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READING On Your Own E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 888.

TER. S A M KLINE ANY WAY. C A L B NOT A ODUCED IN S I T I Independent HTED. TO BE REPR G I R Y IS COP THIS BOOK K O O Reading R O LE B F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV & Writing ION S S I M P ER

Activities

Level

G


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Reading On Your Own …………… Independent Reading & Writing Activities Grade Levels 3-8 Students work independently to reinforce reading skills during summer vacation. Parts 1 & 2 Passages with Multiple-Choice Questions • Higher-Level Comprehension Questions • Stamina Builder • Informational and Literary Text Part 3 Passages with Open-Ended Questions • Higher-Level Short and Extended-Response Questions • Lengthy passages Answer Key includes answers and scoring rubrics with possible answers for open-ended questions. Level C D E F G H

Grade Level 3 4 5 6 7 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

Level

G


Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM ISBN 978-1-4204-7033-8 R 7033-8 Copyright ©2013 RALLY! EDUCATION. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright may be reproduced in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner. Printed in the U.S.A. 0512.MAQ RALLY! EDUCATION 22 Railroad Avenue Glen Head, NY 11545 (888) 99-RALLY

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Contents Reading On Your Own Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Part 1: Passages with Multiple-Choice Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Part 2: Passages with Multiple-Choice Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Part 3: Independent Expository Writing Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Part 4: Passages with Multiple-Choice and Open-Ended Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Answer Key

RALLY!’s Reading Comprehension Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Part 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Part 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

R. AY. LIN W K C Y A L N A Part 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .N.O.T. A. .B. . . . . . E. D . .IN . 59 C U S I D T RO .I Rubrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . I.G.H.T.E.D. . . . . . .B.E. R. E. P. . . . . . . . . . 61 O COPY . I.S. B. .O.O.K. T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Total Your Score. . . .B.O.O.K. I.S. . . . . . .TH FOR PLE N M E A V S I THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

TE Part 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E. M . A. S58

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Introduction Reading On Your Own: Independent Reading and Writing Activities Reading On Your Own gives you reading and writing activities to reinforce skills.

Parts 1 & 2: Passages with Multiple-Choice Questions

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

• Higher-Level Comprehension Questions • Informational and Literary Texts • Stamina Builder

Each multiple-choice question is worth 1 point.

STER. . A M E Part 3: Independent Expository Writing BActivity ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L A S NOT PRODUCED I T I • Expository Writing Prompt . ED GHTEssay BE RE I R O Y T P • Practice Pre-Writing and Planning Your K IS CO THIS BOO K O O B • Check Your Writing Editorial FOR Checklist PLEUsing Ian N M E A V S THIS NOT G S I N IO RMISS Part 4:PEPassages with Multiple-Choice and Open-Ended Questions • Higher-Level Short and Extended-Response Questions • Lengthy Passages Some open-ended questions are worth 2-points. Questions that require greater stamina are worth 4-points. The answer key in the back of the book includes sample answers and scoring rubrics for open-ended questions.

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 1

Part 1: English/Language Arts

Directions Part 1 asks only multiple-choice questions. Each question has only one correct answer. Read the questions and answer choices very carefully. Be sure to mark the answer you have selected.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Part 1

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Sample Passage and Questions Read the sample passage and then answer the two questions.

The Iditarod Probably the most renowned sporting event in Alaska is the Iditarod. Also known as the “Last Great Race on Earth,” the Iditarod is a dogsled race through Alaska’s snow, ice, and biting winds. It is held to commemorate a 1925 dog-sled relay that brought life-saving medicine to the city of Nome. Since the first Iditarod was held in 1973, the race through the Alaskan wilderness has been held annually. The race covers more that 1,100 miles and can take more than two weeks to complete. Sled drivers, called mushers, must maneuver their team of sled dogs along winding paths and through rugged mountains. Just finishing the demanding race is considered to be an admirable feat.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

ER.

S1 The author uses phrases like “winding paths” and “rugged mountains” MAST E N I AY. L W K C Y A L N so readers will think the Iditarod is AB IN A

A B C D

S NOT PRODUCED I T I . an old tradition GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B a long, boring journey K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S a difficult THIS competition NOT G S I N ISSIO a popular PERM sporting event

S2 Which of the following is the BEST title for this article?

A “Ultimate Sledding” B “The Last Great Race on Earth” C “Alaska’s Best Sporting Events” D “Dogs in Alaska”

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 1

Directions Read the passages and answer the multiple-choice questions.

The Goofiest Gutter Ball E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H Annika stared at theLEparty FOR Tas if it might bite her. “A bowling P BO invitation N M E A V S I party? I despise T G had not been bowling since she was eight THISbowling.” NOAnnika S I N and had tossedIS the bowling ball the wrong way, shattering her father’s big toe. SIO M R E P “Give it a try,” her mother advised, ruffling her hair. “Jerry will be disappointed if you don’t go.” “Not if I end up breaking his toe,” Annika muttered. Annika anticipated a day of disasters. She imagined herself shifting the weight of the bowling ball in her hands and then flinging it three lanes over into a crowd of partygoers. She imagined gutter balls, broken bones, and utter humiliation.

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Part 1

Reading On Your Own • Level G

The day of the party Annika tried to block the images of disaster from her mind as her mother dropped her off in front of the bowling alley. As soon as she entered the building Jerry saw her and waved. There was no escape. She changed her shoes and approached the shiny lanes on shaky knees. “Are you ready to bowl, Annika?” Jerry inquired. Annika nodded and sat down to wait her turn. When the moment arrived, she wiped her sweaty hands on her jeans, picked up a ball, and stared down the lane, scornful laughter echoing in her head. Even the pins taunted her. She swung her arm back and then forward, releasing the ball, which hit the lane with a solid thunk and rolled straight into the gutter. “Nice one, Annika!” Jerry said. “Next time make a goofy face, though.” An embarrassing moment passed before Annika realized that Jerry wasn’t teasing her. He had a big grin on his face, and the other kids were clapping! Sheila got the next gutter ball, and then Randy, and Patrick, and Gloria. The balls bounced and wobbled and always ended up in the gutter, as the players competed to see who could have the funniest reaction. Everyone was enjoying it so much, that when Jerry bowled a strike, there was a loud groan from the group.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

“No gutter ball?” Patrick asked. “Are you trying to ruin the game?” Soon Rthey STE . . A M were all trying to win the Goofiest Gutter Ball title. E IN AY

A CK L L ANY W B A N I T D O Later, Annika’s mother asked how the party had gone. E IT IS N REPRODUC . D E T Annika shrugged. “It was a lot of RIGHevenOthough O BE I only got seven Yfun, T P K O C O gutter balls.” OK IS OR THIS B O B E L EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 1

1 Read this sentence from the story. She imagined gutter balls, broken bones, and utter humiliation. What does the phrase “utter humiliation” mean?

A loud noises B amusing events C minor injuries D great embarrassment

2 Why does the author say that Annika “stared at the party invitation as if it might bite her”?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A to show that Annika is not pleased about the party B to show that the invitation looks threatening C to show that the situation is dangerous

D to show that Annika has a sense of humor

3

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A What type of narrator is telling this story? S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE A first-person I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H B third-person PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S S NOT G C limited THI S I N ISSIO PERM D objective

4 When does Annika realize that Jerry is NOT making fun of her?

A when he compliments her gutter ball B when she sees his expression C when he asks her if she is ready to bowl D when she sees that everyone is bowling gutter balls

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Part 1

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Tunisia: Land of Contrasts Tunisia is the smallest country in North Africa. It is slightly larger than the State of Georgia in the United States and it has a population that is about half that of New York State. Although Tunisia is not a very large or heavily populated country, it is a melting pot that has a great deal of variety. In fact, both the people of Tunisia and the nation they share are highly diverse.

farmland in Tunisia. There are two mountain ranges that are separated by a fertile valley. The land is less fertile in the central region of the country. This makes farming difficult. Another problem is that there is very little rain. Some farmers rely on dew to water their olive trees!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 O

