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NOVEMBER ISSUE

2010

SM NOV. ISSUE 2010

SYLVIA PLACHY SCAD LECTURE SERIES BY SHARAE GIBBS

RESURRECTION of JOYCE ELAINE BY DARRELL PEACOCK

ART& DESIGN

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST

KEHINDE WILEY HIGH MUSEUM

BY SHARAE GIBBS

INSIDE!

ALEX FOLZI photography by WENDY JENKINS 1


EDITOR IN CHIEF

MANAGING DIRECTOR FASHION EDITOR

ASSISTANT EDITOR P.R. CONSULTANT

PHOTOGRAPHERS

SHARAE GIBBS

PAMELA GIBBS

DARRELL PEACOCK SIMONE TUBBS TIFFANY ROSS

WENDY JENKINS

BEVERLY HOLDER

CHARLES LAMOUR ARIANNA BIASINI SM NOV. ISSUE 2010

STYLE EDITOR MODELS

ASIYAMI GOLD WEKULOM MARI ELIZABETH FARR TEJA BURNEE

MAKE-UP ARTIST HAIR STYLIST

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

DANIELLE GUILLARD ELICIA MITCHELL IZIEN OBVIAGELE

VICTORIA CAMPBELL ALEXA IDEZ SM INTERNS

DIAMOND SUAVA

ALEXIS ARMSTRONG HILLSMAN JULIUS ANDREWS EVANS SPECIAL THANKS

FASHION DESIGNERS

TIFFANY TEAGUE HORTON AMANDA SOEDER

SUSAN SCHNEDEKER

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Maribeth Elizabeth Farr wears a creame colored dress with an embroidered sleeve by Samantha Schnedeker Photograph by Wendy Jenkins Stylist Asiyami Gold Makeup Danielle Guillard Hair Elicia Mitchell Director Sharae Gibbs


Sylvia Plachy Lecture

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Inspired Looks For November Issue Asiyami’s Closet

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Alex Folzi Briefcases & Trunks

Kehinde Wiley Contemporary Artists The High Museum

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Resurrection of Joyce Elaine

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Fashion Advice Darrell Peacock Upcoming Exhibitions

THIS ISSUE WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE WITHOUT THE HELP OF: SHARAE MAGAZINE’S NYC TEAM, LAURA HOLDER-GIBBS, KIM GIBBS, KYIA LATIESE BISH, YSERDIA CORNISH, WENDY JENKINS, TIFFANY TEAGUE HORTON, SCAD’S FASHION DEPT., REMINISCE MODELS, NEW YORK DRESS.COM, THE WOODRUFF ARTS CENTER, & THE HIGH MUSEUM

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SYLVIA PLACHY

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By Sharae Gibbs

Award-winning writer and photographer Sylvia Plachy visited SCAD for the Artist Lecture Series this evening. Some of her essays and portraits have appeared in New York Times Magazine, The Village Voice, The New Yorker, Granta, Artforum, Fortune, and other publications. Her book “Self Portrait with Cows Going Home” is a personal history of Central Europe with photographs. She is also the mother of Academy Award-winning actor Adrien Brody. She began with photographs taken during the Hungarian Revolution. Her parents were too afraid for her to grow up during Stalin’s reign so she left Hungary at the age of thirteen. This photograph triggers a memory of her entire family lying flat on the ground in hiding to escape Hungary. Her photography reflects glimpses of her life that she captured. I recognized the portrait of her son in the movie, “The Pianist”, taken during their trip to the concentration camps. Many of her 4

memories were tragic, a photograph from the corner where Emmett Till was killed, and in Kuwait during the first Iraqi War. I admire her ability to arrange her photographs to form a visual connection. A professor in the audience noted that a lot of her work was shot in different formats. He posed the question “how do you chose which camera to use?” She responded to this question by stating “every camera has it’s own personality. “ As a young photographer she remembers walking around with six to eight types of cameras some in her waist or even back pocket. She uses panoramic, 33mm, and a Holga camera. She prefers square formats for portraits for solidity and beauty, and Nikons because they have “a warmth to it.” The life of Sylvia Plachy amazes me because she was able to live fully engaged with her environment and fulfilled with the passion for her work .


