Capstone 2021 Progress Book

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IT’S PET’S A WORLD SHAYLA HICKS. 101682700. DIA40002: PROGRESS BOOK.


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CONTENTS

01 INTRODUCTION 02 RESEARCH 03 DESIGN BRIEF 04 PRECEDENTS 05 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 07 DESIGN DETAILS 3


Fig. 1 - Dog in a cold, concrete room with a sad appearance.

THE DESIGN ISSUE

Animals in adoption centres are quite often confined to a small space making it difficult for them to live comfortably. This is unnatural for animals and is generally not how they would be living their everyday lives once they find a forever home. Animals can feel highly neglected when living in these circumstances and impacts their behaviour.Most of the time these behavioural issues are anxiety related in which the animals will shy themselves away from humans or other animals. Other common factors that show neglect are when they show anger towards other living beings around them or they act out of character/irrationally. A lot of the time these behaviorual issues can stem from spending too much time with themselves and not having any social interactions.

01 INTRODUCTION 4


02 RESEARCH

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LITERATURE REVIEW INTRODUCTION There are many underlying issues within the pet adoption scene whether that includes the adoption centres/shelters themselves through to the people looking to adopt a pet. The issues that are most important in adoption, but are most neglected, concern the animals. Animals’ behaviours are influenced by situations they are put in and the behaviours of other animals or humans surrounding them and need to be taken into consideration when they are adopted or put up for adoption. The relationship between the animals and the staff in the facilities, the people looking to adopt and people interacting with animals in other environments within adoption have a huge impact on animals, so

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human-animal interaction is very important for creating that connection between them. These are issues that already were happening in adoption, so to add a pandemic into it had made it even more difficult for animals and humans. In some cases, though, this made people realise how important it is to have animals surrounding them for the animals’ benefit, their own benefit and that adoption is just as much about humans needing animals as it is animals needing humans. So, to further benefit human-animal interaction within adoption, the design of adoption centres, animal necessities and social hubs where animals and humans can come together needs to be changed.

Fig. 2 - Dog living luxuriously in a pet hotel.


BEHAVIOURAL ISSUES OF ANIMALS IN ADOPTION It is not uncommon for animals to have experienced negative effects of adoption, but the reasons for these effects are not out of our control. Pets are born and bred to be looked after by humans, they can’t cater for themselves and they need a companion to be by their side for their whole life so it our duty to cater for their needs and give them a great life, but when humans lack in this then animals suffer the consequences, and this is when they develop behavioural problems. Admitting animals into adoption centres is simply just putting animals in other people’s hands. Before the animals find their forever home, staff are required to learn the ins and outs of the animals, so they need to know the behavioural issues which means working closely alongside them to familiarise themselves with these characteristics. This assists the customers in

the future who are looking to adopt so they are aware of what they are getting themselves into (Happold 2018). In an environment where there are a lot of other animals, noises and surroundings can take a toll on the animals’ emotions and behaviour which may cause them to act irrationally which can be unappealing to people looking to adopt. Designing an area where animals’ behaviours are monitored, and they are separated for their behaviours might prevent the animals feeling uncomfortable and acting irrationally. The layout of the facility should be designed to make the animals feel as comfortable as possible. It is most common that pounds and kennels are known to feel small and jail-like for animals which can be an influence for their characteristics that they portray, so doing as much in the design to prevent this from happening is the most crucial factor (Kornelis 2020).

Design can be quite important in an adoption centre, but it is also the owner’s responsibility to have patience when walking in and to understand that the animal has a past. For a dog who has been adopted and been to multiple homes previously, they can develop more aggressive, erratic manners which can make prevent them from being picked first to be adopted (Gates, Zito, Thomas & Dale 2018). In saying this, though, it is more of a common occurrence for cats than dogs to take longer to adapt in a new home after being neglected and disowned by their previous owners (Scott, Jong, McArthur & Hazel 2018). It Is important for the adopters to do their research and take into consideration that a cat’s behaviour is more likely to change coming from the adoption centre to a new environment, this can sometimes be a negative change and other times a positive change, but it Is

