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Table of Contents OACUHO 2014 Spring Conference Welcome from Laurier’s Host Committee … …… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …1 Welcome from the OACUHO President & President Elect… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 2 About Wilfrid Laurier University… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …3 About Waterloo… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ... … 4 Your Laurier Experience… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 5 Schedule at a Glance… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ... .7 Special Events… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …9 Pre-conference Sessions… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..12 Opening Keynote Biography… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …13 Higher Education Talks… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …14 Featured Speakers… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …15 Concurrent Session #1 Descriptions… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …16 Concurrent Session #2 Descriptions… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ...19 Concurrent Session #3 Descriptions… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ...22 Concurrent Session #4 Descriptions… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..25 Concurrent Session #5 Descriptions… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..28 Concurrent Session #6 Descriptions… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 31 Concurrent Session Evaluation link & QR code … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .33 Closing Keynote Biography… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ... .34 OACUHO Board of Directors 2013-2014 & 2014-2015 … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …35 Stay Connected … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..36 Delegate Directory… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … ..37 Campus Map… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …42 Sponsorship … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 43

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Welcome from Laurier’s Host Committee Dear friends and colleagues, It is with great excitement that the Department of Residence at Wilfrid Laurier University hosts the 2014 OACUHO Spring Conference! Ever since we put in a bid to host the annual conference back in May 2013, we have been working tirelessly to ensure that we uphold the legacy that our neighbouring institutions have imparted on the conference in years past. OACUHO 2014, Leadership & Purpose, promises to be an unforgettable week. When the Laurier team sat down and discussed what principles would guide the development and implementation of our conference, we discussed ideas such as engagement, learning, challenge, growth, family, and home. We wanted to ensure that our conference engaged you, our delegates, to further your learning, while challenging you to continue to think outside of the box and grow in your day to day work. We also felt that is was important to create an environment for you – our friends and family, which would make each of you feel at home. After yet another successful academic year has come and gone, we are very much looking forward to opening our home to you, and welcoming you to Laurier’s Waterloo campus. Please take advantage of every opportunity that the OACUHO Spring Conference has to offer you. We invite you to explore our campus and city during your visit. If there is anything that you need throughout the conference, feel free to ask any of our volunteers, and we will do our best to accommodate you. Thank you for coming to Laurier’s OACUHO Spring Conference – we hope that it is a week to remember! Brandon Falcao, Josh Duarte, Sheldon Pereira & Chris Dodd On behalf of the OACUHO 2014 Spring Conference Host Committee

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Welcome from the OACUHO President & President-Elect Welcome OACUHO delegates! On behalf of the 2013-14 Board of Directors for the Ontario Association of College and University Housing Officers (OACUHO) – welcome to our annual Spring Conference! I want to extend a special welcome to those of you participating for the first time – welcome! You will find that OACUHO is one of the friendliest, most-welcoming professional groups around. I am sure you find the networking and sessions helpful. The conference host committee at Laurier has been working so hard for months to ensure an amazing conference experience. We would like to extend a huge thank you to the host committee for their hard work and dedication. We are very excited by the comprehensive and innovative conference program that they have put together! Thank you so much to all the session presenters. There would be no conference without your contribution – thank you! I would also like to extend a big thank you to our Corporate Partners that make our conference possible. Please visit with all of them at our Vendor Fair. Both the 13-14 and the 14-15 Board of Directors are very excited to chat with all of you this week. Please introduce yourself to individuals wearing Board of Director ribbons. We would love to discuss all the exciting ways of getting involved in OACUHO. Thank you for choosing to attend the Spring Conference and making OACUHO your professional home! Have a wonderful conference! Chad Nuttall 2013-14 OACUHO President

Laura Storey 2014-15 OACUHO President-Elect

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Wilfrid Laurier University Inspiring Lives Wilfrid Laurier University has recently celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2011 commemorating its humble beginnings as the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in 1911. Since that day, Laurier has continued to inspire lives of leadership and purpose through its innovative programs and student and community engagement. Laurier is home for over 17,000 students studying on campuses in Waterloo and Brantford, with additional locations in Kitchener, Toronto, and Chongqing, China. Students are offered programs through seven different faculties, three of which are offered with the option of our highly regarded cooperative education program. Laurier also formally recognizes student participation in co-curricular activities that complement their academic experience by encouraging further involvement and purposeful reflection. As a leading university in Canada, Laurier is poised and ready for another 100 years focused on education, research, and building a strong sense of community with engaged learners and leaders of tomorrow. “Let your aim and purpose, in good report or ill, in victory or defeat, be so to live, so to strive, so to serve as to do your part to raise even higher the standard of life and living..." – Sir Wilfrid Laurier

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Waterloo, Ontario Change of Industry Waterloo was settled in 1806 by a gentleman named Abraham Erb, a Mennonite from Pennsylvania, and just ten years later he had built a sawmill on Beaver Creek (now Laurel Creek). The mill was used to grind wheat into flour, and with flour being a primary ingredient during this time, farmers from miles around would travel to the mill in order to process their goods. This was just the beginning of an industrial town that would grow and change with the times becoming a commercial and social hub. Today we see a change from manufacturing and the industrial base towards a focus on the commercial sector, higher education, and high technology including the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics – a highly regarded think tank. Waterloo continues to be a central hub for business and innovation, while still maintaining its small town heritage. St. Jacob’s Market, located just North of Waterloo, is a place that continues to hold true to the Mennonite heritage of the region by providing Canada’s largest year-round farmer’s market where you can find local grown produce, crafts and other antiquities. Waterloo is filled with rich history and heritage that can be seen everywhere you go. Whether visiting St. Jacob’s Market, or walking by the old Seagram Distillery there is a little piece of Waterloo history that can be found. We highly encourage you to explore the area for yourself and take the chance to soak up a magnificent piece of Canadian history.

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Your Laurier Experience King Street Residence 200 King Street North Waterloo, Ontario King Street Residence is an eight storey, co-ed residence which houses 332 first year students. The building consists of mostly single style dormitory rooms with semi-private washrooms. Other facilities include a common lounge with a kitchenette on each floor in addition to a main crossover lounge and a laundry room located on the South side of the building.

Hospitality Suite Sponsored by: Foliot Furniture The Hospitality Suite is located in the King Street Residence Crossover Lounge – located on the 6th floor. Open throughout the conference, it is a great place to relax and further network after the day’s events! Take some time to watch TV, play games and enjoy a few light refreshments and snacks in comfortable furniture provided by platinum sponsor – Foliot Furniture.

Internet Wireless internet will be made available to all conference delegates staying in King Street Residence. Upon check-in, each delegate will be provided with a username and password to connect to the network OACUHOSpringConference2014.

Linens Bed linens and towels will be provided to your room. Each room will have two towels; any extra towels will be provided at the delegate’s request from the Hotel Laurier front desk.

Dining Hall All conference meals - with the exception of special events – will be provided in the Dining Hall located in the heart of campus. See campus map. All food contracted through Aramark.

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Your Laurier Experience continued Athletic Complex Conference delegates will have full access to the Athletic Complex throughout the conference at any time throughout the day. To gain access to our facilities, display your official Spring Conference name tag to the Front Desk staff at the Athletic Complex.

Public Transit With the use of your official Spring Conference name tag, free public transit is available to all conference delegates on Waterloo’s Grand River Transit System. Take some time to explore the city when not in sessions!

Emergency contact In the event of any emergency situation please contact Laurier’s Special Constable Services at 519-885-3333.

Conference Volunteer Information & Hotline Volunteer T-shirts sponsored by: Traces Screen Printing Ltd.

