Issuu on Google+

portfolio

shellie halkyard


design statement Responsible design is fostered by respect towards the environment and of its inhabitants. Throughout my education, I have developed a sincere admiration for designing spaces that enhance the human experience while being considerate of the world around us. The following projects are selected from a variety of scale and program to demonstrate the craft that I employ with my design. I delight in elegant form and detail, and I am moved by the complexity of meaningful experiences. Using architecture as a medium, I am able to express my values through my designs, creatively responding to human needs and desires. As I pursue my career as an architect, I hope to be a part of a timeless service to community.


contents LINEAR

LUMINOSITY

01

C O M M U N A L H A R V E S T 29

international competition: Emerging New York Architects

nominated for Chicago Award in Architecture selected for exhibit at Center for Architecture in NYC published and distributed internationally by AIA

L A K E F R O N T U P L I F T 35 V I R T U A L U R B A N S C A P E 45

revitalization of Chicago lakefront

international competition: Close the Gap

selected for exhibit in New York City & Houston

D Y N A M I C R E T R E A T 51

Chicago boutique hotel

U R B A N D E N c i t y 63

revitalization of Champaign-Urbana

R E S I D E N T I A L R E C L A M A T I O N 69

nominated for Edward C. Earl Prize

R E C L A I M I N G T H E R E S I D U A L 77

nominated for Chicago Award in Architecture

international competition: Haiti Ideas Challenge

S T R U C T U R A L D E T A I L S 83 P A T E N T D E S I G N 89 D R A W I N G S + G R A P H I C S + P H O T O G R A P H Y 94 R E S U M E 98


linear luminosity This project was nominated for the Chicago Prize and was selected to be reviewed by the NAAB The School of Ballet at the Wurttembergische Staatstheater in Stuttgart, Germany is one of the most prominent institutions for dance in the world. It belongs to the so-called “Champions League of Dance.” Since its formation, the school was housed in a converted newspaper printing facility in the city of Stuttgart; with the new building it will be given a modern and inspiring space that is appropriate for the international importance of the school. Located on one of Stuttgart’s most prominent downtown sites as part of the “Cultural Mile,” the design houses the programmatic functions of the academy, ranging from offices for faculty and staff, library, piano teacher offices, lecture halls, changing rooms and shower facilities, halls for ballet education, a dorm facility for 150 students, dining facilities, kitchen and auxiliary rooms, and a theater space including the necessary service rooms.

01


The key design approach is in conveying the relationship between light and movement that exists in both the surrounding environment of the school as well as the art of dance. Gestures, expressions, and the movement of dancers through space will allow for a unique approach in developing a tangibility of experience through the architecture. The interaction of daylight within the building will play a significant role in translating the movement of the dancers to the building envelope. This will be achieved without interrupting the needs of the dancers. The changing patterns of daylight that filter through the alternating chases of the school will mimic the movement of the dancers. This movement will not only be translated through lighting conditions, but also through climate control. The building itself will move, or respond, to the environment as the dancers perform and as exterior climate conditions change.


concept

residential

LOCATION STUTTGART, GERMANY

LATITUDE/LONGITUDE 48.68 north, 9.22 east

ballet studios

central core circulation

glass chases

enclosed courtyards

The building systems are based on a glass chase, which serve as the air delivery system for the building. The chases distribute air into ducts which then supply the dance studios, classrooms, and corridors. Prismatic panels hang from the tops of the chases to more effectively bring light to the interior core of the building while also creating a pattern of moving light on the floor. The chases are accessible at each floor for maintenance purposes.

