eric seeing his birthday cake

2

Which sentence from the passage best shows that Eric is beginning to get upset? A He listened closely, but could hear no laughter.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

B Quietly closing the shed door behind him, Eric set out to continue his search. C He had invited 29 friends to play in his birthday hide-and-seek game. D Maybe his friends had thought hide-and-seek was for babies and not come at all. 3

ER. T S A M Read this sentence from the passage. KLINE C A L B T Ayour jacket “It’s very important that you come inside Iand NOget S TO BEright T K I O . D O now,” his mother said firmly.IGHTE THIS B R Y R P O O F C K IS Eric’s GIVENsays Nthis? O WAY. What is the main reason mother T O Y O B N E A L S I P IN SAM UCED ISSIOisNsilly. D M THISthinks O A She the game R R E P REP B She is worried Eric will get sick. C She knows his friends are hiding inside. D She has bought him a jacket for his birthday.

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Which of these is the main theme of the passage? A Mothers often know best. B People can let you down. C Friends make things special. D It is mean to play tricks.

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6

Based on the events of the passage, how will Eric most likely feel about searching for his presents? Use details from the passage to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

How would Eric’s birthday have been different if he had looked inside the house first? Use at least two details from the passage to supportR. STE A M your answer. E N LI

LACK B A T IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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Explain how Eric’s friends made his birthday special. Give two reasons you can tell that Eric’s friends are good friends. Use details from the passage to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • explain how Eric’s friends made his birthday special • give two reasons you can tell that Eric’s friends are good friends • use details from the passage to support your answer

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

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Passages 2 and 3: Passages Connected by a Theme Introduction: The next two passages are connected by some common ideas. The first passage is called “Study Time.” The main purpose of this passage is to teach readers how to study. It also gives instructions for making a homework calendar. The second passage is called “Get It Together.” It also teaches readers how to study, and gives instructions for making something to help readers study. Both passages are on the topic of studying and homework. They also have some ideas about studying and homework in common. Read both passages and try to determine what common ideas about homework and studying they share.

1

E L P M A S N / Study Time \ O I T A C U D E ! Y RALL 99.RALLY 888.

Think about all of the classrooms you have ever seen. They may be different in some ways, but there are some things that always seem to . TERand S be the same. They have desks, blackboards, books, bulletin boards, A M E ACKisLIaN reason why L pencil sharpeners. And this is just naming a few! AThere B BE certain NOT you S I TOneed classrooms have these things. To be aDgood student, T K I O . O IS Bevery movie theater IGHaTEfire Ftruck THand R tools. Just like every firehouse has Y R P O O IS C classroom . supplies you need Kevery GIVENmustNhave O WAYthe needs a movie screen, T O Y O B N E A L S I P IN M N to doTHyour IS SAjob. DUCED MISSIO

P ER

2

REPRO

Part of your job involves homework! So where do you do this part of your job when you are at home? Do you have a special place set up with the tools you need?

Selecting a Spot 3

Having a study area at home is important. Your study area should not be near the television or phone. Even though every home is different, there is likely to be some place where you can set up your own special work place. Maybe you can’t find any place at first. But look around. Think about it. Maybe you can use more than one space!

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4

5

When Nancy has to read a book she has a perfect spot. It’s between her bed and the wall. She puts a couple of pillows on the floor, gets comfortable, and settles down to enjoy the story. She feels hidden away from everything that is going on.

QUIET ZONE SCHOOLWORK GOING ON!

But that spot does not work when she has writing to do. Then she likes to work at the kitchen table. There was a problem though. Her brothers would come in, tease her, and push each other around. It often took her a long time to finish her work. Then her mother had an idea. She made a sign to put on the kitchen door. It looks just like the signs you see around the city. However, this sign says: QUIET ZONE—SCHOOLWORK GOING ON! If the sign is up, her brothers cannot be loud. It took a while, but finally everyone got TER. S A used to the idea. Now even her brothers use the sign sometimes! M E

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 8 8 8 Tick Tock

6

KLIN C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y FO Managing your time can parts COPone ofGthe ENhardest IS be . of being a good V Y I K A O W T O student. In addition ANYclubs, chores, and many IS NO there PLE B toSIhomework, Nare I M N A D O S E C S do you U to remember to do all those IS Dhave otherTHactivities. RMIonly PENot REPRO

things, but you also have to decide what should be done first and what can wait. You have to decide what is most important.

7

Making a daily schedule can be the best way to organize your day. It is easy to make a weekly calendar that will help you get everything done.

8

Divide a piece of paper into eight columns. At the top of the first column, write Time. Then write a day of the week at the top of each of the other columns.

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Time

Monday

Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Before School During School After School

9

10

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

The Time column is going to have three parts: Before School, During School, and After School. Draw three lines across the page. You will need the least space for “During School” because that part of your day is usually decided for you. “Before School” is where you will write reminders about taking library books, assignments, or other materials to school. “After School” will need the most space because that is where TER. S A you will write activities, homework assignments, chores, and anything M KLINE C A L else important. B TA

IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D TE fill in the SB Every Sunday night, take the Ytime for the week. IGHto THIcalendar R R P O O F C N S E . the new things Every day when you fill K I home AYin GIV school, W Y OT from BOOcome N N E A L S I P N homework that has to be Mon the calendar. N You might Iadd that belong HIS SA PERMISSIO EPRODUCED T done that day, a quiz that R is scheduled for tomorrow, or a project that is due by the end of the week. If you keep a good calendar, you will be able to get everything done on time. You will also be ready for every single school day.

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/ Get It Together \ 1

Has this ever happened to you? You sit down to do your homework. After a couple of minutes you have to go and find some more paper. A few minutes later, the pencil point breaks and you get up to search for a pen or pencil. You put papers for different classes in different piles, but they start to get mixed up. It would be so nice to have a paper clip, but you don’t want to have to search for that, too! Well, there’s a better way. You can make your own study box. It’s a toolbox for a student that can help you stay organized and stop you wasting time!

2

Before making your study box, organize your papers into folders. You may want to choose different colored folders: red for math, blue for writing, and so on. Label each folder clearly. Then gather all the other tools you will need to use when you study.

