__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 26

noted

IN OUR SCHOOLS

Forge Great Futures, Durham Technical Community College’s campaign to gain funding to support talent development and economic opportunity for students, exceeded its $5 million goal at the end of June. Hundreds of individuals and organizations contributed, including Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, Walter and Denise Dilts Newton, the A.J. Fletcher Foundation and Bank of America. The campaign began on July 1, 2017, and ended June 30. Durham Technical Community College launched a new mobile health lab with a $1 million grant from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina. The mobile lab will allow students and practitioners to travel to places where care is needed most, and will be used for educational and community service purposes. It will provide free glasses fittings and glasses for children, free dental pre-screenings and health fairs at public elementary schools. The lab will mainly engage with elementary-age children in Durham and Orange counties where transportation poses as a barrier to accessing health services. Jordan High School graduate Clayson Good won the 53rd

N.C. Junior Boys’ Championship for golf on June 26 at Maple Chase Golf and Country Club in Winston-Salem. He will go on to play golf for Queens University of Charlotte. 24

|

durhammag.com

|

August 2020

PHOTO BY CHI BROWN

of Business, increasing enrollment, creating new academic programs, adding new buildings, increasing the school’s operating budget and more. Albert (pictured above) is preceded in death by his wife, Lottie Luck Whiting, who died in 2004. They were married for more than 50 years and had two daughters, Dr. Brooke Whiting and Dr. Lila Ammons.

In June, NCCU added two new bachelor degrees for the 2020-21 academic year: information technology and sports medicine (below). NCCU is the only school in the UNC System offering the Bachelor of Science in Information and Technology with concentrations in cybersecurity and data analytics, which will be offered through its School of Business.

The University of North Carolina Board of Governor’s Historically Minority Serving Institutions Committee announced on June 16 that North Carolina Central University was one of six institutions chosen to receive a $6 million grant for COVID-19 care and research. The opportunity comes through a partnership between the UNC Board of Governors and the N.C. Policy Collaboratory at UNCChapel Hill. NCCU’s $1 million share will be allocated for creating the Advanced Center for COVID-19 Related Disparities to study the economic and public health impact of COVID-19 on underserved communities in the state.

IN OTHER NEWS

In May, the City of Durham was named one of 10 cities and counties to win a national challenge to join Cities & Counties for Fine and Fee Justice, a network to reform unjust fines and fees that’s facilitated by PolicyLink, the City of San Francisco’s Financial Justice Project and the Fines and Fees Justice Center. Durham received $50,000 along with access to technical expertise and guidance, and membership in a cohort of other teams to develop solutions with community input. “I am delighted about this opportunity to work with PolicyLink in a national movement towards equity, as it centers the work on creating and implementing policies to decrease harm and address the role of our fines and fees on the financial health and wellbeing of residents in cities, towns and villages across the country like ours,” says Council Member DeDreana Freeman, who submitted Durham’s application. EczeMama Club, a premium private social

network for moms of kids with eczema, launched on June 30. Created by Durham resident Amy Pruitt (below), the club provides exclusive perks, discounts and resources, which can be accessed via a mobile app or online. Branch Basics, Lil Mixins and Blue Lizard Sunscreen are a few of the companies that offer free products or discount codes to members.

Durham Public Schools

purchased more than 20,000 Chromebooks for the DPS One-to-One Initiative, which will provide each DPS student from kindergarten to 12th grade with a digital learning device for the 2020-21 school year. On June 25, the Durham Public Schools Board of Education unanimously voted to rename the DPS Staff Development Center after Minnie Forte-Brown, a board member since 2004. It will now be called the Minnie

Forte-Brown Center for Staff Development.

The City of Durham launched its updated website on June 25; it includes a refreshed design using the city’s colors, simplified navigation and easy access to top tasks. “We worked hard to ensure this design update kept our users in mind, that the functionality is fairly intuitive and that most users will be able to quickly find the information they’re seeking,” says Beverly Thompson, the city’s public affairs director.

Profile for Shannon Media

Durham Magazine August 2020  

The Best of Durham

Durham Magazine August 2020  

The Best of Durham

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded