Page 34

34 // End User

(2016)

First store opens in Drury Lane, Holborn, London.

supermarket chain with a

for more complex CO 2 systems. Maj o r e n d use r s li ke S a i ns b u r y ’s therefore have the power to change the market by placing large orders. Procurement on this scale also helps to reduce the cost of natural refrigerant-based solutions by virtue of economies of scale. “ Ini tiall y we saw a c os t p re miu m for CO 2 , but after working with our s u p p l i e r s a n d a s t h e te c h n o l o g y has become more mainstream, the cost difference has eroded away,” Arrowsmith argues. “ We’re cost- neutral with HFC installations.” Some customers cite the perceived complexit y of natural refrigerantbased HVAC&R systems vis-à-vis their HFC counterparts as another obstacle to overcome. But Arrowsmith argues that the situation is changing fast. “Componentry now, for Sainsbury’s and for our supplier base, is businessas - usual,” he says. “ There is no problem finding suppliers.” With natural refrigerants becoming increasingly mainstream HVAC &R options to help the European food

Revenue (2016)

16.9% market share

(May 2017)

£23,506 billion

second-largest

1,415 stores

Net income (2016)

UK’s

Holborn, LONDON.

£471 million

Headquartered in

£707 million

Founded in 1869 by John James Sainsbury.

162,700 employees

Operating income (2016)

Sainsbury's at a glance

retail sector to comply with the HFC p hase - d ow n ta k i n g p la c e u n d e r th e EU’s F- Gas Regulation, installers are becoming more comfor table with the te c h n o l o g y a n d s u p p l i e r s a r e m o r e supportive.

the UK, we’re seen as one of the leaders in adopting natural refrigerants.”

“When we first started our CO 2 journey in 20 0 8 an d 2010, th e c o m p o ne ntr y was more limited,” Arrowsmith says. “ We ’ve see n a major ste p c hange in engineer competence.”

“A commercial contractor probably only ge ts to se e what his cus tome rs are doing, which may be relatively narrow,” Arrowsmith says. “But here we’re dealing with convenience stores, supermarkets, and industrial refrigeration.”

In the early days, even the most highly qualified engineers were not necessarily familiar with working on CO 2 systems. “ S a i n s b u r y ’s r e c o g n i s e d t h i s , a n d working with our suppliers, we financed the training of 132 of our contractors and engineers so that they were competent to work with CO 2 ,” Arrowsmith says. The retailer also trains staff whenever it opens a new facility. “Awareness of the refrigeration is part of the training for whomever we’re handing over the building to,” he explains.

Driving force for NatRefs Does Sainsbury’s want to be recognised as a driving force for natural refrigerants? “We’ve made our commitment and we’re delivering on it,” Arrowsmith argues. “In

Asked what he enjoys most about working for Sainsbury’s, the refrigeration boss highlights the job’s variety.

“We have to approve any new piece of equipment that comes into the estate, assessing it for its efficiency, safety and performance. And then there’s all the new innovation that people bring to the table, which we have to evaluate and decide whether is right for Sainsbury’s as a business,” Arrowsmith says. Af ter some 35 years in the business, what motivates him to come to work each day? “I genuinely enjoy engineering and refrigeration,” Arrowsmith says. “You can see that for the environment, this is naturally the right thing to do.” T h e fu tu re of Sainsb u r y ’s is in safe hands. AW

Accelerate Australia & NZ // Summer 2018

Profile for shecco

Accelerate Australia & NZ #8 Summer 2018  

DRAKES: PIONEERING CO2 IN AUSTRALIA Facing some of the highest energy costs in the world in its South Australia home, Drakes Supermarkets –...

Accelerate Australia & NZ #8 Summer 2018  

DRAKES: PIONEERING CO2 IN AUSTRALIA Facing some of the highest energy costs in the world in its South Australia home, Drakes Supermarkets –...

Profile for shecco