3

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Your StudyR BoxALLY Y L L A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M E Your study box will hold your folders and all of the other you KLINsupplies C A L B A to study. need. You can take it with you to wherever you BE It will be NOTplan O S I T T K I all packed and ready to go! HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O Materials Needed O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS HIS DU •T A large carton PERM REPRO • • • • • •

4

Colored paper Ruler Scissors Glue Markers or crayons Large piece of cardboard that is at least as long as the carton

You will need a carton that is big enough for file folders and all your other supplies. Write down the measurements and take them to the grocery store. You can usually get empty boxes of every size there.

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5

1. On a long side of the carton, use your ruler to draw a square. The sides of the square should be about 2 inches from the sides of the carton. The bottom of the square should be about 3 inches from the bottom of the carton. Have a grown-up cut out this section.

6

2. Now you will use colored paper to cover your carton. For the side that has been cut out, use the ruler to measure for strips that will fit on each side of the opening. Use the ruler to draw these shapes on the colored paper and then cut them out. Use a marker or crayon to decorate the strips and write your name on the strip that will go along the bottom. Glue the strips onto the carton.

7

3. Measure one of the short sides of the carton. Use your ruler to draw that shape on your colored paper. Cut the shape out. Then trace around it on the paper to make the same shape again. Glue them on the short sides of the carton. Measure and cut out paper for the last side and glue it on.

8

4. Now you will make a divider. Measure the length of the carton.ER. MASofT the E Cut out three pieces of cardboard that are exactly the length N I L K BLAC to Esee that it A carton and 7 inches wide. Try one piece in the carton T O OB IS N You may Thave T K I O . fits as tightly as possible without bending. to trim it a D O HTE IS B G H I T R Y R OP bit. Once that piece Iis cut Etwo N FOother pieces S Cperfect, . the same size. V Y I K A G O W T O O NY divider in the middle of Now glueMP the Put LE Bthree Ipieces IS Ntogether. N Athe I N A D O S E S C S U IS THIcarton. the PROD PERM

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888. RE

9

5. Put your folders in the area between the divider and the uncut side of the carton. Put a paper or plastic cup over to the side in the front part of the carton. Put your pens and pencils in it. Find a small box for paper clips and put that next to the cup. Scissors, rulers, and other items can also fit in this section.

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8

What is the main link between the first paragraph of “Study Time” and the passage “Get It Together”? A The paragraph lists classroom items that can be put in a study box. B The paragraph describes how students need tools to do their work. C The paragraph suggests places that students could study. D The paragraph explains that not all classrooms are the same.

9

How is the item made in “Study Time” similar to the item made in “Get It Together”?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

A It helps students combine schoolwork with other activities. B It helps students choose the best time and place to study. C It helps students use their study time well and not waste time. D It helps students remember the dates of important events. 10 The sections “Your Study Box” and “Tick Tock” are mainly organized TER. S A M NE by — LACKLI A B C D

OT A B TO BE N S I describing a problem and then a solution ED. IT THIS BOOK T H G I listing things to do in OPYR IVEN FOR Corder S I K WAY. TG Y Ostudying BOO ways N N E A L comparing different of S I P IN IS SAM ERMISSION RODUCED H T stating the effects of studying P REP well

11 How do the authors of both passages most likely feel about homework? A Students are given too much homework. B Homework is an important part of school. C Students should have fun doing their homework. D Homework is often too difficult.

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12 According to the passages, how can students waste time when doing homework? Use details from both passages to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

13 The passage “Study Time” suggests having more than one study space. How could the information in “Get It Together” help students work in more than one space? Use details from both passages to support your ER. T S A M answer. LINE

LACK B A T IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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14 Good students are organized students. Explain why it is important for students to be organized. Describe how students can stay organized. Use details from both passages to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • explain why it is important for students to be organized • describe how students can stay organized • use details from both passages to support your answer

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Passages 4 and 5: Passages Connected by a Theme Introduction: The next two passages are connected by a common theme. The first passage is a poem called “When the Snow Is on the Ground.” The poet describes how a robin is searching for food in winter. The second passage is a fable called “The Ants and the Grasshopper.” Fables often use animal characters to teach readers lessons about life. The grasshopper in the fable has a similar problem to the robin’s. He is also searching for food, and then learns an important lesson from the ants. Read both passages and see if you can determine the main lesson that both the grasshopper and the robin need to learn.

1

2

E L P M A S N / When the CSnow \ O I T A U D E Is on the Ground ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B E OT A IT IS N BOOK TO B R THIS O F N S E I . OT GIV IN ANY WAY BOOK N E L S I P The air SisScold, worms D I AM the ISSION arePRhid; H M T ODUCE R E For robin here Pwhat can beREdone? The little robin grieves When the snow is on the ground, For the trees have no leaves, HTED. G I R And no berries can be found. Y COP

Let’s strow1 around some crumbs of bread, And then he’ll live till snow is gone.

1

strow — scatter

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/ The Ants and the Grasshopper \ Adapted from a Fable by Aesop

1

In a field of grass one summer’s day, a grasshopper was hopping about. He was chirping and singing to his heart’s content. An ant passed by carrying an ear of corn he was taking to the nest.

2

“Why not come and chat with me?” said the grasshopper. “Why bother toiling in that way?”

3

“I am helping to lay up food for the winter,” said the ant. “I recommend that you do the same.”

4

“Why bother about winter?” said the grasshopper. “We have got plenty of food at present. And look at what a beautiful day it is. It would be a terrible shame to waste such a lovely day by doing something as silly as working.”

5

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M E thought The ant stopped and rested the ear of corn on the ground. KLINHe C A L B A clear blue about the grasshopper’s words. He looked upNat OTthe BE sky and O S I T T K I . OOplay. He thought noticed that it was a lovely day and day HTEaDperfect IS Bfor G H I T R Y R FO dance Yand briefly of how nice it would ENand IS COPbe toT Gsing . be free. But after V I K A O W O B he hoisted NY onto his back and went just a minute of IS NO theCear PofLE rest, N Acorn I M N A D O I S E S S For the IS THIway. on his ODUthe ant continued his toil. All the PERMrest of Rthe EPRday, time, he could hear the grasshopper’s happy song. Each time he passed by with another ear of corn, he could see the grasshopper still playing in the fields without a care in the world.