P

BOOK

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Sicily

An n a b a

Tunis

Vallelta

C o n s ta n ti n e B a tn a

M A LTA

M e d i t e r r a n e a n S e a

A

Sfa x Ga fs a

TUNISIA

Medenine

Tripoli M i sra ta h

ALGERIA

L I B YA

R THIS few people have attempted to live in this

E as varied The country of Tunisia EN F O AMPisLjust V S I G S I T H T inhabit it. NO as the people who IS Tunisia N O I S IS includes rich coastal PERM areas on the Mediterranean Sea, large mountain chains, and part of the famous Sahara Desert. These areas are each very different and divide the country into three parts. These parts are called Northern Tunisia, Central Tunisia, and Southern Tunisia. Northern Tunisia is the most heavily populated region in the country. Although it is a mountainous area, it has the best

Palermo

C

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R E For a long time, this area of the world U was part of the Roman Empire. Later Arabs and Berbers were the rulers of the country. People from other parts of Africa, Europe, and the Middle East also came to Tunisia. Each group of people contributed to the culture of the region. Today, Arabic is the STER. . A M E official language of the country. There are AACKLINF INRANY WAY L B A very few people who speak the Berber S NOT PRODUCED I T I . language. Officials and businesspeople E RE region of Tunisia GHTED TheTsouthern B I R O Y P K usually speak French. contains the famous Sahara Desert. Very IS CO BOO

dry, hot area. Camels roam the dunes, eating the scrub brush. They also provide rides for tourists. Environments in much of the country are hostile and difficult. As a result, Tunisians have stayed close together in the livable parts of the country. Tunisia’s northern cities and central farm communities are busy, crowded places. In this way, the diversity of Tunisia’s land has actually brought its people together.

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 1

5 Which statement is BEST supported by the article?

A All of Tunisia is mountainous. B Nobody lives in the central or southern regions. C Tunisia is drier in the south than in the north. D Farming is difficult everywhere in Tunisia. 6 Read these sentences from the passage. Although Tunisia is not a very large or heavily populated country, it is a melting pot that has a great deal of variety. In fact, both the people of Tunisia and the nation they share are highly diverse.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

What does the author mean by “melting pot”?

A crowded city B mixed group C hot place

D uninhabited desert

7

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B For Number 7, read the paragraph. Then follow the directions. A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . To repair a hole in a screen, first, thread needle GHTEDa long BE RE with strong I R O Y T P K O nylon thread. Cut a piece of thatBis K IS Cscreen S OOslightly larger than the I O H O T B R hole. Then, remove from O the door or window and set it PLEthe screen EN Fhandle AMyou V S I G S I T H upright so that can easily the needle on both sides of T NO S I N the screen.MIPosition the patch over the hole. Carefully push the SSIO R E P needle through both the patch and the screen. Using small, even stitches sew around all sides of the patch. When you have finished attaching the patch to the screen, tie the end of the thread. _____________________. Choose the sentence that MOST LIKELY comes next.

A Dispose of the old screen at a recycling center. B Use scissors to cut the loose end of the thread. C Remember not to push on the screen. D Place the screen back in the door or window.

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Part 1

Reading On Your Own • Level G

The Facts on Fossils Much of what we know about prehistoric life on earth has been

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

recorded by fossils.

A fossilized mastodon skull, showing teeth Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress

The definition of fossils is broad. hard parts, such as the creature’s skeleton Generally, fossils are traces of ancient life and teeth, remain under thick layers of TER. that have been preserved by nature. mud. Next, a process called Schemical A M E IN During AY. W KLplace. Fossils are fascinating remnants of the alteration mustBLtake C Y A N A TA D INair, Oalteration, E N past. Some fossils are the bones of ancient chemical water, and other C U S I D T O I R . P D E E T R land animals or the shells of aquatic elements Baffect O E the animal skeleton. Over YRIGH hundreds T P K O O C creatures that lived long before humans. or thousands of years, the O K IS SB I O H O T B R Other fossils, known asAtrace animal’s bones will change into a harder, MPLE fossils, EN F O V S I G S I T H T animals’ISmovements provide records of or rock-like material. If the conditions are NO N O I S behaviors. Fossilized right, the skeleton will become fossilized. ISburrows and PERMfossils that have been footprints are trace Eventually, the swamp that holds the left behind by ancient life. skeleton will dry up, revealing the mud Fossilization, especially of animal and stone of the former swamp bed. Wind remains, is a complicated and delicate and rain eventually wash away the dirt, process. Many factors must work together exposing the ancient fossils hidden to preserve proof of past life. First, an beneath. Fossils are often found by animal must die and fall to the ground. scientists, but those amateurs who look Swampy areas are best because the very hard may be lucky enough to animal’s body will be covered in mud. As discover an ancient piece of the past as time passes, the animal’s skin, muscles, well. and organs will rot away until only the

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 1

8 Read this sentence from the passage. Some fossils are the bones of ancient land animals or the shells of aquatic creatures that lived long before humans. What does the word aquatic mean?

A living in the water B living long before humans C fossilized D ancient

9 Which of the following statements about fossils is a FACT?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A Fossils are fascinating remnants of the past.

B Chemical alteration is a surprising aspect of nature.

C Trace fossils are markings left behind by ancient life.

D Amateurs and scientists who find fossils are very lucky.

10

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A Choose the sentence that is written MOST clearly and correctly. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . TED are GHfascinating. A Traces of the past are, fossils that BE RE I R O Y T P K O IS CObehind K left S BOaltered. I O H are and O T B Trace fossil footprints B R AMPLE T GIVEN FO S S I H T are to fossils, particularly those of dinosaurs. NO C Some museums IS dedicated N O I S ERMIS can teach us much; about how ancient creatures lived. D TracePfossils

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13


Part 1

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Excerpt from

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The first place that I can well remember There were six young colts in the was a large pleasant meadow with a pond meadow besides me; they were older than of clear water in it. Some shady trees I was; some were nearly as large as grownleaned over it, and rushes and water lilies up horses. I used to run with them, and grew at the deep end. Over the hedge on had great fun; we used to gallop STER.all . A M E one side we looked into a plowed field, together round and IN theNYfield WAYas CKLround A L A B A N and on the other we looked over a gate at hard as we we had NOTcould go. C ED I USometimes Srough I D T O I R . our master’s house, which stood by the rather play, for they would D REP GHTEfrequently BEbite I R O Y T P roadside; at the top of the meadow was a and kick as well as gallop. K CO OO S I B K S I O H grove of fir trees, and at theLEbottom P BO IVaEN FOR T One day, when there was a good deal of M A S running brook overhung by a steep G bank. T O THIS N kicking, my mother whinnied1 to me to S I N ISSIO While I was young come to her, and then she said: PERM I lived upon my mother’s milk, as I could not eat grass. In “I wish you to pay attention to what I the daytime I ran by her side, and at night am going to say to you. . . . I hope you I lay down close by her. When it was hot will grow up gentle and good, and never we used to stand by the pond in the shade learn bad ways; do your work with a good of the trees, and when it was cold we had will, lift your feet up well when you trot, a nice warm shed near the grove. and never bite or kick even in play.” As soon as I was old enough to eat grass I have never forgotten my my mother used to go out to work in the mother’s advice. daytime, and come back in the evening.

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 1

11 Which of the following is a theme in the story?

A the value of hard work B growing and maturing C avoiding danger D the importance of friendship

12 The reader’s FIRST clue that this narrator is NOT a person is when he says

A he could not eat grass B he remembers a meadow

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

C he ran with the colts D he stayed in a shed

13 Why does the narrator’s mother give him advice?

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY B She wants him to have good values. L B A NOT UCED S I D T O I R She wants him to work instead of play. . C GHTED TO BE REP I R Y P CO others. OOK IS with B D She wants him to get Oalong K S I O H PLE B IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N SIO When thePnarrator’s ERMIS mother tells him to lift his feet up when he trots, she A She wants him to be like the other colts.

14

wants him to

A run faster than everyone else B walk with pride and grace C make sure he doesn’t fall D kick hard to defend himself

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Part 1

Reading On Your Own • Level G

In the Doghouse T

here are many real cartoonists, but Matt Arbuckle is not one of them. He is imaginary, so this is a story about an imaginary cartoonist who created imaginary animals. Imagine that!

“It was my first big break,” recalled Arbuckle. Later, after graduating high school, he began looking for a cartooning college. He showed the college officials copies of the Clydesdale Chronicler in which his cartoons appeared and they accepted him right away. A short time after he graduated from the college, he had a big break.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

In the real world, dogs don’t walk on two legs and converse with people. In Matt Arbuckle’s world, though, they do that and much more! Arbuckle is the creator of the comic strip In the Doghouse, which can be seen daily in the funny pages of more than twenty newspapers. It’s one of the most popular cartoons in the state.