On behalf of the volunteer team, we welcome you to our campus. Our volunteer staff are happy to support you in any way so please let us know how we can make your conference experience exceptional. We're happy to share with you our conference hotline number – 519-884-0710 ext.4744. Calling this number will connect you with a Professional Staff Member at any hour of the day. You may also connect with us through email at oacuho2014@wlu.ca

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Schedule at a Glance Monday May 12 & Tuesday May 13 Time 7:00 -4:00 pm 9:00-4:00 pm 9:00-4:00 pm 1:00-4:00 pm 4:00-5:00 pm

Monday May 12, 2014 Event Registration Crucial Conversations (pre-conference) Board of Directors Meeting Living Learning Communities (pre-conference) Break

5:00-6:00 pm

Newcomers Welcome

6:00-8:00 pm

Opening Reception

8:00-8:30 pm 8:30-11:00 pm

Break & Transition Time Social Evening on Campus

Time 7:00-7:45 am 7:45-8:00 am 8:00-9:00 am 9:00-9:15 am 9:15-9:45 am 9:45-10:45 am 10:45-11:00 am 11:00-12:00 pm 12:00-12:30 pm 12:30-1:45 pm 1:45-2:00 pm 2:00-3:00 pm 3:00-3:15 pm 3:00-5:00 pm 3:15-4:15 pm 4:15-4:30 pm 4:30-5:30 pm 5:30-6:00 pm 6:00-6:15 pm 6:30-9:00 pm 9:00-11:30 pm

Tuesday May 13, 2014 Event Health and Wellness Programming Transition Time Breakfast Transition Time Spring Conference Kickoff Opening Keynote Address Transition Time Higher Education Talks Break & Transition Time Lunch & Case Study Transition Time Concurrent Sessions Block #1 Transition Time Senior Level Professionals Concurrent Sessions Block #2 Transition Time Concurrent Sessions Block #3 Break & Transition Time Bus Loading for Evening Social Oktoberfest Keg Tapping Bauer Kitchen Social

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Location King Street Residence Bricker Academic 111 WLUSU Boardroom Bricker Academic 110 -Maureen Forrester's Recital Hall/Robert Langen Art Gallery Maureen Forrester's Recital Hall/Robert Langen Art Gallery -Wilf's Restaurant & Bar

Location King Street Residence -Dining Hall Bricker Academic Bricker Academic 201 Bricker Academic 201 -Bricker Academic -Dining Hall -Bricker Academic -WLUSU Boardroom Bricker Academic -Bricker Academic -King Street Residence Concordia Club Bauer Kitchen


Schedule at a Glance Wednesday May 14 & Thursday May 15 Time 7:00-7:45 am 7:45-8:00 am 8:00-8:50 am 8:00-8:50 am 8:50-9:00 am 9:00-10:00 am 10:00-10:15 am 10:15-12:00 pm

Wednesday May 14, 2014 Event Health and Wellness Programming Transition Time Buyers Breakfast Breakfast Break & Travel Time Higher Ed. Talks Transition Time OACUHO Annual General Meeting

11:30-1:00 pm

Lunch & Exhibitor Fair

1:00-1:30 pm

Break & Transition Time

1:30-3:30 pm

Chief Housing Officers

1:30-2:30 pm 2:30-2:45 pm 2:45-3:45 pm 3:45-4:00 pm 4:00-5:00 pm 5:00-5:45 pm 5:30 - 6:30 pm 6:00-6:40 pm 6:30-11:00 pm

Concurrent Sessions Block #4 Transition Time Concurrent Sessions Block #5 Transition Time Featured Speakers Break & Transition Time Past Presidents & CHO Reception Bus Loading for Evening Social Closing Banquet

Location Athletic Complex -Hawk's Nest (Turret) Dining Hall -Bricker Academic -Bricker Academic 201 Senate & Board and Paul Martin Centre -Hawk's Lounge (Athletic Complex) Bricker Academic -Bricker Academic -Bricker Academic -To be announced King Street Residence Tannery Event Centre

Time 7:00-7:45 am 7:45-8:00 am 8:00-9:00 am 9:00-9:15 am 9:15-10:15 am 10:15-10:30 am 10:30-11:30 am 11:30-12:00 pm 12:00-1:00 pm 1:00-2:00 pm 1:15-3:00pm

Thursday May 15, 2014 Event Health and Wellness Programming Break & Travel Time Breakfast Break & Travel Time Roundtable Concurrent Sessions (Block #6) Break & Travel Time Closing Keynote Address Conference Closing and Final Remarks Lunch Conference Check-out Post-Conference Outing & Travel Home

Location Athletic Complex -Dining Hall -Bricker Academic -Bricker Academic 201 Bricker Academic 201 Dining Hall King Street Residence St. Jacob's Market

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Special Events Newcomers’ Welcome May 12, 5:00-6:00 pm, Maureen Forrester Recital Hall The Newcomer's Reception of OACUHO 2014 Leadership and Purpose is a time for entry level professionals to gather and connect not only with one another, but with a variety of seasoned professionals in the industry. This will be a low stress environment and should be a fun way for people to meet before the entire delegation arrives. There will be an interactive portion to this event where attendees will have the chance to win some great prizes and have some memorable conversations along the way. Located in the Maureen Forrester Recital Hall and Robert Langen Art Gallery, please join us for some wine and cheese to provide a warm welcome to the Newcomers!

Opening Reception May 12, 6:00-8:00 pm, Maureen Forrester Recital Hall The opening reception of OACUHO 2014 Leadership and Purpose is a time when professionals can come together and connect/re-connect with other colleagues from across Ontario. In this low pressure environment, there is opportunity for mingling and mixing with the entire group. Located in the Maureen Forrester Recital Hall/Robert Langen Art Gallery, join us for a few hours of enjoyable entertainment, intriguing artistic sights, and an assortment of delectable finger foods. At this time the host committee as well as select members of the OACUHO board of directors will offer a full delegation welcome and express excitement for the week to come. It is a relaxed way to start the conference and to set the tone for the week.

Social Evening on Campus May 12, 8:30-11:00 pm, Wilf’s Restaurant & Bar Join us for a casual social evening at Wilf’s Restaurant & Bar, Laurier’s very own restaurant & pub on campus. Located on the second floor of the Fred Nichol’s Campus Centre, Wilf’s is a Laurier hot spot. Join us for a drink to cap off the first day of the OACUHO 2014 Spring Conference. 9


Special Events Tuesday Evening Social May 13, 6:30-11:30 pm, Concordia Club and Bauer Kitchen Traditional meets Modern at this year's social night. Join us at Concordia club for an Oktoberfest event, complete with ceremonial keg tapping, and of course Wiener schnitzel. After enjoying an authentic Oktoberfest meal, stop at Bauer Kitchen for a post dinner drink. Described as a little bit of New York City in the heart of Waterloo; it will be the perfect modern cap to a traditional night! Buses will depart King Street Residence at 6:00 pm and run on a loop in 15 minute intervals.

Buyer’s Breakfast May 14, 8:00-9:00 am, Hawk’s Nest (Turret) The buyer's breakfast is a fairly new tradition at the OACUHO Spring Conference. It allows CHOs and Senior level housing professionals with purchasing authority to engage informally with vendors and other organizational partners to discuss new products and opportunities. The 2014 buyer's breakfast will be taking place in the Hawk's Nest adjacent to the Turret Nightclub on the top floor of the Fred Nichol's Campus Centre.

Exhibitor Fair May 14, 11:30-1:00 pm, Senate & Board Room and Paul Martin Centre The OACUHO 2014 Spring Conference is proud to showcase over 20 corporate partners and sponsors in our annual exhibitor fair. This intimate setting will provide delegates the opportunity to interact with the companies and organizations that provide services to the housing industry. Whether it's your first or 15th conference, we encourage you to take the time to ask questions and start to build, or strengthen relationships with our corporate colleagues who continually support OACUHO. The Exhibitor fair will be located in the Paul Martin Centre and Senate and Board Chambers.

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Special Events Closing Banquet May 14, 6:30-11:00 pm, The Tannery Event Centre Join us for this year’s Closing Banquet to be held at The Tannery Event Centre. Once a turn-ofthe-century mill, The Tannery has been renovated into a modern banquet hall that still holds onto its historical charm. Join us for a night full of great food, inspiring speeches, and excellent company as we celebrate our last evening together at the OACUHO 2014 Spring Conference. Buses will depart King Street Residence at 6:00 pm and run on a loop in 20 minute intervals. This year’s closing banquet is proudly sponsored by Foliot Furniture.

Post-Conference Outing – St. Jacobs May 15, 2:00 pm, St. Jacob’s Hop on a bus for a quick ten minute ride to St. Jacobs Market! Participants will have the opportunity to explore the market and if they wish, purchase local food or handmade crafts. Don’t miss out on this local tourist destination as the OACUHO 2014 Spring Conference winds down. This is an optional outing but is not to be missed! Be sure to sign up at the registration table located at the Hotel Laurier front desk of King Street Residence. Buses will depart King Street Residence at 1:15 pm.

