Issuu on Google+

Shannon
Lehotsky
 Prof.
Quintal
 August
11,
2009
 Crea=ve
Strategy
&
Principles


Final
Project:

Rebranding
the
iPhone STRENGTHS


WEAKNESSES


Speed
 First
product
released
in
its
 category
 50%
of
iPhone
customers
are
 buying
the
iPhone
as
their
first
 smart
phone.


Cost
per
month
 Customers
may
have
exis=ng
 plans
with
other
service
 carriers
 Poor
service
with
AT&T
–
not
 buying
phone
for
phone
 features
because
of
beTer
 alterna=ve
service
providers


OPPORTUNITIES


THREATS


Simplicity
may
appeal
to
less
 tech‐savvy
adults
 Several
applica=ons
are
 appealing
 25%
of
users
are
using
the
 iPhone
as
a
laptop
 replacement
 50%
of
iPhone
users
are
under
 30
years
old


Blackberry
planning
business
 features
 Possible
percep=on
that
 iPhone
is
an
unnecessary
 luxury



Compe==on
 Palm
Pre:

The
Palm
Pre
was
released
on
June
6th,
2009
with
the
 carrier
Sprint.

It
entered
the
market
in
the
Smartphone
 category,
making
it
a
compe=tor
to
the
iPhone.


Their
main
 func=ons
are
the
same
as
the
iPhone:

mobile
Internet,
music
 storage
and
player,
and
of
course
–
a
phone.

Many
of
their
 features
are
similar
to
the
iPhone,
including
applica=ons
to
 download,
e‐mail,
GPS,
photos,
search,
and
the
ability
to
sync
 calendars
and
informa=on
with
your
computer.

They
have
also
 announced
plans
to
be
sold
under
the
Verizon
service
carrier
in
 2010.
 •  
 Some
of
the
differences
from
the
iPhone
include
its
QWERTY
 keyboard
that
you
can
access
from
sliding
up
the
phone.





 •  
 Their
current
campaign
strategy
includes
the
tagline
“now
 network”
which
emphasizes
that
the
phone
gives
you
 informa=on
in
“real
=me.”

Because
of
this
feature,
you
can
use
 the
Palm
Pre
during
your
busy
day
and
your
phone
will
not
only
 be
able
to
keep
up,
but
it
will
be
ahead
of
you.

 (www.palm.com).


 •  

 •  BlackBerry:

There
are
several
versions
of
the
Blackberry
phone,
 which
was
originally
released
in
1999
as
a
pager.

Ini=ally,
the
 primary
func=on
for
the
BlackBerry
was
to
provide
mobile
e‐ mail.

However,
now
the
features
of
this
Smartphone
include
e‐ mail,
Internet
connec=on,
photos,
search,
calendars,
and
 mobile‐to‐mobile
messaging.



 •  
 Some
of
the
differences
from
the
phone
include
the
QWERTY
 keyboard
and
the
scroll
ball
in
the
center.

They
do
not
provide
 as
many
applica=ons
as
the
iPhone,
and
because
they
are
 developed
internally,
there
are
not
as
many
compared
to
the
 iPhone
applica=on
choices.

However,
because
they
have
been
 providing
mobile
e‐mail
services
for
some
many
years,
their
e‐ mail
service
is
very
high
quality.
 • 


Strategy
Statement
 Document:
 • 

Key
Marke)ng
Fact:

The
iPhone
is
not
a
product
that
 consumers
need.

They
buy
iPhones
as
a
luxury
item.




• 

Key
Marke)ng
Problem:

The
iPhone
emphasizes
in
their
 commercials
frivolous
applica=ons
and
features
that
may
 not
be
perceived
as
worth
the
cost.

The
iPhone
is
perceived
 favorably,
but
not
something
that
the
target
really
needs
to
 have
(and
sacrifice
other
things
in
order
to
afford
one).






• 

Target:
18‐24
year
old
college
students
and
25‐45
business
 professionals,
male
and
female,
in
the
United
States


• 

Current
Percep)ons:
The
iPhone
is
perceived
as
hip
and
cool,
 with
its
sleek
design
and
posi=ve
reputa=on.

However,
the
 cost
of
having
an
iPhone
and
the
poor
service
provided
from
 AT&T
deters
customers
from
buying
the
iPhone
as
a
need
(if
 they
need
a
quality
phone,
there
are
cheaper,
more
reliable
 cell
phones
and
plans
available).

Having
an
iPhone
is
a
 symbol
of
status
–
you
don’t
need
to
have
the
applica=ons
 that
the
iPhone
provides,
but
people
can
afford
them
see
it
 as
a
need
once
they
become
accustomed
to
having
one.