Arbuckle convinced two major newspapers to pick up In the Doghouse. Once these papers began publishing R. it ashis E T S A strip, other papers wanted to run Y. NE M Aand LIbecame W K C Y A L N well. In the Doghouse more A D INdaily OT A BIt appeared E N C U S I more popular. in D T .I PRO D E E T R H E G PYRI newspapers K TO B all over the country. O It wasn’t always so popular, though. In O C O S I B K BOOin fact, Arbuckle remembers getting R THIS “Matt Arbuckle’s comic strip is a great E O L F P N M E A one,” said Dr. Steven Buckley, who studies trouble for doodling OT GIVin THISinS his notebook N S I N cartoons and their impact on society. “It’s school. He was sketching MISSIO his characters, R E P well-drawn and each new one has a fresh two dogs named Chester and Humphrey, idea. The characters work together when he should have been studying perfectly. Chester is a daredevil who struts algebra. “It’s no wonder that, to this day, around looking for adventures. Poor I’m terrible with numbers!” Arbuckle Humphrey is quiet and timid. Their joked. personalities balance one another out.” During high school he got his first Dr. Buckley also saw a deeper reason for chance to move his cartoons from his the comic’s success. “People like seeing notebooks to a newspaper. The first In the themselves from different points of view,” Doghouse cartoon strip was printed in his he added. “In the Doghouse succeeds in school paper, the Clydesdale Chronicler. It showing people what they might look like was warmly received. “People fell in love to their pets. The result is very funny.” with those dogs,” said Mona Alvarez, a former editor of the newspaper.

16

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 1

15 The MAIN idea of this article is that

A some people study cartoons B school newspapers can help people start careers C national newspaper readers enjoy dog humor D a cartoonist can use his skills to succeed

16 Which of the following is the BEST title for this article?

A “Matt Arbuckle’s Education” B “Cartoon Dogs in Our Society”

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

C “Matt Arbuckle and His Doodled Dogs” D “A Pedigreed Pair of Pooches”

17 Why did Matt Arbuckle draw more than one cartoon for the Clydesdale Chronicler?

A B C D

STER. . A M E He wanted to make money for college. ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A His first cartoon was popular with the students. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . D HTEDr. Gby BE RE I R O Y T His first cartoon was recommended Buckley. P K K IS CO R THIS BOO O O B E of math He wanted toAget FO MPLout EN class. V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

18 Read this sentence from the passage. “Matt Arbuckle’s comic strip is a great one,” said Dr. Steven Buckley, who studies cartoons and their impact on society. What does the word impact mean in this context?

A effect B crash C drawing D humor

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17


Part 1

Reading On Your Own • Level G

19 For Number 19, read the paragraph. Then choose the topic sentence. 1 2 ▼ My family and I have gone many different places on vacation. ▼ My 3 favorite vacations are beach vacations. ▼I love to lie in the sun with my 4 toes in the sand. ▼ I always bring a book, headphones, and a cold drink. 5 ▼ Sometimes I wish I could spend every day at the beach.

A Sentence 1 B Sentence 2 C Sentence 3 D Sentence 4

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

20 For Number 20, read the following sentences. Then choose the sentence that should come FIRST if all sentences were written in a single paragraph.

A My mother sometimes makes me pancakes when I come downstairs. TER.

E MAS WAY. A N ANY I T D O E N C U C I love Saturdays more than any otherTEday . ITofISthe Eweek. PROD D E R H G B RI KofTOthe O COPYfor free the rest day. O D After I do my chores, OI Kam S I B S I H O T B R AMPLE T GIVEN FO S S I H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM N B I don’t have to go to school and can sleep as late as IBwant LACKLIto.

STOP

18

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 2

Part 2: English/Language Arts

Directions Part 2 asks only multiple-choice questions. Each question has only one correct answer. Read the questions and answer choices very carefully. Be sure to mark the answer you have selected.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Part 2

Reading On Your Own • Level G

See You in Cincinnati

Directions

Read the passages and answer the multiple-choice questions.

Marcie wants to fly from Hartford, Connecticut, to Cincinnati, Ohio. She wants to go on either Tuesday, June 7 or Friday, June 10. She wants to come back on either Thursday, June 16 or Sunday, June 19. Marcie gets the flight schedules for the airports in the two cities and is trying to decide which flight she wants to take to Cincinnati. Her travel plans are flexible, so she has many options.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E Hartford Airport - Morning and Afternoon Flights ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T Schedule for Tuesday, June 7 I . RE GHTED Departure Airline Number Destination Arrival Time BE Time I R O Y T P K O Francisco O O US Seahawk Services 2927 K IS CSan 6:30 A.M. 12:35 P.M.* B THIS BOO R Business International PLE 3788 Minneapolis 7:15 A.M. 9:20 A.M. O F AM 6591T GIVEN Cincinnati S Northern Skies 9:05 A.M. 1:15 P.M.* S I H O T IS N6216 5:10 P.M.* Worldwide Air XPress Greensboro 1:05 P.M. N O I S Air SunsetERMIS 2371 Cincinnati 4:20 P.M. 8:32 P.M.* P * connecting flight Schedule for Friday, June 10 Airline Number Sunny Skies 6404 Worldwide Air XPress 2739 Pacifica Blue 2492 Regal Aviator 3512 TransGlobal Trek 6101

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Destination Detroit Cincinnati San Francisco Minneapolis Cincinnati

Departure Time 5:35 A.M. 7:30 A.M. 9:15 A.M. 11:05 A.M. 3:15 P.M.

Arrival Time 10:45 A.M.* 9:30 A.M. 3:30 P.M.* 1:10 P.M. 7:20 P.M.* * connecting flight

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 2

Cincinnati Airport - Morning and Afternoon Flights Schedule for Thursday, June 16 Number Airline Pacifica Blue 3819 Regal Aviator 3202 Business International 6093 Northern Skies 2573 US Seahawk Services 2094

Destination Tampa Hartford New York Greensboro Hartford

Departure Time 7:05 A.M. 9:07 A.M. 11:00 A.M. 2:20 P.M. 3:01 P.M.

Arrival Time 1:00 P.M.* 1:15 P.M.* 12:54 P.M. 3:30 P.M. 7:10 P.M.* * connecting flight

Schedule for Sunday, June 19 Airline Number Pacifica Blue 2306 Sunny Skies 6510 Regal Aviator 6424 TransGlobal Trek 3846 US Seahawk Services 2803 Global Travel 3652

Destination San Francisco New York Newark Hartford Baltimore New York

Departure Time 7:00 A.M. 9:20 A.M. 10:05 A.M. 12:05 P.M. 2:00 P.M. 3:45 P.M.

Arrival Time 2:35 P.M.* 1:10 P.M.* 11:54 A.M. 4:20 P.M.* 3:25 P.M. 5:50 P.M. * connecting flight

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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21


Part 2

Reading On Your Own • Level G

1 If Marcie decides that she wants to buy a round-trip ticket and fly on the same airline both ways, which airline should she choose?

A Regal Aviator B Northern Skies C TransGlobal Trek D Worldwide Air XPress 2 To avoid changing planes on the way to Cincinnati, Marcie does NOT want to take a plane with a connecting flight. Which date and time could Marcie choose to leave Hartford?

A Tuesday, June 7 at 9:05 A.M.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B Friday, June 10 at 7:30 A.M.

C Tuesday, June 7 at 4:20 P.M. D Friday, June 10 at 3:15 P.M.

3 Which of the following flight numbers does NOT fly from Cincinnati to Hartford?

A 2573

4

STER. . A M E B 3846 ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I C 3202 T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P D 2094 CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S OT G For Number Then follow the directions. THI4,S read the Nparagraph. S I N O I S IS Choose PERaMgood, sunny garden spot for your roses. Add compost to the soil and dig a hole about two feet deep. Turn over the plastic container and tap it gently until the rose bush and soil pop out in one clump. Place the bush in the hole and fill in with soil until the soil clump is even with the rest of the soil. ________________________. Choose the sentence that MOST LIKELY comes next.

A Monitor your roses to make sure they are growing well. B Use a garden spade to dig a hole for your roses. C Create a small moat around your roses and fill with water. D Water your roses frequently and add fertilizer if necessary.