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Pre-conference Sessions May 12, Concurrent Sessions

Living Learning Communities Living-Learning Communities (LLCs) provide a salient example of what is occurring on our college and university campuses today; the increased focus on integrating curricular, co-curricular and extra-curricular experiences in residence and Student Affairs. Eric Pernotto, Assistant Director of Academic Initiatives for University Housing at Clemson University, has served numerous institutions across America over the last fifteen years to create engaging living and learning environments for students. Eric will join us at this year’s OACUHO spring conference to provide a three hour workshop where participants explore best practices and develop campus-specific responses to challenges experienced when developing LLCs. Emphasis will b e placed on developing a framework for LLCs on your campus, engaging campus partners in Academic and Student Affairs in your LLCs, and the development of an assessment plan for your LLCs. Additional topics including staffing LLCs, student recruitment, room assignment , and funding LLCs will be explored. Date: May 12, 1:00-4:00 pm Room: Bricker Academic 110

Crucial Conversations Crucial Conversation training will “create alignment and agreement by fostering open dialogue around high-stakes, emotional, or risky topics—at all levels of your organization. By learning how to speak and be heard (and encouraging others to do the same), you’ll begin to surface the best ideas, make the highestquality decisions, and then act on your decisions with unity and commitment.” Date: May 12, 9:00-4:00 pm Room: Bricker Academic 111

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Opening Keynote Dr. Gene Luna Tuesday May 13, 9:45-10:45 am, Bricker Academic 201 Gene Luna currently serves as Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Academic Support at the University of South Carolina where he also has a clinical associate professor appointment in the College of Education, teaching in the higher education and student affairs administration graduate programs. In 2002, Dr. Luna directed the design and construction of a $31 million multi-building residential living and learning complex that has been certified LEED Silver by the US Green Building – one of the first newly constructed “certified green” residence communities on a university campus. He has served as a consultant for 30 plus colleges and universities with his most recent consulting experiences focusing on the areas of master planning for student housing, privatized housing, academic and student affairs partnerships, initiatives for first year students, and environmental sustainability practices. He has previous teaching, student affairs and campus housing experience from the Universities of Georgia and Florida, as well as Appalachian State University. He has published more than thirty articles and made over 100 presentations on a variety of higher education subjects.

Keynote Topic: Disruptive Innovations in Student Housing As is the case throughout higher education, numerous events, perceptions, and innovations are taking place with student housing on our college and university campuses. In his talk, Dr. Gene Luna (University of South Carolina) will review some of these disruptions to our traditional way of managing student housing and residence life and offer some opportunities to adapt and even strengthen your department’s position in the mission of your institution.

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Higher Education Talks #1 Tuesday May 13, 11:00-12:00 pm

The Impact of Residence Dan Herman, Balsillie School of International Affairs Location: Bricker Academic 201

Get to Know OACUHO Laura Storey, President-Elect of OACUHO Location: Bricker Academic 201

Residence Living and Learning: Why it Matters David McMurray, Wilfrid Laurier University Location: Bricker Academic 201

Higher Education Talks #2 Wednesday May 14, 9:00-10:00 am

Residence’s Impact on Personal and Professional Growth Haley Cranston & Kareina Souzak, University of Guelph, Julianne Pettigrew Award Winners Location: Bricker Academic 201

Using technology to Assess Customer Service Experience Chad Nuttall & Valerie Bruce, OACUHO & Ryerson University Location: Bricker Academic 201

Supporting Student Transition to Off-Campus Accommodations Paul Reifenstein, University of Waterloo Location: Bricker Academic 201

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Featured Speakers Wednesday May 14, 4:00-5:00 pm

Developing an Assessment Action Plan Andrew Noble & Glen Weppler, University of Waterloo Does your Housing department make decisions using evidence? Can you prove to a faculty member the impact of living in a residence community? Is there a plan to achieve your department’s assessment goals? At the University of Waterloo (UW), the Housing and Residences department has been learning the value of assessment in their development of an action plan. At this session, Glen Weppler, Housing Director, and Andrew Noble, Project Coordinator, will explain the priorities, the principles, and the practices associated with the development of an assessment action plan. Participants will hear the lessons learned of UW’s housing department. Attendees of this presentation will learn a) at least three benefits of why assessment planning and evidence based decisions are important for a campus housing operation, b) a number of principles used by UW when developing an assessment plan, and c) a handful of tested methods and resources for improving effective assessment practices. Location: Bricker Academic 101

Residence Expansion: From Concept to Move-In Chris Bumbacco, Western University of Ontario At the 2012 O-ACUHO Conference, Chris Bumbacco & Peggy Wakabayashi presented a session on the process Western used to obtain Board approval for the financing and construction of a $92 million undergraduate residence that would accommodate 1000 students. The first 600 residents moved into Ontario Hall in September of 2013. This session will follow the design, contract tendering, construction, and move in processes that were used to open our newest residence. Discussion will include why certain decision were made, as well as lessons learned throughout the process. Location: Bricker Academic 102

From Don to Dean, and Defining Moments In-Between Leanne Holland Brown & Adam Lawrence, Wilfrid Laurier University For years, we've heard that residence life experience provides an unrivaled foundation and launch pad for professional success, irrespective of one's chosen career path or profession. Join Adam Lawrence and Leanne Holland Brown, Laurier's two Deans of Students, as they reflect on the specific elements of the residence experience that contributed to their journey from Don to Dean, and how to maximize residence experiences to achieve meaningful success, effective leadership and difference-making impact. Location: Bricker Academic 201

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Concurrent Session #1 Tuesday May 13, 2:00-3:00 pm Ryerson University Lecture Bricker Academic 110 From Front Door to Rez Floor: How Customer Service Builds Community in Your Housing Operation Presenter: Valerie Bruce Stream(s): Facilities; Administration; 0-3 year Professionals Session Description Participants will explore the value and highlight the importance of all housing staff understanding their impact on the student experience. We will explore how the Ryerson University residence service desk has transformed from 2011 to 2013; moving from transactions to connections among students within the housing community. Reviewing feedback data pre and post to the implementation of a mystery shop program and emphasize the importance of an integration of customer service and residence life values in the entire housing operation. Learning Outcomes Participants will be able to: • articulate the benefits of integrating values of customer service with residence life positions and vice versa • strategize how to ensure all staff understands their impact on the student experience • identify an action plan of how all staff can feel more connected to the mission, vision and values of the both their institution and the student housing department.

University of South Carolina Workshop Bricker Academic 111 Using Disruptive Innovations to Improve Learning Outcomes for Students in Residence Presenter: Dr. Gene Luna Stream(s): Student Learning; Senior/CHO Session Description In this conversational session, participants will join Dr. Luna in exploring our future in housing and look deeper into some of the disruptions we’re experiencing and expecting in the world of student housing on college and university grounds. Participants will offer examples of disruptions they see and anticipate in the future while the group offers more in-depth solutions and responses.

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Concurrent Session #1 Tuesday May 13, 2:00-3:00 pm University of Toronto Roundtable Bricker Academic 306 We’ll Start The Bidding At… Presenter: Kat Keller Stream(s): Comprehensive; Student Learning; Senior/CHO Session Description What is the PURPOSE behind the questions you ask in Don Interviews each year? What type of LEADERSHIP qualities do you want represented on your Don Team? A Don that is…Responsible? Spontaneous? Authentic? Mature? Outgoing? Realistic? Approachable? Ultimately the qualities that each individual Don possesses will impact the dynamic of the team. So which qualities are most important to you & why? In this interactive session, you will work in a small “hiring committee” to assemble your own Don Team. To do this you will bid against other “hiring committees” in an attempt to snatch up the qualities you think are most important to have represented on your team. Be prepared to think on your feet, act quickly & dish out your Don Dollar’s Learning Outcomes By the end of the session participants will be able to: • identify & discuss the key leadership skills & traits that are appropriate for a student staff member to display • assess the importance of different leadership skills & qualities in respect to having them represented on a student staff team; • discuss the strengths & weaknesses of different leadership traits; • learn how to form & maintain a purposeful & diverse student staff team; To establish a fun environment to network with like-minded student life professionals.

Ryerson University Panel Bricker Academic 211 Leadership and Purpose: Chief Housing Officer Panel Presenter: Chad Nuttall Stream(s): Comprehensive; Student Learning; Senior/CHO Session Description Please join Chief Housing Officers (CHO) from across the province as we discuss important trends in Student Housing. This session will be sure to engage housing professionals from across functional areas and experience levels. The discussion will be moderated and there will be an opportunity for attendees to submit questions. program and emphasize the importance of an integration of customer service and residence life values in the entire housing operation. Learning Outcomes By the end of the session: • new and mid-level professional attendees will be familiar with key topics in the life of a CHO • chief housing officers panelists will have identified key contacts within the membership to expand their network • attendees will be able to articulate themes from all functional area of Student Housing.

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Concurrent Session #1 Tuesday May 13, 2:00-3:00 pm Ryerson University Workshop Bricker Academic 307 Understanding Group Dynamics Through Active Learning Presenter: Jen Gonzales Stream(s): Comprehensive; Administration; Student Learning; Counselling 0-3 Year Professionals Session Description As housing professionals, our service to stakeholders is enhanced by working in strong teams. As a group member or manager of teams, it is imperative to understand group dynamics, and the roles people play within teams. Using coaching theory, and innovative instructional strategies, participants will learn how to enhance their personal performance in teams and effective management of groups. In experiencing high impact learning, participants will be able to apply learning strategies to their potential requirements as educators. Learning Outcomes By the end of the session participants will be able to: • identify stages of group development as demonstrated by the instructional and cooperative learning strategy: placemat • identify their top task, maintenance and self-oriented behaviors as demonstrated by a self-assessment and coaching discussion; • apply their understanding of group dynamics by creating a mind map of how they will contribute/develop to the various teams they are a part of.