• 

Universal
Brand
Truth:
The
iPhone
is
a
luxury
item
that
 provides
entertainment
and
useful
tools
to
its
user.





Strategic
Plalorm:


 1.
Name:

“iPhone
is
All
You
Need”
 2.

Why
it
works:

 
The
iPhone
has
several
features
that
set
them
apart
from
other
brands
in
the
Smartphone
 category.

Apple’s
recent
marke=ng
efforts
have
highlighted
the
mul=ple
applica=ons
that
 are
designed
exclusively
for
the
iPhone;
however,
this
marke=ng
strategy
will
take
these
 features
and
frame
them
to
show
that
the
iPhone
provides
everything
for
your
 technological
needs
–
mobile
and
sta=onary.

The
iPhone
is
“all
you
need.”


3.
Key
tenets
of
the
Strategy:


 
The
iPhone
is
already
a
category
leader.

Other
products,
such
as
the
Palm
Pre,
are
merely
 imita=ng
the
features
of
the
iPhone.

We
want
to
keep
one
step
ahead
of
the
compe==on
 with
our
branding
strategy:

that
the
iPhone
goes
beyond
mobile
technology
to
fulfill
your
 tasks
that
you
thought
were
not
capable
from
a
mobile
device.


4.

Posi=oning
/
Points
of
Differen=a=on:
 
We
are
staying
ahead
of
the
compe==on
by
comparing
our
features
not
only
to
other
 mobile
devices,
but
also
to
other
technological
and
entertainment
products
that
aren’t
 mobile.

The
iPhone
will
posi=on
itself
as
providing
the
same
quality
services
and
 entertainment
and
a
lower
price
and
collected
into
one
item
that
can
fit
in
your
pocket.





5.

How
to
Redefine
the
Market
/
Category:
 
The
iPhone
is
going
to
break
out
of
the
Smartphone
category
and
break
into
a
new
 category
called:

“Aggregated
Electronics.”

This
will
go
one
step
further
than
Smartphones
 to
emphasize
the
versa=lity
and
the
value
of
having
an
iPhone.




6.

Value
Alignment:
 
We
are
going
to
posi=on
the
iPhone
as
an
investment
that
pays
the
customer
back
in
every
 aspect
of
their
lives.

The
iPhone
is
going
to
give
them
everything
that
they
need
and
more.

 And
on
top
of
the
func=onal
value,
customers
will
aTain
the
favorable
status
of
being
an
 iPhone
owner.




7.

Emo=onal,
Ra=onal,
Rep=lian
Wrappings:
 





People
buy
cars
to
travel
in
a
faster,
easier
way.

When
people
living
in
the
city
buy
 Hummers
aper
hearing
that
they
can
drive
over
a
16‐inch
wall,
it
is
clear
that
one
of
the
 internal
mo=va=onal
factors
is
the
status
symbol.

The
chances
that
we
find
ourselves
 facing
a
16‐inch
barrier
that
we
need
to
get
over
in
the
city
are
slim
to
none.


However,
the
 thought
of
owning
a
product
with
those
capabili=es
and
having
that
power
ourselves
is
a
 value
that
customers
value
inherently.





Strategy
Canvas
/
Curve:

 
New
Product
Category:

“Aggregated
Electronics”





 
Looking
Across
Different
Industries:
 
The
iPod
is
a
rela=vely
expensive
product
and
for
many
customers
 who
don’t
own
one,
a
luxury
item
that
seems
unnecessary.


 
The
iPhone’s
unmistakable
design
makes
you
immediately
recognize
 the
product
and
then
make
a
judgments
about
the
owner
based
on
 this
ownership.


 
iPhones
are
s=ll
func=onal
products.

Similar
products
that
offer
the
 same
value
–
claiming
a
status
of
power,
importance
and
wealth
 while
s=ll
providing
some
valuable
func=on
‐
include
cars
and
 clothes.



 
Consumers
may
jus=fy
their
more
expensive
purchases
with
 func=onal
reasons;
however,
many
people
are
buying
them
because
 of
the
way
the
product
makes
them
feel.

If
it
makes
them
feel
more
 powerful
and
wealthy,
then
they
will
buy
a
product
to
display
that
 and
reflect
those
feelings.

 


 
Look
across
Strategic
Groups
within
Industries
–
What
Makes
 Consumers
Trade
Up
or
Down:


 
Many
iPhone
customers
upgrade
their
phones
once
a
newer
model
 is
released
 
The
percep=on
that
Apple
products
are
“cooler”
than
other
brands
 
Innovators
who
want
to
be
the
first
to
own
the
newest
technology
 
Many
Apple
customers
are
very
brand
loyal



Look
Across
Chain
of
Buyers:
 


 
Purchasers:
iPhones
are
available
for
purchase
in
Apple
Stores
and
 AT&T
stores.