6

In the same field many months later, winter had arrived. The grasshopper searched high and low for food, but could find none. The grass was covered with snow, and most of the trees had lost their leaves. The grasshopper had found only the tiniest amount of food in weeks. While there was once food everywhere he looked, he now had to search for days just to find a little. He became weaker and weaker. He was too hungry to sing or dance, and was soon too hungry to even search for

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food. While the grasshopper was resting on a bare branch hoping for winter to end soon, the ant he had met in summer passed by. The ant had a happy trot in his walk. 7

“How can you be so full of energy?” the grasshopper asked.

8

The ant explained that he had plenty of food. The grasshopper used all the energy he had left to follow the ant to find this hidden supply. He saw the ant join his mates. There, corn and grain were passed out for all the ants to share. The grasshopper watched the ants bustling around. Then he humbly walked up to the head ant and asked for a grain to eat. The ant looked shocked by the request.

9

“I’m sure you don’t need any of our food,” the head ant said. “Didn’t you store anything away for the winter?”

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

10

The grasshopper shrugged and shook his head.

11

“But you must have known winter was coming,” the head ant continued. “It comes every year, just the same as always.”

12

13

14

TER. S A M E CKLINfood,” Aany L “I was just so busy that I didn’t have time to storeA up B NOT S I TO BE whined the grasshopper. T K I O . D O IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O N “What in the world Owere allWlast K IS Cyou soOTbusy AY. summer?” the head GIVEdoing O Y B N N E A L S I P IN ant asked.SAM ISSION PRODUCED M THIS R E P RE “I was so busy making music and playing that before I knew it, the summer was gone,” the grasshopper explained.

15

The head ant shrugged his shoulders in disgust.

16

“Did you hear that, everyone?” the head ant cried out. “All during summer, he was too busy making music to store any food away, and now he has none. For all you young ones that are always asking, that is why we work every day even when times are good.”

17

With that, he turned his back on the grasshopper and went on with his work.

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15 Which of these is a main theme in both the poem and the story? A How wise older people can be B How good times do not last C How the seasons bring change D How you should help others in need

16 What is a main difference between the robin and the grasshopper? A The robin is helped, but the grasshopper is not. B The robin plans ahead, while the grasshopper does not.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

C The robin did not know that winter was coming. D The robin can live longer without any food.

17 Based on the poem, how is the robin most likely similar to the grasshopper?

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B He likes to sing during summer. NOT A K TO BE S I T I He did not store any food forIGwinter. HTED. R THIS BOO R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. He often begs forOfood. K O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

A He lives in a field of grass. B C D

18 Which word best describes how the grasshopper and the robin feel during winter? A Embarrassed B Lonely C Puzzled D Upset

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19 Compare the poet’s feelings about the robin’s problem to the head ant’s feelings about the grasshopper’s problem. Use details from both the poem and the story to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

20 Explain why animals have trouble finding food in winter. Use details from both the poem and the story to support your answer. R.

STE A M E N LACKLI B A T IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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21 Read these sentences from “The Ants and the Grasshopper.” “But you must have known winter was coming,” the head ant continued. “It comes every year, just the same as always.” What main idea is the head ant describing? Explain how this main idea relates to both the poem and the story. Use details from both the poem and the story to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • describe the main idea the head ant is describing in the sentences • explain how this main idea relates to the poem • explain how this main idea relates to the story • use details from both the poem and the story to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Independent Practice This section contains two individual passages with questions for students to complete on their own, and three pairs of passages connected by a theme with questions for students to complete on their own.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passage 1: Single Passage

/ Each in Its Own Place \ TIME: a hundred years ago PLACE: a tiny house in the country 1

[The tiny kitchen is seen. The SAUSAGE is stirring the pot. The COAL is tending the fire. The SALT is laying the table. Enter STRAW with a load of wood.]

2

STRAW (throwing down some wood): Do you think you’ll need more wood for the dinner, Sausage? (Sausage does not answer. She gets into the pot to flavor the vegetables.)

3

COAL (whispers to Straw): Sausage is quite put out.

4

STRAW: What’s the trouble?

5 6 7

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B COAL: No one knows. NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y OP of water.] [Enter SNOWFLAKE withISaCpail EN FO WAY. V I K G O T O NO LE B IS Where’s P(looking N ANY I M N A D O I S E SNOWFLAKE about): Sausage? S C IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

8

STRAW: She is flavoring the vegetables.

9

[Sausage comes out of the pot.]

10

SNOWFLAKE: Here is the water, Sausage.

11

[Sausage does not answer.]

12

SNOWFLAKE (speaking louder): Will you come for the water, Sausage?

13

SAUSAGE (sharply): No, madam, I will not!

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14

THE OTHERS (with surprise): Sausage!

15

SAUSAGE: I’ve been trapped here long enough!

16

THE OTHERS (with surprise): Sister Sausage!

17

SAUSAGE: I am tired of doing all this work!

18

SNOWFLAKE: But we all do our share. I fetch the water, Straw brings in wood, Coal makes the fire, and Salt sets the table.

19

SAUSAGE: I must stand over the fire. I must not only stir the dinner, but flavor it with myself as well. For each of you there is one duty, but for me there are plainly three.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

20

STRAW: But, sister—

21

SAUSAGE (interrupting): Don’t “sister” me!

22

SNOWFLAKE: Sausage, dear, would you break up our pretty home?

26

ER. T S A M SAUSAGE: There must be a change! Someone else can stand KLINEover the C A L B fire, or stir the pot, or flavor the vegetables. OT A IS N TO BE T K I O . D O IGHTE notFObeR eaten. THIS B COAL: If I flavored them, they could R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E SAUSAGE:SAThat’s you’re saying, MPL what N IS always D IN A but I’m not so sure of it. O I E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO SNOWFLAKE: If I stirred the pot, it would be the end of me.

27

SAUSAGE: Yes, you say that often enough, but I’m not so sure.

28

STRAW: Should I stand over the fire, I’d be no more.

29

SALT: It is plain that I should not get into the pot. It would be goodbye for me!

30

SAUSAGE: Excuses! Excuses! I say there must be a change! I will bring the wood or draw the water.

23

24 25

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31

COAL: But, Sausage, you should stay within.

32

SAUSAGE: Not I, sir! I’ll go out of the house, I will! I’ll see a bit of the world, I will!

33

SALT (sighing): Well, if she will, she will!

34

SAUSAGE: We will make a change. Straw will tend to the fire, Salt will draw the water, Snowflake will stir the pot, Coal will lay the table, and I will collect the wood. Now, Straw, go and see if the fire needs wood on it. (Straw hesitates.) Come on, do your duty!