03


climate analysis average conditions of STUTTGART, GERMANY

SKY COVER RANGE

total cloud cover - 100% recorded high average high mean average low recorded low clear skies - 0

ILLUMINATION RANGE

HOURLY ILLUMINATION DAYLIT HOURS ONLY recorded high average high mean average low recorded low recorded (lux): direct normal global horizontal

04


max 88.39

max 90.50

min 34.52

min 47.35

0.00

0.00

RELATIVE HUMIDITY (%) 0% 0% 15% 38% 46%

< 20 20 - 40 40 - 60 60 - 80 > 80

SKY COVER (%) 0% 0% 31% 60% 6%

< 10 10 - 30 30 - 60 60 - 80 > 80

05


climate analysis psychometric chart

COMFORT 4% 96%

06

comfortable not comfortable


PUBLIC CAFE LOADING DOCK

LOADING DOCK ENTRANCE

site plan

PV calculation of roof

rainwater calculation of roof

Input:

Zip Code: 70182 Usable Roof: 1958 sq m Roof Orientation/Direction: South Roof Pitch: <20%

(annual rainfall = 700mm) * (green roof surface area = 1,247m2) = 872,900 liters/year

Output:

Produced solar electricity per year: 235.410 kWh

estimated 50% green roof infiltration = 436,450 liters/year

07


materials

metal paneling

3form ecoresin

_facade

_courtyards _railings _stairs

3form frosted

_lower horizontal windows of studios _entrance flooring to studios

_with

frosted windows

metal mesh _residential

08

wood flooring

_studios _dorms

linoleum flooring

_circulation spaces


3

2

1

5

4

6

7

2

1

3

4

5

6

7

H I

I make-up and instruction

wardrobe

shower facility

J

shower facility

wardrobes

K

properties storage

director

J shower shower

L

K

scenery storage

void

L up

up

M

M

equipment storage

wardrobe for company

N

N wardrobe for company

costume storage

O

O practice stage

void

P

P storage chairs

toilet

Q

stor. linen

audio

laundry

stor. bed drying

Q

toilet stor. ironing

lighting

R

lounge visitor toiletmen

dn

-2.3m

up

up

visitor toiletwomen dn 282.00m ASL = 0.00

S

S

entrance

stage level 1:400

entrance level 1:400

0

0

1

2

5

10

waste collection and recycling janitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closet

R

up

shop

1

2

5

10

waiting lounge

loading dock


1

3

2

4

5

6

1

7

3

2

4

5

6

7

H I

I

J

J

K

K

mechanical

mechanical

L

L dn

M

M lockers

N

gym

showers

N

void

lockers

O

O void

P

P wellness, jacuzzi

physio therapy

md & first aid

massage

R

R

dn

dn

up

+8.5m

up

up

+3.0m

large ballet hall

large ballet hall

Q

Q

up

void void

S

S

level 2 1:400

level 3 1:400

0

0

1

2

5

10

1

2

5

10

11


1

3

2

4

5

6

7

A

chef office

food storage

1

3

2

4

5

6

7

A loading dock

B

B

C

office

C kitchen lobby + lounge

conference room

dn

up

D

D

E

shwr up

shwr

E faculty lounge

office

F

library + reading room

G

stor it

wc

faculty lounge up

H

dn

up

shwr

wc

kitchen

faculty lounge

F G

dorm cluster 5a

dorm cluster 5b

dorm cluster 5c

dorm cluster 5d

faculty lounge

shwr shwr

I

H I

J K

piano instructor office

warm-up + rest

small ballet hall

small ballet hall

J K

up

up

+ 22.2m

up

L

L

M

up

M

up

student lounge

small ballet hall

N

classroom

small ballet hall

classroom

N

up

O

O

P

P +15.4m dn

large ballet hall

Q

R

dn

large ballet hall

dn

Q

R

S

level 4 1:450 0

1

2

5

10

up dn

dn

level 5 1:450 0

1

2

5

10

student lounge

central laundry


1

A

3

2

apt faculty

apt faculty

office faculty

4

5

6

7

office mgr

UP

B

dorm cluster 6a

C janitor

it

storage

central lounge

kitchen

D E

dn

F

dorm cluster 6b

G

dorm cluster 6c

H

small ballet hall

classroom

I +26.2m dn

J

dorm cluster 6d

K

dorm cluster 6e

dn

L M void

void

N

level 6 1:450 0

1

2

5

10

small ballet studio - detail level 4 scale 1:75

13


view of level 3 lounge

14


view from level 5 dorm balcony

15


+26.2

+22.2

+15.4

site section 1:450 +8.5

282.00 asl = 0.00

-2.3

B

A

L

L

E

north elevation 1:450

16

T


northwest exterior view

17


JOHN

east elevation 1:450

18

CRANKO

SCHOOL

OF

BALLET


extended chases above roof + prism panels + vertical air distribution

2

4

3

ahu and heat exchanger

vent closed

raised floor (classroom) for space mechanical ventilation vented floor at perimeter for corridor distribution