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The Indiana Myotis T

he Indiana Myotis is an endangered bat species. Despite its name, it lives in more than twenty different states, mostly in caves or forests and especially in areas near streams and rivers. During the summer, the Indiana Myotis eats many small insects to build up its body fat for winter hibernation.

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 2

on humans by vicious bats with rabies scared the public into a trend of bat destruction that lasted several years. While some bats do have rabies, they almost never attack humans. They swoop down to eat insects, not to harm people. Disturbance of hibernation by cavers and others has also reduced the population drastically. In the past, even scientists have unknowingly harmed the animals. TER. Stheir A M As a result, bats have reached E AY. LIN W K C Y A L N present levelTof endangerment. AB IN A

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

At the beginning of the fall, the Indiana Myotis seeks out a perfect cave in S NO PRODUCED I T I which to hibernate: a cave with a . RE their habits and fragility GHTEDEducation BEon I R O Y temperature of about forty degrees T P K BOO to be the key to saving these bats. K IS CO R THIseems SBesides O Fahrenheit and a relatively high O B public education, other efforts to LE EN F O AMPfor V S humidity. It is very H difficult these bats I G S I save the Indiana Myotis and other bats T T NO S I to survive under any other conditions, N have included bans on harmful scientific SIO MISmajority which means that of the PERthe practices and efforts to provide the bats Indiana Myotis population live in only a with more ideal places to live. Some few caves. By early December, several people have built bat boxes where the thousand bats line the ceilings of these Indiana Myotis can hibernate in peace. caves in clusters. They must not be Also, conservation organizations now disturbed. Waking them will cause them close off hibernation caves in the winter to lose some of the precious body fat that so that cavers will not disturb the bats. helps them survive a winter without food. With continued efforts such as this, Indiana Myotis populations have dropped considerably for several reasons. Most of these reasons lead back to human ignorance. In the past, rumors of attacks

perhaps the Indiana Myotis has a chance for survival.

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Part 2

Reading On Your Own • Level G

5 Choose the sentence that is written MOST clearly and correctly.

A Pups are raised in the summer by colonies of female Indiana Myotis; underneath the bark of dying trees.

B Dying trees, underneath their bark, let female Indiana Myotis raise their pups in colonies in the summer.

C In the summer, colonies of female Indiana Myotis raise their pups underneath the bark of dying trees.

D Colonies of female Indiana Myotis, underneath the bark of dying trees, in the summer raise their pups. 6 With which of the following statements would the author MOST LIKELY agree?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A Bats should hibernate in places other than caves.

B It is more important to save the Indiana Myotis than it is to save other bats.

C People should never enter caves because bats may be hibernating. D Human ignorance can lead to unnecessary destruction. 7

STER. . A M E Read this sentence from the passage. ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A D OTbe the Dkey Education on their habits and fragility seems UCEto S Nto I T O I R . saving these bats. GHTED TO BE REP I R Y P O key”? C“the OOK S I B What does the author mean by K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S A the lock THIS NOT G S I N B the reason ISSIO PERM C the answer

D the problem 8 Which of the following statements about the Indiana Myotis is a FACT?

A Clusters of hibernating Indiana Myotis must frighten unsuspecting cavers. B Many caves are closed off during the winter to allow bats to hibernate in peace. C Building bat boxes is a noble contribution toward saving the Indiana Myotis. D The Indiana Myotis is small, furry, and cute.

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTER

Part 2

May 10 Today I had to utilize months of training and studying in order to complete the final step of my firefighting course—the structure burn. I was the only woman in my class of volunteer firefighters, but everyone knew that I was capable of hauling hoses, heaving heavy ladders, operating tools, and extinguishing raging fires. When I arrived at the three-story concrete building, I immediately noticed the coating of thick black soot that remained from previous burn sessions. My classmates and I formed an assembly line and loaded piles of wood and hay into the building. Then we donned our bunker gear as the instructors ignited numerous fires inside the building to generate heat and smoke. A few minutes later, I ventured into the building for the first time with a stack of fire hose balanced on my shoulder. I made a few errors, including accidentally releasing a mountain of hose at the bottom of the steps, but I didn’t get discouraged.

E L P SAM N O I T A C U D E ! Y RALL 9.RALLY 9 . 8 8 8

As I prepared to battle my second blaze, I tried to recall everything I had learned throughout the past few months. Then, E IN ACKLmy L ready for the challenge, I hoisted the cumbersomeOhose onto B A IS N T beneath a T I . shoulder and climbed the ladder, which was positioned D IGHTE R Y P O smoke-filled window.OIKturned IS C the Sknob R.on my air pack and fresh air E T O B A E M the smoky room. Then, PL before I entered flooded my AMmask S S I H T crouching low, I hurried up the stairs toward the third floor, where the smoke was thicker and the heat was intense. My hand was glued to the nozzle as I scanned each room for signs of fire while my partner maneuvered the hose around corners and up steps. Soon, the orange glow of flames was visible through the dense smoke. I crawled toward the flames, opened the nozzle, and discharged a powerful stream of water onto the flames. Smoke, heat, and steam filled the room, so I aimed the stream of water out the window to help vent the smoke. As I exited the building, soot-covered and exhausted, my instructor commented, “Terrific job.” That was a wonderful moment.

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Part 2

Reading On Your Own • Level G

9 Read these sentences from the passage. As I prepared to battle my second blaze, I tried to recall everything I had learned throughout the past few months. Then, ready for the challenge, I hoisted the cumbersome hose onto my shoulder and climbed the ladder, which was positioned beneath a smoke-filled window. What does the word cumbersome mean?

A dirty B bulky C serious D lengthy

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

10 One difference between the author and the other people at the structure burn is that

A she is female

B she is a volunteer

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L D she made some mistakes B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H Read this sentence from FOR T PLE BOthe Ipassage. N M E A V S G nozzle as I scanned each room for signs S gluedNOtoT the THIwas My hand S I N ISSIO of fire… PERM C she is almost done with training

11

What does the author mean by the phrase “my hand was glued to the nozzle”?

A The nozzle burned her hand. B She could not move her hand. C She had a tight grip on the nozzle. D Her hand was sticking to the nozzle.

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 2

Excerpt Excerpt from from

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by by Mark Mark Twain Twain

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK were to be the subjects of their S I B …Who K S I O H PLE BO IVEN1 FOR T piracies was a matter that did not occur to M A S s the two boys THISwalkedISsorrowing NOT G them. Then they hunted up Huckleberry N O I along, they made a new compact to stand S S I Finn, and he joined them promptly, for all PERM

A

by each other and be brothers and never separate till death relieved them of their troubles. Then they began to lay their plans. Joe was for being a hermit, and living on crusts in a remote cave, and dying, some time, of cold and want and grief; but after listening to Tom, he conceded2 that there were some conspicuous advantages about a life of crime, and so he consented to be a pirate…

careers were one to him; he was indifferent.

They presently separated to meet at a lonely spot on the river-bank two miles above the village at the favorite hour-which was midnight. There was a small log raft there which they meant to capture. Each would bring hooks and lines, and such provision as he could steal in the most dark and mysterious way-as became outlaws…

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27


Part 2

Reading On Your Own • Level G

About midnight Tom arrived with a boiled ham and a few trifles, and stopped in a dense undergrowth on a small bluff overlooking the meeting-place. It was starlight, and very still. The mighty river lay like an ocean at rest. Tom listened a moment, but no sound disturbed the quiet. Then he gave a low, distinct whistle. It was answered from under the bluff. Tom whistled twice more; these signals were answered in the same way. Then a guarded voice said: “Who goes there?”

furnished these titles, from his favorite literature. “‘Tis well. Give the countersign.” Two hoarse whispers delivered the same awful word simultaneously to the brooding night: “BLOOD!” Then Tom tumbled his ham over the bluff and let himself down after it, tearing both skin and clothes to some extent in the effort. There was an easy, comfortable path along the shore under the bluff, but it lacked the advantages of difficulty and danger so valued by a pirate.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

“Tom Sawyer, the Black Avenger of the Spanish Main. Name your names.” “Huck Finn the Red-Handed, and Joe Harper the Terror of the Seas.” Tom had

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 2

12 Why does Joe change his mind about becoming a hermit?

A Huckleberry Finn tells him about a ship they could steal. B He does not want to live alone in a cave for the rest of his life. C He wants to spend more time with Tom and Huckleberry Finn. D Tom convinces him that being a pirate and a criminal is better.