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unknown until they reside in their new home. The reason for this can be because they are learning to adapt in a new environment or they can feel stressed or uneasy around another animal in the home, but these are unknown reasons and the actions of a cat in a new environment are unpredictable (Weiss, Gramann, Drain, Dolan & Slater 2015) (Finka, Ellis & Stavinsky 2014). Being aware of animals’ emotions and actions are crucial when introducing a them to a person’s home, but people being aware of their own actions are also important to take not as they can easily influence the behaviour of their new furry friend e.g. if the owner is constantly distant or controlling of the animal, they are likely to develop more aggressive behaviour (Gobbo & Zupan 2020). Space for a pet is just as important for them as it is for a human especially when they are coming from an adoption centre where small, confined spaces can negatively impact their behaviour such as aggression, stress, anxiety and their hygiene (Kornelis 2020), so when adopting it is important for adopters to keep in mind that they need to live in an open, more spatial living environment than what they previously have been to prevent them from acting displeasingly. Pets are known to adapt easier to a new home when they have their personal space and a sense of freedom. (Landa 2020)

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ANIMAL AND HUMAN SOCIAL INTERACTION Humans tend to have unrealistic expectations when going thinking of adopting a new pet into their home, assuming that what they see is exactly what they get, but in most scenarios, this is not the case at all (Weiss et al. 2015). Animals change their behaviour in different environments and sometimes this may benefit the owner but knowing that it may not go to plan is worth being mindful of. Adoption centres usually lack staff, so the animals don’t receive a whole lot of individual attention which can then form social and behavioural issues (Finka et al. 2014). This is huge in adoption because it impacts the process of creating a bond with the animal. Building a relationship between human and animal is a significant part of adopting a new pet and welcoming them into a home. Animals are known to be great companions for humans and they are very intuitive when It comes to sensing whether their owner is stressed, upset, anxious, happy and all other different emotions and a lot of the time they mimic the way their owner feels (Landa 2020). This is where the connection between both animal and human’s relationship becomes


important so they have each other to rely on when going through all different emotions. Stress that humans feel also causes stress on the animal because their emotions and behaviour are influenced by human’s reactions or actions (Gobbo & Zupan 2020), but pets are known to reduce stress and lower anxiety for people just by having the company around (Bender 2020). Although animals are great companions and better people’s mental health, they also have issues of their own that are not always easy to overcome. It

is common for people to not know how to deal with their pet’s temperamental behaviours so having the research to back a person up before adopting is crucial (Scott, et al. 2018). Human-animal interaction can be made difficult if the animal is troubled and been through trauma from previous homes and adoptions. This brings us back to expectations of adopting a pet from a shelter and doing research before adopting. (Gates et al. 2018). Not having the research to back up any adoption can causes stress on both animals and humans which then affects the human-animal relationship between the two.

ADOPTION DURING A PANDEMIC As much as it’s always been important to have an animal companion at home, we have seen it be even more of a benefit to humans and animals to adopt during the most recent global pandemic. During lockdowns and spending time at home, animals provided comfort for humans and prevented people from feeling lonely and anxious (Bender 2020). People developed habits when spending time at home so adopting a pet got them into regularly feeding, walking and training them. Getting into habits because so much time was spent at home

can cause stress on the animals if these habits are stripped away when life went back to normal for humans, so adapting to everyday routine that can work in alignment with the lifestyle lived before the pandemic prevents behavioural issues further down the line for the pets because otherwise they will feel neglected or as if they are not getting as much attention as before (Balaban 2020). Although it was made harder to have the humananimal interaction before the adoption process went

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through due to government guidelines, there was still a huge increase in pet adoption because more people became compassionate towards and aware that pets needed to be rehomed (Kornelis 2020). The recent pandemic shows us that animals are affected just as much as humans, so changing the design to cater to them even when humans have guidelines in place will make a positive difference in the way we live now, in the future and will advantage the animals. There were other ways that made it easier to adopt for people as well when they couldn’t walk into adoption centres. As an example, Café Meow in Minneapolis, US is a café that allows cats to walk around and mingle with customers that come in and out and are able to be adopted from another organisation through the café, too (Happold 2018).

CONCLUSION

Many influences impact the behaviour of animals in adoption and are things that humans need to be mindful of when being a staff member at the adoption centre, interacting with the animals through a café or, more importantly, being the one who adopts the animal and rehomes them. The review shows that humans and animals work in alignment with each other and use each other as comfort and support bases. Especially recent times, we have noticed this more as we have been made to reevaluate our lives and the way we live with pets in our homes, helping us to become more mindful of their feelings, emotions and behaviours when things change in their life as well.

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Fig. 3 - Kitty Cafe in Leeds, UK.

This then poses the question:

“IN WHAT WAYS CAN DESIGN POSITIVELY IMPACT THE FUTURE OF PET ADOPTION FOR BOTH ANIMALS AND HUMANS?”