20

systems diagram - day

air & light delivery


2

3

ac mechanical = off

vent open for night time flushing (natural ventilator)

return 100% exhaust via heat recovery unit

thermal mass

systems diagram - night

4


systems axon level 6 (residential)

level 5 (residential)

level 4.5

level 4

level 3

level 2

entrance

practice stage

22


view of glass chases


LEED analysis

LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations Project Checklist 20

3

3

Y

?

N

Y 1 5

Prereq 1 Credit 1 Credit 2

1 6 1

Credit 4.2 Credit 4.3

2

Credit 4.4

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Credit 5.2

Credit 6.2 Credit 7.1 Credit 7.2 Credit 8

2

Y 4 2 2

2

23

12

Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3

Prereq 2 Prereq 3

9 3

Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3 Credit 4 Credit 5 Credit 6

4

6

Y

Prereq 1

3 1 1 1

Credit 1.1 Credit 1.2 Credit 2 Credit 3

2 to 4 2 2 to 4

Possible Points: 35

Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems Minimum Energy Performance Fundamental Refrigerant Management Optimize Energy Performance On-Site Renewable Energy Enhanced Commissioning Enhanced Refrigerant Management Measurement and Verification Green Power

Materials and Resources

1 5 1 6 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 10

Water Use Reduction—20% Reduction Water Efficient Landscaping Innovative Wastewater Technologies Water Use Reduction

Energy and Atmosphere Prereq 1

Possible Points: 26

Construction Activity Pollution Prevention Site Selection Development Density and Community Connectivity Brownfield Redevelopment Alternative Transportation—Public Transportation Access Alternative Transportation—Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms Alternative Transportation—Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles Alternative Transportation—Parking Capacity Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat Site Development—Maximize Open Space Stormwater Design—Quantity Control Stormwater Design—Quality Control Heat Island Effect—Non-roof Heat Island Effect—Roof Light Pollution Reduction

Water Efficiency Prereq 1

Y Y Y 10 4 2 2 3 2

24

Credit 5.1

Credit 6.1

8

1 1

Credit 3 Credit 4.1

3

4

Sustainable Sites

1 to 19 1 to 7 2 2 3 2

Possible Points: 14

Storage and Collection of Recyclables Building Reuse—Maintain Existing Walls, Floors, and Roof Building Reuse—Maintain 50% of Interior Non-Structural Elements Construction Waste Management Materials Reuse

1 to 3 1 1 to 2 1 to 2


Materials and Resources, Continued Y

?

1 1

1 1

11

1

N Credit 4 Credit 5

1 1

Credit 6

3

Indoor Environmental Quality

Y Y 1

Credit 7

Prereq 1 Prereq 2 Credit 1

1 1 1 1 1

Credit 2 Credit 3.1 Credit 3.2 Credit 4.1 Credit 4.2

1

Credit 4.3

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Credit 4.4 Credit 5 Credit 6.1 Credit 6.2 Credit 7.1 Credit 7.2 Credit 8.1

1 2

Recycled Content Regional Materials Rapidly Renewable Materials Certified Wood

4

1

Credit 8.2

1

Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4 Credit 1.5 Credit 2

Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring Increased Ventilation Construction IAQ Management Plan—During Construction Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy Low-Emitting Materials—Adhesives and Sealants Low-Emitting Materials—Paints and Coatings Low-Emitting Materials—Flooring Systems Low-Emitting Materials—Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control Controllability of Systems—Lighting Controllability of Systems—Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort—Design Thermal Comfort—Verification Daylight and Views—Daylight Daylight and Views—Views

Regional Priority Credits

1 1 1 1

Credit 1.1

68 16 26

Total

Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4

Regional Regional Regional Regional

Priority: Priority: Priority: Priority:

Certified 40 to 49 points

Specific Specific Specific Specific

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 6 1 1 1 1 1 1

Innovation in Design: Glass Duct Work & Chases Innovation in Design: Specific Title Innovation in Design: Specific Title Innovation in Design: Specific Title Innovation in Design: Specific Title LEED Accredited Professional

4

590 meters < 800 meters

Possible Points: 15

Innovation and Design Process Credit 1.1

1 1 1 1

1 to 2 1 to 2 1 1

S.S. Credit 4.1 - Alternative Transportation - Public Transportation Access

we credit 1: water efficient landscaping option 2: no potable water use or irrigation -only captured rainwater will be used for irrigation purposes innovation in design - glass chase air + light delivery The building systems are based on a glass chase which serve as the air delivery system for the building. The chases distribute air into ducts which then supply the dance studios, classrooms, and corridors. Prismatic panels hang from the tops of the chases to more effectively bring light to the interior core of the building while also creating a pattern of moving light on the floor. The chases are accessible at each floor for maintenence purposes.

Possible Points: 4 Credit Credit Credit Credit

1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 110 Silver 50 to 59 points

Gold 60 to 79 points

Platinum 80 to 110

25


1

r-value calculation (summer)

r-value calculation (winter)

r metal panel 2.67 air surface outside 0.044 150mm polystrene 5.2 air space 0.17 400mm concrete 0.21 Total 8.29

metal panel air surface outside 150mm polystrene air space 400mm concrete

26

r 2.67 0.03 5.2 0.12 0.21 Total 8.23

33

facade section


1

200mm growing media 90mm root protection barrier waterproof membrane

box type window diffuser ceiling panels

louvers insulated aluminum panels r-value: 2.67 (metric) or 16 (american) 150mm expanded polystrene r-value: 5.2 (metric) or 31.2 (american) air space r-value: 0.12 (metric) or 0.68 (american) 400mm cast in place conrete r-value: 0.21 (metric) or 1.25 (american)

33

20mm gypsum board on 90mm metal studs

27


communal HARVEST INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION This project was selected among over 300 projects to be exhibited at the Center for Architecture in NYC. It was published in a catalog and distributed internationally by the American Institute of Architects, New York Chapter. Harlem is significantly lacking in PRODUCTIVE PUBLIC SPACE. The notion of â&#x20AC;&#x153;publicnessâ&#x20AC;? is typically relegated to the purpose of adding recreational and leisure spaces classified as public: parks, plazas, squares. But what is public space today for a city like Harlem, and how can it be occupied to allow people to congregate freely and to participate in a place that promotes health and nourishment? Through the integration of GREENHOUSE agricultural PRODUCTION and DISTRIBUTION, COMMUNAL HARVEST aims to redefine the concept of public space. This new form of productive public space proposes the idea of a community where each individual can participate not only in the production and distribution of something, but also has the opportunity to learn and improve their quality of life.

29


30


3 2

11

8

12

5

10

7

16

16

16 6

5

8

13

12

7

9

8

15

14

5

11

5

7

9

9

4 1

1

level 2

level 1

1

1

level 4

level 3

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

hydroponic system

harlem’s future

greenhouse greenhouse market cold storage administration restrooms distribution center experimental auditorium

A

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

lounge nourishing NYC offices classrooms learning kitchens library restaurant exhibition space storage

public parks +

greenhouses_ marine transfer station

perforated growing tray 25,000 sq ft 300,000 lbs of produce $2.5 million revenue

15,000 sq ft 100,000 lbs of produce $1.5 million revenue

water level

5,000 sq ft 50,000 lbs of produce $750,000 revenue

harlem’s public parks

harlem’s public parks

nutrient solution submersible pump drain

31


existing building

proposed production

hydroponic system [ramps allow for better nutrient flow]

restaurant

auditorium public market growing

hydroponic greenhouse

auditorium hydroponic greenhouse greenhouse market

32


33


lakefront uplift The site is located on the north end of Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lakefront, at the border of the Rogers Park neighborhood in Evanston. Existing site conditions make accessing the beach a difficult task. In many places the path becomes too narrow for use by walkers and bikers. The central span of the site across from the Cavalry cemetery has been rejected and is currrently nothing more than a pile of rock revetments. The 26 miles of Chicago lakefront parks come to an abrupt end just south of the site. Lakefront Uplift completes these paths and provides a valuable connection to Evanston.

35


existing site

36

new lakefill new beach

cafe sensory experiences

Lakefill was added to enable the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s access to the lake.This new land forms two peninsulas: one to the north in Evanston and one to the south in Chicago. Juneway Terrace Beach and Rogers Park Beach have been joined to form a more accommodating lakefront.

Sensory experiences were added to the north and south beaches including a misting wall, promenade, wading pool/ice rink,and bird sanctuary. Each experience is located along the peninsulas with the best vantage points of the lake. A cafe is situated near the wasing pool.


37


alternating experiences The central portion of the site features a wading pool that transforms into an ice rink in the winter months. Space for entertainment is provided within this feature.

summer months_wading pool

winter months_ice rink


A

section A 39


40


lakefront cafe

41


existing site

bird sanctuary mist wall

bird sanctuary

promenade peek-a-boo bird blind

entry 01

01

42


promenade

mist wall

promenade // visitor information center

43


virtual urbanscape INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION This project was selected among the international competition entries to be exhibited in New York City and the University of Houston Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture Technology has permeated into every aspect of our lives. It has changed the way we do just about everything. But what then is LOST? Today, we find ourselves serving technology by constant updates, messages, emails, and comments made in an instant TIME, in no SPACE. We believe that by simply slowing the city down we can guide the city to grow organically into a more ecologically cogent society. As a result of congestion and density of cars within the city, the average speed of the car in New York City has become 9mph. Clearly the future transportation of New York City has become the BICYCLE. VIRTUAL URBANSCAPE therefore creates a bicycle highway along the INFUSED with a technology built to serve our means and help us experience the city in new ways. This experience slows the bombardment of information by providing an EXPERIENCE, and plays a part in creating a SLOW SPACE for physical meetings within the community.

45


vir tual

vir tual

vir tual


circulation

green extensions

experience experience

speed

social space

47


9mph

strategy

mph?

48


virtual projection

sensor

fiber optic glass framing structure

select your desired experience

projector

!

deck networked wiring

49


dynamic retreat Through the integration of several studies, a design for a boutique hotel was developed along the lake in North Chicago. With a diverse and ever-changing community, this project affords an opportunity to create a form ordered by the dynamic culture. Inspired by the demographics and history of the surrounding area, the building is both expressive and changeable. The dynamic design reflects the vacillating diversity in the city and the fast-paced lifestyle of the community. Dynamic elements convey this concept of constant change present within the city. Throughout the day, a different personality is evident as guests interact within the space.

51


entry lobby area reception desk conference center spa loading dock

1 2 3 4 5 6 13

restrooms 7 breakfast room 8 outdoor cafe 9 restaurant 10 kitchen 11 performance space 12 bike dock emergency refuge janitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closet/storage vending/ice machine lounge/dining linens closet

10 11 8 9

12

18

level 5

2

13 14 15 16 17 18

1 7 3 6

5

4

level 4

level 1 17 16 14 15

level 2

population density

highly diverse

dynamic

concept for facade

53


Each unit of levels 2, 3, 4 and 5 contain a modular wall that stores a fold-out table, television, sound system, and storage spaces. This allows for better efficiency of space and provides the guest with a variety of options that will be most accommodating. In order to maximize the view, each bed has also been set at an angle to view the lake on the South facade and downtown Chicago on the North facade.

54


unit perspective_modular wall closed

modular wall sliding glass panels_dual purpose shading device_privacy device

wet bar individual unit balcony

bed positioned at angle to maximize view

storage space entertainment space

dining area_work space

unit perspective_modular wall opened


56


east elevation

With normal solar cells, you need direct sunlight to generate power. This panel can generate power from diffused light using a specialized colored panel. They are panes made with fluorescent dyes and nanoparticle metals. As the direct or indirect sunlight hits the panels, it diffuses across and the nanoparticles of metal and concentrate the sunlight to the edges where the silicon is.

south elevation

57


passive solar pavers This system incorporates LEDs into transparent glass conductor plates that are protected by a top and bottom layer of laminated glass. The clear conductor layer allows electricity to travel throughout the entire piece of glass and is charged by 9 high-quality, silicon-encapsulated, mono-crystal solar cells.