Wilfrid Laurier University & Clemson University Workshop Bricker Academic 308 Utilizing International Partnerships to Implement a Residential Curriculum Presenters: Dave Shorey & Eric Pernotto Stream(s): Student Learning Session Description Is your residence life staff being asked to do more with fewer resources? Have you questioned if your traditional programming model is effective? At Clemson University and Wilfrid Laurier University, we are implementing a new curricular approach to add value and intentionality to our residential experience. Our collaborations have allowed us to develop similar but unique ways to promote a higher level of student learning and engagement. Listen and engage as we share our experiences of how collaborations across universities can positively impact your residential communities. Learning Outcomes By the end of the session participants will: • differentiate between traditional programming models and residential curriculum models • create an action plan to implement new strategies for a curricular approach to student learning in residence halls • discuss opportunities for collaboration across universities to enhance educational initiatives.

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Concurrent Session #2 Tuesday May 13, 3:15-4:15 pm Nipissing University & University of Guelph Workshop Bricker Academic 110 Assessing Student Learning Part 1 Presenters: Jen Coulter & Julie West Stream(s): Student Learning; Comprehensive; 0-3 year Professional Session Description In developing learning centred campuses, it is critical that housing professionals embrace a learning paradigm, seek to direct intentional learning of students on their campuses, and demonstrate their contributions through assessing learning. Part one of this workshop, for entry level professionals, will explore the shift to a learning centred paradigm, outline Bloom’s Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives for use in developing learning outcomes, and discuss learning outcomes. Participants will leave this interactive session with written learning outcomes for an area of focus they have identified in their work. Learning outcomes will be used for the development of an assessment plan in Part 2. Learning Outcomes By the end of session 1 participants will be able to: • identify where they may direct student learning in their roles • distinguish between Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives • write an assessable learning outcome.

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Carleton University & Humber College Lecture Bricker Academic 111 Why College Students Are Different: Purposefully Leading Under-Represented Populations Presenters: Sarah Wills & Alyssa Graham Stream(s): Counselling Session Description The mission of colleges across Ontario is to expand educational opportunities for under-represented populations (Ontario Colleges, 2012). As housing professionals, it is important that we recognize the needs of a college student differ from those of a traditional university student. Utilizing retention theories by Beatty-Guenter and Dr. S. Swail, this session aims to explore the history of Ontario colleges, the under-represented populations that colleges seek to serve, and discusses meaningful strategies to guide engagement, conduct, and retention of college students in residence. In recognizing these unique needs, we are better able to lead our college students with purpose and direction. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session participants will: • learn about the history of Ontario colleges and their mission to educate under-represented and at-risk populations • discuss the unique demographics of Ontario colleges and the challenges these students face in their transition to college • learn how to better serve college students in residence with an emphasis on student engagement, conduct, and overall retention.

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Concurrent Session #2 Tuesday May 13, 3:15-4:15 pm University of Guelph

Lecture

Bricker Academic 112

Purposeful Processes: Establishing Competencies to Direct Student Staff Hiring, Training and Performance Coaching

Presenters: Brian Ingoldsby & Mike Bird Stream(s): Administration Session Description In describing their recent work revising Residence Life Staff competencies, Residence Life Managers from the University of Guelph will touch on the need for clearly defined competencies based in research and evaluation, the current dearth of research related to student-staff competencies in the Residence Life and Student Affairs fields, the competency set and framework developed at Guelph to anchor Residence Life hiring, training and performance coaching processes, and the transferability of the developed framework to HR practices within other areas of Student Housing. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session participants will: • contrast your department’s use of competencies in staff selection, training and performance coaching versus that of surveyed institutions, Identify the current deficit in research on competencies for studentstaff level practitioners within the Student Affairs and Residence Life fields • describe “foundational skills” and the value of their identification and inclusion in a student-staff competencies model, Identify the value of using a competencies-based framework to guide staff hiring, training and coaching, • apply the process used to generate University of Guelph’s Residence Assistant competencies and framework to student-staff positions within your department/institution.

Carleton University Lecture Bricker Academic 211 Keep the Energy Coming: Avoiding RLS Burnout Presenters: Harriet Tinnish & Andrew Natale Stream(s): Counselling; 0-3 year Professionals Session Description There’s a yearly energy cycle that students, staff, returning staff and professional staff go through during the academic year. Wouldn’t it be great if we could all be energizer bunnies continuously coming with the same amount of energy? Let’s make a plan. We’ll provide you with the skeleton plus some great strategies and proactive programs to bring out the bunnies in your staff, and yourself. We also want you to bring your ideas and participate in a brainstorming session to provide us all with even more options. Once you leave you will have developed a holistic, yearlong plan to fight the Residence Life burnout and bring out the never ending, always steady, drum beating bunnies. Learning Outcomes By the end of the presentation participants will have: • compiled a variety of strategies to avoid burnout (personally and within their staff teams) • begun developing a yearlong action plan to “Keep the Energy Coming” within their Residence Life Program • the tools they need to finish their action plan and have demonstrated their ability to do so engagement, conduct, and overall retention.

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Concurrent Session #2 Tuesday May 13, 3:15-4:15 pm OACUHO PD Committee Workshop Bricker Academic 305 “Navigating the Networking Landscape” – Knowing Yourself, Knowing What’s Out There Presenters: Sunita Karir, Dan Cantiller, Elizabeth Wong & Victoria Gadon Stream(s): 0-3 year Professionals Session Description Presented on behalf of the OACUHO PD Committee, this presentation is specifically designed to educate contract professionals on best practices for networking. Participants will learn how to enhance their networking abilities, assess the skills they have developed in their current role, and focus on future competencies they need to further develop while pursuing career goals. Part of the presentation will be in a lecture format and the roundtable portion will give participants the opportunity to network, ask questions and learn from each other. Learning Outcomes By the end of the presentation participants will: • identify 3 tools related to enhancing networking skills • assess their own skills in their current role, define future career goals, and discuss what skills they need to further develop to reach these goals • identify OACUHO members from specific functional areas of expertise within housing who are open to be contacted as resources to discuss their functional area within housing and their professional journey, • during the roundtable discussion, participants will have the opportunity to network with each other, and reflect on the presentation content.

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Concurrent Session #3 Tuesday May 13, 4:30-5:30 pm University of British Columbia Workshop Bricker Academic 110 UBC’s Alcohol Skills Training Program Presenters: Kyle Lethbridge Stream(s): Counselling; 0-3 year Professionals Session Description The University of British Columbia strives to provide a safe and secure living learning environment for our residence students. This includes safe and responsible alcohol use. We have expanded our response to over-intoxication in residence to include an Alcohol Skills Training Program in response to residents who required emergency services assistance as a result of alcohol consumption. We will share how our efforts have impacted student life and we will discuss further areas of opportunity. Learning Outcomes By the end of the presentation participants will: • explore a new initiative and approach to developing alcohol awareness in residence students • have an opportunity to participate in some of the discussion topics and activities Alcohol skills Training has to offer • learn about some of the data we have collected from the program, resident feedback, and we will discuss further areas of opportunity.

Nipissing University & University of Guelph Workshop Bricker Academic 111 Assessing Student Learning Part 2 Presenters: Jen Coulter & Julie West Stream(s): Comprehensive; Student Learning; 0-3 year Professionals Session Description Developing an assessment plan can be an overwhelming assignment. Breaking it down into manageable steps can help to demystify this task. Part two, for entry level professionals, will walk through the steps in developing an assessment plan in a logical way. We will focus on methods, techniques and strategies to evaluate learning in a variety of settings, implementation of these strategies, making meaning of results, and communicating with stakeholders. Learning Outcomes Using the learning outcome developed in session 1 participants will: • develop a plan to assess the learning outcome • identify 2 assessment techniques appropriate • develop a plan to implement one or more techniques • develop a plan to analyze results • develop a plan to communicate the results of your findings, • describe the steps in the assessment cycle.

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Concurrent Session #3 Tuesday May 13, 4:30-5:30 pm McMaster University Lecture Bricker Academic 112 Technological Tools with Diverse Applications Presenters: Vadim Levin & Melissa Pratt Stream(s): Comprehensive; Administration Session Description The following session will focus on exposing participants to less known technological applications. The presenters will share several applications and the ways in which they have used them in the past while also brainstorming with the audience additional ways those tools can be used for day-to-day tasks as well as larger processes in Residence Life. The audience will shape the conversation and may focus on a number of different areas of need including, but not limited to: day to day productivity, staff management, community building, assessment and larger system-wide practices. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session participants will be able to: • identify new technological applications, • recall resources for technological competency • illustrate relevant uses for technological applications within Residence Life • propose one change to their own systemic organizational process that was previously impossible.