35

[Straw crosses the hearth and looks into the fire. He is very careful, but the fire reaches him and he is gone in a puff!]

36

SNOWFLAKE: Poor Straw! Well, it is now my duty to stir the pot.

37

[She crosses to the hearth, but just as she reaches it, she disappears without so much as a cry.]

38 39 40 41

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

.

TER SALT: Poor Snowflake! Well, it is now my duty to draw the water. E MAS

KLIN C A L B A no more.] [She forgets that the pail is full, falls into it, and NisOTseen S I TO BE T K I O . D O IS B IGHTEto lay THtable R Y R P O COAL: Poor Salt! Well, IitS is my duty the O F C EN . nicely. V Y I K A G O W T O Y EB IS NOfromCEhaving PLhe N ANtended I M N A D O I S [He forgets that is still burning the fire. As he places S DU MIS THIS O R R E P P E R fire and wraps itself around him.] the plates, the tablecloth catches

42

COAL (from inside the burning cloth): This is the end of me!

43

SAUSAGE (weeping): Dear me! Dear me! Who would have thought it would turn out so badly! Well, it is my duty to bring in wood.

44

[Sausage opens the door and is face to face with a hungry dog who is sniffing about.]

45

DOG: Ah, I thought you’d be coming out soon!

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46

SAUSAGE (pleased): Do you want to see me, sir?

47

DOG: Why, yes, I’ve been waiting for you.

48

SAUSAGE: How good to be out in the world! They always said my place was within.

49

DOG: They did, eh? Well, just to please them, I’ll put you there.

50

[He swallows her quickly, and Sausage is no more.]

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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1

Based on the way the other characters react to Sausage, you can infer that they — A are content with how things are B are afraid of going outside C are used to her getting upset D are bored with doing the same tasks

2

Read these lines from the passage. SNOWFLAKE (speaking louder): Will you come for the water, Sausage?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

SAUSAGE (sharply): No, madam, I will not!

What does the word sharply suggest about Sausage? A She is startled by Snowflake.

B She is pointing at Snowflake.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B D She is feeling angry. NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y S COP T GIVEN FO WAY. Ipassage. K Read this line from the O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S U me! Who would have IS SAUSAGE (weeping): me!DDear THIS PERM Dear REPRO C She is about to cry.

3

thought it would turn out so badly! Well, it is my duty to bring in wood.

What does Sausage’s decision to go outside to bring in the wood suggest? A She feels sorry for what she did. B She has not learned her lesson. C She is glad that things have changed. D She is pleased to be all alone.

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4

The end result of changing the tasks for Straw is that he — A catches on fire B is attacked by a dog C gets blown away D burns the house down

5

Based on the events of the passage, explain what the title of the passage means. Use details from the passage to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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6

Identify two reasons that Sausage wants to swap the tasks around. Use at least two details from the passage to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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7

Why did each character in the passage have a set task? How does the passage show that each character was suited to the task? Use details from the passage to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • explain why each character had a set task • describe how the passage shows that each character was suited to the task • use details from the passage to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passage 2: Single Passage

/ Make Your Own \ Memory Timeline 1

You might have seen timelines before when studying history. A timeline is a display of a list of events. The events are described from earliest to latest, and the dates of events are listed. Timelines can describe many different things. A timeline could list all the American presidents and the year they became president. It could list the dates of important inventions. Timelines also often describe the life of a person. They list the important events of the person’s life.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888. The Life of Albert Einstein

1879 Einstein is born.

1905 He publishes five important papers.

1955 . ASTER He dies at the N ageE ofM76.

LACKLI B A T IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D IGHTE 1920 THIS B 1940 R 1860 1880 1900 Y R P O O F K IShighC school.OT GIVEN He receives AY. Prize. O Wa Nobel O Y B He finishes N N E A L S I P N AM D IN MISSIO EPRODUCE 1922 THIS S PER1896 R

1960

2

Timelines are not just for recording events in history or details about important people. A timeline can show any series of events. What events are special to you? It does not matter if you have not done anything as great as Albert Einstein! Not everybody can change the world. The events in your life are still important to you because they happened to you!

3

Everyone has special memories that are important to them. A memory timeline is a great way to organize your memories. It helps you see when things happened. A timeline always goes in the order of dates. It goes from what happened first to the last thing that happened.

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4

To make a timeline of your life, you do not have to read history books. It is about you! And who knows more about your memories than you do? Choose the memories you want to put on your timeline. You can ask family members for help with dates.

5

A timeline is very cheap and simple to make. But that doesn’t mean that it isn’t special. It is special because it is all about you. To make your timeline, you will need: • 2 pieces of paper • a pen or pencil • a ruler

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

To make your timeline, follow these steps: 6

1) On one piece of paper, make a list of your favorite memories.

7

2) Now number your memories. Put the number 1 in front of your earliest memory. Then number the rest of your memories in theR. STE A M order they happened. E N LI

8

3)

9

4)

LACK B A T O that theTOpaper BE is longer IS Nso Turn your second piece of paper sideways T K I O . D O HTE top to HIS B IGfrom Tbottom. from left to right and shorter R Y R P O O F K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E A IS Use the aN horizontal the middle of the page. IN across MPL to draw Aruler Dline O I S E S C S S U I I H D M T O R R E P REP

10

5) At the left end of the line, write the year you were born. At the right end of the line, write the year it is now.

11

6) Divide the line into sections for each year of your life. Try to make the sections as even as possible. Write the year for each section. For example, if you were born in 1997, then the second line section should say 1998. The third line should say 1999, and so on. There should be a section for each year of your life.

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12

7) Now write your memories in the correct sections. Draw a short vertical line in the section where a memory should go. That short line is like an arrow. It points to the memory on the timeline. Underneath that line, write a short description of your memory. Suppose you learned how to ride a bike in 2002. Then write “learned to ride a bike” in the section for that year.

13

8) You can add photos from your life to go with some of the memories.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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8

Based on the passage, which statement would the author most likely agree with? A Everyone should try to keep busy. B Everyone should try to do great things. C Everyone should study history. D Everyone should remember their past.

9

Which sentence best supports the idea that each person’s memories are special?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

A It does not matter if you have not done anything as great as Albert Einstein! B The events in your life are still important to you because they happened to you! C A memory timeline is a great way to organize your memories. D It goes from what happened first to the last thing that happened.

10

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B OT A How is the timeline titled “The Life of Albert different NEinstein” S I TO BE from T K I O . D O the timeline at the end of the passage? IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O C K IS life. GIVEN NY WAY. O A It describes aE person’s T O O B N N IS AMPL in order. D IN A O I E S C S U I B ItTlists HIS Sevents D PERM REPRO C It is about a famous person.

D It shows when a person was born.

11 In which step of making the timeline would a person make it most unique and special? A Step 3 B Step 5 C Step 6 D Step 8

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12 How does the list of items in paragraph 5 support the idea that the timeline is cheap and simple to make? Use details from the passage to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

13 Would a memory timeline about your own life be as important as a timeline about the life of someone like Albert Einstein? Use at leastRtwo E . T S A M details from the passage to support your answer. LINE

LACK B A T IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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14 If you were going to make a memory timeline, explain how you would choose the memories to put on it. Explain whether it would be a good idea to ask other people to help you choose memories to put on it. Use details from the passage to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • describe how you would choose the memories to put on your memory timeline • explain whether it would be a good idea to ask other people to help you choose the memories • use details from the passage to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passages 3 and 4: Passages Connected by a Theme

/ The Pet Donkey \ Adapted from a Sioux Legend

1

2

3

Maka was the daughter of a Sioux chief. She grew up and married a brave warrior named Dyami. After a few years of marriage, Maka and Dyami had twins. They had a daughter named Winona and a son named Chayton. On the children’s first birthday, their grandmother handcrafted two leather saddlebags for them and presented them with a donkey.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

“I want my grandchildren to ride in the best way possible,” she said to Maka. “This donkey is patient, steady, and cautious. He shall transport the children in these saddlebags.”

ER.

AST A few days later, Maka and Dyami were preparing to go onNEa M trip. I L K Maka positioned the leather saddlebags on the donkey’s BLAC backE as the A T O B and IS N onOOone TOside T grandmother had instructed. She placed Winona K I . D HIS Bproud of his children. IGHTE Fwas Tvery R Y Chayton on the other. Dyami, however, R P O O K IS Cto rideOTupon AY.his swiftest and most GIVENthe back O Wof O Dyami felt they deserved Y B N N E A L S I P IN AM beautiful UCED onto the pony’s back and ISSION thePRsaddlebags D THIS Spony.PHe O ERMshifted RE in them. He told Maka to stack the placed Winona and Chayton traveling supplies on the donkey. She heaped teepee poles, blankets, and food onto the donkey’s back.

4

Suddenly, the donkey began to buck and kick. He brayed loudly. The items on his back fell to the ground, and he stomped on them. The children’s grandmother came out of her home to see what was going on. She smiled when she saw the chaos the donkey had caused.

5

“This donkey is smarter than you may realize,” said the grandmother. She took the children down from the pony. She placed the saddlebags back on the donkey, and put the children back in the saddlebags. The

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donkey settled down and nuzzled the grandmother’s palm with his nose. 6

“He knows that these are the chief’s grandchildren and that he is meant to carry and protect them. You insult him by making him carry household items,” she explained.

7

Maka and Dyami nodded in understanding and loaded their belongings onto the pony. Then, they started their journey into the forest.

8

The next day, as the family trekked through the thick forest, storm clouds began to develop overhead. The sky turned dark, thunder roared, lightning sliced the sky, and the wind shrieked. Sheets of rain made it impossible for Maka and Dyami to see. As the storm raged on, they sought shelter and tried to set up camp. They spent the night in the freezing rain and cold.

9

10 11

12

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

The storm finally ended the next morning. Maka and Dyami collected items that had been blown away by the wind. Glancing around, Maka noticed that the ponies were still huddled together under a large rock, TER. S but the donkey was no longer with them. A M E

KLIN C A L B TA BE cried. “Dyami, where are Winona, Chayton, andISthe NOdonkey?” TOMaka T K I O . D O B IGHTEHe searched THIS in R Y R P O Dyami sprinted through the woods. O F EN IS C . caves and bushes, V Y I K A G O W T O O the children but it was no Puse. LE BThe donkey IS Nand N ANY had disappeared. I M N A D O I S E S C DU MIS THIS PERfinally REPRO that it was time to return to the Maka and Dyami decided

village. They had to tell the dreadful news to their family. The journey home seemed longer and more difficult than usual. Maka broke down into sobs several times along the way. Maka and Dyami finally stumbled into the village. 13

As she approached her teepee, Maka could hardly believe her eyes. There, standing outside her front door and chomping on an ear of corn, was the donkey. Next to him, Winona slept in the arms of her grandmother. Chayton was safely in the arms of his grandfather.

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14

“Where have you been?” asked the grandmother.

15

Maka reached for her husband’s arm to steady herself. “Dyami,” she said, “please tell me that I am not dreaming.”

16

Dyami approached the donkey and rubbed his hand across its nose. He lifted the children from their grandparents’ arms and placed them in the arms of their elated mother.

17

“You are not dreaming,” he said.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

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/ Designer Dogs \ 1

2

3

4

Have you ever heard of a labradoodle? It’s a dog that comes from crossing a Labrador with a poodle. The idea is to get a dog with the good nature of a Labrador, but the smaller size of a poodle. Of course, it’s also likely to be a very cute dog. This is one example of a designer dog. These are dogs created by combining different breeds. Designer dogs can be created to have some features that people will like, such as not shedding hair. However, they are also often designed based on looks. A scoodle is the result of crossing a poodle with a Scottish terrier. One of the reasons crosses like this are so popular is that the resulting dog is very cute.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

This crossing of dog breeds is not a new idea. It has been happening for centuries. However, in the past, its main purpose was not based on the dog’s looks. Instead, it was based on the dog being better able to do its job.