1/8â&#x20AC;? min. clear between perimeter memeber & concrete concrete

1/16â&#x20AC;? sealant

glass

extruded silicone cushion

4 1/16â&#x20AC;?

aluminum flashing

perimeter member

waterproof membrane

silicone-encapsulated mono-crystal solar cell steel angle support

welded stud

passive solar paver

58

sealant


high mass night vent cooling

warm air escapes through skylight

Cool air, particularly at night during the shoulder seasons, can be used as a free source of cooling. The building is designed with features that allow for natural ventilation through the frces of stack effect and cross ventilation. Thermal mass exposed to the building interior will act as a storage medium for heat or coolness.

warm air released through atrium

section a b

a

60

section b

cool air brought in through operable windows


urban denCITY

urban denCity

This project introduces a new urban strategy for Urbana, Illinois while implementing three new focal points along a centralized railroad that will equally redistribute the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population. The city of Urbana is a canvas dotted by fragments of the old and new. Once a rail hub for western expansion, the track now acts as a divider, separating its sides into zones of residential and commercial construction. Our Urban DenCity plan stitches the cut. It calls for a reuse of the rail, transforming it into an infrastructural core serving as the connection between Hubs in the city. The Hubs are mixed-use structures lining the railway programmed for commercial, residential, as well as train stations for the light-rail system. Urban DenCity also addresses the issue of under-used land with a site-wide re-elevation project creating peaks and valleys of the landsurface where new spaces are created above and below the land, therefore following the idea of layering private, public, and semi public spaces.

63


urban strategy a site location

overall site

a

b

blended land forms

b

c c

composite topography

urban hubs

64

site a

site b

site c


The most developed location with an area that has a continuous flow of people. By establishing a transit stop here, it will serve as a vital location along the central rail. Not only will it allow for a convenient departure point for this active area, but it will reconnect the disadvantaged western area of Urbana with itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thriving eastern end.

Designated as the center of all three sites, site b contains a mixed use environment accommodating the needs for surrounding areas. The purpose of this site is to create a common grounds between the three hubs, acting as a starting point for new population growth and redistribution of existing population.

Due to a lack of proactivity throughout the surrounding areas, the primary goal is to redevelop the western portion of Urbana, reconnecting it with the city. By creating additional commercial, residential, and transit zones, new jobs become available, homes are conveniently located, and transportation allows for easy access to the rest of the city.

a high activity

b central hub

c proactivity

example of programmed layers in site c

parking residential commercial transit

65


phase I _5 yr

> phase II_15 yr

> phase III_25 yr

>

topography

flat depressed

surface alterations

elevated

radial grid

landscape_25 year plan

66

The 25 year plan allows for additional space while also separating function by layers. The site has three main sections, each of which relate to the surrounding community’s structure. The highest of these buildings are located in the center of the site. The medium sized buildings make up section two, while section one contains the smallest. In each of these sections, a “ground zero” was established. Section one retains the original ground level, section two has a ground level of 10 feet, and section three at 20 feet. The land will be allowed to elevate above or depress below the newly established ground level by 20 feet, 10 feet, and 5 feet for sections 3, 2, 1 respectively.

ground zero

composite map

landscape plan_year 25


residential

ground zero [1]

business

ground zero [2]

commercial

ground zero [3]

67


residential reclamation This project was nominated for the Edward C. Earl Prize in Design As a continuation of the previous project, urban denCITY, this exercise attempts to reframe existing urban phenomena. The city is an extremely complex set of relationships between processes and phenomena such as landscape, infrastructure, built fabric, and social networks. These relationships are indeterminate and dynamic and are especially legible at the edges and boundaries of urban territories. Residential Reclamation breaks these boundaries while exploring the potentials of everyday life and the ordinary with the not so ordinary.