There
is
a
possibility
that
they
could
be
sold
in
 discount
retail
stores
such
as
Wal‐Mart,
however,
this
may
decrease
 its
brand
iden=ty
and
it
may
deter
overwhelm
customers
if
they
 don’t
have
credible
personnel
to
help
them
with
their
purchase.


 
Users:

The
iPhone
is
designed
to
be
extremely
user‐friendly.

The
 user
experience
is
a
very
important
feature
for
the
iPhone.
This
 feature
should
s=ll
be
emphasized
in
all
of
the
marke=ng
efforts.
 
Influencers:
The
influencers
for
the
iPhone
would
primarily
be
 current
owners
of
the
phone.

Through
word
of
mouth
 recommenda=ons
from
current
users,
they
generate
interest
in
the
 product.

Also,
Specialists
who
work
in
Apple
stores
are
influencers
 because
they
are
knowledgeable
about
the
product;
however,
 because
they
do
not
earn
a
commission
and
they
don’t
have
any
 benefit
from
you
buying
a
product
from
them,
they
are
a
reliable
 source
for
informa=on.


 
Look
Across
Complimentary
Product
and
Service
Offerings:
 
The
new
strategy
will
create
the
idea
that
your
iPhone
can
do
 everything
that
you
need
it,
just
as
well
as
it
would
if
you
were
 doing
it
on
a
laptop,
credit
card
machine,
voice
recorder,
or
any
 other
feature
that
the
iPhone
provides.

25%
of
iPhone
users
are
 using
it
in
place
of
their
laptops;
that
insight
opens
up
an
 opportunity
for
our
brand
image.

The
iPhone
does
everything,
so
 it’s
all
you
need.


 
Applica=ons
can
be
created
by
anyone
and
offer
services
for
a
 myriad
of
features
–
communicated
by
the
“there’s
an
app
for
that”
 campaign.
 
To
extend
the
message
that
the
iPhone
can
do
everything,
Apple
can
 offer
products
that
help
make
these
tasks
easier.

For
example,
a
 screen
magnifier
or
a
USB
outlet
to
transfer
files.



Look
Across
FuncMonal
and
EmoMonal
Appeals
to
Buyers:





 
Adop=ng
the
mindset
that
the
iPhone
is
all
that
you
need
 will
not
be
enough
to
make
them
clean
out
their
work
or
 home
office
and
replace
it
simply
with
an
iPhone.

This
 expecta=on
is
unrealis=c
and
not
unfavorable
(Apple
wants
 them
to
buy
other
Apple
products).
 
The
brand
image
will
appeal
to
customers
on
an
emo=onal
 level.

The
previous
“there’s
an
app
for
that”
campaign
 described
the
features
and
their
func=ons,
so
this
campaign
 will
appeal
to
the
consumer’s
emo=onal
need
to
have
the
 best
products
that
can
do
what
they
need
from
it
and
more.


 
Looking
Across
Time
–
Current
Trends
that
Assess
Viability
 Over
Time:
 
In
the
future,
it
is
a
possibility
that
a
hand
held
device
is
all
 that
a
person
will
need
for
their
technological
needs.

 However,
that
goal
is
not
even
within
sight,
but
by
aTaching
 this
image
is
keeping
the
iPhone
ahead
of
its
compe=tors.



Four
Square
Framework:
 RAISE REDUCE •  Applications / features that •  Emphasis on mobile or onmimic larger technological the-go features in functions promotions •  The perception that the •  Emphasis that applications iPhone is a need – not just are for fun or unnecessary something you want to have or a luxury •  Apple brand image of simplicity and minimalism

CREATE •  The perception that iPhones are capable of more than must mobile functions •  Applications that are catered to businesses

ELIMINATE


Strategy
Statement:


 
Focus:
The
focus
of
this
campaign
will
be
the
following
 features
of
the
iPhone:
simplicity
/
ease
of
use,
above
 average
func=onality,
and
that
it
is
not
just
for
mobile
or
on‐ the‐go
uses.

This
focus
is
consistent
with
Apple’s
established
 image;
however,
it
is
branching
away
from
compe=tors
who
 are
mimicking
the
iPhone’s
features.
 
Divergence:
We
are
going
to
diverge
from
the
compe==on
 with
our
tagline
and
our
brand
image.

We
want
our
 messaging
to
also
show
that
the
iPhone
is
a
need,
and
not
 just
a
want.

