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HOLIDAY ISSUE | VOL.1 NO.7

DEC EMBER 2019 | COMMUNI TY. ENTER TAINMENT. ACTIVITIES | FREE 2 A LL


INDUSTRIAL ELEGANCE Modern design features balance The Monarch’s industrial architecture in The Royal Room, featuring exposed steel trusses, concrete floors and white washed brick walls. Unrefined yet sleek and contemporary, The Royal Room has been artfully designed for modern weddings and other elegant events. Local first. We’ve partnered with some of Ogden’s best restaurants, florists, photographers and more to bring you the best rates and make your planning easy.

THE ROYAL ROOM Weddings, Corporate Events & Special Occasions Occupancy 470

UPPER DECK Outdoor Events, Music & Markets Occupancy 1200

THE ATRIUM Workshops, Exhibits & Fairs Occupancy 150

GIST Lobby/Foyer Occupancy 350 discover more at:

themonarchogden.com/#venues


TIMELESS DESIGN meets MODERN LIVING Peery Lofts is a downtown Ogden landmark that blends classic architecture with contemporary style. Our twelve living spaces include one and two bedroom floor plans renovated in respect to Peery’s historic period and designed to support your lifestyle today. Enjoy artful urban living at Peery Lofts, located steps away from creative studios, hip restaurants and public art in the Nine Rails Creative District, and just a few blocks from Historic 25th Street in the heart of downtown Ogden. Original finishes have been restored or replicated as unique accents to each apartment’s contemporary design, which features updated amenities, open layouts and bright natural light. Floor plans starting at $900, visit www.peerylofts.com to discover more.

For More Info Call or Text

Crystal Guillen 801.589.2771 Crystal is committed to service with an emphasis on accountability, reliability, timeliness and enthusiasm. She is an Ogden native and graduated from Weber State University with a Bachelors in History. RE/MAX Hall of Fame Realtor / ABR, CNE, MRP & SFR Women's Council of Realtors 2017 Realtor of the Year


From the Editor We at Indie Ogden would like to wish everyone a safe and happy Holiday Season. We would also like to say thank you for all the support and love we’ve been shown in our first year putting out the magazine. We feel blessed to live in Ogden and to get to do what we do! These past six months have been a roller coaster ride and we have so much in store for 2020 that we can’t wait to share with you. We are very excited for the upcoming Indie Ogden Awards and encourage you to make sure to nominate your favorite people and businesses! Voting begins in January and the party is March 14th. In this issue, we look back on 2019 and all the awesomeness that happened in Ogden, while we also highlight Ogden’s Lantern House and the struggle they face to help the most vulnerable Ogdenites. Homelessness is having a huge impact in Ogden and we as a community can help, not only during the holidays but year-round. Join us for a fundraiser on December 20th for YCC. Thank you Ogden for all of your support. We would like to thank Gina Herbert with Trailsxposed Photography for our beautiful cover shot, a very special thank you to Weber State Special Collections Department for use of their photos, and a heartfelt thank you to our amazing team at Indie Ogden, whose tireless efforts make putting this magazine together monthly a labor of love and laughter. Cheers to 2020! Daniel Mathews - Editor-in-Chief/Owner Brandy Shay - Director of Operations/Co-Owner Matt Shay - Creative Director/Cover Design Deann Armes - Lead Editor/Writer Caril Jennings - Theater and Arts Contributor Chelsi Lasater - Copy Editor Cody Hockin - Designer John Slaugh - Photographer Lance Garcia - Distribution Coordinator Ahmree McKissick - Social Media Manager 2

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PHOTO CONTEST

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We think everyone would agree that the holidays in Ogden are a magical time of year. From Christmas Village to the endless activities put on by members of the community, there is always something going on from now until the New Year that will help you get into the Holiday Spirit. At This Is Ogden, we want to encourage you to get out and experience them. This magazine is a perfect resource to find the events that best fit you. There's something for everyone! Remember, as you are out and about, snap some photos, share them, and don't forget to tag #THISISOGDEN.

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Gina Herbert, Ogden’s Christmas Tree

Lacee Porter, Berry Path

Stormie Elmer, Christmas Village Fireworks

This Is Ogden was founded in 2012 by Tim Sessions. His goal was to highlight all the great content Ogdenites were sharing on social media. Keep it up! #thisisogden INDIEOGDE NUTA H .C O M

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JANUARY W I N T E R

M A R K E T

Ogden Downtown Alliance presented the Winter Market on Saturdays from late January through February, where community members came together at the historic Ogden Union Station to meet more than 50 local vendors featuring specialty artisan goods, food and coffee, a vegan bakery, producers of preserves and canned items, community yoga, live music and more.

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B RE WE RY

The highly anticipated new Roosters B Street Brewery opened its doors in the new “Trackline” area north of 24th Street and B Avenue in Ogden. The new brewing facility offered tours and some of the best summer parties (Summer of Love, Bite & Beer) in the ages 21 and up space with a great outdoor patio and long list of unique craft ales and delicious menu!

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2019 By Deann Armes

Living in Ogden just keeps getting better year after year as our favorite traditions continue and new ones begin. We are rich with community, festivities, and events that keep growing, and this year was huge. As such, it would be impossible to list them all, but here are some of the highlights of 2019!

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FEBRUARY WA S AT C H

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The popular winter celebration hosted by Visit Ogden returned to give us something to cheer about! The free festival, held the first Friday in February, was packed with fun: Sweaty Yeti Fat Bike Race, winter market, arts market, Yeti Beard Competition, Beer Garden, Yeti Yoga, live entertainment, s’mores, and best of all, Yeti Sightings!


MARCH INDIE

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2019 marked the 7th year of the annual Indie Ogden Awards, and we were excited to once again produce this amazing event that brings together the best local businesses of the region. This year’s sold-out WestWorld themed event took place on March 8 and was a tremendous success!

H E R I TA G E F E S T I VA L 1 5 0 T H A N N I V E R S A RY One of the most exciting, biggest and proudest Ogden moments of the year, this year’s Heritage Festival celebrated the 150th anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad with the famed Golden Spike. The three-day celebration included the arrival of Big Boy 4014, 45 cultural performance pieces, 22 vendors, 10 local organizations, seven community partners and two live broadcasts filling Historic 25th Street with history, heart and fun for locals and visitors from all over the country.

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Another fun rally of the best craft beverages and pairings in Northern Utah! The Spring Beer Fest, hosted by Ogden Downtown Alliance at Ogden Union Station, highlights local chefs, brewers and producers and is a true celebration of O-Town pride.

M A R AT H O N

More than 6,000 runners returned to participate in the “Best Running Event in Utah,” produced by local nonprofit GOAL Foundation. This beautiful northern Utah course starts in the Wasatch Mountains just outside the city and finishes in our scenic downtown and includes the Ogden Marathon, Half Marathon & Relay. This year’s winners were Riley Cook and Emily Barrett.

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M C Q U E E N ’ S 1 0 0TH B I RT H D AY PA RT Y

Ogden’s beloved sax player, the legendary Joe McQueen celebrated his 75th wedding anniversary this year, and 100th birthday! A big birthday bash was thrown on May 31 at Lighthouse Lounge where the Joe McQueen Quartet played to a packed house full of fans.

APRIL OGDEN

R ESTAU R AN T

JUNE W E E K

In April we set out to explore and support Ogden’s growing food scene! Ogden Restaurant Week, April 4-13, by Visit Ogden, highlighted over 20 local and independently-owned restaurants in downtown Ogden that offered special fixed menus, a two-course $10 lunch and three-course $17 dinner, throughout the week.

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The first issue of the new monthly print publication Indie Ogden Magazine hit the streets with 20,000 beautiful copies. It is now distributed to over 150 locations and continues to grow as Ogden’s #1 community resource, art and entertainment guide. INDIEOGDE NUTAH .C O M

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We were spoiled all summer long with Mavis Staples at Ogden Music Festival and Ogden Twilight Concert Series throwing huge shows—Iron & Wine/Calexico, Phantogram, Of Monsters and Men, The National and Flaming Lips, to name just a few—not to mention Snowbasin’s Blues, Brews and BBQ delivering national and local musicians to the mountains every Sunday. It was a party every weekend!