13 After Tom climbs down the bluff, the author notes that there is an easier way to reach the bottom. This shows that Tom

A is afraid of heights

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B enjoys adventure and taking risks C believes that he really is a pirate D wants to impress his friends

14 Which of the following is a theme in the story?

A B C D

STER. . A M E value of friendship ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A facing a fear S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y reaching a goal P CO OOK S I B K S I O H appeal of danger PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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29


Part 2

Reading On Your Own • Level G

MAYVILLE S E R V I N G

M A Y V I L L E

F O R

SUN TIMES

M O R E

T H A N

5 0

Y E A R S

Letters to the Editor To the Editor,

To the Editor,

It has recently come to my attention After a recent series that a certain intersection in our town of minor car accidents in has become unsafe. Mayville residents town, Mayville residents who are familiar with Route 22 seem to have started buzzing about the need for a feel very comfortable driving twenty traffic light at the intersection of Route miles or more per hour over the speed 22 and Linden Street. I, for one, do not limit. While most of this road is straight think that we need to put a traffic light at and goes through farmlands, as it enters this intersection. the town it intersects with Linden Street, Over the past few years, the number of and this is where I have witnessed many traffic lights in and around town has accidents and other traffic problems. more than doubled, severely STER. altering Many people who take this road through A M E N once-manageable patterns AY. and LItraffic W K C Y A the countryside seem to forget that they L N IN A that creating causingNO traffic IDthink T A B jams. E C U S are coming into a town and drive through I D T instances TEDso. I many REPRO where traffic has to H E the intersection at ridiculous speeds, G B I R O T than travel at a steady pace COPY IS Bstop OOK rather S I creating a dangerous situationOfor those K H PLE BO IVEN FOR T actually creates traffic problems in town traveling on Linden Street. M A S and can cause accidents; the traffic lights THIS NOT G S I N I believe that we Sneed a traffic light at hinder more than they help. The last I SIO M R E P this intersection. A traffic light would thing we need is another light to further force drivers to slow down and that would aggravate the problem. We cannot create a safer situation for those who eradicate the lights that are already there cross Route 22 every day. It would also because they have become a part of the help to alert non-residents that they are traffic pattern, and getting rid of them driving in a town where there are would create more problems. We can, pedestrians and playing children. however, try to prevent more traff ic lights from appearing by driving slowly As a last note to my fellow citizens of and cautiously through town. Mayville: Slow down! Henry Ballast Marla Menendez Mayville Resident Mayville Resident

E L P SAM CATION U D E ! Y L Y L L L A A R R . 9 9 . 8 8 8

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 2

15 As it is used in Henry Ballast’s letter, eradicate means

A ignore B fix C dislike D remove

16 Which of the following points is made by the authors of BOTH letters?

A Traffic lights create traffic problems. B Residents should drive slowly.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

C Non-residents are to blame for the traffic problems.

D A traffic light would make the intersection less dangerous.

17 Read this sentence from Henry Ballast’s letter.

STER. . A M E traffic light…” ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A What does the word buzzing mean in this context? S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R A talking Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H B worrying PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I C laughing N MISSIO R E P D thinking “…Mayville residents have started buzzing about the need for a

18 Information in this passage is presented as

A a series of events B a list of facts C a contrast of opinions D a literary review

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31


Part 2

Reading On Your Own • Level G

19 For Number 19, read the following sentences. Choose the sentence that should come FIRST if all sentences were written in a single paragraph.

A The best place to read is in the big chair in my room. B I like mysteries best, but I also like adventure tales. C Reading is my favorite hobby. D It is next to the window, so I can look out in between pages.

20 For Number 20, read the paragraph. Then choose the topic sentence. 1 2 ▼ I have many friends, but Brittany is my best friend. ▼ We have so 3 much in common that we get along very well. ▼ We both like bike 4 riding and love country music. ▼We also live on the same block, so we 5 see each other a lot. ▼ I hope we are in the same classes when we get to

high school.

A B C D

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E Sentence 1 ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T Sentence 2 I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO Sentence 3 OOK S I B K S I O H E BO FOR T N E SentenceIS4SAMPL V I TH NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

STOP

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 3

Part 3 Independent Expository Writing Activity

Directions In Part 3, you will write an essay. Your writing will be scored on how clearly you write and how well you get your ideas across. Be sure to check your writing for correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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33


Part 3

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Ideal Career Read the writing prompt below and complete the writing activity. Your guidance counselor has asked each student in the seventh grade to write an essay explaining what he or she wants to do after graduation from high school. He plans to use this information to help each student decide on a career path. Write an essay to give to your guidance counselor in which you describe what you want to do after you graduate from high school and explain why you made that choice.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Be sure to include

• your plans after graduating • your career choice

• the type of duties you might have in this career

. E AY. LIN W K C Y A L N • an introduction, a body, and a conclusion to yourOessay TAB D IN A E N C U S I D T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

R • an explanation of why you think this career would be ideal for you MASTE

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 3

Use the Pre-Writing/Planning space or additional paper for notes, lists, webs, outlines, or anything else that might help you plan your writing. Then write your essay on the lined pages. Be sure to write neatly. Only your writing on the lined pages in this book will be scored. Using the Editing Checklist on page 39, check your writing for correct paragraphing, grammar, spelling, punctuation, and the use of Standard English.

Pre-Writing/Planning

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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35


Part 3

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Essay Title:

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

36

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 3

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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37


Part 3

Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 3

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E Now check your writing using this Editing Checklist. ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO Checklist OOK Editing S I B K S I O H FOR T PLE BO and N M E A V S 1 Check yourHcapitalization punctuation. I T IS NOT G S I N IO 2 Spell all words ISScorrectly. PERM 3

Check for sentence fragments or run-on sentences.

4

Keep verb tense consistent.

5

Make sure subject and verb agree.

6

Use words according to the rules of Standard English.

7

Remember to paragraph correctly.

STOP

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39


Part 4

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 4 Passages with Multiple-Choice and Open-Ended Questions

Directions For Part 4, you will read an article and a story. You will answer questions based on each passage. Then you will do some writing on a related topic.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Have you ever wondered what the earth looked like millions of years ago? Scientists believe that the earth’s appearance has changed over many years. The first passage you will read, “Pangaea: Pieces to a Giant Puzzle,” is an article about the movement of earth’s continental and oceanic plates. After you read the article, you will answer questions about what you have read.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

40

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Pangaea: Pieces to a Giant Puzzle

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 4

to think that perhaps Ortelius’s It’s difficult to imagine how the earth observations had been correct. may have looked hundreds of millions of years ago. When viewing a modern map While working at the University of of the world, the oceans are always in the Marburg in Germany, Wegener discovered same place and the continents of North a paper listing fossils found on the coasts and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, of South America and Africa. Some of the Australia, and Antarctica are always in the fossils found on each continent belonged same position, with Antarctica at the very to the same types of plants and animals. bottom. However, scientists believe that Wegener continued researching and cold, snowy Antarctica was once discovered that fossils of tropical plants connected to the much warmer had been found in the frozen lands of continents of Africa and Australia. And ER. Antarctica. This means that atSTsome A M though they are separated by the Atlantic E IN enough AtoY. W KLwarm point, AntarcticaBLwas C Y A N Ocean, it has been suggested that South TA D IN Aplants. Ogrowth E supportISthe of tropical N C U D T America was once connected to Africa. It’s TED. I OofBEglaciers REPROexists in Australia and Evidence H G I R hard to believe that such dramatic T COPY IAfrica, means that these warm, dry OOKwhich S I B K S O changes have occurred, but several H O T B R lands may have had a much colder EN F O AMPLEchanges V scientific theories make these S I G S I T H climate in the past. Fossils from the same T IS NO seem possible. N O I S plants were found in parts of Asia, South ERMIS America, and Africa, supporting the idea Map Mysteries P that these lands had all been connected. In 1596, a mapmaker named Abraham The more research Wegener did, the more Ortelius noticed that the eastern coast of convinced he became that the continents South America seemed to fit like a puzzle had all been part of the same landmass. piece along the western coast of Africa. Wegener, like Ortelius, also noticed that Ortelius thought that somehow North the continents seem to fit together like a and South America had been separated puzzle. The coast of South America from Europe and Africa. More than three seemed to fit perfectly along the coast of hundred years later, German geologist Africa. Mountain ranges from different and meteorologist Alfred Wegener began continents appeared to align.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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Part 4

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Theory of Continental Drift

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Continental Mystery In 1915, Wegener published a book called On the Origin of Continents and Oceans in which he discussed his observations. Wegener used his book to introduce a new theory, which he called “continental drift.” Wegener asserted that at one time, all of the earth’s continents were part of one gigantic landmass called Pangaea. Pangaea means “all the earth” in Greek. According to Wegener’s theory, about two hundred million years ago Pangaea separated into smaller landmasses and began to drift apart. He believed that the continents eventually drifted to their present locations.

Part 4

plates. Scientists believe that the movement of these plates causes volcanoes, earthquakes, mountains, and seafloor spreading. For example, when two continental plates collide, the crust is pushed upward forming a mountain. When two oceanic plates collide, one plate may slip beneath the other plate, forcing magma from within the earth to rise. This is how volcanoes form. When two oceanic plates move away from each other, seafloor spreading occurs. In this situation, magma rises from the earth’s mantle and forms new crust, pushing the two plates away from each other.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Perhaps the best example of seafloor spreading, or two plates moving away Unfortunately, many people refused to from each other, is the Mid-Atlantic accept Wegener’s new theory because he Ridge. Running from north to south couldn’t explain how the continents through the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, moved. It wasn’t until the 1960s, thirty the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is an underwater STER. . A M years after Wegener’s death, that his ideas E WAY mountain range. LAlong Y magma ACKLINtheINridge, N A B gained support based on a new theory. A from within CED and hardens Urises S NOTthe Pearth I D T O The theory of plate tectonics provided an I R . TED newOcrust, GHinto BE REpushing the oceanic plates I R explanation for many of the earth’s Y T P K CO apart. S BOO Scientists estimate that the MidI strange geological activities thatBOOK IS H T R Atlantic Ridge spreads slightly less than LE the VEN FO AMPthat supported Wegener’s Ibelief S I G S T H one inch per year. That may not seem like T S NO time. Iover continents somehow moved N O I S a lot, but over the course of hundreds of IS PERM Plates Make It Possible millions of years, those inches have added up to thousands of miles. The activity Scientists discovered that the earth’s along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge helps prove crust, or the top layer of the earth, sits that the earth’s crust is constantly upon a series of plates, or large pieces of moving. It also answers a question that solid rock. These plates float atop the Wegener could not: how parts of Pangaea earth’s mantle, a layer of soft, molten may have separated and drifted apart. rock. Plates are constantly moving into, over, under, against, or away from each other. Plates beneath the earth’s crust are called continental plates, while plates beneath the ocean floor are called oceanic

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Part 4

Reading On Your Own • Level G

1 What was the author’s MAIN purpose in writing this passage?

A to explain how earthquakes happen B to illustrate how the continents could have moved over time C to discuss the difference between continental drift and plate tectonics D to explain how activity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge causes seafloor spreading

2 Which of the following statements from the passage expresses an OPINION?

A “Wegener used his book to introduce a new theory, which he called ‘continental drift.’”

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

B “Perhaps the best example of seafloor spreading, or two plates moving away from each other, is the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.”

C “Scientists believe that the movement of these plates causes volcanoes, earthquakes, mountains, and seafloor spreading.”

D “Plates beneath the earth’s crust are called continental plates, while

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . E RE According to the passage, the various movements plates have GHTED TOofBcontinental I R Y P K O O C O different effects upon the Oearth. information from the passage, fill in K IS Using HIS B O T B R E O L F P each typeENof plate movement. the cause or effect AMfor THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P plates beneath the ocean floor are called oceanic plates.”

3

CAUSE

EFFECT

Seafloor spreading Continental plates collide A volcano is formed

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 4

4 Read this sentence from the passage. It’s hard to believe that such dramatic changes have occurred, but several scientific theories make these changes seem possible. What does the word dramatic mean in this context?

A minor B likely C permanent D remarkable

5 Using information from the passage, write TWO discoveries that supported Wegener’s theory of continental drift. 1)

2)

6

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GasHTED TO BE RE I Information in the passage is presented R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H A a scientific article PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I B a fictional story N ISSIO PERM C an instructional guide D a newspaper column

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Part 4

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Directions Sometimes people do not realize the consequences of their actions. There are times when seemingly innocent behavior may cause an unexpected result. Next you will read “A Bad Scare at the Fair,” a story about a babysitter with good intentions. Then you will answer some questions and write a brief essay on a related topic.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 4

A Bad Scare at the Fair “Danny! DANNNNY!” called out Marcie again and again. People peered at her, either confused by her anxiety or agitated by her yelling. She ignored everyone. Her eyes were scanning back and forth, nervously searching the crowd at the fair for any sign of Danny. Marcie had been asked to babysit her neighbor’s children, eight-year-old Todd and his little brother, Danny. She had felt excited and confident about her first job—until she actually tried it. As soon as the boys’ parents had left for the day and Marcie was in charge, she felt overwhelmed.

E L P SAM TION A C U D E ! Y RALL 9.RALLY 9 . 8 8 8

Immediately, Todd and Danny had begun to argue. Todd said that Danny was boring, and Danny said Todd was annoying. Marcie had been unable to suggest an activity they were both willing INEdo. She tried CKLto A L B A getting them to draw pictures, but Todd said NitOwas T boring, and Danny kept S I T I . throwing crayons and running around TED the table.

YRIGH STER. P O C Marcie tried starting MA in the backyard. Todd enjoyed this OK ISa game of catch O B E L pastime Sbecause AMP it involved more action, but now Danny was definitely THIS

unenthusiastic. He halfheartedly attempted to catch the ball a few times, but kept dropping it. He could barely throw it to Marcie, even when she stood close to him. Todd, tired of waiting for Danny, decided to tackle him and take the ball. He’d started playing football with the baseball when Marcie caught him and made him apologize to Danny. Within a few hours, Marcie was desperate. Searching for a solution, she decided to take the brothers to the county fair that was being held in the town park, a couple of blocks away. She reasoned that there had to be activities at a fair that both boys would enjoy.

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Part 4

Reading On Your Own • Level G

At first, Marcie’s plan seemed to work and the boys stopped arguing, but they also stopped paying any attention to one another. Danny was lagging behind, his hands in his pockets, looking at the clouds. Meanwhile, Todd was anxious to witness every spectacle and try every game. Marcie even joined him in several of the games. She started to have a good time, and thought maybe babysitting wasn’t so tough, once you got the hang of it. Marcie and Todd convinced Danny to join them on some of the small rides but he didn’t seem too enthralled. Todd, however, was yelling merrily, waving his hands in the air. As soon as the rides were over, he was rocketing along to the next attraction. Marcie tried to keep her eyes on both boys, but they were moving at different speeds and the crowd was thick. Just as it was growing dark, she turned around to check on Danny and realized, to her horror, that he had disappeared.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

“Danny! Where are you?” she yelled, racing this way and that. Todd followed her closely now, frightened and increasingly concerned for his little brother’s safety. His eyes were round and attentive as he looked around at the unfamiliar faces. Marcie was struggling to think calmly. “Okay, let’s backtrack and revisit the . places where we stopped,” Marcie said. “Maybe Danny decided to go Aback TERto S M E IN do what AY. Lto one of them.” Todd, normally very rambunctious,1 was willing he W K C Y A L N AB IN A was told. IS NOT DUCED

O . IT D E T REPRtheir H E G B I R So the two turned around andObegan carefully retracing path through O PY KT O C O S I B K the carnival. They triedBto which OOrecollect R THIS attractions they’d stopped at. They E O L F P N M E Agame, where went to the dart had been able to pop a yellow balloon IVTodd OT Gwas THIS S ISthere N and win a poster,IObut no sign of Danny. “He wouldn’t be here, N S S I Marcie,”PTodd ERM said. “He doesn’t like games with throwing.”

They moved along to the Dragon Slayer, a children’s ride designed to resemble a green fire-breathing monster. Todd had loved pretending he was a knight who was battling the diabolical dragon. Danny was not on the ride, or anywhere near it. “No, Danny doesn’t like moving real fast,” Todd informed Marcie. They continued backtracking their way through the fair.