TER. S A M LINE Around 10,000 years ago, dogs were important partsLof Kfamilies. C A B T A they are NOlike However, dogs were not just important as Ipets S TO BEtoday. T K I O . D O B used to help the Instead, dogs had important roles They IGHtoTEplay. THISwere R Y R P O O F C family seek food andOKtoISprotect the VEN GIfamily. WAY. T O Y O B N N E A L S I P IN SAM haveMbeen UCED ISSIONusedPRfor D Hunting thousands of years. Before people THIS dogs O R E P E R were able to simply go out to a grocery store and buy food, they had to

hunt their own food. Dogs were used to help in the hunt for food. Hounds are breeds of dogs that are able to track down animals. While hounds have the ability to track well, they are not as intelligent as other breeds. It became common to cross hounds with other breeds. A hound crossed with a collie produced a new breed of dog known as a lurcher. A lurcher could track well. It also had the intelligence of a collie. It was not the prettiest animal, but it was great at its job. 5

What type of dog would best protect a family? It depends what the family needs. Sometimes dogs were needed to protect the family’s

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livestock. A dog’s role would be to keep other animals away. A dog suited to this purpose would be large enough and tough enough to scare away animals such as wolves or foxes. However, it would also need to be a dog that wants to protect. It is no good if the dog is also going to attack the livestock! Dogs were bred that had the size, intelligence, and nature needed to protect. 6

7

Another way dogs protected the family was by noticing threats. These dogs were like guard dogs for the family. However, they did not need to be fierce and frightening guard dogs. The guard dogs were not trained to attack. Instead, a dog might bark to let the family know about things like foxes or snakes. This type of dog had to be able to spot threats, but also needed to have a good nature. It needed to look after young children and bond with them. Different types of dogs were crossed to create a dog that had all the right features. A larger hunting dog with the ability to spot threats might be crossed with a smaller breed to create a dog better suited to living with a family.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A Is the Chow Chow the Perfect Dog? R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B A chow chow is a small but sturdy dog that comes China. BE Chow NOT A from O S I T T K I O good guard chows were once hunting and herding They HTED. dogs. IS BOmake G H I T R Y R dogs because of their ability threats. dislike strangers and EN FO They IS COPto spot . V Y I K A G O W T O Y small enough to safely O form strongMbonds their They IS Nowners. PLE B with N ANare I N A D O I S E S C IS HIS children, DU to guard a family. Chow chows play Twith enough PERMbut tough REPRO have become popular pets all over the world.

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15 Which of these is a main idea about animals in both passages? A They come in many different breeds. B They have many different purposes. C They can be smarter than they look. D They do not always do as they are told.

16 Which sentence about the lurcher best shows how it is similar to the donkey in the story? A A hound crossed with a collie produced a new breed of dog known as a lurcher.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

B A lurcher could track well.

C It also had the intelligence of a collie.

D It was not the prettiest animal, but it was great at its job. 17 Which statement best explains why the donkey in the story and ER. Tthe S A M NE chow chow in the article both make good pets for children? LACKLI A B C D

OT A B TO BE N S I They mainly want to play. ED. IT THIS BOOK T H G I They are slow and patient. COPYR GIVEN FOR S I K WAY. Y OT BOO N N E A L They want to protect. S I P IN IS SAM ERMISSION RODUCED H T They are easy P to train. REP

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18 Read this sentence from the story. Dyami felt they deserved to ride upon the back of his swiftest and most beautiful pony. How is Dyami’s view of the pony most similar to an idea in “Designer Dogs”? A It suggests that animals need to be fast. B It suggests that people focus too much on looks. C It shows that animals need to be cared for. D It shows that everything has a purpose.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

19 Describe at least two ways that animals can help protect people. Use details from both the story and the article to support your answer.

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20 Think about the donkey in the story and the guard dogs described in the article. Describe how they show that an animal chosen to protect may not be what people expect. Use details from both the story and the article to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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21 Pets are often selected based on looks, but looks are not the most important things to consider. Explain what roles pets can play in a family and describe two features of a good pet. Use details from both the story and the article to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • explain what roles pets can play in a family • describe two features of a good pet • use details from both the story and the article to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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Passages 5 and 6: Passages Connected by a Theme

/ Ancient Greece \ 1

What is your everyday life like? What do you want to do with your life? How will your life be different as you grow older? People today will have many different answers. There are many choices. You might not realize how lucky you are to have these choices. For some people, life is decided for them.

2

In ancient Greece, people did not have as many choices. A lot of things were decided the second a person was born. If you were a boy, you followed one path. If you were a girl, you followed another. Here is what life might have been like if you had been born in ancient Greece.

3

After your birth into your Greek family, your father lifts you into the air. He performs a special dance with you. He places an emblem above TER. S A M NElet everyone KLIto your family’s door. Already, it is important for the family C A L B OT aAboy, an BE branch Nare know whether you are a boy or a girl. If Tyou S I TO olive K I O . D O SB is displayed. If you are a girl, aRpiece A few days IGHTEof wool TisHIdisplayed. Y R P O O F C N S E I later, your relativesOand Y. After that, your WAyou. T GIVto welcome Y Omeet B OK friends N N E A L S I P life couldSgo ways. AMtwo verySdifferent ION CED IN

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

THIS

IS PERM

DU REPRO

The Life of a Boy 4

At age 7, you start going to the local primary school. Books are costly, so you have to remember all of the information your teacher provides. You study reading, writing, music, and sometimes art.

5

At age 12, you go to another formal school for four more years. You learn about math, government, public speaking, and drama.

6

At age 18, you are considered an adult. You are required to join the army. You will train in the army for two years. You are expected to be strong, loyal, and wise.

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7

As an adult, you have a job and a family. You might work as a businessman, politician, soldier, or farmer. Your work keeps you busy most of the day. In the evening, you dine with your wife and children. As a man, you are allowed to attend sporting events, public hearings, and festivals.

8

In old age, if you have had a son, he must make sure that you and your wife are cared for. The elderly are highly respected in ancient Greece. However, those without a son usually continue to work for the rest of their lives.

The Life of a Girl 9

10

11

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

At age 7, while your brothers attend school, your mother teaches you how to manage a household. You learn how to cook, clean, and sew. Only the daughters of rich families are taught to read and write. From ages 7 to 14, you help your mother maintain the household and care for younger siblings. You rarely journey outside of your parents’ ER. are TYou S home because women are not allowed to appear in public often. A M LINE allowed to attend some events, but not many. A BLACK

NOT S I TO BE T K I O . D O At age 14, you are no longer expected HIS aBchild. It is time for IGHTE toFact Tlike R Y R P O O you to prepare to beOmarried. IVEN willY select K IS C Your Gfather WAY. a husband for you. T O O B N N E A L S I P IN Most boysSAcomplete SION andOarmy UCEDtraining before they marry. Your IS M ERMISschool H D T R P older than you. husband will probably be aRElot P

12

As an adult, your only jobs are to be a wife and mother. You must make sure your household runs smoothly, and you must take care of your children. You may spend time with other wives and mothers, but most of your time is spent with your family.