RESEARCH DESIGN The main issue of pet adoption is that the animals are not receiving enough human attention and care which affects their behaviour and emotional state. This is even more concerning during a pandemic, so it was noted that this may also affect their behaviour. My independent research was focused on humans who are around animals and see the treatments they receive from humans and in enclsoures. This research was conducted through interviews of people who have had animal interactions or experiences with adoption, observations of humananimal interactions within multiple pet cafés around Melbourne and data-mining via social media to see how humans interact with animals. The focus was to see whether human’s actions are beneficial to the animal’s mental health/behaviour or if their interactions are making it worse for them. Finding out the issues behind the scenes has made me more aware of what precisely needs to change to positively impact the future of adoption.

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INTERVIEWS METHOD

Four interviews were conducted with four separate people to gather an understanding of how each person perceives adoption of animals. These four people were three peers who have adopted or owned an animal and a professional in the industry a veterinary nurse. Conducting interviews is a way to get knowledge from behind the scenes of the pet adoption environment. Interviewing mulitple people of multiple different ages, social groups, occupations and locations is going to give a more accurate result to finding the underlying issues as it shows different perspectives. Questions that were asked in these interviews revolved around the environment of pet adoption centres and what each person thinks is effective or ineffective for a lot of pet-centred places in terms of design and human accessibility. It was also important to find out what they think the most important factor of pet adoption is and what they would do to change these places to create a positive impact on both humans and animals.

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FINDINGS

The interview process gave a more advanced understanding of how the general public feel about management of adoption centres in the past and current situation during COVID-19 restrictions. Interviewees seemed to have similar or the same concerns about adoption centres and the treatment of animals, as seen by the repeated themes that came from each individual. This included recognition of the negative impacts for animals stemming from adoption centre enclosures, minimal human interaction and uninviting adoption centres. Some interviewees also shared concerns regarding vet clinics and the unfortunate affect the pandemic has had on animals when visiting or being detained in adoption centres. Although all interviewees had their own individual experiences, it is clear that there is a common theme of issues within the pet adoption world.


OBSERVATIONS METHOD

FINDINGS

Research cannot be properly documented if all the information is gathered from external sources, so one has to go out and bring the information together themselves. Witnessing human-animal interaction makes one more aware of behaviours of both parties and how they work together in the same space and place.

Observations were conducted at two pet cafés in Melbourne to witness human-animal interaction in a shared, public environment. This was done to see if there were any issues between humans and animals that needed ot be improved on going forward. The locations observed both facilitate and accomodate to cats or dogs respectively. Both cafe’s provide a good setting to view how animals and humans interact with each other.

I have specifically observed and taken note of pet café’s more so than any other environment to see the behaviours of the animals when they are surrounded by humans and how they are treated by the people visiting. Staff were also observed to see how they control the area and make sure no human or animal is being mistreated or getting hurt.

The GAP cafe was the first place visited. They provide a gathering place for dogs, dog owners and dog lovers alike with an adoption program available. The second place was The Cat Cafe. They resident felines for cat lovers to come and interact with the option to also adopt. From the observations it can be seen that people are very respectful of the animals and conscious of the animal’s living space. It was apparent that people saw the importance of not tampering with their everyday lifestyle while visiting. Whilst there are strict rules at each cafe to ensure the best experience for both parties, the cats and dogs at no point seemed distressed around strangers, rather both groups seemed to enjoy interactions with one another.

Fig. 4 - The GAP Cafe, South Melbourne.

Fig. 5 - The Cat Cafe, Melbourne Central.

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DATA MINING METHOD

Social media - Instagram, Facebook and Google Reviews - is the main online forum that is used to gather information on key issues of topics. The purpose of data mining these platforms is to further understand the consumer, their concerns and opinions on the organisations. As such, the reputation of the organisations are represented through customer feedback. Gathering information such as comments, posts, shares, tags and locations from social media pages of specific organisations/adoption centres shows me each of their demographic, target audience and actions they are taking on their platforms to get their animals adopted. Observation of their pages have also shows how they are coping during a pandemic, keeping their business up and running and what they are doing differently to still ensure the animals are finding their forever homes in more trying times.