69


urban context

site

evolutionary diagram

70


conceptual diagram of compactor pods In this case, domestic waste is divided into organic and inorganic divisions. Organic waste becomes compost and the compost is transferred into the programmatically divided lawns to serve as fertilizer and aid in lawn beautification.

seasonal fashion phasing

time lapse stack

71


site striation

programmatic lawn divisions

lawn traditional

lawn decomposed

landscaped housing sections lawn beautification

72


Striations in the landscape are determined by sight lines through the house, where only the traditional programmed lawn and its beautifying elements are visible. These strips are also translated to the interior of the house - forming a one-to-one relation between the constructed house and its constructed lawn. Closets, as another node of disposal for unwanted items, become a public display - exposing the hidden lives of residents. Only after the establishment of these definitions does the house undergo formal changes.

73


wasteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s destiny awaits

74


exploded elevations

I south elevation

II east elevation

III north elevation

IIII west elevation

75


reclaiming the residual INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION This project was nominated for the Chicago Prize Troutier Landfill is 2 km north of Cite Soleil and is the home to a few dozen families that were displaced from the 2010 earthquake, and thousands of victims are laid to rest here. In October of 2010 the residents of Troutier barricaded the entrance to the city in an effort to prevent waste management vehicles from dumping obscene amounts of waste into the city. About 500-900 cubic meters of human waste are delivered to the landfill every day yet there is not a waste treatment center to properly process these wastes. Much of the human waste sits in cess pools that are located adjacent to homes where it spreads diseases.

77


RESIDUAL waste

>

recyclable + organic

78

TRANSPORTED waste

recyclable and organic waste is transported from restroom facilities and landfills

>

TRANSFORMED waste

collected waste is processed into biogas fuel

>

RECLAIMED waste

biogas fuel is utilized for various needs


A. T R A N S F E R C E N T E R B. B I O F I L T E R PRE-COMPOSTING D. R A I N W A T E R C O L L E C T I O N E. D I G E S T I O N INDOOR AIR TREATMENT G. C O M P O S T I N G T U N N E L S H. B I O G A S R E C O V E R Y J. C O M P O S T S T O R A G E K. M A T U R A T I O N

BIOGAS FACILITY 79


Troutier

mass grave memorial education center

Port-au-Prince

80


biogas fueled transit bringing Haitians to the national memorial which may result in new opportunities for economic growth within Troutier

MEMORIAL

local biogas DRAINAGE

eternal flame

PHYTO F I LTRATI O N

< Troutier landfill mass grave

2010

National Memorial victims of earthquake unceremoniously dumped into landfill > 25,000 victims

<

<

<

Port-au-Prince region

2020

Mass Grave a national memorial on the site of the mass grave provides a place for families of victims to commemorate the deceased who did not receive a proper burial

81


structural details The following pages include construction drawings from various projects.

83


concrete coping splayed fixing block c.m.u. base flashing steel channel batt insulation 1/2” gypsum board steni clips

carpet carpet padding steel w-connection tyvec rigid insulation 1” air gap vapor barrier

double glazed 1/2 “ heat strengthened glass railing double glazed 1/2 “ heat strengthened sliding glass glazing channel glazing packer brush seal concrete slab 1/2” gypsum drop ceiling 25 mm wide steel strap hangers

84

1/4” = 1’-0”


june 21

translucent shade not in front of window

dec. 21

june 21

dec. 21

translucent shade in front of window

shading study The south facade incorporates a sliding glass panel system that serves as both a shading and privacy device. Each unit contains two sliding glass panels that can be moved to completely deflect sunlight when placed directly in front of a window. When not placed directly in front of a window, the balconies are designed so that windows are fully shaded during the summer months, but receive full sun during the winter months. A vertical fin will be utilized as a movable shading device on the east facades. At 8 AM on June 21, when the sun is at a angle of 36.5 deg. Users may turn the device at any angle they wish to direct the sunlight.