University of Toronto Scarborough Lecture Bricker Academic 211 Distributing Leadership & Purpose to Residents: Factors in Creating and Engaging Upper Year Experience Presenters: Mike Plumton & Rebekkah Nighswander Stream(s): Comprehensive; Student Learning Session Description Wondering how to engage upper year residents beyond the hired Residence Life Team, elected Leaders, and volunteer roles? This presentation will explore key factors in creating an engaged upper year residence experience. Will will share our story, highlighting successes from the Podium Community at UTSC and the impact on our overall Residence system. We will also highlight key features and success factors from other residence life programs from across North America. Learning Outcomes By the end of this presentation participants will be able to: • design new or elevate current upper year residence experiences • refocus upper year experiences and increase the value proposition of an on campus residence living experience for senior undergraduates • apply key success factors identified in qualitative and quantitative data from UTSC and from other models of student housing • create a strategy that integrates improving student experiences, marketing & communications and occupancy in residence.

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Concurrent Session #3 Tuesday May 13, 4:30-5:30 pm Niagara College Workshop Bricker Academic 305 Motivation through Mutton Chops Presenter: James Hotze Stream(s): 0-3 year professional Session Description When you attend the January Residence Life Conference with absurd mutton chops, you spend some time evaluating your life. Why did I tell my residence staff that I would grow these if they met important performance indicators? Was this the best way to motivate? What else could I have done? And why, oh why did it work? This session explores formal motivational theory including Content Theory and Aspiration Management, providing Residence Life Management formal theory to complement their informal practice. Participants will have the chance to learn motivational theories while sharing their own successes and trials in motivating their staff. Learning Outcomes By the end of this presentation participants will: • remember at least one core component of Content and Aspiration Management Theory • understand how to integrate at least one component of Content or Aspiration Management theory into their existing practice • be able to enunciate a part of their personal informal theory on staff motivation.

University of Toronto Lecture Bricker Academic 306 Chestnut 10 Years Later: Building Community & Leadership in a Non-Traditional Residence Presenter: Jeff Brown Stream(s): Facilities: Student Learning; Senior/CHO Session Description A decade ago the University of Toronto was facing the Double Cohort and while three new residences were built, more bed space was still needed. The solution? Buy a 40 year-old hotel to convert into a residence for over 1000 students. From physical layouts of a building designed for privacy, to building community with an extremely diverse and un-unified student body, come learn how Chestnut Residence has adapted successfully, and sometimes not successfully, to building community and leaders in a non-traditional residence space.students. From physical layouts of a building designed for privacy to building community with an extremely diverse and un-unified student body, come learn how Chestnut Residence has adapted successfully, and sometimes not successfully, to building community and leaders in a non-traditional residence space. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session participants will learn about: • identifying, assessing and designing a res life program by examining the strengths and weakness in both physical residential spaces and areas of the residence life program. • collaboration on best practices with tangible and useful ideas and tools.

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Concurrent Session #4 Wednesday May 14, 1:30-2:30 pm Ryerson University & McMaster University Essentials in Project Management Presenter(s): Brandon Smith & Brittany Gawley

Workshop

Bricker Academic 110

Stream(s): Comprehensive, Facilities, Administration, Student Learning

Session Description You're going to leave this conference with many ideas for new initiatives, but how will you truly execute this, while balancing the needs to complete existing summer projects and August Training? A Project Management structure, through the Project Management Institute (PMI) model, is an essential tool to effectively plan, execute and assess any project - large or small - individually or as a large management team. Join Brandon & Brittany, both trained through PMI, to learn how you can take all of the tasks, post-it's, voice mails, last minute requests, new ideas from a 1:1 and changes to budget into a highly effective approach to your program. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session participants will: • describe the pillars of effective Project Management (using the PMI model) and relate them to one short-term and long-term project they are responsible for/a part of through a workbreakdown structure of these specific project • identify/assess/understand 'gaps' to their current workflow/organization and plan strategies to mediate these risks that support the Project Management structure • connect colleagues/positions to Project Management roles to effectively complete specific tasks related to the project; described through the development of 'work packages' related to specific tasks necessary to complete the described projects • deliver the foundational Project Management rubrics/skills/resources to their home institutions from the resources provided for the participants to the presenters.

OACUHO Workshop Bricker Academic 111 OACUHO Needs Assessment Presenter(s): Jessica Brain & Alysha Ferguson Stream(s): Comprehensive Session Description Members of the 2013-2014 OACUHO Board of Directors will be seeking feedback from the membership through an active needs assessment focus group. We will be collecting information related to PD offerings, delivery methods of PD offerings, possible limiting factors that exist and what can be done to overcome those barriers and much more. We are excited to hear from all facet of Student Housing to ensure that the OACUHO Board of Directors is best serving the membership. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session participants will: • understand the mission of the OACUHO Board of Directors • have offered feedback on how the OACUHO Board of Directors can better support all facets of Student Housing Services through active participation in a focus group • have a better understanding of the association and be able to sign up for any committees in which they are interested in joining.

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Concurrent Session #4 Wednesday May 14, 1:30-2:30 pm Trent University, Oshawa Lecture Bricker Academic 112 Residence Exemptions and the Ontario Residential Tenancies Act Presenter(s): Justin Fisher Stream(s): Facilities, Senior/CHO Session Description With increased scrutiny on the topic of resident rights, this timely and interactive presentation will dive into the freedom residences are offered by being exempt from the Ontario Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) and the criteria that must be met to ensure compliance with the exemption. Best practices will be identified among participants that will ensure residences do not abuse the privileges of the exemption. We will also look at how the RTA applies to live-in staff members and will identity best practices to limit potential risk with regards to the rights offered to live-in staff by the RTA. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session participants will: • understand the autonomy that is given to institutions by being exempt from the Ontario Residential Tenancies Act (RTA) • understand the criteria institutions must follow to enable their residences to be exempt and identify practices at their institutions that may not comply with the RTA exemption • identify best practices to ensure that institutions do no abuse the privileges offered by this exemption • understand the rights and responsibilities offered to live-in staff by the RTA • identify best practices to limit potential risk to institutions with regards to rights offered to live-in staff by the RTA. Queen’s University Lecture Bricker Academic 209 Influencing Change Presenter(s): Stacey Kiefer Stream(s): Comprehensive, Administration, Counselling Session Description Change is a constant in our profession: org. structures, programming models, technology needs, student demographics, training and development models, hiring practices…the list goes on! When starting out in a new position, we often come with lots of ideas for modifications to such practices, events, or even responsibilities. Sometimes we feel powerless to influence change within our roles or circumstances. Supplemented by examples from the past eight years of personal work experience, this session seeks to review some of the theory surrounding the broader subject of Change, while finding practical tactics and techniques to influence change in an organization from any level. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session, participants will be able to: • identify at least two actions that can be taken to influence change in an organization • describe key elements involved in creating organizational change • select applicable theory or practices to apply to individual visions for change • discuss challenges encountered in influencing change with colleagues.

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Concurrent Session #4 Wednesday May 14, 1:30-2:30 pm York University Lecture Bricker Academic 210 Using Lizzio’s “Five Senses” to Shape Residents’ First Year Experience Presenter(s): Dimple Savla, Matthew Harris, & Daryl Stream(s): Student Learning Nauman Session Description In the Spring of 2013, York's Residence Life program shifted their student development framework to that of Alf Lizzio's (2006) "Five Senses of Successful Transition" focusing on the importance of positive transition and the First Year Experience. This shift strengthened our theoretical base, complimented the Division's strategic plan, and allowed us to achieve outcomes that we strive for through residence programming. Using Lizzio's Senses, as well as ACUHO-I and CAS Standards, we developed a student experience model that is institutionally-relevant, theory-based, and assessable. In this session participants will learn about York's strategy, and gain relevant ideas for their institutions. Learning Outcomes Through this session, participants will be able to: • learn York’s strategy for implementing a First Year Experience model that is directed by theory and institutional priorities • understand Lizzio’s (2006) ‘5 Senses of Successful Transition • utilize a framework or theory to create assessment of department programs • see examples of how to use a variety of assessment data to strengthen your program model.

University of Guelph Lecture Bricker Academic 211 Continuing the Conversation: How to Talk to Students About Consent Presenter(s): Haley Cranston & Kareina Souzak Stream(s): Comprehensive, Counselling, 0-3 years Session Description The majority of university-aged students will engage in some form of sexual activity while in residence. Thus, talking to students about consent and sexual assault is a crucial, though often difficult, task for Residence Life leaders. While programming often occurs at the beginning of the academic year, informing and educating students about consent should continue throughout the year. This program will equip Residence Life leaders with ideas and skills that will enable them to engage their students in on-going conversations about consent and sexual assault - reminding everyone to "Ask the cutie before you touch the booty!" Learning Outcomes By the end of this session, participants will understand: • the importance of discussing consent and sexual assault in residence • how do you talk to students about consent and sexual assault • what programs can be run to inform students about these topics • tools Residence Life leaders can utilize to have open 1 on 1 conversations with students.