8 5 T H A N N I V E R S A RY OF O G D E N P I O N E E R D AY S The painted horses returned in July to line the streets and make way for Ogden Pioneer Days, one of Ogden’s most beloved traditions for 85 years—five days of spectacular rodeo excitement in the most beautiful outdoor rodeo the stadium in the country, the sweet clippity-clop sounds at the Horses and Hitch parade, and the Grand Ogden Pioneer Days Parade!

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This mountain biking race hosted by GOAL Foundation returned for its third year at Powder Mountain for “One Heck of a Ride, One Heck of a Party!”

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This year’s festival, held on June 8-9 at the historic Union Station by Nurture the Creative Mind, was extended to include new elements—live graffiti painting, skateboarding competition, Shorts Film Festival—and had even more kids’ crafts, music on two performance stages and an additional 30 artist booths.

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The summer Farmers Market by Ogden Downtown Alliance brought more than 200 vendors to Historic 25th Street for 13 weeks of shopping local artisan goods, fresh produce, prepared foods and more. Thanks, ODA for the wonderful summer Saturdays and all of the amazing local vendors for their talents and hard work!

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S U M M ER

SATU R D AY S

FREE activities for families were offered every Saturday throughout the summer through this wonderful program. These included entry to some of the best local venues: Ogden Nature Center, Dinosaur Park, Treehouse Children’s Museum, Union Station Museums, Weber County libraries, and Lorin Farr Pool.

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O G D EN

An enlightening five-hour event at Peery’s Egyptian theatre featured a pre-event social, a line-up of eight incredible local speakers, six local performances, and an after-party!

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The premiere song-based music festival by Grammy award-winning songwriters Monty Powell and Anna Wilson came to Ogden Amphitheater with a lineup that included local favorite Sammy Brue and famed Utah rock band Royal Bliss headlining.


AUGUST OGD E N VALLEY BALL O O N FE STI VAL The beautiful summer tradition in Eden drew thousands of visitors from around the world. It is the only balloon festival in the intermountain west that enhances the attraction of a balloon rally with all-day arts & cultural events. Fifteen hot air balloons, five launches, and one balloon glow are the focal point of the weekend event that also includes live music, arts & crafts booths and food vendors.

W O R L D WA K E S U R F I NG C H A M P I O N S H I P Ogden Valley’s Pineview Reservoir was selected for the second year in a row as the destination for the World Wake Surfing Championship. The weekend event was loaded with beachside fun for spectators: music, Social Axe throwing competition, beach games, and local food vendors.

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H O M E C O M I N G

Hundreds of fancifully-dressed riders took to the streets of Ogden for Ogden Bicycle Collective’s annual fundraising event that ended at the Ogden Amphitheater for a big, awesome dance party!

OCTOBER B I Z M A R K I E C O N C E RT AT T H E M O N A R C H

OGDEN

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Indie Ogden hosted its premiere concert at The Monarch on Halloween night with Hip Hop legend Biz Markie! Support from local hip hop artists Earthworm and Cotes and DJ Bryson Dearden’s pre-show made this one of the hottest dance parties of the year.

This year’s Ogden Pride Festival helped raised funds for the future Ogden Pride Center. The weekend celebration included a Soiree and Homecoming Dance at The Monarch, Rally, Youth Drag Show and 5K preceding the festival of music, food vendors and family-friendly activities.

SEPTEMBER H ARVEST

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Community members celebrated the end of Summer 2019 with family-friendly activities, live music by local artists, community partners, local businesses and more at Northern Utah’s biggest party of the year!

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The second Hispanic Festival in Ogden by LUPEC (Latinos United Promoting Education), held at the Union Station was a fantastic celebration that featured delicious authentic Hispanic foods, delightfully festive live mariachi music and beautiful art!

October Events by Ogden Downtown Alliance W I T C H S T O C K

F E S T I VA L

Witches, Zombies and Monsters alike gathered at The Ogden Amphitheater for Witches Tea, Zombie Crawl and The Monster Bash featuring local artisan vendors, prepared foods, spooky beats by DJ Johnny B and more! INDIEOGDE NUTAH .C O M

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PEC U LI A R

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Peculiar Pours rallied together local breweries and challenged them to bring their most peculiar flavors, seasonal brews and test pours together with live music by DJ KYWIZ, delicious bites and a party for the taste buds.

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More than 1,000 zombies of all ages sported their most gruesome, creative costumes and crawled down Historic 25th Street. Zombie Crawl participants were encouraged to donate coats to Youth Futures and canned goods to The Lantern House.

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Ogden’s premiere Day of the Dead celebration produced by Nurture the Creative Mind was a phenomenal success! The historic Union Station was filled to capacity throughout the night with thousands of attendees who came out to celebrate their loved ones as a community and enjoy free authentic Mexican food, music and art vendors.

G R A N D O P E N I N G O F O G DE N’ S C H R I S T M A S V I L L A GE It’s the most wonderful time of the year in downtown Ogden! On the Saturday after Thanksgiving, one of Ogden’s most charming traditions carried on with hundreds of Santa suits running down Washington Boulevard. The “real” Santa Claus arrived at the end of the Electric Parade, and the Christmas Village lights went on for the holiday season!

NOVEMBER GRAN D O PEN I N G O F T H E M O N AR C H Thousands attended the highly anticipated opening of this beautifully renovated historic space that offers event spaces and creative studios, the Art Box gift shop, and WB’s Wine Cafe & Coffeehouse. It is truly a gift for the Ogden community and Nine Rails Art District.

DECEMBER Still to Come!

1 S T A N N U A L C R A F T L A K E C I T Y H O L I D AY M A R K E T Hosted at The Monarch, the popular Craft Lake City event is coming to Ogden for the first time. Come out and shop local for the holidays! Thank you to all of the Ogden community members, volunteers, leaders, local businesses and organizations for another magical year of living in this beautiful town. We wish everyone the warmest holiday season and look forward to everything Ogden in 2020! The Eighth Annual Indie Ogden Awards are Coming! Photos courtsey of Bryan Butterfield, Pam Mitchell, Austin Luckett, Toni J Studios, Cheryl Alterman Images, and visitogden.com 8

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TIME FOR NOMINATIONS The Indie Ogden Awards is a community-nominated and community-voted celebration of all things Ogden. The 2020 Oscar-themed awards ceremony will continue the tradition started seven years ago by Mikaela Shafer in recognizing the hard work of individuals and businesses that make our city an amazing place to live. Save the date for March 14 and be part of the fun, inclusive night of revelry by nominating and voting for your local favorites! To nominate your favorite business or individual just go to our website www.indieogdenutah.com and click on the Nominate tab and let us know who you think is the Best of Ogden!

WH O

M A KE YO U R V O I C E H E A R D . S H O U LD B E O N T H E B A L L O T T H I S

Y E A R ?

The Awards Categories Best Restaurant

Best Local Venue for Movies, Music or Events

Best Italian Food

Best Yoga Studio/Class

Best Mexican Food

Best Local Gym/Place to Exercise

Best Asian Food

Best Sports/Gear/Outdoor Shop

Best Sushi

Best Local Service Provider

Best Local Brewery or Craft Ale

Best Tattoo Shop/Artist

Best Burger and Fries

Best Hotel / B&B

Best Vegetarian/Vegan Food

Best Health & Wellness Business

Best New Business

Best Barber Shop or Barber

Best Local Retail Shop

Best Salon/Hair Stylist

Best Bar

Best Real Estate Agent

Best Bar Food Best Bakery or Dessert Spot

Best Local Community Group/ Organization (Non-Sports team)

Best Pizza in Town

Best Community Spirit

Best Coffee Shop

Volunteer of the Year

Best Date Night Spot

Politician of the Year

Best Breakfast or Brunch

Musician of the Year

Best Local Artisan-Craftsperson

Artist of the Year

Best Dance Studio/Classes

Teacher of the Year

Best Place for Family Fun

Best Project, Event or Accomplishment of the Year

Best Stage Theater or Playhouse

Ogdenite of the Year INDIEOGDE NUTAH .C O M

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MORTGAGE INDUSTRY

PURCHASE OR REFINANCE WITH A LOCAL, HONEST & EXPERIENCED LOAN OFFICER.

