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Opinion

The Kigali Amendment: Next Steps A Montreal Protocol meeting last month in Bangkok focused on safety standards, energy efficiency and financial support for developing countries By Avipsa Mahapatra

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ast October, in Kigali, Rwanda, 197 countries agreed to extend the scope of the Montreal Protocol treaty from the original phase-out of ozone-depleting gases to a new phase-down of HFC super greenhouse gases in what has become known as the Kigali Amendment.

Seven years in the making, this was a signature moment in the global struggle to reduce global warming. If successfully implemented, the Kigali Amendment could avoid emissions of over 70 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO 2 e) by 2050. Also, the amendment represents a major boost to the prospects for climate-friendly natural refrigerants. But the work has just begun. Last month (July 11-14), in the first follow-up meeting to the Rwanda gathering, the Parties (countries) to the Montreal Protocol met in Bangkok, Thailand, to

start addressing the critical elements needed to implement the Amendment. Officially, this was the 39 th Session of the Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG) of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. Three key issues stood out among the topics under discussion:

Updating safety standards Obsolete safety standards have been a barrier to market uptake of climate-friendly alternatives to HFCs in the cooling sector. To address this issue, a full-day workshop on “Safety Standards Relevant to the Safe Use of Low-GWP Alternatives to Hydrofluorocarbons” was convened the day before the OEWG meeting.

Accelerate America 

  August 2017

Accelerate America #27, August 2017  

The Facilitator: Source Refrigeration’s pivotal role in the transition to natural refrigerants

Accelerate America #27, August 2017  

The Facilitator: Source Refrigeration’s pivotal role in the transition to natural refrigerants