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“ I’m happiest when I fall into something, when I am the one dancing with people.” – Sylvia Plachy

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KEHINDE WILEY

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by Sharae Gibbs

“Shit this is a lot of people,” began contemporary artist Kehinde Wiley for the High Museum of Arts ‘Conversations with Contemporary Artists Series’. Wiley is known for his large-scale reinterpretations of classical portraits of African American men. He states that these vibrant paintings are a reflection of him, thus everything he does is a self-portrait. Wiley introduces his first slide, the mug shot of a young African American man lying on the ground in Harlem. This fallen paper inspired him; the stark light against the young mans dark features he believes are the essence of portraiture. He refers to this mug shot as “the absence of grace,” and it was this photograph that changed his course of painting at Yale. Some of his early works are of pedestrians from 125th street in Harlem whom he saw as extraordinarily beautiful. These works also focused on black masculinity in which he painted with large Afros. His ideations

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of painting suggest that they should occupy space just as sculpture does. His process includes approaching individuals on the street, and allowing them to choose from his art history books how they would like to be portrayed. This idea of black masculinity can be interpreted by the sperm cells he incorporates in the painting and framework that symbolize a special emotional directness and visual power. The ornate patterns incorporated into these paintings are inspired by the Rococo period. In Wiley’s Rumors of War at Deitch Projects series Equestrian Military portraiture became a vocabulary for honoring powerful men. His fascination with Western European paintings from Rubens, Titian, and Velasquez are also evident in these works. While visiting China, he focused on portraiture during the Mao Zedong period where ultimately a lot of people were lied to. To reflect these hopeful portraits, he began to make his subjects smile

when he returned to streets of Brooklyn. He notes that when these paintings are transformed onto black figures they mean something different. During exhibitions, Wiley would allow his models to attend and speak with the general public about how it felt to be portrayed in his painting. When traveling to West Africa he would ask his subjects to reinterpret statues in Lagos, Nigeria. As a young artist Wiley spoke of having to learn to accurately paint black and brown skin, using dark purple undertones. In his portraits there is a sophistication in the treatment of painting dark skin that you don’t find in other paintings of black art. Some of his most recent works include Legends of Unity: 2010 World Cup: A Puma Collaboration, Black Light in which light symbolizes the presence of God, and Down at Deitch Projects that portray his fascination with the fallen soldier.


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Upper Left: The World Stage Brazil Randerson Romualdo Cordeiro , 2008 48”x 36”. Upper Right: Rumors of War at Deitch Projects Napoleon Leading the Army Over the Alps, 2005. 9”x9” Bottom: Down At Deitch Projects, New York, 2008 132” x 300” Oil on Canvas.

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MARI ELIZABETH FARR INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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photography by Wendy Jenkins

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BEHIND SM NOV. ISSUE 2010

the SCENES

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Left to Right Hair Stylist Elicia Mitchell, Stylist Asiyami Gold Wekulom, Makup Artist Danielle Gulliard, President of Sharae Magazine Sharae Gibbs, Model Mari Elizabeth Farr Photograph by Wendy Jenkins


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WHO IS

SHARAE? Sharae Gibbs founded Sharae Magazine in August of 2010. Sharae is a strong leader and highly motivated individual. She grew up in Queens, New York and was raised by her single parent mother to be a strong and independent black woman. Currently, she attends Savannah College of Art & Design where she majors in Graphic Design. Her immense passion for Art, Design, Fashion, and Photography guided her to begin her own company in which she could utilize her talents as a graphic designer and genuinely love the atmosphere she has created for herself. With her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, and the abundance of love and support from her family and friends there is nothing that dares to stand in this young lady’s way.

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THE RESURRECTION

of

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JOYCE ELAINE by Darrell Peacock

Brooklyn stylist Jade Ford is the owner of Joyce Elaine’s Closet; a vintage clothing business that provides the everyday woman with classic pieces from unforgettable eras. She sits down to speak with our very own Stylist Darrell Peacock in an exclusive interview. DP: Can you please introduce yourself and give us some background information of your work? JF: I’m Jade Ford from Los Angeles, California and I have been in New York for seven years now. I currently reside in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn and I just LOVE living in Brooklyn. I am also the owner of a vintage clothing business that consists of strictly woman’s vintage clothing, shoes, dresses, blouses, blazers, and jewelry. I take clothes of different eras and altar these pieces to make them fashion forward, while still keeping the authenticity of the piece. I hold trunk shows, and do some personal shopping for my new and existing clients. 14


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“ Joyce Elaine’s Closet supplies the everyday woman with classic pieces from unforgettable eras.”  SM NOV. ISSUE 2010

DP: What made you decide to move to the East Coast?

and this is my home now!’”