SENIOR LOAN OFFICER PHONE: 801-991-0100 652 E. CHAMBERS ST. STE. 1 SOUTH OGDEN, UT. 84403


MARY MAPES

Mary Mapes, author of Truth and Duty: The Press, The President, and the Privilege of Power. AwardWinning former producer of 60 Minutes. DATE: MONDAY, MARCH 30, 2020 | 7 PM Tickets: $5 Students | $12.50-$25 General Public http://www.weberstatetickets.com/

INDIEOGDE NUTAH.C O M

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more than just skin deep By Deann Armes

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nside Ogden Clinic Dermatology at Professional Center North on Harrison Boulevard is a thriving cosmetic surgery practice led by Dr. Chad Tingey, MD that has successfully grown almost entirely through word of mouth. The dermatology clinic, more widely known for treating all forms of skin disorders and skin cancers has also developed an extended clinic with the most up-to-date, innovative and effective repair techniques to treat a variety of skin conditions resulting from things like sun damage, skin disorders, or aging.

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Ogden Clinic Dermatology “To be completely honest I never imagined myself loving cosmetic dermatology,” admits Dr. Tingey who specializes in using the most advanced tools and medicines available for patients to achieve their desired cosmetic results. “But I did extra training in surgical dermatology and lasers and I found that working to achieve cosmetic goals with patients came easily for me. And I find it very rewarding after 10 years of practice in Ogden.” Dr. Tingey and three PA-C’s, a FNP-C, and Master Esthetician Lara Schlaf ‘s team of five medically-supervised and highly trained estheticians make up the clinic staff who all love the comprehensive services in cosmetic skincare they get to offer patients. “We do more laser resurfacing than any other clinic I’m aware of,” says Dr. Tingey. “We aren’t afraid of using the full science of laser treatments on the skin to achieve results that ‘wow’ a patient.” Lara Schlaf says that laser is the “gamechanger in skincare” and that their clinic is the place of choice because Dr. Tingey cares so much about his patients and staff. What also makes the clinic so successful in growing a distinguished cosmetic practice is its aggressive approach to lasers and devices coupled with a “subtle approach” to facial fillers and Botox injections. Co2 Resurfacing, a highly-effective treatment that uses an ablative laser to repair damaged skin is one of their specialties and most popular treatment options. “When using lasers, one must have the training and skill to push the treatment to levels where real results are seen. But at the same time, we inject faces with fillers like Juviderm and Restalyne along with Botox and Dysport in many patients every single day. This is where a subtle approach sets us apart. If one is trying to alter the way they look too much with injections the result can be an unnatural and almost uncomfortable appearance for people to see,” says Dr. Tingey who performs all injections himself. It takes the expertise of a highly-trained medically supervised staff to capture the perfect balance of real results with a natural look. “We use these products for what they do best, to accentuate what the patient already has and just add to the beauty of the patient.” Dr. Tingey points out that one can tell this is the case by meeting

and seeing the staff at Ogden Clinic dermatology, all of whom have had injections and also have a natural beauty that isn’t over-altered by the treatment. But for Dr. Tingey his passion for the effects of cosmetic surgery are more than just skin deep. “I love the science of skin. Training in medicine I was drawn to how integral the skin is to overall health, protecting us from the outside world, keeping us warm or cooling us down, even metabolizing vitamins and helping to regulate our metabolic activity.” He loves that he gets to help patients cosmetically with the texture and coloring of their skin in addition to helping with unknown rashes, infections, and skin cancers, describing how cosmetic skin repair can affect overall health. “When one resurfaces the skin with a laser and all-new cells grow back it’s very healthy for things like pre-cancers, and also lets the patient have younger and smoother skin to enjoy.” Another rewarding aspect of his practice, Dr. Tingey says, is that he gets to help patients of all ages. “It’s so fulfilling to use lasers and devices to take off years of sun damage and reverse aging of faces and necks, and even arms and legs. It’s fulfilling to laser birthmarks and angiomas so children aren’t embarrassed by them. It’s fulfilling to have a few injections to the face and have it look more awake and fresh.” And, he adds, “seeing a 17-year-old girl get rid of severe acne and watching her come out of her shell is awesome!” Ogden Clinic Dermatology’s mission is to improve skin health by providing cosmetic and laser services that offer solutions to your concerns that are designed to rejuvenate and restore the skin. Treatments include chemical peels, Microdermabrasion, laser skin treatments, laser resurfacing/fractionated Co2, laser hair removal, IPL (LimeLight Facial), Skin Pen Microneedling, Sclerotherapy, varicose veins treatment, Coolsculpting, upper eyelid Blepharoplasty, Latisse, PicoWay Laser Technology (tattoo removal and pigmentation treatments), permanent underarm sweat reduction with miraDry, Botox, Dysport & Xeomin, Radiesse, Restylane, Juvederm & Voluma.

INDIEOGDE NUTAH.C O M

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ALWAYS IN SEASON fest URBAN adventure MARCH

SEPTEMBER

MAY

OCTOBER

Music on the Plaza JUNE

OCTOBER

JUNE - JULY

POP-UP EVENTS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR!

24 WEEKS OF FARMERS MARKET OGDEN

JUNE - SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER - OCTOBER

JANUARY - FEBRUARY

@OgdenDowntown | OgdenDowntown.com


The story of Ogden’s Christmas Village By Deann Armes

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n 1961, a father had a grand vision on a cold and sleepless winter night. His five-year-old boy Tommy had been terribly disappointed at the end of the Christmas Parade earlier that night. Escalating excitement turned to overwhelming despair as Tommy stood with his parents, Jerry and Maxine Green, in the perfect spot for the big holiday parade as Santa Claus dashed by, waving from the back of a big flatbed truck to hundreds of children, vanishing out of sight; a departure far too quick after such eager anticipation for Santa’s arrival. Jerry Green’s inspired idea was born of a desire to create a magical holiday experience that would live up to his boy’s imagination—a “Christmas Village” populated with all the toy and candy shops you’d find at the North Pole in addition to a bigger, more wonderful Santa Claus Parade. Town merchants enthusiastically hopped on board to make Green’s $25,000 dream a reality, and on November 23, 1962, Ogden’s very first Christmas Village and Parade opened to kick off the holiday season. Utah Power and Light pledged to donate the electricity for the lights, merchants donated materials, and people in the city came together to help with the construction of the village. All of those involved in the first Christmas Village hoped the new holiday tradition would be kept alive through the generations. A rescue effort in 2002, led by Jo Packham and a committee of dedicated Ogdenites who love the Christmas Village, successfully revitalized the village. Under their care, the nearly-forgotten village of twelve elf-sized cottages grew to sixty-seven, and Ogden’s Christmas Village became Utah’s largest holiday celebration—and one of Ogden’s most beloved traditions.

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Ogden’s Christmas Village 2019 • Open now through January 1 • Lights on nightly from 5 p.m. to Midnight • Located at Ogden’s Municipal Park 323 E 25th Street • Free admission • This year’s theme: “Are You ‘Yeti’ For Christmas?” • Visit Santa Claus & ride the Mini Polar Express Train Monday through Friday 6 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 5 to 9 p.m. through December 23. • Free to meet Santa Claus, pictures with Santa are $5.00 • Christmas Village Store is open Monday through Friday from 6 to 9 p.m., Saturday from 5 to 9 p.m. Shop for novelty items and your 2019 “Are you ‘Yeti’ for Christmas” hoodie • Ogden Breakfast Exchange Club’s Hot Cocoa Booth raises funds for the local Shoes for Tots Program. Open Monday through Friday, 6 to 9 p.m. and Saturday 5 to 9 p.m. • The Corner is now open at the corner of 25th Street and Washington Boulevard • Entertainment on the Amphitheater Stage Monday through Saturday nights at 6:30, 7:00 and 7:30. • Mrs. Claus gives tours to preschool-age children Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 801-629-8714 to schedule a tour. • Santa’s Reindeer are visiting December 20th and 21st from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. • Play “I SPY!” Hidden in each cottage is a yeti. Can you find all 63 of them? Vote for your favorite cottage at christmasvillage.ogdencity.com. Want to support Ogden’s Christmas Village? Contact StacyOlsen@ogdencity.com to make donation arrangements or mail a check to Ogden’s Christmas Village: 133 W 29th Street, Ogden UT 84401.