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FINDINGS I focused on two large organisations - RSPCA and Lost Dogs Home - to see if there were significant factors that stood out from their social media pages, Google reviews and the general public’s opinion. I then compared both organsiations to see the pros and cons of each. Trending hashtags were also really important findings to demonstrate the amount of people aware of issues in the pet adoption world. From the data gathered, I found that a lot of consumers are interested in the wellbeing of animals, showing their furry friends on social media and promoting hashtags that receive a lot of positive attention. Organisations on the other hand can go two different directions - positive and negative - in which feedback and social media helps the audience become more aware of who they are dealing with when adopting animals. The positive direction shows great communication and a compassion towards pets, providing as much information to the public as they can so it makes online adopting during a pandemic easier, whilst the negative side is the oppopsite and moreso repels the target audience.


CODING SCHEMA

CODES

LT G L O BA H E M E

BAS

Positively changing adoption by focusing on the way humans interact with animals to benefit both parties.

E

S

OR

ISI N G T HE M GA N

IC TH E M ES

Personal Experiences

Dull Colours Can’t see animals unless booked online Lack of outdoor space Uninviting Design Refusal of entry Inconsistent pedestrian plan

Common features found in Vets/Pet Grooming/ Adoption Centres

Design factors to best suit the needs of animals.

Uninviting entryways Informative Imagery Animals neglected Small Spaces Loud/Noisy No outdoor area

Reoccuring Findings Treatment of animals when human’s take them in their care.

Clinical Design

Lack of human-animal interaction Pandemic has a negative impact on adoption Animals unable to leave their spaces

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03 DESIGN BRIEF

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DESIGN REQUIREMENTS

THE OBJECTIVE

The community of Carrum Downs are limited to supplies for their pets and facilities needed to keep them happy such as pet shops, grooming, obedience schools, vets and adoption centres so a facility that provides all of these things in the one building is exactly what the community needs. This building will bring animals and humans closer together. A pet cafe will be included in the building design to incorporate a social aspect to bring the community closer together as well as meeting the needs of animals. The building will be taking over the former Masters building which has more than enough room to renovate it into what will be called PetWorld.

TARGET AUDIENCE

The real target audience of my design is the animals, but the demographic of my design is aimed towards families, couples or singles wanting to adopt a pet or own a pet. There is no age limit to who can access the facilities within PetWorld as long as they are in need of the resources provided. Because of how large the building is and the location, it will mainly attract a lot of locals around the community, but will definitely not be missed by passers-by. Word of mouth, advertisement and media will be major factors that will bring in the right demographic for the substantially sized establishment.

THE PROBLEM

The main concern is that animals feel confined and scared in adoption centre enclosures, vets and social environments which tend to affect their behaviour and their mental health. The design of PetWorld needs to factor these in and to do this, the shared spaces between humans and animals need to be more open, colourful, fun and welcoming for animals. Adoption enclosures need to provide everything an animal needs to keep themselves occupied and happy during their temporary stay, the vet needs to be designed in a way where animals are not threatened by other animals or fear seeing the vet and other facilities surrounding these need to include the same details so the animals are comfortable in the entire building, but also so it creates aesthetic appeal for the humans entering. The building will be easy to access and navigate, will provide both indoor and outdoor experiences, natural and artificial light, a balance of colour and monotone designs and will overall be a place for animals and humans to interact and connect.

The inside of the building will be renovated with walls, skylights, new light fittings, windows, furnishings and finishes to serve the new purpose of the building. The interior design needs to be colourful, directive, open/spacious and high-tech to cater to all needs of humans working, humans visiting and animals. The only thing that already exists that will still remain is the exterior shell and structural columns, but changes to colours will be made.

CONCLUSION

To conclude, the entire process of conducting a literature review, methods of design statement and preliminary data analysis allowed for a thoroughly educated and performed design brief. The literature review revealed a multitude of issues in the pet adoption scene, of which influenced important aspects involved in the methods of design. These areas of concern regarding pet adoption centres such as cold, uninviting spaces and a lack of human-animal interaction were confirmed from the evidence gathered during the preliminary data analysis. It is because of this research, the design brief involves a strong focus on a comfortable living environment, tailored to the specific needs of rescue animals, such as the importance of regular human interaction. In this way, the design makes a positive impact on the future of pet adoption for both humans

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04 PRECEDENTS

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WILLIAM ANNENBERG PETSPACE, CALIFORNIA, USA.

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RSPCA, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA.

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MESHCHERSKY PARK DOG SHELTER, MOSCOW, RUSSIA.