JF: I’ve always wanted to move to NY since I was a young girl. I would tell my mother all the time and she would get so excited. She encouraged me to always want to do more with my life. Her only stipulation was that I had to excel in school and could not get pregnant. In my eyes those were easy guidelines to follow. I really loved California, but I knew there was something else for me here in NY. I didn’t know what it was, but I knew I would come here to seek what was calling me. I graduated from a junior college in 2003, moved to NY and never looked back. I completed my Undergraduates degree from Long Island University and my Masters degree from Brooklyn College. I have always been determined to stay here even when things got tough. New York really pours so much life into you. It has been a whirlwind of ups and downs but I became a woman here, and discovered the true essence of who I am.

DP: Explain the concept of Joyce Elaine’s Closet and what made you want to begin this venture.

Being here has introduced and exposed me to aspects of life that I would have never been open to if I stayed in California. I always tell people that “California will always be in heart, but NY is where I discovered Jade 16

JF: The concept of Joyce Elaine’s Closet is to supply the everyday woman with classic pieces from unforgettable eras.  In August of 2008, the person I was in a relationship with for about three years decided he wanted to part ways. He was a huge part of my life and I was truly devastated. I was broken and in a dark place for a very long time. Being that I am a private person I didn’t mention it to anyone, not even my family. I was totally lost at the time and I couldn’t eat, and my interaction with people was very limited. I needed some type of release to escape, but nothing could bring me out of my hole. I eventually told my mother, but only gave her limited information. My mother who is my lifeline called me one day and said “Jade, you need to come home.” I don’t normally go back home to California but we both knew it was what I needed. She bought me a


one-way ticket and my life changed the moment I reached home. I was very skinny could see her concern, but she welcomed me and nourished my heart, as only a mother knows how to do. At the time my mother was living with my grandmother who has dementia. I came home and just sat for a few days lost and in a daze. My grandmother’s house is like a gold mine, she has all these amazing antic pieces that I’ve never really noticed or appreciated until this trip home. It was like I had been living in a blur and I could feel my eyes refocusing to view each antic piece in a new light. One afternoon, my mother asked me to grab her blouse out of the closet. I opened the door and it was if I was struck by something. My grandmother had all these amazing vintage clothes stacked and packed in the closet. I had seen these clothes over the years but wouldn’t dare try them on or wear them in today’s times. I asked my mother what she was doing with these clothes and my mother responded “ I dont know what you really see in them, but you can have anything you want!” Right Jade Ford Styling Model Left

I spent hours that first day digging and digging and I wanted more. Every piece took me back to a memory of my grandmother getting dressed and I had a story for almost every piece of her clothing. My heart began to smile and I was laughing again. All I wanted to do was go through everything I saw in sight. I had found my release without even knowing it. I was beginning to discover my, happiness, joy, strength and self worth. I was drowning in my grandmothers past and in that time I was introduced to vintage. Vintage penetrated her timeless essence of longevity into my soul. I began to discover my heart felt passion that had been waiting for me within her closet doors. I remember showing my mother this all black with multi color polka dot dress. I was in awe with it and my mother just kind of looked at it and smiled. I knew she didn’t see the vision just yet. That same day I got it tailored, shortened, brought it home, dressed it up for her, and she was a believer. I think we were both amazed at how it turned out. Its one of favorite dresses because it was the guinea pig. People always stop me when I wear it and ask where I got it from and I just love saying...”Oh it was my grandmothers, she defi17

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nitely had style.” Within that time I knew I had something, but I still wasn’t exactly sure yet. All I knew is that a weight was lifted off my shoulders and the dark cloud was slowly vanishing. I had an amazing new wardrobe, which spoke volumes to me. I mentioned to my mom that “I lived in the vintage capital” but I didn’t really realize it until that moment. After three weeks went by it was time to leave. I was overwhelmed with the things I wanted to do once I got back to New York. I came back with a vengeance; thrusting myself in this empire of creativity, researching everything I could learn about vintage. I began going out to flea markets, thrift stores, Good Wills, garage and estate sales. It was if I was trying to catch up in a world I had completely missed out on.