Other Ways to Donate: Stop by the donation box set up near the train or attend Breakfast with Santa! ogdencity.com/714/Breakfast-with-Santa INDIEOGDE NUTAH.C O M

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Things to Do This Holiday Season Ogden’s Christmas Village

First Friday Art Stroll

Thru December

Friday, December 6, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

One of Ogden’s most beloved traditions, Municipal Gardens downtown is transformed into a dazzling winter wonderland resembling the North Pole. Visit Santa in his castle, get a tour by Mrs. Claus, ride the Polar Express Train and get some hot cocoa while walking through the village of sixty-seven elf-sized cottages and peer into the windows of each uniquely-themed whimsical wintry scene.

It’s the most wonderful time of year...in downtown Ogden. Take a stroll through the dazzling light displays at Ogden’s Christmas Village and the surrounding areas abuzz with exciting exhibit openings, artist receptions and live music, in venues and in the streets.The stroll runs from Union Station, to Historic 25th Street, to The Junction, The Vard, The Nine Rails Creative District to Harrison Blvd. Don’t forget to stop by the Art Box at The Monarch for holiday shopping and catch Van Sessions, live music recorded from inside a van, suitable for all ages.

christmasvillage.ogdencity.com

The Nutcracker Ballet Thru December

FB@OgdensFirstFridayArtStroll

Two outstanding productions of “The Nutcracker Ballet”, by Julie Moffitt Ballet School and also by Imagine Ballet Theatre, are presented throughout December at the beautiful Peery’s Egyptian Theatre downtown. Don’t miss a night to get the family dressed up for a night out for this magical holiday classic.

A Fairly Potter Christmas Carol at The Ziegfeld

Egyptiantheaterogden.com

A Broadway Christmas

December 6 to 23 The magic returns! For the fifth year in a row, this heartwarming musical parody, and audience favorite, returns to the stage. Spend a night with your favorite witches and wizards as they learn about the magic of Christmas. It’s the perfect show for the whole family! Ticket prices and showtimes vary.

Thursday, December 5 @ 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

theziegfeldtheater.com

OnStage Ogden presents this evening of holiday cheer with all of your favorite Yuletide carols with Broadway star Ashley Brown, at the Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts. See website for ticket prices.

First Annual Craft Lake City Holiday Market in Ogden

onstageogden.org

Craft Lake City, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, is expanding programming to Northern Utah residents! The inaugural event, held at The Monarch, will feature 70+ local artisans, craft food and holiday spirits. $5 entry.

Saturday, December 7 @ 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

craftlakecity.com/holiday-market/ 1 8

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Holiday Open House and Local Artisan Fair at Ogden Nature Center

Family Holiday Traditions at Eccles Community Art Center

Saturday, December 7 @ 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Saturday, December 14 @ 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Kick-off the holiday season with a fun shopping day at the Nature Center. The Nest Gift Shop is stocked with unique goodies and admission is free for everyone! Explore the wintry trails and enjoy kids’ crafts from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The Eccles historic home will be decorated for the holidays. Tours will be available and art projects will be offered for children. Santa will visit! $20 per family.

ogdennaturecenter.org/events

The Muppet Christmas Carol Sunday, December 8 @ 11:30 a.m. Sunday Brunch movies at Brewvies are FREE and open to ages 3+! Doors open at 11am, movie at 11:30am. Everyone will love this “retelling of the classic Dickens tale of Ebenezer Scrooge, miser extraordinaire. He is held accountable for his dastardly ways during night-time visitations by the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and future.” brewvies.com/ogden/nowplaying.html

Jingle Bell Jazz with BBC4 Wednesday, December 11 @ 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Swing in the holidays with the whole family for a FREE hour of music by some of Ogden’s favorite local musicians! Union Station, 2501 Wall Ave

Breakfast with Santa Saturday, December 14 @ 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Ogden’s Christmas Village presents the 5th Annual Breakfast with Santa at the Union Station. Meet the Christmas Village Elves, Mr. & Mrs. Claus, watch a magic show and a short cartoon. Receive your annual Christmas bell and toy! After breakfast, join us in the Christmas Village for a train ride and see if you can spy all the hidden Yeti’s in the cottages.

Ogden4arts.org

Utah Symphony Here Comes Santa Claus Monday, December 23 @ 7:00 p.m. Presented by OnStage Ogden. Nothing sets the holiday scene like hearing your wintry favorites performed live by the Utah Symphony. Kids from one to ninety-two will enjoy the musical gifts on stage, with a joyful sing-along closing out the concert. There may even be a special appearance by the jolly man himself! See website for ticket prices. onstageogden.org

Christmas Eve Celebration at Snowbasin Tuesday, December 24 @ 4 p.m. The annual holiday celebration at Snowbasin is packed full of festive fun for the whole family. Get pictures with Santa before he heads out to spread Christmas cheer around the world and enjoy a Christmas Eve torchlight parade and fireworks show on City Hill! See website for full schedule of events. snowbasin.com/events/detail/Christmas-Eve-Celebration Photos courtesy of Ogden Christmas Village Committee, WSU, and visitogden.com

ogdencity.com/714/Breakfast-with-Santa

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S H O P L O C A L F O R T H E H O L I D AY S

@ THE MONARCH

A Wine Cafe and Coffeehouse Enjoy an (indoor) shopping experience in our building where you can savor brunch, bites and beverages at WB's Eatery – then find the perfect gift or treasure at Art Box! Looking for original art? Visit us every First Friday for Open Studio Night from 6–10pm to meet our 40+ artists and makers.

H O L I D AY G I V I N G D R I V E

for more details, please visit:

themonarchogden.com

455 25th St, Ogden @TheMonarchOgden


2020

CRUISE INTO THE NEW YEAR WITH

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MEXICAN-STYLE CRAFT BEERS OGDEN-BASED • INDEPENDENT Now Available in Select Stores! www.Zolupez.com

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December 6

December 14

December 21

Paddy Teglia Live

Fuzion

Michelle Moonshine

7 PM – FREE Harp and Hound

9 PM – $5 Funk ‘n Dive

9 PM – FREE The Yes Hell

Standards & Substandards

Youth Futures Christmas BENEFIT

9 PM – $5 Lighthouse Lounge

7 PM $5 in advance / $10 at door (or $5 with donated item) The Sand Trap

December 7 8th Annual Christmas Disco Kamikazes 8 PM

Hip Hop Organics in Ogden 9 PM – $5 The Sand Trap

December 19 Mark Dee 6 PM – FREE Saddlebag Saloon, Eden

Sunday Funday w/ Nate Cook 12-2 PM – FREE Lighthouse Lounge

Keyvin VanDyke Trio w/ From the Sun 9 PM – $5, Funk ‘n Dive

The Elders

Scott Rogers 6 PM – FREE Slackwater Pub & Pizzeria

December 13

9 PM – $5, Lighthouse Lounge

Pistol Rock (Friday & Saturday) ugly sweater christmas party

7 PM – FREE Harp and Hound

TBA – $10, the monarch

Earthworm & Super Young Adult 9 PM – $5 Funk ‘n Dive

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12-2 PM – FREE Lighthouse Lounge

December 27 Joe McQueen Quartet 8:30 PM – $5 Lighthouse Lounge

Union Blues Band 9 PM – $5 Funk ‘n Dive

December 28 Pick’ee out the Stingers 9 PM – $5 Lighthouse Lounge

Cotes w/ Rytuaal

8:30 PM – FREE, The Horse

Cherry Thomas

9 PM – FREE The Yes Hell

Sunday Funday w/ Christian Scheller

December 20

December 8

DJ Bryson Dearden

December 22

December 21 Panthermilk w/ Painted Roses and Doctor Barber 9 PM – $5 Funk ‘n Dive

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9 PM – $5 Funk ‘n Dive

December 31 NYE Party Featuring DJ Linus Stubbs 9 PM – $5 Funk ‘n Dive


Wasatch Distribution Would like to wish Everyone a safe and happy Holiday Season!