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 4

Marcie led Todd back toward the caricature artist who’d drawn silly, exaggerated sketches of the boys. Danny had actually enjoyed that more than Todd, so Marcie suggested hopefully, “Maybe he just came back here to watch the artist.” They looked around, but to no avail. Next to the artist was a game with loud music playing. “Danny wouldn’t want to stand near that loud radio,” Todd said. “He wouldn’t come back here.” More frantic than ever, Marcie lifted her hands in anguish. “I don’t know where to look. Danny doesn’t like anything, so how could we have any idea where he might go?” Todd, though still very concerned, felt a bit angry at his little brother. “Yeah, all he likes to do is sleep.” “Sleep!” Marcie repeated. She grabbed Todd’s hand and ran toward the fair entrance. There was a huge old sycamore near the entrance that Danny had stopped to look at when they first arrived. Marcie ran straight for that tree.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

There, under the tree, Danny was peacefully napping. Marcie shook him awake, both furious and relieved. “Never leave without telling someone where you’re going!” she said urgently. “I’m sorry,” said Danny. “I was just tired. All day, I wanted to take a nap, but you and Todd wanted to run around!” R.

MASTE AY. E N I L BLACK D IN ANY W A T O E IT IS N REPRODUC . D E T YRIGH OOK TO BE P O C OK IS OR THIS B O B E L EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Part 4

Reading On Your Own • Level G

7 Which of the following is an important theme of this story?

A Many people don’t like carnivals. B Carnivals are dangerous places for families. C Not all children like the same things. D Babysitting is a rewarding task.

8 Read these sentences from the story. “Okay, let’s backtrack and revisit the places where we stopped,” Marcie said. “Maybe Danny decided to go back to one of them.”

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

These sentences show Marcie’s

A desperation B fright

C clear thinking

D angry reaction

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A 9 Describe TWO activities that Todd likes, but Danny doesn’t. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y 1) P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO 2) PERM

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 4

10 The babysitting job is important to Marcie because

A she enjoys spending time with Todd and Danny B it is the first job she’s ever had C she wants to earn some money D she wants to learn to be responsible

11 Danny’s MAIN reason for moving so slowly is because

A he dislikes loud music B he doesn’t like his brother C he is tired

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

D he is bored by games

12 Give TWO reasons why Danny became separated from Marcie and Todd. 1)

2)

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Part 4

Reading On Your Own • Level G

13 If Marcie took Todd and Danny to the fair again, what might she do differently? Based on what was expressed in the story, write an essay in which you describe Marcie’s second trip to the fair with Todd and Danny.

You may use the space below to plan your writing. Only your writing on the lined pages in this book will be scored. Using the Editing Checklist on page 54, check your writing for correct paragraphing, grammar, spelling, punctuation, and the use of Standard English. Remember, your essay should be well organized and have an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.

Pre-Writing/Planning

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

52

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Part 4

Essay

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Part 4

Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E Now check your writing using this Editing Checklist. ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO Checklist OOK S I B Editing K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S 1 Check your THIScapitalization NOT Gand punctuation. S I N 2 Spell allER MISSIOcorrectly. P words 3

Check for sentence fragments or run-on sentences.

4

Keep verb tense consistent.

5

Make sure subject and verb agree.

6

Use words according to the rules of Standard English.

7

Remember to paragraph correctly.

STOP

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

Answer Key

Answer Key Cut along the dotted line.

Cut along the dotted line to remove this section.

RALLY!’s Reading Comprehension Skills Skill 1: Recall Facts and Details Skill 2: Identify Main Idea Skill 3: Identify Sequence Skill 4: Analyze Language and Vocabulary Skill 5: Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting Skill 6: Recognize Cause & Effect Skill 7: Compare & Contrast Skill 8: Distinguish Fact from Opinion Skill 9: Predict Outcomes Skill 10: Draw Conclusions Skill 11: Make Inferences Skill 12: Analyze Point of View & Purpose Skill 13: Identify Literary Forms & Sources of Information Skill 14: Apply Prior Knowledge Skill 15: Grammar

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55


Answer Key

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Answer Key – Part 1 Passages with Multiple-Choice Questions Correct Answer

S1

C

12 Analyze Point of View & Purpose

S2

B

10 Draw Conclusions

1

D

4 Analyze Language and Vocabulary

2

A

4 Analyze Language and Vocabulary

3

B

4 Analyze Language and Vocabulary

4

B

5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting

5

C

6

B

7

B

8

A

9

C

10

C

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

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RALLY!s Reading Comprehension Skill

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 10 Draw Conclusions

4 Analyze Language and Vocabulary 3 Identify Sequence

4 Analyze Language and Vocabulary 8 Distinguish Fact from Opinion 15 Grammar

STER. . A M E WAY CKLIN Y A L N A B A N I A 5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting S NOT PRODUCED I T I . ED & Setting B 5 Analyze Character, GHTPlot, BE RE I R O Y T P K O B 4 Analyze BOVocabulary K IS COLanguage Sand I O H O T B R E FO Idea DAMPL 2 Identify ENMain V S I G S I T H O Draw Conclusions T C IS N10 N O I S IS PERM B 5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting B

2 Identify Main Idea

18

A

4 Analyze Language and Vocabulary

19

B

2 Identify Main Idea

20

C

15 Grammar

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Cut along the dotted line.

Question


Reading On Your Own • Level G

Answer Key

Answer Key – Part 2 Passages with Multiple-Choice Questions Cut along the dotted line.

Question

Correct Answer

1

C

10 Draw Conclusions

2

B

10 Draw Conclusions

3

A

1 Recall Facts and Details

4

C

3 Identify Sequence

5

C

15 Grammar

6

D

12 Analyze Point of View & Purpose

7

C

8

B

9

B

10

A

11

C

12

D

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

RALLY!s Reading Comprehension Skill

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 4 Analyze Language and Vocabulary 8 Distinguish Fact from Opinion

4 Analyze Language and Vocabulary 5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting

4 Analyze Language and Vocabulary 5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting

STER. . A M E WAY CKLIN Y A L N A B A N I D 2 Identify Main Idea S NOT PRODUCED I T I . D 4 Analyze Language and GHTEDVocabulary BE RE I R O Y T P K O of View B 12 Analyze K IS CPoint S B&OOPurpose I O H O T B R E N FO and Vocabulary A SAMPL 4 Analyze ELanguage V I G S I T H T C NOIdentify Literary Forms & Sources of Information IS 13 N O I S IS PERM C 15 Grammar B

A

5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting

2 Identify Main Idea

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57


Answer Key

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Answer Key – Part 3 Independent Expository Writing Prompt

Sample answer: After I graduate from high school, I would like to pursue a career as a television reporter. I think that I am well suited for a reporter job because I love talking to people and I am constantly asking questions. I have the ability to gather information and assemble it into interesting, well-written stories. In addition, I love to travel and would enjoy being sent out on assignments. My first step toward becoming a television reporter has been to become an active member of our high school's Communications Club and newspaper staff. I have had many opportunities to conduct interviews and report school news to my fellow students. These experiences have convinced me that I am making the correct career choice.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

After high school, I will attend college where I will take classes in both print and audio-visual media in order to improve in all areas of the field. I will take English and journalism classes to improve my writing, and I will also take a variety of communications classes so I can learn about the industry and different methods of effective communication. I may also take acting classes to improve my on-air abilities. When I am not attending class, I will intern at the university or local news station. If I can find the time, I would also love to write for the ER. university's newspaper. I hope that at the end of my college career, I will have degrees MASinT both AY. E N I L journalism and communications. ANY W BLACK

D IN OT A E N C U S I D T . I so that aEtelevision After college, I will need to prepare a good interviewTEtape PRO station will see RElong GH DI will Tdedicate B I R that I have talent and hire me. Once I havePaYposition, to my job, O K probably havehours O O C O S I B researching and putting together O stories for newscasts. I will to contact many K HIS and deliver them on air. Eventually, O T B R E O L people and visit many story sites, then write newscasts I F EN evening news anchor job. These are high hopes, V SAMPand land I G hope to climb T the a national T HISladder O IS NI can N but with hard work ISam sure get there. O I IS M R E P Skills 1–15

58

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Cut along the dotted line.

Use the 4-point scoring rubric on page 62.


Reading On Your Own • Level G

Answer Key

Cut along the dotted line.

