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Policy

HFC phase-down in Indonesia and Malaysia Representing Indonesia’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry was Bitul Zulhasni, head of the Sub-directorate for Ozone-Depleting Substances Control – Indonesia’s national focal point for the implementation of the Montreal Protocol. Asked why she was interested in attending ATMOsphere Asia, Zulhasni replied, “I’m looking for information on what direction natural refrigerant [technology] will go”. Zulhasni said that for Indonesia to come up with an effective HFC phase-down strategy, she would need more information on the technology roadmap and major market trends for natural refrigerants.

Although there is still a long way to go, we have to think now because the baseline year begins in 2020. That’s very fast. – Bitul Zulhasni

Bitul Zulhasni, head of the Subdirectorate for Ozone-Depleting Substances Control, Indonesia

Winter 2017

Accelerate Europe

With respect to the major technology providers, Zulhasni asked: “What is their plan? Especially since they already know that our goal is to phase down HFCs soon – so how will they make [the technology] available for us? That is what we want to know.” During her presentation, Zulhasni outlined Indonesia’s HFC phase-down targets. “Under the Kigali Amendment, Indonesia is classified as a Group 1 country,” she said. For Group 1 countries, the baseline years for measuring reduction targets are 2020-2022. Compared to developed countries, they have a grace period of about ten years. Indonesia’s phase-down will begin with a freeze in 2024 followed by a 10% HFC reduction target by 2029, explained Zulhasni. “Although there is still a long way to go, we have to think now because the baseline year begins in 2020. That’s very fast,” she said. Representing the Department of Environment of Malaysia was Yahya Bin Atan, who joined Zulhasni in speaking during the policy session. Atan explained that Malaysia is also a Group 1 country whose baseline years are from 2020 to 2022. Both countries are yet to ratify the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol.

Yahya Bin Atan, Department of Environment, Malaysia

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However, both Zulhasni and Atan stated that they are focused on monitoring the ongoing natural refrigerant pilot projects in their countries, while forming their preliminary strategies for the HFC phase-down.

Pilot projects boast results The first CO 2 condensing unit in Malaysia was installed and commissioned in May 2017 at one of Malaysian retailer Jaya Grocer’s supermarkets. Chai Chun Leong, a representative from project installation contractor and partner Coolcare, spoke during the end user session about this installation. Two Panasonic 20 HP CO 2 outdoor condensing units were installed at the supermarket, providing cooling for a total of 23 medium temperature CO 2 display cases. The project was carried out under the framework of Stage 1 of Malaysia’s HCFC Phase-out Management Plan, which included assistance from the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol. Though cost challenges remain, feedback from the end user has so far been positive, according to installation contractor Coolcare. “For the energy savings, we have saved about 12.8% (in energy consumption costs compared to HFC-based systems),” said Leong.

Chai Chun Leong, Coolcare

Accelerate Europe #9 Winter 2017  

HONOURING THE TRAILBLAZERS The past twelve months have been full of innovation in the HVAC&R sector. The winter 2017 edition of Accelerate...

Accelerate Europe #9 Winter 2017  

HONOURING THE TRAILBLAZERS The past twelve months have been full of innovation in the HVAC&R sector. The winter 2017 edition of Accelerate...