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05 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

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SITE ANALYSIS

24 LATHAMS ROAD, CARRUM DOWNS. This building I wish to reaccomodate on this site was formerly known as a Masters building. There are multiple factory/industrial lots on this one block of land that are the same address. One of which is including another pet store which holds a veterinary clinic within. The shop is large for a pet shop, but not large enough to include the facilities I intend to design. This may be competition for this existing shop, but a large facility like this is needed within the community and this lot is the perfect location and size for that purpose. The building is located on the corner of two main roads (Lathams and Frankston-Dandenong), close to Eastlink and 45 minutes from Melbourne CBD.

FORMER MASTERS BUILDING: CURRENT SITE

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COVID REQUIREMENTS During the recent pandemic, a lot more restrictions have been put in place in all workplaces. For Pet World, these restrictions include frequent sanitising, temperature checks for customers and staff coming in, constant cleaning of surfaces and physical social distancing with capacity limits. The floorplan has to be designed to have open spaces in each section of the building so people can be safely separated. Open spaces allow each customer to interact with potential animals they want to adopt in a way that separates them from others to align with COVID-19 restrictions. It also allows them to shop for their pets, visit the Vet and dine at the pet cafe without needing to be too close to others around them. Not only are the restrictions between humans important, but during this pandemic a lot of adoption centres and veterinary clinics would neglect the animals they have in the facility. In intense lockdowns, they didn’t have the staff or resources to monitor the animals in which this had a negative impact on them. Behavioural issues and mental illnesses would become more apparent because of these unfortunate circumstances, so making a difference in the amount of staff and their duties in the entirity of the PetWorld building will benefit the animals. On top of this, their potential owners will find it easier to build a connection with them.

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LAYOUT CONCEPTS

LAYOUT ONE

LAYOUT THREE

LAYOUT TWO

KEY/LEGEND ADOPTION CENTRE/ KENNELS

VETERINARY CLINIC/PET SHOP/ GROOMING

PET CAFE

TOILETS

ENTRY

COURTYARD/ OBEDIENCE SCHOOL

RECEPTION

ENTRY POINTS

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BEHAVIOUR

SOCIALISATION

MOODBOARD

COMFORTABILITY

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OBEDIENCE


PET SHOP OVERLOOKING GROOMING ROOM

CAT ENCLOSURE

DOG ENCLOSURE

PROPOSED SKETCHES EXTERIOR

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FLOORPLAN

PROPOSED DESIGN IDEAS 28


RENDERS

EXTERIOR

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OBEDIENCE SCHOOL/CAFE

PET CAFE

RENDERS

GROOMING ROOM

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CAT ENCLOSURE - COURTYARD


FEEDBACK SUMMARY My proposed designs were presented to a panel and were given feedback. This feedback encouraged me to make changes into the design to more align it with my design statement. These changes include incorporating a more adventurous perspective to the building that will make my design stand out against competitors. A way of doing this would be to introduce pet inspired shapes, forms or spaces in parts of the design that will be remembered, and people will associate this with my project. Delving deeper into the behaviours of animals and how outdoor/semi-outdoor spaces and yards are going to work with each type of pet was also advice given to me during my feedback. All these tips and factors will be included into the new design brief and will be what refines my project for the final portfolio/ presentation.

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REFINED SKETCHES

PET PLAYHOUSE

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KENNELS CUTOUT


REFINED LAYOUT LEVEL ONE

GROUND FLOOR

KEY/LEGEND PET ADOPTION

VETERINARY CLINIC/PET SHOP/ GROOMING

PET CAFE

TOILETS

ENTRY AREAS

PET PLAYHOUSE/ OBEDIENCE SCHOOL

RECEPTION

ENTRY POINTS

STAFF KITCHEN/ MEETING ROOMS

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FLOOR PLAN REFINEMENT

LEVEL ONE

GROUND FLOOR

AXONOMETRIC

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CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

KEY/LEGEND Least Motion Moderate Motion Most Motion Entry Points

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06 DESIGN DETAILS


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AXONOMETRIC VIEW


Implementing a beam system into the building opens up the space and allows for better insulation when working with a building of large area and height. The structure is more secure and sturdy with steel beams especially when designing a warehouse-style building. The beams go through all areas of the building, but ceilings have been placed to lower the height of some spaces.

BEAM SYSTEM

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EXTERIOR - DAY TIME

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EXTERIOR - NIGHT TIME

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9. 4.

1. 3.

5.

11.

10. 8.

12.

6. 2. 13.