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Concurrent Session #5 Wednesday May 14, 2:45-3:45 pm University of South Carolina Lecture Bricker Academic 110 Talent Search – Building an All-Star Team Presenter(s): Gene Luna Stream(s): Comprehensive, Administration, Senior/CHO Session Description How do you attract the best and brightest to join your staff? How do you keep them when you hire superstars? In this session, Dr. Luna will give an overview of his and others’ successful approaches to build, develop and retain the “Best of the Best” for their staff teams. Starting with hiring people he would be happy to work for someday, he has been fortunate to keep several stars with him over the years even when they have other opportunities. A side benefit to attending may be that you find out some of the characteristics and traits he looks for when recruiting and hiring staff and how you might adopt some of them for your “branded” self.

Ryerson University Lecture Bricker Academic 111 Towards Appreciative Advising: The Evolution of “Plan A” within the new Residence Curriculum Presenter(s): Dan Cantiller Stream(s): Student Learning Counselling Session Description Last year, Ryerson Residence implemented the “Plan A: Academic Planning” pilot, engaging residents and peer academic staff with an academic goal-setting tool. Building from the model of Individual Education Plans (IEPs), Plan As guided conversations with students about their first-year academic and social transition experiences. Learning from feedback about this pilot, we adapted our approach this year to incorporate Appreciative Advising principles and broaden the reach of this tool within the new Residence Curriculum. Residence Advisors and Academic Links now conduct complementing 1-on-1s each term with their students. Come learn about these changes and the results we’ve seen so far! Learning Outcomes By attending this session, participants will: • identify changes made to last year’s ‘Plan A’ (academic goal-setting) pilot at Ryerson Residence, and how the reach of the program has expanded into a larger approach within the Residence Curriculum • define the foundations of the appreciative advising approach and identify where its concepts apply or already exist within their programming/approach • discuss the results of the Ryerson Residence’s implementation of term 1-on-1s between residents and their Residence Advisors and Academic Links • evaluate recommendations about developing a similar 1-on-1 strategy/approach as part of community development in their residences.

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Concurrent Session #5 Wednesday May 14, 2:45-3:45 pm University of Waterloo Lecture Bricker Academic 112 The Massification of Higher Education: International trends and how they effect Residence in Canada Presenter(s): Brian Cunha Stream(s): Comprehensive, Facilities, Student Learning, Senior/CHO Session Description It is no secret that higher education enrolment around the world is growing at a massive rate. The number of students enrolled in higher education by 2030 is forecast to rise from 99.4 million in 2000 to 414.2 million in 2030 – an increase of 314%. If an extra five years is added to these projections, the number of students pursuing higher education by 2035 is likely to exceed 520 million. Massification in higher education is the notion that higher education is becoming more accessible to more people all over the world. What does this mean for our residence systems? Learning Outcomes By the end of this session, participants will be able to: • explain and give examples of the theory of massification • apply the trends of global higher education to residence living • evaluate their own international student residence program and develop strategies to make it sustainable and successful.

University of Guelph Lecture Bricker Academic 209 Working Collaboratively with Campus Community Police Presenter(s): Jason Verhoeve, Jessica Brain, & Lindsay Stream(s): Facilities, Senior/CHO, 0-3 years Winger Session Description Student Housing Services and Campus Community Police have a unique role in the development of community and the students who live and interact within them. A collaborative partnership between these two departments is essential to an exceptional student experience. The University of Guelph has several strategies in place to build this partnership. These include a shared conduct system, an Officer in Residence Program, strategic communication, assessment tools and shared professional development. With a common understanding of shared goals, guidelines and initiatives we are meeting our goal of collaboratively supporting an on-campus population of approximately 5,000 students and ensuring their safety, security and well-being. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session participants will be able to: • identify ways in which an intentional collaborative partnership with Campus Community Police is beneficial to student success • develop a plan to collaboratively work together with Campus Community Police to create a rewarding student experience on their home campuses • identify tangible means of assessing collaborative partnerships with their Campus Community Police.

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Concurrent Session #5 Wednesday May 14, 2:45-3:45 pm Nippissing University Lecture Bricker Academic 210 Determining Behaviour: How Space and Design can Shape the Student Experience Presenter(s): Martin Holmes Stream(s): Facilities Session Description The term built environment is used when referring to our surroundings, specifically those created by humans and used for human activity. In residence life extensive effort is made to provide social and educational opportunities to enhance the student experience. It has become clear that the built environment both enhances the attractiveness of a campus to potential students but also influences the behaviour that students exhibit when placed in the space, including things like traffic flow, loitering, and use of designated study spaces. This presentation is designed to brief attendees on the science around environmental determinism and how Residence Life professionals can modify their spaces to elicit positive behaviour and experience. Learning Outcomes By participating in this conference session, learners will be able to: • identify 5 components of the residence built environment that can promote educational and social benefit • discuss ways that their residence complex is designed to enhance educational and social opportunities • practice the design of residence public spaces to enhance educational and social opportunities.

Wilfrid Laurier University Panel Bricker Academic 211 Laurier Waterloo’s Approach to Supporting “At Risk” Students Living in Residence. What is your Institution’s Approach for “At Risk” Residential Students? Presenter(s): Heather Landells, Adrienne Luft, & Stream(s): Counselling, 0-3 years Amanda Kalbfleisch Session Description The presentation will discuss the approaches which Laurier Waterloo incorporates for "at risk" students living in residence with an explanation of the purpose of CASST and a description of the rubric which CASST uses. This will be discussed in the first 15 minutes of the presentation. The remaining 45 minutes will allow for a group discussion of the approaches which other institutions (represented at the presentation) incorporate for "at risk" students living in residence. Minutes will be taken during this presentation and later shared with those who attended this presentation. Learning Outcomes By participating in this conference session, participants will: • learn about the purpose and function of the CASST (Caring About Student Success Team) at the Laurier Waterloo Campus and the rubric used to identify students "at risk" in residence. • based on group participation, explore the various approaches which other institutions utilize to support "at risk" students living in their residences.

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Concurrent Session #6 Thursday May 15, 9:15-10:15 am Trent University Roundtable Bricker Academic 306 Assignments Professionals Round Table Presenter(s): Kim Fielding Stream(s): Administration Session Description Residence Assignments Professionals are often the lone wolf of student housing services. Working in an area where it is 'just me' can be challenging and isolating. Come out and meet other professionals in the assignments field. Round table topics to include establishing an assignments presence within OACUHO, hot topics, professional support networks, AOB. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session, participants will: • be able to meet and interact with other Assignments professionals on a face to face level to develop a support network • be able to have an opportunity to develop and explore of hot topics or issues influencing assignments • explore the possibility of developing an Assignments focus within OACUHO conferences, future sessions.

OACUHO Roundtable Bricker Academic 307 Best Practices for New Professionals: Learning from your Peers Presenter(s): Jessica Brain & Brandon Smith Stream(s): 0-3 years Session Description The Engaging New OACUHO Professional Network (ENOP) would like to bring together new professionals from across the membership to partake in roundtable discussions on common trends within the Student Housing field. Discussion topics will include: balance, wellness (self-care), and personal/professional development. This is an opportunity for new professionals to share their best practices and learn from one another. This is also an opportunity for new professionals to become more connected to the ENOP network and find supports in one another. Learning Outcomes By the end of this session, participants will be able to: • analyze their strategies for success as a new professional • identify solutions to common challenges new professionals within the field of Student Housing face • generate an action plan for personal and professional development.

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Concurrent Session #6 Thursday May 15, 9:15-10:15 am Queen’s University Roundtable Bricker Academic 112 If You Plan It, They Will Come: Purposeful Collaboration with Athletics Presenter(s): Jordon McLinden Stream(s): Student Learning, 0-3 years Session Description Many of the opportunities we look to provide students through Residence Life can be met through building relationships with the Athletic and Recreation departments at our Institutions. So many of the core values align with respect to school spirit, student engagement, and community development, not to mention the prospects for alternative programming. Initiating a program like this, though mutually beneficial to both departments can come with its own challenges. This session will serve to generate and explore strategies and ideas around the creation and development of these relationships, as well as provide participants with the opportunity to discuss how they maintain these relationships on their own campus. Learning Outcomes By participating in this conference session, participants will: • learn how to start to create or build upon a pre-existing collaborative program with their institution’s athletic department. • openly discuss and problem solve potential challenges in the creation of a collaborative program. • share successful strategies to develop or enhance relationships with campus partners through discussion. University of Waterloo Roundtable Bricker Academic 308 Connecting and Supporting Institutions with Paraprofessional Programs Presenter(s): Jessica Lang Stream(s): Student Learning, Senior/CHO Session Description Recently some institutions have adapted their staffing model to include paraprofessional roles. This roundtable exists as an opportunity for institutions with paraprofessional programs to come together to support one another. Participants will be encouraged to share the goals of the program as well as their program’s successes and challenges. Participants will be asked to comment on the future of their paraprofessional opportunities. Whether your paraprofessional program has been in existence for 8 years, 5 years or 1 year… let’s come together to share our ideas and learn from one another. Learning Outcomes After completing this roundtable experience, participants will: • be able to list institutions that possess paraprofessional programs • be knowledgeable about paraprofessional opportunities that exist in the field • be able to identify the successes that institutions are celebrating with regards to paraprofessional opportunities • be able to identify challenges that institutions are facing with regards to paraprofessional programs • be able to describe how institutions are adapting their paraprofessional frameworks to support their program and initiatives.