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With time I began to collect items bit by bit. I felt a connection in what I was doing. I would spend hours at different markets in the city learning and visualizing. Each garment spoke to me and I was able to create a story line that was able to be worn in the streets of New York City. I started to become interested in possibly selling vintage, but was really too afraid at the time. I didnt beleive in myself that I would have the ability to bring my creations to the masses. From time to time I would have people stop me and ask where I got my clothes from or if I was a stylist. I would cringe because I was fighting myself within, questioning if fashion had room for me to flourish in. I began to meet wonderful people, that really saw my vision, and I accepted that I truely belonged. Before jumping and making the commitment I always consulted my mother on everything. Her voice matters; its a powerful blessing in my life that fuels me. Once “ma dukes” laced me with her insight and knowledge Joyce Elaine’s Closet was birthed. I went back and forth with names, but when I finally came up with Joyce Elaine I knew it made a statement. Joyce is my grandmother’s name and Elaine is my mother’s middle name. “Joyce Elaine” pays homage to the two women that aided me out of my dark place and solidified my marriage in this world of wonders.

DP: Where do you get your style inspiration? 18

JF: My style or vision inspiration comes from grandmother’s era. Joyce is in her late 70’s so she has been around for some time now. I’m really into the period of when woman dressed classy and elegant. When women wore long gowns or knee lengths dresses and swing skirts just because. Detailed blouses with pleats, bows and shoulder pads daily. When wearing fur capes, coats and wraps was a necessity. I am inspired by the 1930’s and 1940’s because women sewed there own clothes, and created intricate classic pieces. What spark my interest even more about these eras are the accessories. Every tailored look a woman had, was accessorized with classic fedora’s, wrist and elbow length gloves, broaches, flowers worn as hairpieces, and pearls. I started watching the Turner Classic Movie channel and drew tons of inspiration from black and white films. Women in those movies represent a different type of sex appeal, that’s tasteful. That’s what I definitely strive for when I am out shopping for my clients. Everything I put together is still very fashion forward, but I make sure not to lose touch of the elegance and class that my grandmother has or that of the women from the 30’s and 40’s era.

DP: If you had to pick a past era to live in, what would it be?

JF: It is really hard to just pick one era when each introduced men and women to something new. In these times today nothing is new, just reinvented. I am really drawn to the 1940’s. During this time floral prints were the booming crave and I love floral. Women of that time became more daring and began to raise their hemlines on skirts and dresses to their knees. During this time fabrics were limited due to the war, and women felt liberated to be able to raise the hemlines and not be frowned upon. Silhouettes were exposed elaborate curls and the classic red lipstick was a must. To me the 40’s boomed femininity, opening the doors for other eras to bring something new and refreshing for women. DP: What is next from Joyce Elaine’s Closet? JF:I’m building my business and striving hard to get Joyce Elaine to the top. I give all honor to God that guides me.w I stepped out on my faith, relinquished my fears and now there’s no looking back for me!


Vintage penetrated her timeless essence of longevity into my soul. I began to discover my heart felt passion that had been waiting for me within her closet doors.

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- Jade Ford

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ALEX FOLZI

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by Alexa Idez

THE GREAT LIFE OF CHARLES FABIO AND ALEX FOLZI. - A.K.A THE FAGBURE TWINS. Funny, original, fun-loving, smart and sexy as hell, is it any wonder that we love ‘em to bits? But these rascally twins weren’t always fashionistas, at least not as openly. Growing up in the sedate but fun little city of Benin in Edo State, Nigeria, amidst the love and affection of a rowdy, full, nature loving family, they could never ask for more, indeed, considering the outcome, who could ever ask for more? The only boys of six children, the twins grew up as was expected; rowdy and rough with just the right amount of childish cuteness to allow them always break free of trouble. They had an affinity for the bizarre and dangerous even spontaneous and try as they might, their parents could never curtail them.

