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Technology Focus

He pointed out that both heating and cooling should be integrated to make this more efficient. “We as manufacturers need to be clever whereby the same cycle can produce heat and cooling,” he said, lamenting that, “for commercial heating and cooling, it’s not the same people making the decisions”. GEA was also represented at ATMOsphere Europe. Kenneth Hoffmann, product manager (heat pumps) at the compressor manufacturer, gave an example of how waste heat from ventilation can be recycled. In 2017 Islington Council in London, UK installed a 1,000 kW two-stage GEA heat pump in the London Underground. The heat pump turns the waste heat from a London Underground ventilation shaft into useable heat for a high-rise apartment block in the area. By using two-stage piston compressors it was possible to achieve a heating COP of above 3.5, according to Hoffmann, thus saving the council money. As the project is next to a residential building, the installation includes an ammonia absorber, which filtrates the air from an emergency extract fan to ensure that the extracted air is ammonia-free. This was an essential part of the installation, as more high-rise buildings are planned in the area.

Kenneth Hoffmann, GEA, at ATMOsphere Europe

“London is not the only city in Europe with underground trains, so I think you will see a lot more of this type of application in the future,” Hoffmann predicted. Delforge, who outside of his work with the EHPA leads Mayekawa’s public affairs team in Brussels, told the ATMOsphere audience that low-charge ammonia systems would also increasingly be used. Speaking at the European Heat Pump Summit, Matteo Munari, product and application development manager at Alfa Laval, previewed a prototype ammonia system for residential applications. The ammonia-water absorption heat pump for domestic heating uses the company’s Alfa Nova plate heat exchangers to efficiently supply water at temperatures up to 65°C. The units can be installed on a wall, taking up a surface area of 500x400 mm with a height of 800 mm, and on the floor with a total surface area of 600x600 mm and a height of 800 mm. The first working prototype has already been built and results so far have been promising, according to Munari. The prototype is just one of many heat pumps that will use natural refrigerants in the future. It remains to be seen how quickly the heat pump sector will transition away from HFCs, but innovating with natural refrigerants is clearly one way to get there. CM

Matteo Munari, Alfa Laval, at the European Heat Pump Summit

Accelerate Europe

Winter 2017

Accelerate Europe #9 Winter 2017  

HONOURING THE TRAILBLAZERS The past twelve months have been full of innovation in the HVAC&R sector. The winter 2017 edition of Accelerate...

Accelerate Europe #9 Winter 2017  

HONOURING THE TRAILBLAZERS The past twelve months have been full of innovation in the HVAC&R sector. The winter 2017 edition of Accelerate...