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KEEP OGDEN LOCAL

We Proudly Support

EST 1945

YCC

Family Crisis Center

Call Us Today! 801-621-7955 Graphic Design • Business Cards • Letterheads • Envelopes Statements • Invoices • Carbonless NCR Forms • Fliers Mailers Full-Color Printing • Brochures • Programs • Postcards Newsletters • Presentation Folders • Wedding Invitations Greeting Cards • Books/Booklets • Notepads • Tickets


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The Largest Ski Resort on the Continent is still largely a hidden gem in the ski world By Deann Armes

INDIE OgdeN SPORTS HIGHLIGHT

O

nly locals and the most devout ski-travelers know where to find the best snow and purest skiing and snowboarding experience in the country—where the powder is real and the vast terrain remains untouched. But for the rest of the ski world, the biggest ski resort in North America remains one of the best-kept secrets.

Sitting high in Utah’s champagne powder-cloaked Wasatch Mountains, Powder Mountain preserves the most precious skiing commodities on earth—its fresh powder and raw mountain experience—with a passion that other resorts reserve for packing as many skiers and snowboarders on the slopes as possible.

Powder Mountain has the thing all skiers and snowboarders want—more personal powder. It only relies on natural snow, making it the softest in the state. The beauty of Utah snow is attributed to the Great Salt Lake that absorbs water out of it, resulting in the dry “powder” our mountains are famous for. All of the other major Utah ski resorts use snowmaking to supplement natural snow, a process that adds water to it, creating the possibility of icier snow. You will never have an icy snow day at PowMow!

The result is a true anomaly in the skiing world: No lift line cattle calls. No racing for fresh tracks only to find the mountains skied out in minutes. Its size of 8,464 acres of skiable terrain—larger than Whistler Blackcomb and twice the size of other Utah ski resorts—and the fact that Powder Mountain caps skier and snowboarder numbers each day allows Powder Mountain to offer that exclusive undiscovered feel so coveted in winter sports. It’s the only ski resort where you can explore fresh snow all day long, soaking in the alpine landscape

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Powder Mountain: Quick Facts • 8,464 acres of skiable terrain (the most of any ski resort in the United States) • Nine ski lifts • 154 runs • Cap on lift tickets to preserve uncrowded slopes • Ski-in, ski-out lift access from each lot • Directly connected to 30 miles of hiking and biking trails • Adjacent to a future village that will have pedestrian access to shops and restaurants • Access to heli-skiing and cat skiing • Complimentary two-hour tour of resort offered to each skier and rider • Over 500 inches of annual snowfall. 100% natural snow. Never ice at #PowMow! • Night skiing • Less expensive than other major ski resorts

in near-solitude even on sold-out weekends—the average ratio is three acres per skier, or snowboarder! Powder Mountain is truly unique in securing the feeling of laid-back isolation on the slopes any day of the week, a distinguishing quality largely due to its independence. Powder Mountain is the only major ski resort in Utah that isn’t under one of the larger conglomerates, Alterra or Vail, or partnered with multi-resort season passes, like Epic and Ikon. While these partnerships are great for Utah tourism in attracting skiers and snowboarders from all over the world, it also means overpopulated slopes. At Powder, you can also be whisked by helicopter or snowcat to quiet Wasatch peaks for a truly off-thegrid experience. Included with a lift pass is shuttle access to Powder Country and Woody's World,

sidecountry consisting of over 1200 off-piste acres to explore. In bounds cat skiing is also available, which not many resorts offer in-bounds cat skiing or such easy accessibility to backcountry powder. This is the place for skiing and snowboarding experiences die-hards travel worldwide for and it’s available right in our own backyard for a fraction of the price. Complimentary tours of Pow Mow’s groomed runs and vast terrain begin at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. daily. Day passes go quick, so purchase them at least a week or two in advance, and don’t delay in grabbing a season pass before they sell out at powdermountain.com Photos courtesy of Ben Moisen and Paul Bundy

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Know Homeless Shelter?

HOW WELL DO YOU

YOUR LOCAL

By Deann Armes

T

he Lantern House—Northern Utah's largest homeless shelter—is being forced to reduce capacity, and respond to public criticism, while facing an influx of people in crisis seeking warmth as winter hits. On July 1 of this year, Lauren Navidomskis walked into her first day as Executive Director of Lantern House to news from the city that the shelter had been exceeding building capacity. An occupancy load had never been issued previously, according to Navidomskis. Describing it as the “worst day of her life,” Navidomskis had to turn one hundred people away to uphold the newly-ordered occupancy limit of 211. It was the first time the co-ed, family-friendly shelter had ever closed their doors to anyone, says Navidomski who had worked within the organization for almost four years before stepping into the executive director role. Navidomskis immediately opened thirty emergency beds that first day and hoped fair weather would remain long enough for a solution to be found. But on a cold, wet night in early September quick action was required. “I decided I’m not turning people away, I am not going to have people freeze on the streets.” Too late to call the city, the health department or community partners after 4:00 p.m. on a Friday, Navidomskis took matters into her own hands. “I understand it’s not safe to pack people into a space they can’t escape from in an emergency. But when the alternative is turning them away onto the street, what do you do?” 2 8

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Navidomskis decided to open the soup kitchen that night, making room for an additional sixty-four beds. Anyone is welcome to access one of these emergency beds, regardless of intoxication level or other substance abuse or mental health issues. A ninety-day, case management intake program is available for anyone wanting further help. The health department approved of the temporary plan to use the kitchen for the additional emergency beds, and since that point they haven’t had to turn away more than three people at night. But, she says, winter is coming. Lantern House is currently working with the building architect and city code to increase occupancy to 280, and their goal is to get through the middle of February when the weather starts to warm up again—but with the recent closure of The Road Home in Salt Lake City, higher demand is inevitable. “[These people] are resilient and survivors. They will find what they need to survive, and right now they’re going to come to Ogden. Of course they’re going to come this way, but I don’t think it’s people in Salt Lake saying ‘just go to Ogden.’” Lantern House communicates daily with Salt Lake resource centers and is doing everything they can to help. Lantern House serves seventeen percent of the total homeless population in Utah. In this year alone they served 2,200 unduplicated people and transitioned 494 people into homes. “We want to provide everything, but we can’t do everything.” Help is needed from other city resources.


They receive $800,000 per year from the State of Utah to help with shelter nights, with a small percentage going to the kitchen rapid rehousing program; $100,000 of annual funding goes to general operational funds; $150,000 in annual federal funding is allocated to programming. The total annual budget is 1.8 million dollars. Grants and individual donors help to bridge that gap but grant funding is competitive, and while they’re grateful for the programming support, unrestricted funds for use on shelter, food, and utilities is urgent. Staffing alone costs $1,000,000 per year. Lantern House employs a total of thirty-four staff, including nine BS-level case managers in the social service field. Four kitchen staff prepare three USDA-compliant meals per day, and it takes twenty-eight volunteers a day to serve meals. Two security staff per night, trauma-informed and trained in CPR, mental health and first aid, help check people in each night. Still, like any facility that provides emergency shelter for people in crisis situations, controversy and criticism are inevitable. To recent claims of Lantern House staff being inhumane, Navidomskis points out that three-hundred people come through their doors every day. “We are doing so much and we can’t make everyone happy.” It only takes one person to spark criticism. “Our staff does a phenomenal job of understanding our clients,” says Navidomskis. “But we can’t let go of policy and procedures in order to make someone happy or we could lose control and not be the kind of facility that people want to support,” says Navidomskis, emphasizing that the priority is always to provide food and a safe place to go. They have a positive working relationship with Ogden Police Department and turn to them for support as needed.

have, we give—sheets, blankets, mats…and everything comes from the community. Not everyone may get a mat but they have a roof over their head.” “I’m a [masters level] social worker. I understand what humanity looks like, but what people don’t see is that we are choosing to keep our doors open. Although it’s not ideal, what would it look like if we weren’t here?” Like homelessness in general, that continues to rise nationally as housing costs spike and employment wages remain stagnant, facilities like Lantern House need more than criticism to initiate change. It will take a shared public responsibility to ensure the success of such a vital community resource.

How You Can Help

Donated items and monetary support for the purchase of needed supplies are critical. In-kind services are also highly encouraged: construction skills, school teachers, business professionals, etc., make a huge difference in clients’ lives. However, the best way to help is to utilize staff to organize your efforts. They know what is needed and how to protect both clients and the public. Please contact Lantern House for guidance and they will be more than happy to assist you in your generous efforts. Contact Shelby Boyce, Volunteer and Community Service Coordinator: sboyce@stannescenter.org or visit stannescenter.org. For quickest response, contact via email or social media.