13

In old age, your husband has probably retired. You will now spend more time together enjoying your family. Your son and his wife will most likely care for you. You might also help look after your grandchildren and pass your skills on to them.

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/ Coretta Scott King \ 1

2

Coretta Scott was born on April 27, 1927. She was born on a farm in Alabama. The world was very different back then. In Alabama, and much of the South, African Americans had different laws than white people. Early in her life, Coretta had to live with unfair laws because she was African American. Coretta walked five miles to a tiny school that had just one room. White students did not have to walk. They rode buses to a large school.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B T A her problems NOlet Coretta rose above these struggles. She didISnot TO BE hold T K I O . D O S B did very well in her back. She just worked as hard IGHasTEshe Fcould. THIShe R Y R P O O C wentGto N elementary school. She High IVELincoln K ISthen O WAY. School and did very T O Y O B N N E A L S I P IN at the top of her class. well again. finished high school M 1945, she IS SAIn ISSION PRODUCED H M T R E Because of her Pgood grades, REshe was given money to study at Antioch College in Ohio. While at college, she became interested in civil rights, or the fight for African American people and white people to be treated alike. She joined a group that tried to help African Americans get the same rights as white people.

3

Coretta finished at Antioch College. She then won money to study at a college in Boston. In Boston, Coretta met Martin Luther King, Jr. The two were soon married. In September of 1954, Dr. King got a job at a church in Alabama. Coretta returned with him to her home state.

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Photo courtesy of The Library of Congress

Early Life


Making a Difference 4

5

6

In Alabama, the couple became more involved in the fight for civil rights. White people and African Americans were still not treated equally. They sometimes had to follow different laws. One unfair law stated that African American bus passengers had to sit at the back of the bus. It also stated that they had to give their seats to white bus passengers. One African American woman named Rosa Parks refused to give her seat to a white bus passenger. She got in a lot of trouble. African Americans in Alabama became angry with the unfair laws. They joined together and stopped using the buses. Coretta and her husband both stood up for Rosa Parks. They asked African Americans and white people not to follow the laws that were unfair to African Americans.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Many people did not like the Kings because of their struggle for equal rights. This made life very dangerous for Coretta and their four children. However, she still did not give up. Even while she was busy raising her children, Coretta found time to help people. She traveled all over the country with her husband, spreading messages about civil TER. S A M INE rights. She was the first woman ever to speak at Harvard KLUniversity’s C A L B A Class Day. IS NOT TO BE

ED. IT THIS BOOK T H G I COPYR GIVEN FOR S I Keeping Up the Fight K WAY. Y OT BOO N N E A L S I P IN M King passed Even H Coretta UCED continued to fight for civil IS SADr. ISSION away, D M Tafter O R R E P Americans. REPShe also stood up for others who were not rights for African

treated equally. She wanted everyone to have the same opportunities in life. Coretta started a group to honor her husband’s lifelong work. In 1969, Coretta wrote a book that described her and her husband’s life. She fought to make her husband’s birthday, January 15, a holiday in the United States. In 1986, she won this fight. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is now celebrated every year. People also still celebrate Coretta’s life and her hard work to help African Americans. She is one of the reasons that people today are treated more fairly.

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22 Based on the passages, how was Coretta’s life different from the lives of most girls in ancient Greece? A She was able to go to school. B She got married. C She looked after her children. D She had to follow many rules.

23 Which statement is most likely true about the authors of the passages? A Both authors believe it is good that people are treated more fairly today.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

B Both authors wish that life today was more like how it used to be. C Both authors think that people today have too many choices. D Both authors worry that people today do not fight for their rights. 24 Coretta Scott King would probably think it most unfair that —ASTER. A B C D

NE M I L K C A L boys in ancient Greece had to remember all Ttheir O A B lessons N O BE S I Twrite T K I O . only rich girls in ancient GreeceTlearned to read and D O IGH E FOR THIS B R Y P O young men in ancient had N join theAarmy K IS CGreece GIVEto O W Y. T O Y O B N N E A L S I P IN keep working in old age some people AM in ancient ON Greece hadD to THIS S PERMISSI EPRODUCE R

25 How is the passage “Coretta Scott King” different from the passage “Ancient Greece”? A It tells about one person’s life. B It describes events in order. C It is based on facts. D It includes opinions.

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26 Compare how the information is organized in the sections “The Life of a Boy” and “Early Life.” Use details from both passages to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

27 If Coretta Scott King could have spoken to girls in ancient Greece, what advice would she probably have given? Use details from both passages ER. T S A M to support your answer. LINE

LACK B A T IS NO OOK TO BE T I . D IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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28 Think about the way people were treated unfairly in ancient Greece and in the early 1900s. Describe at least one way the unfair treatment was similar. Describe at least one way the unfair treatment was different. Use details from both passages to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • refer to how people were treated unfairly in ancient Greece and in the early 1900s • describe at least one way the unfair treatment was similar • describe at least one way the unfair treatment was different • use details from both passages to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

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Passages 7 and 8: Passages Connected by a Theme

/ The Fisherman \ by Abbie Farwell Brown

1

The fisherman goes out at dawn When every one’s abed, And from the bottom of the sea Draws up his daily bread.

2

His life is strange; half on the shore And half upon the sea — Not quite a fish, and yet not quite The same as you and me.

3

The fisherman has curious eyes; They make you feel so queer, As if they had seen many things Of wonder and of fear.

4

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y S COP days EN FO WAY. Ifoggy V They’re like the seaOO on — I K G T LE Bquite Iblue; IS NO CED IN ANY Pyet M N Not gray, nor A O S S DU THIS RMIS EPROhe They’re like thePEwondrous tells Rtales

Not quite — yet maybe — true. 5

He knows so much of boats and tides, Of winds and clouds and sky! But when I tell of city things, He sniffs and shuts one eye!

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/ Nature’s Gifts \

Based on an excerpt from The Land of the Blue Flower by Frances Hodgson Burnett 1

The Land of the Blue Flower was not called by that name until the beautiful King Amor came down from his castle on the mountain crag and began to reign. Before that time it was called King Mordreth’s Land. The first King Mordreth had been a fierce and cruel king. This gloomy name suited the land.