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Concurrent Session #6 Thursday May 15, 9:15-10:15 am York University Lecture Bricker Academic 209 Joining Forces: Peer-Driven Wellness Sanctions for Residence Conduct Cases Presenter(s): Dimple Savla & Danielle Stein Stream(s): Counselling, 0-3 years Session Description During this academic year, Residence Life and Health Education and Promotion at York University teamed up to create options for interactive educative sanctions assigned to residence students who violate the Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities. In our session, we will discuss sanctions that residents participated in, including workshops, presentations, and coaching conversations on topics directly related to their violation, that were led by Health Education Peers. These have increased opportunities for the development of leadership skills, and a reduction in repeat offenses by the participating students. Learning Outcomes By attending this session, participants will: • learn about the relationship between Residence Life and Heath Education at York University, and the benefits of this partnership • be familiar with the student conduct process in Residence Life at York University • create an awareness of an interactive approach to Residence-related sanction. • learn how to implement a peer-driven approach to educative sanctions with a restorative focus.

Scan this QR code to complete session evaluations for all concurrent sessions! Or visit the following link: http://tinyurl.com/oacuhoeval

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Closing Keynote Speaker Dr. Richard Mullendore Thursday May 15, 10:30-11:30 am, Bricker Academic 201 Dr. Richard Mullendore is a (retiring) professor of College Student Affairs Administration at the University of Georgia. Prior to moving to the faculty, Mullendore served as the senior student affairs officer at the University of Mississippi and the University of Georgia. He also worked at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, the University of Charleston (WV), and Tusculum College (TN). He is a Fellow of the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition (FYE). Mullendore received his B.A. from Bradley University, a M.S. from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and a Ph.D. from Michigan State University. Dr. Mullendore, a former president of NODA (Association for Orientation, Retention, and Transition in Higher Education), is a frequent conference presenter, speaker and consultant on student affairs administration, student learning, orientation, parent programs, housing/residence life, and transfer students; and he is the author of numerous publications. Mullendore served on the NASPA Board of Directors, the NASPA Region III Advisory Board, the editorial board of the Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, and the directorates of Commissions I & II of ACPA. He has received several awards including the Pillar of the Profession (NASPA), the Bob Leach Award for Outstanding Service to Students (NASPA, Region III), the Outstanding Contributions to the Orientation Profession Award (NODA), the Outstanding Professional Contribution Award (North Carolina College Personnel Association), and the President’s Award (NODA). He is most likely to be found, however, on the nearest golf course!

Keynote Topic: Engaging Internal and External Stakeholders to Support Student Success

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OACUHO Board of Directors Position President President Elect & Finance Director Communications Director Conference Director Corporate Partner Director Membership Engagement Director Professional Development Director Mid-level Member At Large Member At Large Member At Large Association Manager

2013-2014 Chad Nuttall

2014-2015 Laura Storey

Laura Storey

Julie West

Matt Waghorn

Brian Cunha

Brittany Gawley

Brittany Gawley

Brent Rohrer

Colin Ryrie

Jessica Brain

Brian Ingoldsby

Sunita Karir

Matt Harris

Jennifer Ashenden

Glenn Matthews

Beth Spilchuk Alysha Ferguson Carol Ford

Mike Porritt Samantha Wiebe Carol Ford

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Use Twitter to share your opinions and experiences with all conference delegates. Tweet directly to us at @laurieroacuho or include the hashtag #oacuho2014 to share your comments with your colleagues! Use #OACUHO2014 whenever you tweet to share exciting and memorable experiences with the Spring Conference delegation!

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Delegate Directory Name

Institution

Email Address

Peter Galloway

ACUHO-I

pgalloway@wcupa.edu

Robert Totime

Algoma University

Robert.Totime@saultcareercentre.ca

Paige Doherty

Brescia University College

pdohert3@uwo.ca

Amanda Ziegler

Brock University

aziegler@brocku.ca

Jamie Fleming

Brock University

jfleming@brocku.ca

Colin Ryrie

Brock University

cryrie@brocku.ca

Lesley Beninger

Brock University

lbeninger@brocku.ca

Vince Wilson

Brock University

vwilson@brocku.ca

Emily Risen

Cambrian College

erisen2@gmail.com

David Lacroix

Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine

dlacroix@ccnm.edu

Tara Munro

Canterbury College

munrota@uwindsor.ca

Sara Wills

Carleton University

natalie_allan@carleton.ca

Natalie Allan

Carleton University

natalie_allan@carleton.ca

Harriet Tinnish

Carleton University

harriet.tinnish@carleton.ca

Andrew Natale

Carleton University

andrew.natale@carleton.ca

Elise Durand

elise.durand@carleton.ca araimundo@campusmentalhealth.ca

Eava-Kay McKnight

Carleton University Centre for Innovation in Campus Mental Health Conestoga College