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GROUND FLOORPLAN 44

1. OBEDIENCE SCHOOL 2. PET CAFE 3. TOILETS 4. KENNELS 5. ADOPTION OFFICES 6. PET PLAY AREA 7. STAFF AREA

8. RECEPTION 9. VETERINARY CLINIC 10. SMALL ADOPTION OFFICE 11. SMALL ADOPTION KENNELS 12. PET SHOP 13. GROOMING


The second level floorplan indicates the additional level for the pet play area and the kennels. To separate dogs from cats in the pet play area, a second level has been designed. This will be for cats to play around before they are met with their potential owners downstairs. The second level for the kennels is to provide more space for the adoption centre to take in animals. Maximising the space and utilising the height of the building to add a second level of kennels helps ensures that the adoption centre will have enough room for the amount of animals coming through.

LEVEL TWO FLOORPLAN

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KENNELS The kennels are designed with tall walls, open spaces and curved design in the structure. Large windows have been inserted as well to maximise the amount of light coming into each kennel and also so the space feels larger for animals. The windows are also beneficial to spectators because they can see the animals through the windows clearly. The entrance to the kennels is a corridor-like design between the veterinary clinic and the pet shop, there’s also an entrance point from the reception area. Basically, this space is a gateway to most areas of the buidling, so the design is quite calming and spacious to make the transition between each spce peaceful. The clean, mellow design is also less intruding for the animals as well.

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SECTION

SOLAR SECTION 50

The solar section shows the sunlight coming through the front curtain wall window as well as the light that comes through the skylights in both winter and summer. Ventilation is also important especially in a warehouse, so the skylights are fully operatable to open and let fresh air in as well as the windows on the facade of the building which will be able to open and close by motor.


MEZZANINE STAFF AREA

SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE

The staff area is accessible via elevator or staircase and can be used by any staff memebr who works in the entire buidling. Each area of the buiding has their own break room, but this is an additional space for staff to rest between shifts. This area also includes meeting rooms for conference purposes and potentially job interviews.

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RECEPTION The reception area is a space for people to get directions on where they need to go and is also central to most of the areas in the building. The walls are high and the space is open so visitors can see almost every area of the building as soon as they walk in.

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PET PLAY AREA An important part of my design was to create a space where animals and humans can form a deeper connection through physical interaction before adopting. This has been proven to be a more successful way of finding the perfect pet rather than online profiles of the animals. The pet play area allows each person to meet multiple animals of their liking at different times to see how they interact with them. The space is large so the pets are able to run around and play freely.

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MATERIAL SELECTION

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PET CAFE Another space that was of massive importance to my design to bring animals and humans together was the pet cafe. The pet cafe is an area for humans and an imals to interact outside of thei living space, with other naimals and to bring the community together through animals. The cafe is open to the public and has set days for cats and dogs so the two don’t mingle.

MATERIAL SELECTION

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PET SHOP/GROOMING The pet shop has been designed to cater for small pet adoption as well as enough space for animals to come along with their owners to the retail section of the space. The area is open and large enough to cater to both animals and humans in the one place. The grooming station is also attached to the pet shop and has a peeping window where owners can see their animals being groomed.

MATERIAL SELECTION 60


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VETERINARY CLINIC The veterinary clinic has been designed quite large to cater for large and small animals. There are operating, procedure, consulting and dental rooms for each type of pet. Alongside the vet clinic is also a lecture hall which will have the ability to host lectures for students, teachers, animal owners and more as well as a classroom to teach a variety of animal related courses.

LARGE ANIMAL

CATS

1. LECTURE HALL 2. CLASSROOM 3. TOILETS 4. SURGERY ROOM 5. PROCEDURE ROOM 6. RECOVERY 7. SURGERY PREP 8. DENTAL 9. TOILET 10. SURGERY ROOM 11. SURGERY ROOM

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12. DENTAL 13. ISOLATION 14. PROCEDURE ROOM 15. RECOVERY 16. SURGERY PREP 17. STORAGE 18. DENTAL 19. SURGERY ROOM 20. SURGERY ROOM 21. PROCEDURE ROOM 22. SURGERY PREP

DOGS

23. LAUNDRY 24. RECOVERY 25. ISOLATION 26. X-RAY 27. CT SCAN 28. CLEANING 29. TECH 30. TREATMENT 31. MECHANICAL 32. STORAGE 33. STAFF ROOM

34. OFFICES 35. TOILET 36. STORAGE 37. CONSULT ROOMS 38. RECEPTION 39. WAITING AREA

MATERIAL SELECTION


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