Problems with the four-year-old building have also generated public reproval. Navidomskis reasserts the fact that three-hundred people are living in it and showering every day. "It's hard to keep the quality of any building undergoing so much usage, especially when there’s a flaw in the system to start." The water system is currently being repaired. Further disapproval over the bathrooms surfaced in a recent local news article, to which Navidosmkis discloses that when the city code enforcement came out, the team decided no children and families will be turned away, making it necessary to use areas that aren’t meant for families with children. But the only other option is the streets. “The goal is to transition people out so we can get more people in,” says Navidosmskis. "Whatever we INDIEOGDE NUTAH.C O M

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2019: A BA N N ER Y EAR F O R It was an exceptional year for O1ARTS! Four major art projects—OWCAP, A Stack of Forms by JP Orquiz, Four|For Freedoms, and UN|REST by Richard Ramos— were displayed in the outdoor exhibition space, O1PLATFORMS, at the top of 25th Street; three new murals were completed outside The Monarch in the first O1WALLS project, and the first large-scale installation “Unmaking Monuments” launched a campaign to raise funds for the construction of the upcoming O1XIBIT space.

O1|PLATFORMS: Four New Exhibits Programming continued this year with four new exhibits at the formerly abandoned lot on the corner of 25th and Adams that O1Platforms turned into a vibrant, outdoor community performance and exhibit space. The projects, designed to spur social commentary of issues we face nationally and here in Ogden, advanced O1ARTS goal to promote the careers of promising local artists through paid exhibition opportunities.

OWCAP Coinciding with the Spike 150 Celebration, OgdenWeber Community Action Partnership utilized the ingenuity and creativity of educators to inspire help from the community in putting together these panels at #O1PLATFORMS that showcased how its mission is similar to Ogden’s railroad history in its inspiration for development and growth. The multimedia project was full of color and multiculturalism with an air of whimsy to represent the young children of Weber County.

Four|For Freedoms This #ArtsWithPurpose was brought to you as an arts organization with a social mission to promote Freedom of Expression. For July and August, O1ARTS partnered with ForFreedoms.org, an international arts project, to bring you the For Freedoms exhibit at #O1PLATFORMS. For Freedoms is a platform for creative civic engagement and discourse, inspired by Norman Rockwell’s paintings depicting Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms. Our partnership with For Freedoms sought to deepen public discussions on civic issues and core values, and to advocate for equality, dialogue, and civic participation. Like For Freedoms, we believe citizenship is defined not by ideology, but by participation.

JP Orquiz: A Stack of Forms In conjunction with #ImmigrantHeritageMonth, O1ARTS presented “A Stack of Forms” by JP Orquiz. In the exhibition, JP explored the anxiety that surrounds the immigration process and how it affects the lives of applicants and their families. The work looked at the daunting amount of forms and documents that are involved in the process of obtaining legal residence in the U.S. filtered through the lens of Orquiz’s experience. The community was called upon to #ARTicipate in JP’s sculpture “Immigrant’s Ladder,” by adding an artifact that embodies their family’s immigration story: “Humanity didn’t start here in Ogden so whether your family came thousands of years ago or this year we all have a story we can share.”

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Richard Ramos UN|REST This sculptural installation examines eight different aspects of the bed as a place or object where and with which human beings engage in activities including, but not limited to sleep. Issues involving social justice, mental health, vulnerability, illness and death are addressed through the lens of common definitions and ideas about what a bed is.


O1|XIBIT Art Installation Preview / Campaign Launch O1|WALLS: Three New Murals The first O1WALLS project—the #ARTicipate Ogden mural program—was designed to bring together the diversity and character of Ogden City, The Monarch, the East Central Neighborhood and the Nine Rails Creative District by displaying the work and creativity of three community-voted local artists. The community was invited to view the artwork at O1Platforms and vote for their favorites to be featured on the seven-foot wall located on the east-facing wall of The Monarch in downtown Ogden, and divided into three sections. The selected artists completed their beautiful murals this summer: “Grow Where You Are” by Emily Munk, “Bees” by Jessica Ritter and “Electric West” by Lindsay Huss. The O1WALLS project aims to make Ogden neighborhoods more attractive, instill a sense of pride, provide employment for local artists in their own field, combat graffiti in neighborhoods, and engage young people in the beautification of their own communities.

“Unmaking Monuments,” the first O1XIBIT project in October, kicked off the fundraising campaign for the construction of the future XIBIT space, scheduled to open in winter 2020, in between WB’s Cafe and Coffeehouse and Art Box at The Monarch. XIBIT will be a unique, flexible space for visual, performing, and digital art, immersive installations, and thought-provoking exhibitions and discussions. For this preview, Wade Kavanaugh, in creative partnership with Stephen Nguyen, both of Maine, joined as O1ARTS’ first Visiting Artist-In-Residence and created a large-scale art installation, which takes its cue from the unique geology of southern Utah’s iconic landforms. O1ARTS is dedicated to programming #ArtsWithPurpose, and the project was intended to call attention to the “tradition of land art in the American West and the natural processes that have shaped Utah’s cultural monuments.” It was also another great opportunity for the community to #ARTicipate. The community was invited to come in and help create the artwork for the piece, and over 50 volunteers helped twist, snake, and weave yards and yards of paper into the final form seen in The Monarch lobby just in time for the Grand Opening. O1ARTS is currently undergoing a national search for a full-time Executive Director. This will be an exciting shift for 2020, as well as the completion and opening of the new O1XIBIT space! If all this gets you excited and you are happy with everything O1ARTS is doing, join our newsletter and consider making a donation at ogdenfirst.org! O1ARTS gives thanks to Weber County RAMP, Puffin Foundation West, Ltd, Utah Division of Arts & Museums, Hostler’s Model Railroad Club, and to the City, County, State and community members for their generous support.

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INDIE OgdeN THEATER GUIDE by Caril Jennings

Looking for a great gift idea this season? A seat in the audience is a great gift to yourself and a loved one this holiday. They’ll be impressed! What about a gift for yourself? Have you wanted to be on stage yourself? Not an actor? What about painting scenery, or building a costume? Do you have unrequited skills? Each theatre listing this month includes audition information. The Ziegfeld, Good Company Theatre, Ogden Musical Theater and Terrace Plaza Playhouse also list opportunities to volunteer on their websites. Working together to get a show up and running is a great way to make friends and build community. Think about it! If you’re looking for a unique experience this holiday season, the Choir and Orchestra Holiday Concert presented by WSU is not a theater event, but it is a very theatrical production in the stained glass-illustrated sanctuary of St. Joseph Church. For the holidays it is usually filled with an unbelievable number of poinsettias. Simple pageantry, beautiful voices, wonderful instruments, and music throughout history, this is a peaceful way to spend some time. Arrive before the 5:30 concert to see the sunset through the stained glass.

Choir and Orchestra Holiday Concert Presented by Weber State University Department of Performing Arts Saint Joseph Church, 514 24th Street, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m., 801-479-2570, Weberstatetickets.com December 2

Ogden Musical Theater Presents “Five Carols For Christmas” by Jim Christian and Ken Plain Last show! In 1954, five best friends named Carol prepare for their annual holiday performance at the local high school on Christmas Eve. No good deed goes unpunished. You will laugh!

Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd, (801) 689-8700, $15-$20, ogdenmusicaltheatre.org Auditions info: Maurie Tarbox, mtarbox@ogdenmusicaltheatre.org

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“Scrooge: A Christmas Carol” Directed by Jacci Florence Join Ebenezer Scrooge as he discovers the meaning of Christmas. This heartwarming musical is the perfect addition to the Christmas season. Don’t be a Scrooge! Get your tickets before it is too late.

Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 East 4700 South, Washington Terrace, 801-393-0070, Adults $15$17/Kids $10-$12, terraceplayhouse.com Audition for “Oliver!”, Saturday, December 14 @ 9 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., terraceplayhouse.com/audition-callbacks

December 13

“A Journey to Broadway” Presented by The Ziegfeld Theater A fundraiser for Northern Utah’s ONLY Professional Music Theater! The Monarch, 455 25th Street, 801-893-6605, $50, 6:30 p.m., themonarchogden.com December 6-23

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“A Fairly Potter Christmas Carol” THE MAGIC RETURNS! For the fifth year (and rewrite) in a row, this heartwarming musical parody, and audience favorite, returns to the stage. Spend a night with your favorite witches and wizards as they learn about the magic of Christmas. It’s a perfect show for the whole family! Written by The Ziegfeld’s own Rick Rea, a prolific musical theater artist with nearly a decade of experience coaching actors, singers and instrumentalists. Along with being a composer/lyricist in the prestigious, Tony-Awardwinning BMI Musical Theatre Writing Workshop, Rick has directed and/or music directed nearly fifty musicals.

The Ziegfeld, 3934 South Washington Blvd, 855-ZIG-ARTS, $17 children and students / $19 adults, theziegfeldtheater.com Auditions: Sister Act, January 7 @ 7 PM, theziegfeldtheater.com/audition *Date and time subject to change Good Company Theatre Auditions Submit your resume and headshot anytime: act@goodcotheatre.com 2404 Wall Avenue, 801-917-4969, goodcotheatre.com


DELIVERING HOLIDAY

NEW YEAR NEW MUSIC:

20/20 WAYS OF SEEING

CHEERS! Find our Roosters’ Cottage on the Amphitheater Plaza of Christmas Village

What better way to mark a new year (and a new decade!) than with brandnew works by four Utah composers, written just for us? We are partnering with SLC’s Salty Cricket Composer’s Collective for this exciting event that explores “ways of seeing” in 2020.

JANUARY 11, 2020 / 6:30 PM UNION GRILL, LOWER LEVEL 315 24th St, Ogden

TICKETS $10 // adult FREE // children under 18 BROWNPAPERTICKETS.COM

SPONSORED BY NEXT ENSEMBLE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

NEXTENSEMBLE.ORG

GIFT CARD - ROOSTERSBREWINGCO.COM

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE A L L

LO C AT I O N S

Stop by and warm up at Roosters with hot-homemade soup after visiting Christmas Village… and don’t forget the stocking-stuffers!

Ogden

253 HISTORIC 25th STREET

Layton

748 W HERITAGE PARK BLVD

B Street Taproom 21+ OGDEN - 2325 B AVE

www.roostersbrewingco.com


Cornel West. Ronan Farrow. David Brooks.

attended operas and symphonies

These are just some of the world-renowned

whenever he could. In 1935,

speakers and influencers of our times who

he returned to Utah to become

have recently visited Weber State University

president of the Browning Arms

as part of the Browning Presents! program.

Company. In 1967 he was awarded

The aim of the Browning Presents! Program

an honorary Doctor of Science

is to bring cultural life and performing arts

degree from Weber State College.

education to Ogden and Northern Utah.

Browning Presents! Is indebted to

A Gift Given, A Legacy Secured

Mr. Browning for his commitment and dedication to sharing the arts

As an industrialist, Val A. Browning made his

with Ogden.

fortune in his family’s firearm business. His

Each season, the program

passion for the arts and education, combined with a generous philanthropic spirit, contributed immensely to the cultural, social and economic development of Utah.

features public performances and educational residencies of artistic excellence in a diverse range of disciplines. The 2019-2020 season

Born in Ogden on Aug. 20, 1895, Browning

has included a visit from world-

loved to play musical instruments. He

renowned Jazz artist, Alicia Olatuja, the Utah

graduated from Ogden High School in 1913;

debut of the Dance Theatre of Harlem and

later studying engineering and law at Cornell

will conclude with New York Times journalist

University. During World War I, he instructed

David Brooks on January 14.

U.S. Army troops on the use of Browning machine guns and automatic rifles. In 1920, he became manager of the Browning Arms factory in Belgium. While in Europe, he


Brooks DAVID

JANUARY 14

Val A. Browning Center | 7:30 p.m. David Brooks has covered business, crime and politics over a long career in journalism. Brooks is an op-ed columnist for The New York Times and a commentator on The PBS Newshour, NPR’s “All Things Considered,” and NBC’s Meet the Press. He is the author of five books including the New York Times bestseller, The Road to Character and his latest, The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life.


INDIE OgdeN

OGDEN BACKCOUNTRY BASICS PRESENTED BY by R. Brandon Long

The solitude of a dawn patrol with close friends in the dead of winter, catching the breaking sun over Ogden Valley, is one of the best ways to celebrate our beautiful backcountry. Whether you’re skinning in-bounds at Snowbasin, going for a longer haul up Cutler Ridge to Ben Lomond, or snowshoeing South Skyline Trail, there are a few safety precautions to be aware of when exploring outdoors this winter. We spoke with Ogden Avalanche’s Kory Davis about why it’s important to check conditions before heading into the backcountry whether on skis, a splitboard, snowshoes, or even trail running below avalanche terrain. “Checking conditions before you head into the backcountry allows you to match what the forecast is telling you with what slopes will be safest to ski, ride, or tour. It helps if you choose a smarter safer route in the backcountry a tool that allows for better decision making.”

Avalanche Resources: Know Before You Go & Avalanche Education • Dec 12, Know Before You Go GEAR:30 7pm • Dec 16, Avalanche Awareness, Slackwater Pub & Pizzeria 7pm • Jan 17-19, AIARE Level 1 Course - Weber Outdoor Program • Jan 20, Avalanche Rescue Band Weber Outdoor Program Ogden Avalanche Website - ogdenavalanche.org Ogden Avalanche Instagram Account - @ogdenavalanche Utah Avalanche Center Website utahavalanchecenter.org Consult your local backcountry touring retailers like GEAR:30, and the Weber Outdoor Program

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Locations: The most popular ski-touring destination for Ogden backcountry seekers is Cutler Ridge, accessed through North Fork Park and the nicely groomed trails of Ogden Nordic. Support Ogden Nordic by dropping some cash into their drop box at the trailhead or buy a season pass. Snowbasin allows uphill traffic before the resort opens each morning. Please read the rules and regs of uphill travel at Snowbasin and abide, for both your safety and the resort’s.

Avalanche Terrain Gear Musts: Beacon - An avalanche transceiver that when properly activated, sends electronic signals from the victim that are received by activated search mode transceivers leading searchers toward the buried person. Shovel - Specific shovels designed for avalanche terrain can be used to assess terrain, dig a snow shelter, and of course, dig out a buried victim. Probe - To pinpoint a buried victim after your transceiver directs you to a targeted area, use a deployable avy probe. Users must practice with beacons, shovels, and probes to ensure efficiency in the event of a burial. Without sufficient practice with your avalanche recovery tools, lost time could result in a recovery versus a rescue scenario.

Extras: • Avalung • Avy Airbag Pack • Snow Science Kit: Notebook, Slope Meter, Folding Magnifying Loupe, Analog Thermometer, Snow Crystal Card, Snow Saw.

Side-country access from both Powder Mountain and Snowbasin offers amazing terrain but each resort is governed by different rules. Snowbasin rests on Forest Service land and when the gates are open for side-country access, it’s legal to give it a go. Just know that you are now in avalanche terrain. Snowbasin’s website explicitly states skiing in CLOSED avalanche areas is against the law and results in a 30-day pass suspension. Powder Mountain is surrounded by private property and it is a violation of Powder Mountain’s Boundary Policy to travel beyond marked area boundaries or ducking any ropes at any time. Break that rule and you’ll find yourself in the loving arms of the Weber County Sheriff’s Department. That said, Powder owns a boatload of terrain and allows uphill travel in designated areas along approved routes. You must have a lift ticket or season pass to ski or ride any Powder Mountain property. See Powder’s website for details. When out and about if you notice a slide or avalanche indicators, snap a photo and forward to Ogden Avalanche or tag @ogdenavalanche in your social post. This will help local forecasters gain perspective on conditions. And when you capture that perfect backcountry pow shot or grand uphill touring image, tag @ogdenadventure and we’ll share the love. Have fun and be safe out there. Photos provided by: Ogden Avalanche / ogdenavalanche.com R. Brandon Long of the Ogden Outdoor Adventure Show Podcast produced by The Banyan Collective: Arts & Adventure podcasting since 2010. Check out thebanyancollective.com for all our shows, including The Ogden Outdoor Adventure Show, Van Sessions, The Nine Rails Arts Podcast, LITerally, and the Leaky Waders Fly Fishing Podcast.