85


1/8â&#x20AC;? min. clear between perimeter memeber & concrete concrete

1/16â&#x20AC;? sealant

glass

extruded silicone cushion

sealant

4 1/16â&#x20AC;?

aluminum flashing

perimeter member

spacer member

waterproof membrane

silicone-encapsulated mono-crystal solar cell steel angle support

welded stud

passive solar paver_detail

This system incorporates LEDs into transparent glass conductor plates that are protected by a top and bottom layer of laminated glass. The clear conductor layer allows electricity to travel throughout the entire piece of glass and is charged by 9 high-quality, siliconencapsulated, mono-crystal solar cells.

86


green roof detail concrete curb growing medium filter sheet drainage layer protection mat root barrier

vertical louvers operable double glazed window louver attached to metal sill drywall batt insulation rigid insulation concrete slab

A root barrier prevents roots from penetrating the building while a protection mat helps to minimize punctures. The drainage layer allows heavy rain to run off to a perimeter drain that leads to an underground tank reserved for grey water usage. It also holds water that can diffuse upward as vapor when the growing medium dries. A filter sheet stops fine particles from clogging the drainage layer, and the growing medium provides nutrients for the plants above.

steel channel steni cladding

vertical louver window detail

87


patent design The following pages include details of a patent design. I was co-designer of the patent and consulted with the client in developing their products and designs.

89


90


91


92


93


94


The human experience in the urban environment is a collection of sensory information. Processed into memory, these data points form an internal picture of place characterized by references, landmarks and junctions in relation to one another. They form a cognitive memory.

_EXPOSURE_s c a p e

This memory, however, is largely the accumulation of input on the surface of the environment. Our citizenship in the city is defined by a collage of imagery and places that assemble as we carry on our spasmodic lives. Rarely do we take a moment to view the network of threads that interweave to form the fabric carrying the weight of our urban environment. _EXPOSURE_ s c a p e shaves away at the surface, making apparent the forgotten interfaces of our daily lives controlled by an arbitrary confinement to temporality.

95


97


SHELLIE HALKYARD Education May 2012 May 2010 2004-2007

Experience

Aug 2011 - 2012

smhalkyard@gmail.com

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

• Masters of Architecture GPA: 3.90 • Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies GPA: 3.75

North Central College

Naperville, IL

• General education courses GPA: 3.90

Patent Designer Channahon, IL

• Co-designer of patent • Consulted with client in developing their products and designs • Drafted plans, sections, and diagams in AutoCAD • Created 3D digital models and renderings in Revit, Photoshop, and Illustrator • Compiled and arranged graphic layout of final patent documents

Winter 2007 Summer 2007 2004 - 2008

Church Building Consultants • Shadowed a firm of architects

Wheaton, IL

Friends in Christ Lutheran Church

Morris, IL

• Provided ideas in the development of a preliminary design for a new church

Douglas Halkyard Family Dentistry Morris, IL

• Business Administrator • Managed accounts payable, accounts receivable, payroll, inventory • Executed general office tasks, such as filing and organizing digital data

Awards

+

Honors

2012

Published Work

• Design work from the Harlem Edge Competition was published in a catalog and distributed internationally by the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter.

2011, 2012

Exhibited Work

• Design work was selected among over 300 projects in the international Harlem Edge Competition to be exhibited at the Center for Architecture in New York City • Design work was selected among over 200 projects in the international d3 Close the Gap Competition to be exhibited in NYC and the University of Houston 2007, 2012 2008, 2009 2011, 2012 2007

Organizations

Works reviewed by NAAB

• Designs selected as “high pass” examples to be reviewed by NAAB during UIUC accreditation

Chicago Award in Architecture Nominee Edward C. Earl Prize Nominee Presidential Scholarship of $4,500; Tau Sigma National Honor Society American Institute of Architecture Students Society for Business and Management in Architecture East St. Louis Action Research Project

• Volunteered in helping to improve the living conditions of the community • Preserved historical doucuments and artifacts of the Dunham Museum • Organized items for the goodwill

Skills

98

Drafting Rendering

Graphic Design

MS Office

Revit Rhinoceros AutoCAD Google SketchUp Hand Rendering

Adobe Illustrator InDesign Photoshop Premiere Pro

Word Excel Powerpoint

815 467 4433 4300 Sandridge Rd. Morris, IL 60450



Shellie Halkyard Portfolio