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Top 10 Things to do in Newcastle NSW The Newcastle metropolitan Region is the second most populated region in the Australian Country. Situated in the mouth of this Hunter River, it’s the predominant city inside the Hunter Region. Famous for the coal, Newcastle is the largest coal exporting bowl in the world. Geologically, the region can be found in the central-eastern region of the Sydney basin. Its abundant shores are connected by Bathers Way, a walk between Merewether Beach and Nobbys Beach. Additionally on the road is your 1880s Fort Scratchley, a historical site and a view for spotting migrating whales. There is plenty to do and see in Newcastle which keeps any visitor on his toes, running short of holiday time. Here you will find details of 10 best places to visit in Newcastle, Australia 2020. This is your chance to plan your trip with this list of best places to visit in Newcastle.

1. Horseshoe Beach Are dogs permitted on Newcastle shores? Horseshoe Beach replies yes. People and dogs possess a piece of the paradise so the shore management makes it possible for puppies and completely grown canines to revolve around here to get a walk or a fast dip. Now you understand where puppies and their doting owners proceed for a day shore walk weekdays and evenings. On the lookout for something to do in Newcastle that you and that your pooch may enjoy? Look no farther than Horseshoe Beach at Newcastle East. This stretch of sand is Newcastle’s only leash-free shore meaning dogs can play and run tight, enjoying a dip in the sea or just a tease about the bushes. It is a wonderful chance to socialise a cooped-up puppy. Here your puppy can operate with the pack, play tug-o-war. With this activity, you can be certain Pup will glow in the car on the road home! Horseshoe Beach is also an excellent spot for kids, the serene water making swimming considerably safer and less daunting, in addition to a fantastic location for a puppy.

2. Newcastle Beach What could be more enticing than the usual Victorian Sea Bath? Newcastle Ocean Baths not just entice swimmers for the interest of dipping, but it also intrigues curious travellers who respect lasting historical landmarks. No wonder sailors and tourists continue to flock any period of the year. Lifeguard Services supplied seven days each week throughout the swimming season. But will that be reason enough to visit a beach? WellNewcastle Beach offers you so much that you will not like to leave the place. There are arrangements for volleyball, kiosks and shaded area for some private dining, and shower facilities. You name it and you will get me here. Sand is heavenly soft here. You can walk and link up with Nobby’s Beach in 15 minutes, by the route of Bather’s way, which will be another exciting and scintillating excursion for you. This beach is very popular amongst surfers since its waters have very smooth waves. So you can either surf yourself or simply watch the spectacle sitting on soft sand of the beach.


3. Merewether Baths Merewether Baths are apparent evidence that Newcastle never hesitates from providing wonderful openings to take care of households, groups, and couples. Situated at the southern portion of the Bather’s Way, this sea bath is famed for its historic and striking structure. If you are wondering if people can swim during winter, ask the Mackerels Winter Swimming Club and you would be fascinated with this particular narrative! The rugged swimmers place ice cubes on this particular pool to ensure it is cold enough for swimming pool. It’s the Greatest Ocean Conservancy complement in the Southern Hemisphere. Lifeguard Services supplied seven days each week throughout the swimming season. Features two large swimming pools, among which one accepts young kids. Change room amenities. Picnic tables and sheltered places available Conveniently closed for cleaning two times per week through swimming season, after weekly during wintertime. Relaxation and enjoyment at a swimming pool by the seashore can only be a dream. Come live the dream here.

4. Glenrock Lagoon As a tiny coastal creek that is thousands of years old, Glenrock Lagoon is a favourite among biking and biking enthusiasts. As you research the simple bush walks, you may spot waterfalls, rivers, and a fantastic collection of creatures and plants — it is just like the ultimate outdoor date for couples and families alike. Biking and walking trails are well-maintained so hikers and physical fitness enthusiasts will enjoy every moment in this hidden jewel. Try out swimming in the lagoon but do not forget to make a powerful mosquito repellent for security. Drawing its catchment out of Flaggy Creek inside the Glenrock State Recreation Area and the Awabakal Nature Reserve, the little lagoon is very shallow. It’s connected with all the Tasman Sea via a tidal station. Aboriginal habitation in the area has been obtained from archaeological findings which have shown campsites and other evidence which confirm the fact that even beyond this area there was aboriginal presence. It is a historic spot for visit, so do not miss it.

5. Newcastle Museum Come rainy times, do not lock yourself or your children within the home — bring them into the wealthy universe of Newcastle Museum. They’ll be thrilled to look at the displays of Tyrannosaurs and Deep Oceans. A trip here’s also a speedy and fantastic way to find out about Newcastle’s most important historical moments. Whichever part of this museum you decide to explore, you’ll discover something genuinely worth considering. The place chosen for the museum was the Honeysuckle Railway Workshops and in front of the State Rail Authority. The Honeysuckle Railway Workshops are exceptional parts of classic railroad architecture. There are 3 buildings recorded with the National Trust: The prior Locomotive Boiler Shop is a good example of Victorian Romanesque Architecture and has been constructed between 1882 — 1887. Initial plans for the construction were changed to match in a massive overhead ‘Craven’ crane, the sole one from the southern hemisphere. The Boiler Shop worked for


42 years before 1929 when the job had been taken over by the new Cardiff Locomotive Workshop. The Wheel Shop today comprises a theatrette readily available for venue hire.