Brianna Sadler

Fanshawe College

b_sadler2@fanshawec.ca

Christine Batson

Fanshawe College

Sean Connors

Georgian College

sconnors@georgianrez.ca

Lyne Heroux

HEC Montreal

lyne.heroux@hec.ca

Jean-Francois St-Pierre

HEC Montreal

jean-francois.st-pierre@hec.ca

Susan Miller

Humber College

susan.miller@humber.ca

Alicia Raimundo

ekmcknight@conestogarez.ca

Phil Legate

Humber College

phil.legate@humber.ca

Alyssa Graham

Humber College

alyssa.graham@humber.ca

Jeck Baconga

Humber College

David Hare

Lakehead University

dhare@lakeheadu.ca

Brian Cox

Lakehead University

bcox@lakeheadu.ca

Melanie Howard

Laurentian University

mhoward@laurentian.ca

Benjamin Demianiuk

Laurentian University

bdemianiuk@laurentian.ca

Joseph McGibbon

Laurentian University

jmcgibbon@laurentian.ca

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Delegate Directory Name

Institution

Email Address

Brittany Gawley

McMaster University

gawleyb@mcmaster.ca

Kevin Beatty

McMaster University

beattyk@mcmaster.ca

Brent Rohrer

McMaster University

rohrer@mcmaster.ca

Kaitlin Kellogg

McMaster University

kellogk@mcmaster.ca

Drew Simon

McMaster University

simond@mcmaster.ca

Melissa Pratt

McMaster University

mpratt@mcmaster.ca

Vadim Levin

McMaster University

levinv@mcmaster.ca

Michelle Treleavan

McMaster University

michelle.tr11@gmail.com

Cathie Miller

McMaster University

millerc@mcmaster.ca

Dave Light

McMaster University

lightd@mcmaster.ca

Heidi Muller

McMaster University

hmuller@mcmaster.ca

James Hotze

Niagara College

jhotze@niagararez.ca

Eric Kular

Nipissing University

erick@nipissingu.ca

Katie Calcaterra

Nipissing University

katiec@nipissingu.ca

Courtney Hughes

Nipissing University

courtneyh@nipissingu.ca

Martin Holmes

Nipissing University

martinh@nipissingu.ca

Rebecca Eyers

Nipissing University

rebeccae@nipissingu.ca

Jen Coulter

Nipissing University

jenc@nipissingu.ca

Stacey Kiefer

Queen's University

kiefers@queensu.ca

Chauncey Kennedy

Queen's University

chauncey.kennedy@queensu.ca

Jordon McLinden

Queen's University

jordon.mclinden@queensu.ca

Aida Malekoltojari

Queen's University

aida.malekoltojari@queensu.ca

Nadia Sawaya Fehr

Queen's University

reslife@queensu.ca

Carmen Law

Queens University

carmen.law@queensu.ca

Jeff Newell

Renison University College

jeff.newell@uwaterloo.ca

Jonathan Collaton

Renison University College

jcollaton@uwaterloo.ca

Ian Crookshank

Ryerson University

ian.crookshank@ryerson.ca

Brandon Smith

Ryerson University

brandonrsmith@ryerson.ca

Dan Cantiller

Ryerson University

housing@ryerson.ca

Simon Finn

Ryerson University

housing@ryerson.ca

Jen Gonzales

Ryerson University

j8gonzal@ryerson.ca

Chad Nuttall

Ryerson University

housing@ryerson.ca

Valerie Bruce

Ryerson University

vbruce@ryerson.ca

38


Delegate Directory Name

Institution

Email Address

Karli Campbell

Sault College

karli.campbell@saultcollege.ca

Jamie Palahnuk

Sault College

jamie.palahnuk@saultcollege.ca

Wadhah Al-monaidi

Seneca College

walmonaifi@senecarez.ca

Justin Fisher

Trent University

justinfisher@trentu.ca

Laura Storey

Trent University

laurastorey@trentu.ca

Rachel Robichaud

Trent University

rachelrobichaud@trentu.ca

Molly Raffan

Trent University

mollycraffan@trentu.ca

Myles Latter

Trent University

mlatter@trentu.ca

Kim Fielding

Trent University

kfieldin@trentu.ca

Vladimir Smiljanic

Trent University

vladimirsmiljanic@trentu.ca

Sunita Karir

Trent University

sunitakarir@trentu.ca

Katherina Caby

Universite de Saint-Boniface

kcaby@ustboniface.ca

Pamela Wettlaufer

University of British Columbia

pamela.wettlaufer@ubc.ca

Janice Robinson

University of British Columbia

janice.robinson@ubc.ca

Kyle Lethbridge

University of British Columbia

kyle.lethbridge@ubc.ca

Kate Murray

University of British Columbia

ferguson.ke@gmail.com

Amy Stewart

University of British Columbia

amy.stewart@ubc.ca

Dan Smith

University of British Columbia -Okanagan

dan.smith@ubc.ca

Julie West

University of Guelph

jwest@uoguelph.ca

Jason Verhoeve

University of Guelph

jverhoev@uoguelph.ca

Kristin Lennan

University of Guelph

lennank@uoguelph.ca

Brian Ingoldsby

University of Guelph

bingolds@uoguelph.ca

Jessica Brain

University of Guelph

jbrain@uoguelph.ca

Jess Mace

University of Ottawa

jess.mace@uottawa.ca

Chris Demaine

University of Ottawa

cdemaine@uottawa.ca

Jeff Brown

University of Toronto

jeff.brown@utoronto.ca

Kat Keller

University of Toronto

kat.keller@utoronto.ca

Delores Lanni

University of Toronto

delores.lanni@utoronto.ca

Rebekka Nighswander

University of Toronto-Scarborough

rebekkah.nighswander@utoronto.ca

Mike Plumton

University of Toronto-Scarborough

plumton@utsc.utoronto.ca

Alison Dailey

University of Victoria

daileya@uvic.ca

Brian Cunha

University of Waterloo

b2cunha@uwaterloo.ca

Victoria Gadon

University of Waterloo

vgadon@uwaterloo.ca

Stephanie Cullen

University of Waterloo

scullen@uwaterloo.ca

39


Delegate Directory Name

Institution

Email Address

Jessica Lang

University of Waterloo

j6lang@uwaterloo.ca

Pam De Leo

University of Waterloo

pdeleo@uwaterloo.ca

Alex Piticco

University of Waterloo

alex.piticco@uwaterloo.ca

Jessi Neill

University of Waterloo

jneill@uwaterloo.ca

Samatha Wiebe

University of Waterloo

swiebe@uwaterloo.ca

Elizabeth Wong

University of Waterloo

eewong@uwaterloo.ca

Karen Howey

University of Waterloo

jhowey@uwaterloo.ca

Melissa Blewitt

University of Waterloo

meblewitt@uwaterloo.ca

Jenny MacIntyre

University of Waterloo

jmmacint@uwaterloo.ca

Sheila Goodwin

University of Waterloo

sgoodwin@uwaterloo.ca

Heather Lang

University of Waterloo

hlang@uwaterloo.ca

Jennifer Tabar

University of Waterloo

jtabar@uwaterloo.ca

Ariel Stables-Kennedy

University of Waterloo

jastableskennedy@uwaterloo.ca

Andrew Noble

University of Waterloo

andrew.noble@uwaterloo.ca

Glen Weppler

University of Waterloo

glen.weppler@uwaterloo.ca

Alison Kavanagh

University of Waterloo

akavanag@uwaterloo.ca

Jason Vanamelsvoort

University of Waterloo

jvanamelsvoort@uwaterloo.ca

Jessica Maynard

University of Waterloo

jmaynard@uwaterloo.ca

Mike Iley

University of Waterloo

miley@uwaterloo.ca

Victoria Lam

University of Waterloo

victoria.lam@uwaterloo.ca

Paul Reifenstein

University of Waterloo

paul.reifenstein@uwaterloo.ca

Melissa Steadman

University of Western Ontario

msteadma@housing.uwo.ca

Angela Treglia

University of Western Ontario

atreglia@housing.uwo.ca

Patrick Alain

University of Western Ontario

palain@housing.uwo.ca

Chris Alleyne

University of Western Ontario

calleyne@housing.uwo.ca

Glen Matthews

University of Western Ontario

glenn@housing.uwo.ca

Jennifer Ashenden

University of Western Ontario

jashende@housing.uwo.ca

Mitchell Campbell

University of Western Ontario

mcampbel@housing.uwo.ca

Andrew Quenneville

University of Western Ontario

aquennev@housing.uwo.ca

Joshua McLinton

University of Western Ontario

jmclinto@housing.uwo.ca

Matthew Waghorn

University of Western Ontario

mwaghorn@housing.uwo.ca

Peggy Wakabayashi

University of Western Ontario

peggy@housing.uwo.ca

Ryan Beliveau

University of Western Ontario

ryan@housing.uwo.ca

Ruta Lawrence

University of Western Ontario

ruta@housing.uwo.ca

40


Delegate Directory Name

Institution

Email Address

Luba Shilyuk

University of Western Ontario

lshilyuk@housing.uwo.ca

Brad Bender

University of Western Ontario

3radbender@gmail.com

Joyceln Lorito

University of Windsor

jlorito@uwindsor.ca

Jacqueline Mellish

University of Windsor

jmellish@uwindsor.ca

Amber Norman

University of Windsor

anorman@uwindsor.ca

Sandra Davis

University of Windsor

sdavis@uwindsor.ca

Diane Rawlings

University of Windsor

rawlin1@uwindsor.ca

Shaun McCracken

Wilfrid Laurier University

smccracken@wlu.ca

Jessi Calberry

Wilfrid Laurier University

jcalberry@wlu.ca

Melissa Burke

Wilfrid Laurier University

mburke@wlu.ca

Laura Mammone

Wilfrid Laurier University

lmammone@wlu.ca

Chris Eley

Wilfrid Laurier University

celey@wlu.ca

Brendon Barber

Wilfrid Laurier University

bbarber@wlu.ca

Amanda Kalbfleisch

Wilfrid Laurier University

akalbfleisch@wlu.ca

Josh Duarte

Wilfrid Laurier University

jduarte@wlu.ca

Brandon Falcao

Wilfrid Laurier University

bfalcao@wlu.ca

Adam Rooke

Wilfrid Laurier University

arooke@wlu.ca

Lyn-Marie Farley

Wilfrid Laurier University

lfarley@wlu.ca

Haylea Leaman

Wilfrid Laurier University

hleaman@wlu.ca

Heather Landells

Wilfrid Laurier University

hlandells@wlu.ca

Erinne Babcock

Wilfrid Laurier University

ebabcock@wlu.ca

Scott Conzelmann

Wilfrid Laurier University

sconzelmann@wlu.ca

Megan Lott

Wilfrid Laurier University

mlott@wlu.ca

Alysha Ferguson

Wilfrid Laurier University

aferguson@wlu.ca

Heather Strain

Wilfrid Laurier University

hstrain@wlu.ca

John Will

Wilfrid Laurier University

jwill@wlu.ca

Dave Shorey

Wilfrid Laurier University

dshorey@wlu.ca

Sheldon Pereira

Wilfrid Laurier University

spereira@wlu.ca

Chris Dodd

Wilfrid Laurier University

cdodd@wlu.ca

Steph Francis

York University

stephfra@yorku.ca

Andrea Campea Ashley GrenvilleFinnigan Daryl Nauman

York University

acampea@yorku.ca

York University

ashgrenv@yorku.ca

York University

dnauman@yorku.ca

Matthew Harris

York University

maharris@yorku.ca

Dimple Savla

York University

dsavla@yorku.ca

41


Campus Map

42


Sponsorship We would like to thank the following sponsors:

43


44


OACUHO 2014 Spring Conference Guidebook