Page 1

PRECEDENT DRAWINGS ~ SITE ANALYSIS DRAWINGS ~ SITE MAPPING IMMATERIAL FLOWS ~ FRAGMENTS MOD ELS & AXONS ~ TECTONICS DRAWINGS ~ MEASURED DRAWINGS ~ DIGITAL TECTONICS GENERATIVE ~ DIGITAL

HABITAT FOUR TECTONICS FABRICATION ~ SHOP ASSIGNMENTS ~ PRECEDENT ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION ~ CONTEXTS ~ THE AN ARCHITECTURE OF TIME & CHANGE

CO N T E N T

PROGRAMME ~ THE DESIGN OF A HOUSE ~ PRECEDENT DRAWINGS ~ SITE ANALYSIS DRAWINGS ~ SITE MAPPING FINAL PRESENTATION BOARDS

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OVERVIEW

3

IMMATERIAL FLOWS ~ FRAGMENTS MODELS & AXONS ~ TECTONICS DRAWINGS ~ MEASURED DRAWINGS ~ DIGITAL DETAILED DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 4 STRUCTURE CHARRETTE

16

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT TECTONICS GENERATIVE ~ DIGITAL TECTONICS FABRICATION ~ SHOP ASSIGNMENTS ~ PRECEDENT ANALYSIS & 21 SITE-PROGRAM-CONCEPT

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CONCLUSIONS

INTERPRETATION ~ CONTEXTS ~ THE PROGRAMME ~ THE DESIGN OF A HOUSE ~ PRECEDENT DRAWINGS ~ SITE

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ANALYSIS DRAWINGS ~ SITE MAPPING IMMATERIAL FLOWS ~ FRAGMENTS MODELS & AXONS ~ TECTONICS DRAW INGS ~ MEASURED DRAWINGS ~ DIGITAL TECTONICS GENERATIVE ~ DIGITAL TECTONICS FABRICATION ~ SHOP ASSIGNMENTS ~ PRECEDENT ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION ~ CONTEXTS ~ THE PROGRAMME ~ THE DESIGN OF A HOUSE ~ PRECEDENT DRAWINGS ~ SITE ANALYSIS DRAWINGS ~ SITE MAPPING IMMATERIAL FLOWS ~ FRAGMENTS MODELS & AXONS ~ TECTONICS DRAWINGS ~ MEASURED DRAWINGS ~ DIGITAL TECTONICS GENERATIVE ~ DIGITAL TECTONICS FABRICATION ~ SHOP ASSIGNMENTS ~ PRECEDENT ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION ~ CONTEXTS ~ THE Shea Gibson EVDA 682 Fall 2016 Instructor: Branko Kolarevic University of Calgary Faculty of Environmental Design

PROGRAMME ~ THE DESIGN OF A HOUSE ~ PRECEDENT DRAWINGS ~ SITE ANALYSIS DRAWINGS ~ SITE MAPPING


FINAL PRESENTATION BOARDS

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NARRATIVE SUMMARY STUDIO III

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HABITAT FOUR

Habitat Four, similar to other projects in the studio focused on exploring what change means in architecture and how it can manifested; how architecture begins to truly mediate between the built environment and the people who occupy it. Habitat Four, from it’s inception, has a focus towards creating habitable space that would be subject to continuous processes of change, occurring in different realms and at various time scales, and is a celebration of this. The project addresses the notions of Time and Change, through 5 primary means: 1. changing of 2. changing of 3. changing of 4. changing of 5. changing of

the units the building shape materiality size use

Habitat Four gets its name not only from the four towers, but also how the units can come and go from the four corners of the world and more importantly from this formula: 4 = 2 x 2 = 3 + 1 = 10 - 6 = 8 / 2 Habitat four embodies the notions of multiplication, addition, reduction, division; potential opportunities that can occur to towers and the units. Changing of the Units: The goal for each unit was to enable them to be easily disassemble-able, and stackable for quick and efficient transportation on truck beds. The implemented panel system is broken down into 2 types, interior and exterior. The exterior panels are longer rectilinear panels oriented vertically, to express tallness and add extra dimension to the exterior fascade, while the interior panels are smaller, square panels which are designed for easy reconfiguration and movement in terms of size so a single individuals can move them around. The primary material for the entire building, from units, to the cores, to the residential blocks, is wood,with a variety of wood types, finishes, staining, textures, age, etc… This gives each individual unit a unique appearance as the residents can completely customize their inward and outward appearance. Additionally, the units can be taken up to the construction pad at the top of the towers, and can even be expanded upon and enlarged to a degree. Changing of the Building Shape: The adaptability of the residential units allows the building “facade” to shift and change over time. In a boom and bust economy, the density of units can vary; over time the configuration of units can change with residents moving in and away from the tower to other locations in the country; and as the building grows along with the needs to accompany a growing population. Changing of Materiality: As the primary material Wood offers a sense of uniqueness in materiality and variety. It acts as an extension of nature being its direct fingerprint into the building and the obvious change in appearance that wood can take. For example, as you age and time passes the unit ages along side of you. It changes and adapts with you. Whether you chose to change window location, let the original panels whether, or replace them with new recycled wood of a different variety, the unit embraces the idea of building with you than replacement with something new, just something different. Changing of Size: Habitat Four has the ability to grow with the needs of the population and can without too much difficulty, be expanded vertically one floor at a time to house addition units up to 30 stories per tower, giving the building a unique presence over several decades. Changing of Use: The units are robust enough and can be capable of being dismounted from the tower and then moved to live other Lives away from the tower. As a owner, you can still own your plug-in for the year, but take your unit with you to the forest on the lake. You can enjoy the comfort of your same house, or reconfigure it to take advantage of different views and sunlight opportunities, and when summer ends return to the tower, have the unit inspected and then returned to your plug in space.