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Their passion for fashion, however, was evident even at a very tender age, panting after every item of clothing like a deer after running water, they were always anxious for Christmas clothes even in the middle of spring! They were up for anything that could get them new clothes and everyone knew it. For them, there was never any anxiety over what to wear and when for they had the astonishing ability to combine anything and still look impeccable. They were magnets for anything attractive. By the time they left home to go to boarding school, it was as if they lived, breathed, and even ate fashion in all its ramifications. It was their life, their very existence. For those of us who knew them, fashion had been a part of their lives for so long that we began to take it for granted. Sure we knew they had impeccable taste


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and their fashion sense was out of this world but we never suspected the thrill they felt when in proximity to anything that exuded fashion. Their patience with those without a sense of fashion was admirable, considering, but their patience with those who knew of their lack of it but nevertheless, proceeded to flaunt their outrageous style was practically non-existent. Despite their aversion, they were never stand-offish not to mention snobbish or rude, indeed they were naturally charismatic and people were drawn to them. Usually people who wished to know more. Their way with fashion, their fame, spread far amongst their peers. They stood out in any and every crowd- not necessarily because they were twins or because they were recklessly handsome and possessed effortless confidence and charm but because of their style, their easy grace and their even easier sense of fashion. Thinking on it now, I realize that it had always been there, their passion, in their eagerness to go shopping for clothes whenever they could, for themselves and for others, their readiness with superb fashion tips whenever needed, their bizarre experiments with combined fashion ideas that, somehow, always worked for them even in their predilection for reading fashion magazines and checking out fashion sites on the net. I admit that at the time I had thought of it as rather effeminate of them but by the time people began coming to them for advice on what to wear and how or when to wear it, when random people began stopping them on the street and commenting on their dressing, I was transfixed, proud of them but also a little shocked because these were my brothers, the boys I grew up with, the ones that goofed around in the house like complete dorks and even though no one likes to admit it, nobody ever really knows how any one is going to turn out. It wasn’t long before they began bringing home awards like “Best Dressed” or “Most Fashionable”, they were even voted most likely to become fashion icons! It never occurred to any of us to be jealous. There really was no basis for it because this, their fashion and their style, was theirs and besides, we were too proud of them to be envious! By the end of their senior year in high school, they’d already been branded, THE FASHIONISTAS!

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Alex Folzi, Let our luxury define us...

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DP FASHION for

MEN

by Darrell Peacock

Now accessories are key, yes you are reliving your years, but you are still grown be ahead of the time with a Jack Spade travelers bag. Military boots are a functional piece to complete your This winter is about reliving your youthful years. Show your inner jock with your varsity style cardigan provided by Brooklyn Circus. Pair it with a pair of skinny corduroy from Levi’s Strauss, earth tone so stick to brown and olives.

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To be sturdy and prepare for anything the weather may bring you, pick a pair of Palladium Boots. To be trendy, look out for the one with the Sherlin Inner.

wardrobe with. Dress it up or down with dark color pants or denim, and chunky cardigans or sweaters. Don’t be afraid to ‘DECLARE WAR’ in your closet. 26


Appreciation of Style Month

by Alexis Armstrong-Hillsman

This month is Appreciation of Style month! Ok, so I made this up. That doesn’t mean it shouldn’t exist. People all over the world observe Fashion Week and some small cities like Rochester, New York have tried to formulate their own version. Artist and designer Larry Moss of Rochester, New York had an ‘Airigami’ piece in this years’ Rochester Fashion Week 2010. With so many definitions of style it is easy to make up less than acceptable items of clothing or accessories and call it a hit, but this designer has the creativity of the late Alexander McQueen with a twist.

SHARAE MAGAZINE about

In life we are driven by the passion to achieve our goals. To thrive as a company, we must support the career-minded individual in their pursuit of this goal. To be a successful brand, we must become a network for the upcoming artist, designer, and individual. Sharae Magazine is the metropolis for culture, fashion, and art. The purpose of Sharae Magazine is to create a network for artists and designers. By connecting with the magazine they will gain insight on what is happening in the world of art & design. Our Mission: To nurture the passion to succeed in life To inspire innovative artists and designers To create a network for the career-minded individual Be the Brand Inspire creativity, passion, success, and innovation

September 30, 2010 marked the opening night of Rochester’s Fashion Week. It was not just a chance for local designers to showcase and sell their work together under one roof, it was a charitable event focused on community improvement. 100% of the proceeds raised at the opening night events went to the Center for Youth services helping teen moms find jobs and apartments. Moss’s unusual art has been displayed in 12 countries on four continents. He has done large scale projects as well as exhibits. For more information and pictures visit www.airigami.com

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Sharae Magazine Nov 2010