6. King Edward Park Among the treasured green, It’s a massive playground for kids and adults alike who adore rolling on the grass or playing basketball games. Visitors won’t be disappointed with all the magnificent ocean view, shoreline, even Norfolk island which will greet them on the entrance. King Edward Park, situated on York Drive Reserve Road, a sizable public park with a tasteful Victorian rotunda, Norfolk Island pines, a playground for children, a calm backyard that’s ablaze with vibrant colour, and general amenities. There are loads of fantastic tourist spots, large mountains to slip down along with wideopen spaces. The park also offers connections with Newcastle’s past of penal punishments, together with the Bogey Hole in the base of the eastern cliff face. All in all, King Edward Park is a fun-filled park with superb amenities for families and children. It offers so much to do that a day of the excursion at the park would seem insufficient.

7. Christ Church Cathedral We will not disagree with you If you believe that the Christ Church Cathedral is the most amazing example of Victorian Gothic revival structure. Even non-religious visitors find serenity and enjoyment inside this incredibly restored church situated at the top of a mountain. The church architecture is an entire pleasure for architects and non-architects alike. It’s the cathedral church of this Diocese of Newcastle at the Anglican Church of Australia. The building, made by John Horbury Hunt at the Gothic Revival design is located on a mountain in the town’s eastern end from the suburb Named The Hill. The cathedral is located adjacent to Church Street around the southern side, laid on the incline to the north-west and north on its northern border by King Street. You are sure to get enamoured with the ambience, which is soul searching and peaceful, and the design of the building, which is exquisite.

8. Myall Lakes National Park There is always a motive to Stop by this park whatever the year. In Fall, it is not as busy so go now in case you don’t enjoy the audience. Myall Lakes National Park, north of Newcastle offers excellent walking, fishing and kayaking opportunities. You are able to camp out or stay in heritage-listed lodging. Myall Lakes National Park, on the northwest shore not far from Newcastle, features among the State’s largest coastal river systems which provides innumerable opportunities for canoeing and kayaking, fishing and boating. The park also boasts over 40kms of beaches offering a few fantastic swimming and surfing areas. It is possible to go to for a day excursion to enjoy a picnic or barbecue along with a few walking, but it is far better to come for the weekend or even longer to appreciate everything the park has to offer you. There are many great


wineries. Make sure you check out the Grandis; a 76 metre high flooded gum that’s among the tallest trees in the country.

9. Anzac Memorial Walk And Bridge Though it only officially the bridge spans 160 m while the entire walk steps approximately 450m so walking back and forth will raise your fitness level. Health benefits aside, try to pay particular attention to the inscribed loved ones of women and men who served the war (1914-1918) throughout your trip. The statues of those war heroes also provide excellent photo ops. The Walk was closed to people together with the paths being eroded from the coastal climate for quite some time. However, it is now functioning at its full glory and runs parallel to the Museum Walk. The great thing about The Museum Walk is that anybody can get involved with all the arrangement providing secure access to all to soak up the magnificent views. Besides being scenic, the walk provides a fabulous view of Pacific Ocean and Hunter Valley. The walk will evoke nostalgic feelings of the rich past of the Australian war efforts and its veterans. You must witness this glorious past at the Memorial Bridge.

10. Fort Scratchley Shield Newcastle against impending invasion, Fort Scratchley was remodelled since and has been opened to the public as a tradition in 2009. The Australian authorities restored everything as properly as possible so guests and citizens can start to view the past more vividly. Except for your paid tube excursion (that you have to never overlook ), what that you do round the fort is at no cost. Fort Scratchley, a former coastal defence instalment, is currently a museum. It was developed in 1882 to defend the town from a possible Russian attack. Fort Scratchley is located beneath Flagstaff Hill, overlooking the Tasman Sea along with also the Hunter River, less than one km in the Newcastle central business district. It’s obtained from Nobbys Road and is located right between Newcastle and Nobbys shores. Originally constructed as a coastal defence fort, it’s situated in a controlling position, protecting the Hunter River estuary. You must catch this magnificent piece of history on your visit to Newcastle. Visit for more information : https://www.australiaunwrapped.com/top-10-things-todo-in-newcastle-nsw-in-2020/

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Top 10 Things to do in Newcastle NSW  

https://www.australiaunwrapped.com/top-10-things-to-do-in-newcastle-nsw-in-2020/ Australia Unwrapped Top 10 Things to do in Newcastle NSW...

Top 10 Things to do in Newcastle NSW  

https://www.australiaunwrapped.com/top-10-things-to-do-in-newcastle-nsw-in-2020/ Australia Unwrapped Top 10 Things to do in Newcastle NSW...

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