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Cerveza Zรณlupez Fills the Beer Gap with Local Taco-Friendly Brews By Deann Armes

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ZÓLUPEZ HAS ARRIVED! Craft beer lovers in Ogden, your taco finally has a friend. Mexican-style breweries have been nonexistent in Utah until now. Cerveza Zólupez Beer Company—owned and operated by Ogden local Javier Chavez Jr.—is the first to fill the beer gap. Now you can venture past the mass produced Mexican imports and wash down your carne asada with authentic, Mexican-style ales from a brewery that is Latino-owned, local and independent. Zólupez craft cervezas are now available on shelves at local retail stores, bars and restaurants just in time for the holiday season. Javier Chavez, Jr., an attorney who turned passion into a full-time independent business, spent over a decade homebrewing, then took brewing classes at UCLA’s Extension program, while exploring breweries and brewing clubs in California with a mission to fine-tune his craft and fulfill a long-held dream to bring authentic Mexican-style beer to Utah. Inspired by the cerveza artesanal (craft beer) movement in Mexico, he founded Zólupez in 2017. “There wasn’t a Mexican-style craft beer that resonated,” says Chavez Jr., whose childhood was spent on frequent visits to his parents’ homeland of Mexico. While his dad enjoyed imported Mexican lagers, his new generation who loves craft beers were at a loss. “You want something you can identify with,” he says. Then he discovered some of the best craft Mexican breweries in Baja California and Monterrey, Nuevo Leon — the meccas of the craft beer movement in Mexico. It’s not that a Mexican-style lager has never been produced by a local brewery. “We’re unique in that our entire focus is Mexican-style craft beers, not just seasonal. This is our passion,” says Chavez Jr., who uses Mexicoinspired ingredients to flavor each ale with a personal touch of his heritage. Made with family heritage in mind, Chavez Jr. named the beer company Zólupez using a combination of his Mother’s and Father’s hometowns— Zoquite, Guadalupe—and their last name, Chavez.

WHAT MAKES A GOOD MEXICAN-STYLE BEER? 1. Ingredients traditionally used in Mexican culture 2. Every beer has a story; every beer is inspired by personal experiences in Mexico

THREE SIGNATURE ALES Each one has a story, inspired by Chavez Jr.’s personal experiences in Mexico. Balanced and not overbearing, these beers are designed to pair with Mexican food and fiestas!

Amber Ale Ingredients: Cinnamon and cane sugar (piloncillo) A malty, darker beer made with ingredients commonly found in the coffee, chocolate and other traditional beverages of Mexico.

IPA Ingredients: Agave and Lime Peel Balanced hops with fresh lime flavor. On vacations, the Chavez family would drink beers with limes while overlooking the horizon dotted with cactus and agave plants as far as the eye could see.

Golden Ale Ingredients: Mango and Lemon Peel Light, easy-drinking “beach beer.” Reminiscent of the street fruit punch (aguas frescas) of Chavez Jr.’s childhood visits to small Mexico towns. The mango and lemon were his favorites. If you like typical imported Mexican lager beers with a lime you will love this one! “We love being local,” says Chavez Jr., “and we’re very excited to be out in retail.” All three signature beers are now available in the fiesta sampler box at local retail stores. Cans are coming in early Spring for hikes, bike rides, lakes trips and camping. You can also find Zólupez beers on draft at your favorite bars and restaurants in town! Coming soon is a larger brick and mortar brewery with street tacos, food trucks, live music and fresh beers on tap! Zólupez Beer Company expects to break ground next year for the new brewery in Ogden limits. Mariachi, salsa dancing, Mexican food, and home of Zólupez beer! We can’t wait. Zolupez.com Photos courtesy of Desiree Davis

3. Designed to pair with Mexican food, but these beers can also pair with other rich savory foods, like pizzas and BBQ meats. INDIEOGDE NUTAH.C O M

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Holiday wishes. Kallee Genta CLU RICP, Agent 151 Historic 25th Street Ogden, UT 84401 Bus: 801-394-4561 www.kalleegenta.com

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May the magic of the season bring you peace, love and joy. Happy Holidays to an incredible community!

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elements by Ashley Wolthuis

Many people are convinced that the best time to list your home or start looking for your new home is in the spring and early summer. I’m not one of those people. My favorite time to help clients purchase or sell a home in northern Utah is the late fall through the winter, and if homes are priced correctly, the cold time of year can be the hottest time for real estate. Buyers and sellers have a tendency to be more motivated and more serious in the winter. Most people would rather be snuggled up by a fire with a warm drink or hitting the slopes rather than braving the elements to shop for houses. Those who are buying or selling in the winter are typically motivated by necessity. Add motivated buyers and sellers to a decrease in inventory and you have my favorite cold weather combo. If you are thinking of listing your home now rather than waiting for the spring thaw, follow my tips below for your best chances of a sizzling deal.

WINTER LISTING TIPS KEEP IT BRIGHT: I’m pretty sure it’s starting to get dark by noon, at least that’s how it feels lately. Sadly, many people are still going to want to see houses in the evening when they are off work. Up your lighting game and make your home a beacon that stands out amongst dark and dreary listings. Make sure all of your lights work and change your light bulbs for brighter varieties. Put your lights on a timer so you can ensure your lights are on as it starts to get dark and buyers arrive. Add exterior lights to pathways and around your yard, then open up those blinds and show off how your house shines inside and out.

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KEEP IT WARM: You know that huge sense of relief you feel when you walk inside a warm building after being outside in the cold? You want the buyers to feel that when walking in your home. If your house is vacant do not try to keep the bills low by turning down the heat. No one wants to stay and linger in a home that feels like an ice box. Remember, people who hurry their way through a showing rarely come back with an offer. KEEP THE PATH CLEAR: Make sure all snow and ice is removed from the driveway and paths. You want your buyers to have a positive experience, not feel like they are risking their lives to simply enter your house. Buyers are looking for a home to make lasting memories. A bruised tailbone is one memory they’d rather do without. KEEP IT FRESH: With cold weather comes stale interior air. Do your part to limit lingering odors. When listing your house in the winter, take your trash out every single day. Have pets? Vacuum your rugs and carpets every single day. Empty the kitty litter every single day. See the pattern? Odors left for too long tend to linger longer in the winter than in the summer when doors and windows are opened more. Masking odors with candles and room sprays can often just create an unsavory aroma cocktail that no one wants. Save yourself the hassle and eliminate odors before they have a chance to settle in. Ashley Wolthuis is a Realtor with RE/MAX Associates, and the owner of Element Appraisal. Her monthly articles concerning all things real estate will be featured in Indie Ogden Magazine. She can be contacted with questions or suggestions at Ashley@TheElementsOfRealEstate.com


Thousands of you voted, and the results were clear, Ashley Wolthuis is Ogden’s Best Real Estate Agent. If you have any questions or would like to schedule a walk-through Please call or email me at: Ashley@TheElementsOfRealEstate.com

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“Ashley is an incredible resource for anyone thinking of moving to Ogden or wanting to buy or sell a home. She goes above and beyond helping people find their dreams. If there are personal stylists for home buyers, Ashley would be the queen. I have had the pleasure of working with Ashley for both the purchase of my first home and the sale of that home sometime later. Both times I felt like I had a best friend by my side making sure I was protected and taken care of throughout the entire process. An absolute gem to work with, Ashley truly cares for her clients in a way no other realtor can, because at the heart of all she does is her love of Ogden and the community.

Call Ashley at 801-391-8503 to discuss your options for selling or buying real estate in Ogden and the rest of Northern Utah. *listing was active at the creation of this ad.

Call Ashley for pricing and additional information

Mikaela Shafer


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Indie Ogden - December 2019  

We at Indie Ogden would like to wish everyone a safe and happy Holiday Season. We would also like to say thank you for all the support and l...

Indie Ogden - December 2019  

We at Indie Ogden would like to wish everyone a safe and happy Holiday Season. We would also like to say thank you for all the support and l...

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