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  Specific requirements for training on CO2, ammonia and hydrocarbons  Training in Europe – an overview

Training on hydrocarbons Hydrocarbons carry an A3 safety classification, which means they have a low toxicity but are in the higher range of flammability. Hydrocarbons are subject to strict safety requirements concerning the quantities permitted in occupied spaces. Therefore, an increased training offer must remain a priority for the industry in order to safely handle hydrocarbon refrigerant-based systems. Training techniques and tools are in place to manage safety challenges. Before starting to train or work on systems containing hydrocarbon refrigerants, safety checks are needed to ensure that the risk of ignition is minimal. The area should also be checked with an appropriate refrigerant detector to ensure that technician is aware of potentially flammable atmospheres.

Training on ammonia All work with the flammable refrigerants must be covered under the controlled procedures to make sure that the risk of the flammable gas and vapour is eliminated while the work is done. Technicians must also train how to properly and safely charge the system with hydrocarbon refrigerant. The charging of the refrigeration system is similar to the fluorinated refrigerants. The system must be charged with hydrocarbon refrigerant in the liquid phase and technicians must ensure that contamination of different refrigerants does not occur while using charging equipment. After the system is charged, the system must be labelled, showing that hydrocarbon refrigerants have been charged in the system and that it is flammable. After the charging, the system must be leak tested.

All the equipment and tools must be checked for suitability to work on hydrocarbon systems, with particular attention to refrigerant recovery and leak testing units, electrical test meter, refrigerant recovery cylinders, portable lightning.

Ammonia is categorised as a B2 refrigerant, which equals higher toxicity and mild flammability. The acute toxicity of ammonia is a major consideration in the safe design and operation of refrigeration systems. Ammonia is a gas with a distinctive pungent odor, which can normally be detected by smell at concentrations of 5-10 parts per million (ppm). Higher concentrations are easily detected. It should be noted that the effect of ammonia is a function of concentration level and length of exposure time. Higher concentrations can be tolerated for short periods but the effect of ammonia breathed into the lungs or in the eyes can persist for long periods. Depending on the duration and quantity of the exposure, ammonia can cause slight irritation, suffocation or death, so adequate training is required wherever the product is stored or handled. Technicians must always wear suitable personal protective equipment including gloves and goggles. Technicians must also ensure that breathing apparatus or respirator masks are available and close to hand to be used in case of emergency. In addition, fire-fighting equipment must be accessible in the machinery room. If special work must be carried other than a routine check of the ammonia system, technicians should work in pairs.

GUIDE TO NATURAL REFRIGERANTS TRAINING IN EUROPE 2017

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GUIDE To Natural Refrigerants Training In Europe 2017  

THE reference tool for those looking for guidance on how to select the right training providers, knowledge sources and partners to build the...

GUIDE To Natural Refrigerants Training In Europe 2017  

THE reference tool for those looking for guidance on how to select the right training providers, knowledge sources and partners to build the...

Profile for shecco