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PHASE 4

Detailed Design Development

DESCRIPTIVE NARRATIVE

4


5


6


7


8


9


10


11


12


13


14


15


PHASE 3

Structural Charrette

16


17


18


19


20


PHASE 2

Design Development

21


22


23


24


25


26


27


28


EARLY PHASE 2 EXPLORATIONS BIKE GARAGE CONFIGURATION

FOUR

N

UP

DN

DN

UP

LV 1

UP

DN

DN

UP

CORE & RESIDENTIAL CONFIGURATION

FOUR

UP

DN

DN

UP

32m2

N UTILITY & CIRCULATION

202 BIKE STALLS

core

~96 m2

248 UNITS

65 LOCKERS DN

DN

UP

DN

UNIT A

DN

UP

~27 m2 UP

DN

DN

UP

~29 m2

UNIT C ~28 m2

UNIT D

UNIT E

UNIT F

UNIT G

~39 m2

~39 m2

~39 m2

1 2 3 4 5

PARKING GARAGE CONFIGURATION ONE WAY DOUBLE THREADED DESIGN

N

FOUR

UNIT H ~40 m2

OFFICE /

NEW UNIT ~27-40 M2

~46 m2

m

m 2 4 6 8 10

FOUR

UNIT B

45m2

ISOMETIC VIEWS NE + SW RESIDENTIAL / CORE

COMMERICAL & UNIQUE

UTILITY FLOORS

BIKE / VEHICLE GARAGES

LV 1 UP

DN

DN

UP UP

DN

DN

UP

BIKE GARAGE

DN UP

UP

DN

DN

UP UP

DN

DN

UP

m 4 8 10 12 14

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PHASE 4

Site - Program - Concept

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AERODYNAMICS OF SITE YEARLY AVERAGE NNW NW

N 10

W

NNW

NE

8 6 4 2 0

WNW

MARCH

NNE

WSW SW

NW ENE

WNW

E

W

ESE

WSW

SE SSW

S

N 10

JUNE NNW

NNE

SW

SSE

S

NW

N

W

SW

MARCH

ESE

WSW

SSE

JUNE

NNE NE ENE E ESE

SW

SE S

SSE

DECEMBER NNW

SE S

W

N 10

8 6 4 2 0

SSW

NW

NE

WSW

SSW

E

NNE

8 6 4 2 0

WNW

WNW

SSE

SEPTEMBER 10

ENE

SE SSW

NNW

NW

NE

8 6 4 2 0

ENE

WNW

E

W

ESE

WSW

N 10

NNE NE

8 6 4 2 0

ENE E ESE

SW

SE SSW

S

SSE

SEPTEMBER

DECEMBER

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Alive // Responsiveness // Harvest Energy // E-motive House // System-Based Layers // “Obsolete in New Imaginative Ways // Converge on a Mutually Exclusive Agreeable Nature of Feedback // Encourage Novelty // Provoke Conversational Relationships // ”Middleware” // Field of Change and Modification // Process Based Architecture // Permanence // Pysically, Sustainability , and Familiarity // Temporality is not Moment-by-Moment Succession // Architectural Permanence Realizes Itself in Time // Well-Defined Building Defy Transience // Pre-figuration of a Final Product // Time of Experience // tectonic evolution in façade engineering // Performative Dimensions // Simple Tectonics

SHEA GIBSON “Middleware”

Process Based Architecture

Field of Change & Modification

Time of Experience

Harvest Energy

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CO N C L U D I N G T H O U G H T S What did you learn from your project? Studio three introduced me to several new perspectives and methodologies I hadn’t explored or considered in previous studios. For example, the technical aspect regarding detailed building design such as parking, HVAC, access, etc., were explored in preliminary manners. They were considerations that affected the design after the concept had already been determined and helped to mold the final massing and form into something that flirted with practicality. Additionally, the unique aspect of our particular studio, change and time, tried to address these complex notions through an architectural solution. How can a building change and adapt in time, and reflect these changes in its design and programmatical layout. How can spaces change in programming or be planned and designed to cater to near infinite possibilities? That was something I tried to answer in some form or another through the conceptual framework of Habitat Four. I also learned the effectiveness that simple beautiful drawings can do to explore and explain an architectural project. The complexity of the program was also a constant adversary to wrestle given the size of the project and it being the first exploration into something of this scale.

HABITAT FOUR AN ARCHITECTURE OF TIME & CHANGE

What did you think you were doing during the term when you were immersed in it? In simple summarized terms, as the project pushed onward, my thought process was consistently towards refinement and focus towards my conceptual framework. There were times throughout the term that the design drifted away from the concept to address different ideas, related but not necessarily pertinent towards the design, or fell from the studio focus of change and time, and it had to be re-shifted and re-considered towards those ideas, almost weekly. Additionally, should any details and ideas be added that did not add to the primary ideas but added complexity had to be pruned and removed. Refinement and focus.

Are there problems that you discovered during the term that you would like to continue investigating through your future projects? Several areas for potential improvement arose during the detailed design development phase, but do to a lack of time and the difficulty of the task had to be left on the cutting floor. These include the details regarding the “plug in’s” in the building core, the inclusion of micro-turbines for power generation for the individual units, and the social economies that can derive from such a design (is it an instance where money and power still command in most societies). Graphically, the project would have been strengthened from a complete series of renders to help show the structure in real space aside from the line drawing perspectives I relied on. The complexity of the paneled facade and of the units themselves made creating such a composition impossible for my skill set given the time line of work provided.

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