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Events

From left to right: Marco Buoni (AREA), Volker Stamer (BITZER), Bafoday Sanyang (Gambia National Environment Agency) & Álvaro de Oña (shecco) talk training 

development at RegioNetz Verkehrs GmbH (‘RNV’), a wholly owned subsidiary of DB Regio, the rail arm of Deutsche Bahn for regional transportation. Hasnik called on manufacturers at the conference to help Deutsche Bahn meet its goal of ensuring that all air conditioning in its new trains uses natural refrigerants by 2020. Deutsche Bahn – the world’s secondlargest transport company and Europe’s largest railway operator and infrastructure owner – described how it is already testing and using CO 2 mobile air conditioning in some trains. Despite its clear direction towards CO 2 , the company still lacks enough suppliers of air-conditioning systems for trains. The first DB Bahn train to be fitted with CO 2 air conditioning was a Siemens VT642 train, in Chemnitz (Saxony) in 2016. Since then the company has carried out a few more projects with a CO 2 air-cycle system (see Accelerate Europe #8). Energy savings are about 10% compared to the HFC R134a used previously, Hasnik said during the session. In addition to the environmental and energy-saving benefits of CO 2

systems, Hasnik cited other important reasons to make the switch:

manufacturing cost,” he said (for more on CO 2 MAC in buses, see p. 44).

The use of CO 2 eliminates ‘dependence’ on costly HFC refrigerants R134a, R407C and R404A;

Lutz Boeck of Faiveley argued that MAC remains a cost-sensitive marketplace. “We would like to offer such solutions in 2020,” Boeck said, noting that, “costs are significantly higher than for the R134a [air-con] system” that many train operators throughout Europe are currently using.

Integration of an innovative and patented air distribution system; Reduction of operating and maintenance costs, and; Possible technology transfer to other vehicles. Two manufacturers that presented during the transport session, Faiveley and Konvekta, are currently working with Deutsche Bahn on CO 2 MAC projects. Konvekta has had some success outside of DB with CO 2 MAC in buses in Germany and Austria. “The vehicles with CO 2 in operation number roughly 100,” Michael Sonnekalb of Konvekta told the audience. Despite this success, Sonnekalb noted that barriers remain to making CO 2 a reality. “We don’t sell to the end user but the bus manufacturer, so he won’t see the lifecycle cost but the

Faiveley is working on train air conditioning and heating systems in Scandinavia too. If more large train operators were to opt for CO 2 and governments were to offer incentives for these systems, it could help bring this technology to market. “It would be nice to have incentives from the government, similar to the ones you have for stationary equipment” in Germany, said Konvekta’s Sonnekalb. There are clear signs, then, that the market for natural refrigerants is developing beyond the refrigeration arena. As the HFC phase-down moves into 2018, next year’s ATMOsphere Europe will be an important opportunity to assess this progress. CM & AW

Accelerate Europe

Winter 2017

Accelerate Europe #9 Winter 2017  

HONOURING THE TRAILBLAZERS The past twelve months have been full of innovation in the HVAC&R sector. The winter 2017 edition of Accelerate...

Accelerate Europe #9 Winter 2017  

HONOURING THE TRAILBLAZERS The past twelve months have been full of innovation in the HVAC&R sector. The winter 2017 edition of Accelerate...