Answer Key – Part 4 Passages with Multiple-Choice and Open-Ended Questions Question

Correct Answer

RALLY!s Reading Comprehension Skill

1

B

12 Analyze Point of View & Purpose

2

B

8 Distinguish Fact from Opinion

3

See Below

4

D

5

See Below

6

A

7

C

8

C

9

See Below

5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting

10

B

5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting

6 Recognize Cause and Effect 4 Analyze Language and Vocabulary 1 Recall Facts and Details

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

13 Identify Literary Forms & Sources of Information 2 Identify Main Idea

5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting

STER. . A M E 12 See Below 5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A 13 See Below Skills 1–15 S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O Short Response Answers: H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S T G 61. Use the 2-point scoring THIS rubricISon NOpage N SIO ERMIS plates separate. 3. Cause:POceanic 11

C

5 Analyze Character, Plot, & Setting

Effect: A mountain is formed. Cause: Oceanic plates collide. 5.

Possible answers (any two): • Scientists found fossils from the same plants and animals on several different continents. • Evidence of glaciers has been found on warm continents like Africa and Australia. • The shape of South America's coast seems to fit perfectly next to the shape of Africa's coast. • The theory of plate tectonics states that plates beneath the earth's crust are constantly moving.

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59


Answer Key 9.

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Possible answers (any two): • Todd likes to play catch, but Danny doesn't. • Todd likes to play the games at the fair, but Danny doesn't.

12.

Possible answers (any two): • Todd required more of Marcie's attention, so Danny was able to wander off on his own. • Danny walked behind the others, so it was easier for Marcie to lose track of him. • Danny was very quiet.

Extended Response Answer: Use the 4-point scoring rubric on page 62. 13.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Sample answer:

On Marcie's second trip to the fair with Todd and Danny, she will be much more prepared. First, Marcie will establish some ground rules about what is and is not allowed. She will tell them that they have to stick together and that they cannot go anywhere without letting her know first. She will also tell them to look out for each other, and she will designate a spot where they should meet if one of them happens to get lost. Having a plan such as this will prevent the anxiety and panic that she and . Todd suffered when Danny was lost the first time. ASTER

LINE M NY WAY. K C A L A While they are at the fair, if they find themselves in especially areas, T A Bcrowded D INMarcie Omake E N C U S will make sure that both boys are right with her. She will sure that each boy gets I D T . I will allow PROto go on a fast ride E EDshe T R to do something that suits his interests. IMaybe Todd H E G B R PYDanny, K TOallow O with loud music while she waits with and then Danny to watch the O C O S I B K S waits. Then maybe I O H O caricature artist, a quieter activity, while Todd she will let Todd T B R LE then letVDanny FO choose what they will do next. Pand N M E A play a dartSgame, If Danny loses S I HI the fair altogether, OT G maybe Marcie will promise to buy him an ice cream or N interestTin S I SIONif he remains patient while his brother goes on a few more rides. If some other IStreat M R E P Marcie follows this new plan, she should have a much easier time taking Todd and Danny to the fair. Marcie will probably be able to relax and have a bit more fun herself as well.

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Cut along the dotted line.

• Todd likes to go on the fast rides, but Danny doesn't.


Reading On Your Own • Level G

Answer Key

Rubrics Cut along the dotted line.

A rubric is a description of student performance that clearly articulates the requirements for each of the score points.

Short-Response Rubric: 2, 1, or 0 points Use the 2-point scoring rubric to score answers to short-response questions.

2-point answer • Addresses all requirements. • Demonstrates a clear understanding of the task. • Uses text correctly.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

• Support and/or pertinent examples from the text are included.

• Result is a comprehensive and insightful explanation and/or opinion. • Writing mechanics are correct and appropriate.

1-point answer

STER. . A M E • Demonstrates only a partial understanding of the task. ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A • Information provided may be correct, but is too general or too OT UCED S Nsimplistic. I D T O I R . • Uses text incorrectly or with limited success. GHTED TO BE REP I R Y P CO are incomplete OOKor omitted. S I B • Support and/or examples based on the text K S I O H T E BO explanation FOR and/or PLflawed N M E • Result is an inconsistent or opinion. A V S I OT G THIS N S I • Writing mechanics areIO N ISS adequate. M R E P • Addresses only some requirements.

0-point answer

• Response is irrelevant, inaccurate, or off-topic.

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Answer Key

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Extended-Response Rubric: 4, 3, 2, 1, or 0 points Use the 4-point scoring rubric to score answers to extended-response questions.

• Addresses all requirements. • Demonstrates a clear understand-ing of the task. • Uses text correctly. • Provides information that links to and/or extends aspects of the text. • Result is a comprehensive and insightful explanation and/or opinion. • Writing mechanics are correct and appropriate.

3-point answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

• Addresses all requirements.

• Demonstrates an understanding of the task.

• Uses text to provide some explanation/opinion.

• May not include all the required supporting information. • Result is an adequate explanation.

• Writing mechanics are acceptable.

STER. . A M E 2-point answer ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I • Does not address all requirements. T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R • Demonstrates a partial under-standing of the task. Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H O • Uses text incorrectly or with success. FOR T PLE Blimited N M E A V S I • Result is an inconsistent or flawed THIS NOT Gexplanation that may be too general or too simplistic. S I N IO limited. • Writing mechanics ISSare PERM 1-point answer • Addresses only a few requirements. • Demonstrates a minimal understanding of the task. • Use of text is omitted or there are only vague references. • Result is a highly flawed explanation and/or opinion. • Writing mechanics are poor.

0-point answer • Response is irrelevant, inaccurate, or off-topic.

62

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Cut along the dotted line.

4-point answer


Reading On Your Own • Level G

Answer Key

Total Your Score Cut along the dotted line.

Part 1

Part 2

Passages with Multiple-Choice Questions

Passages with Multiple-Choice Questions

Question

Correct Answer

1

Points Possible

Question

Correct Answer

D

1

1

C

1

2

A

1

2

B

1

3

B

1

3

A

1

4

B

1

4

C

1

5

C

1

5

C

1

6

B

1

6

D

1

7

B

1

7

C

1

8

A

1

8

B

1

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Your Score

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Your Score

Points Possible

1 . R E T S A M E C 1 10 A 1 AY. LIN W K C Y A L N B 1 11 OT CA B DUCED IN A 1 N S I T TED.12I O BE DREPRO A 1 1 H G I R Y T P K O O C O B B 1 OK1IS OR THIS B 13 O B E L F AMP B 1 EN 14 D 1 THIS S IS NOT GIV D 1 15 D 1 ISSION M R E PC 1 16 B 1 C

1

9

B

17

B

1

17

A

1

18

A

1

18

C

1

19

B

1

19

C

1

20

C

1

20

A

1

Your Total Score

20

Your Total Score

20

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63


Answer Key

Reading On Your Own • Level G

Total Your Score Part 4

Independent Expository Writing Activity

Passages with Multiple-Choice and Open-Ended Questions

Question

Correct Answer

1

Your Score

Points Possible

Question

Correct Answer

Your Score

See p. 58

4

1

B

1

Your Total Score

4

2

B

1

3

See p. 59

2

4

D

1

5

See p. 59

2

6

A

1

7

C

1

8

C

1

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Points Possible

R2. E T S A 10 B LINE M NY1WAY. K C A L B 11 NOT A C D IN A 1 E C U S I D T TED. I12 O BESeeREp.PR60O 2 H G I R Y T P K O O C O See p. 60 4 OK IS OR THIS B 13 O B E L F EN AMP THIS S IS NOT GIV Your Total Score 20 N O I S S I PERM 9

64

See p. 60

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Cut along the dotted line.

Part 3


Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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65


Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

66

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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67


Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

68

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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69


Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

70

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Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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71


Reading On Your Own • Level G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

72

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM


READING

On Your Own Reading On Your Own gives you reading and writing activities to reinforce skills. Parts 1 & 2: Passages with Multiple-Choice Questions • Higher-Level Comprehension Questions • Informational and Literary Texts • Stamina Builder

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Part 3: Independent Persuasive Writing Activity

• Persuasive Writing Prompt • Practice Pre-Writing and Planning Your Essay STER. . A M E LIN an NY WAY • Check Your Writing ACKUsing L B A D IN A OT E N C Editorial Checklist U S I D T O I

TED. REPR H E G B I R O KT 4: with Multiple-Choice COPY Part OOPassages S I B K S I O H O T B R AMPLE T GIVEN FO and Open-Ended Questions S S I H T IS NO • Higher-Level Short and N O I S IS M R E P Extended-Response Questions • Lengthy Passages

The answer key in the back of the book includes sample answers and scoring rubrics for open-ended questions.

Reading on your own g sample[1]