2

His fair mother sent for her friend and teacher, who was said to be the oldest and wisest man in the world. The lovely Queen showed him the tiny baby sleeping by her side.

3

The Queen held out the little newborn one in her arms. “Take him away quickly. Take him to the castle on the mountain crag. Keep him there until he is old enough to come down and be King. If he is with R. you he will learn what Kings should know.” MASTE

4

5

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

KLINE C A L B The Ancient One took the child to the mountain. NOT A He Kclimbed S I TO BE and T I O . D O E climbed, and little King Amor slept inHIthe IGHTsoundly T S B folds of his gray R Y R P O O F robe. He reached the Ksummit EN lookedWout IS C at last. AY. over the mountain’s GIVHe O T O Y O B N N E S the spreading edge at theAM sea PLand theSIOsky N Iand D IN A plains below. S E C S S U I I H D T RO PERM REPsaid. “The stars are very near,” he “Waken, young King, and see how near they are and know they are your brothers. Your brother the wind is bringing to you the breath of the trees. You are at home.”

6

Then King Amor opened his eyes, and when he saw the stars in the dark blueness above him he smiled.

7

The castle was huge. The little King Amor lived alone but for the companionship of the Ancient One and a servant as old as himself. But they knew a secret that had kept them young in spite of the years they had passed through. They knew that they were the brothers of all things in the world.

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8

One of the very first things the child King Amor remembered in his life, and he remembered it always, was a dawning day when the Ancient One wakened him gently. He carried him up the winding and narrow stone stairway. At last they stepped out on the top of the huge castle. It seemed to the little creature to be so high that it was quite close to the wonderful sky itself.

9

“The sun is going to rise and wake the world,” said the Ancient One. “Young King, watch the wonder of it.”

10

Amor lifted his little head and looked. He was only just old enough to be beginning to understand things, but he loved the Ancient One and all he said and did.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

11

Every dawn they rose and saw together the wonder of the day. The first time the sky was heavy with gray clouds and the sun did not leap upward from behind the edge of the world, Amor asked why.

12

“The burning gold is behind the lowering gray and purple,” the Ancient ER. STthey One said. “The clouds are heavy with soft rain. When they Ebreak A M KLINearth will C A L will drop it in showers or splendid storms, and the thirsty B BE The NOT AandKthe S I TO roots. drink it up. The grains will drink it and the seeds T I O . D O E HIS Bsprings will bubble up IGHTfresh TThe R world will be joyous and rich with life. Y R P O O F EN K IS C willOrush GIVbabbling O WAY. the green of the like crystal, andEthe brooks through T O Y B N N A L S I P M forest. CED INwill be full and clear, and men S SAdrinking SSION for Rthe Ucattle Iplaces D M THIThe O R E P feel restedRand EP cool. Lift your head high when you and women will walk, young King, and often look upward. Never forget the clouds.”

13

Taller and stronger he grew each day. He became wiser and more beautiful. Each plant, each weed, each animal thing, each wind, and each star of heaven taught him its wonders and its wisdom.

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29 Which word best describes both King Amor and the fisherman? A Wise B Lonely C Shy D Dishonest 30 The fisherman spends his time at sea, while the Ancient One spends his time at the castle on the top of the mountain. How are these two settings similar?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

A They are both hard places to reach. B They are both peaceful places.

C They are both dangerous places. D They are both busy places.

31 Both the poem and the story are about — A B C D

TER. S A M how a good ruler acts KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S being with nature I T I HTED. R THIS BOO knowing who you are OPYRIG EN FO WAY. IS C V I K G O T O taking carePLof E BchildrenN IS NO N ANY I M A D O I S E S C IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

32 Read this sentence from “Nature’s Gifts.” Each plant, each weed, each animal thing, each wind, and each star of heaven taught him its wonders and its wisdom. Which stanza from the poem best shows that the fisherman knows about similar things? A Stanza 1 B Stanza 2 C Stanza 4 D Stanza 5

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33 Dawn is mentioned in both the poem and the story. How is the importance of dawn to the fisherman different from the importance of dawn for King Amor? Use details from both the poem and the story to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

34 How are the fisherman’s and King Amor’s views of the world most likely ER. T S A M different from other people’s views of the world? Use details KLINE from both C A L B the poem and the story to support your answer. E OT A

IS N TO B T K I O . D O IGHTE FOR THIS B R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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35 The fisherman and King Amor both spend time away from everyday things. How do these experiences change them? Do you feel that the changes are good or bad? Use details from both the poem and the story to support your answer. In your response, be sure to • explain how the fisherman’s experiences change him • explain how King Amor’s experiences change him • give your opinion on whether the changes are good or bad • use details from both the poem and the story to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

Page 87 © R A L LY ! E D U C AT I O N . N O PA R T O F T H I S D O C U M E N T M AY B E R E P R O D U C E D W I T H O U T W R I T T E N P E R M I S S I O N O F T H E P U B L I S H E R .


E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE C A L B NOT A K TO BE S I T I HTED. R THIS BOO G I R Y IS COP T GIVEN FO WAY. K O O PLE B SION IS NO CED IN ANY M A S IS DU THIS PERM REPRO


Applying the TEKS for the STAAR—Understanding Complex Reading: Literature & Informational Text by Theme teaches students how to understand, analyze, and evaluate complex passages while focusing on theme. Students will learn how to use close reading to interpret passages, and will develop the necessary critical thinking skills to answer rigorous questions about the passages. The book is divided into five parts: Understanding How to Read Complex Passages Information and Guidance on Understanding, Analyzing, and Comparing Complex Passages How to Identify a Theme Information and Guidance on Understanding and Identifying Themes in Complex Passages

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

Glossary Definitions of the Key Terms Needed to Analyze Complex Passages by Theme Instruction One Single Passage and Two Sets of Passages Connected by a Theme with Background Information and Instruction

TER. S A M KLINE C Independent Practice A L B T A for Students NaOTheme Two Single Passages and Three Sets of Passages Connected by S I TO BE to T K I O . D O IGHTE FOR THIS B Complete on Their Own R Y P O K IS C GIVEN NY WAY. O T O O B N E N IS AMPL D IN A O I S E S C S S U I I H D T PERM REPRO

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Understanding Complex Text Grade 3  

Understanding Complex Reading Literature & Informational Text by Theme Five Parts for Focused Instruction

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