The
tagline,
“all
you
need,”
communicates
that
 having
an
iPhone
is
something
you
cannot
afford
to
not
 have,
because
the
func=ons
are
as
good
as
a
laptop,
a
 calculator,
a
camcorder,
etc.


 
Compelling
Call
to
Ac)on
/
Tagline:

The
tagline
“All
You
 Need”
will
send
the
message
that
the
iPhone
is
the
complete
 package.

The
compe==on
will
try
to
sell
you
something
of
 lesser
quality,
or
possible
several
products
that
combined
 will
perform
at
the
same
quality
(for
a
higher
price
and
less
 convenience).




Posi=oning
Statement:

 The
iPhone
is
all
you
need.






Upda=ng
Brand
Iden=ty
 Map:
 
Target
Audience
Profile
&
Segments
 


 
Male
and
female
college
students,
ages
18‐25

 
Living
in
the
United
States
 
Exis=ng
customers
or
those
buying
iPhone
for���the
first
=me
 
Want
to
have
the
latest
in
technological
products
 
Image
conscious
 
Perceive
Apple
products
and
the
iPhone
to
be
hip
and
cool
 
Value
the
image
of
the
phone
more
than
all
of
its
applica=ons
and
 features
 
Parents
have
extra
income
to
spend
on
phone
bills
 
Brian
is
18
years
old
and
about
to
begin
his
freshman
year
in
college.

 He
already
has
an
Apple
MacBook,
but
he
is
living
off
campus
and
 commu=ng
to
school
this
year
and
doesn’t
want
to
carry
his
 computer
to
class
with
him
because
of
the
chance
that
it
may
break
 or
be
stolen.

He
loves
his
MacBook
and
is
loyal
to
the
Apple
brand,
 and
he
was
intrigued
when
he
saw
the
iPhone
commercials
 displaying
the
various
applica=ons
and
features
of
the
product.



 
He
decided
to
go
to
the
Apple
Store
with
his
parents
during
their
 back
to
school
shopping
trip
to
find
more
informa=on
on
the
 iPhone.

Aper
talking
with
a
specialist,
they
decided
that
the
iPhone
 would
be
a
great
investment
for
them
because
it
had
all
of
the
tools
 that
Brian
would
need
for
his
schoolwork,
as
well
as
entertainment
 for
the
down=me
in
between
classes,
and
he
would
be
able
to
keep
 in
touch
with
his
parents.


 
Aper
the
first
semester
with
his
iPhone,
Brian
is
very
sa=sfied
with
 his
purchase.

He
leaves
his
phone
out
on
his
desk
to
check
the
=me,
 but
also
to
show
everyone
that
he
has
one.

Whenever
possible,
he
 u=lizes
his
applica=ons
and
loves
to
educate
others
about
his
phone.






Business
workers,
ages
25‐45
 
Living
in
the
United
States
 
Exis=ng
customers
or
those
buying
iPhone
for
the
first
=me
 
Ease
of
use
is
very
important
 


 
Maureen
is
a
37‐year‐old
lawyer
living
in
New
York
City.


She
is
also
 the
single
mother
of
a
7‐year‐old
girl,
Carolyn.

Needless
to
say,
her
 life
is
very
busy
and
she
has
trouble
keeping
all
of
her
 responsibili=es
organized.

Aper
leaving
the
house
several
=mes
for
 the
past
three
weeks
and
forgetng
at
least
one
thing
each
day,
she
 decided
it
was
=me
to
get
a
mobile
device.

This
way,
she
would
 leave
the
house
each
day
with
only
that,
her
keys,
briefcase
and
a
 cup
of
coffee.
 
Maureen
bought
an
iPhone
when
it
was
first
released.

Aper
that,
 she
found
herself
using
her
iPhone
for
everyday
tasks
such
as
 messaging
her
friends,
recording
and
sharing
videos
with
her
 daughter,
and
brushing
up
on
the
news
while
she
was
on
the
 subway
going
to
work.

She
also
relied
heavily
on
the
calendar
 feature
and
organiza=onal
tools.
 
Aper
using
the
iPhone
for
about
a
year,
she
immediately
bought
the
 iPhone
3G
when
it
was
released.

The
features
of
the
iPhone
allow
 her
to
save
money
with
the
applica=ons
and
features
included
with
 the
phone,
and
she
also
losses
the
hassle
of
having
to
remember
 separate
items
everyday.

To
her,
the
iPhone
is
a
great
investment
 for
a
valuable
product.






Crea=ve
Brief:


 
Key
Marke)ng
Fact:


 
The
iPhone
is
not
a
product
that
consumers
need.

They
buy
iPhones
 as
a
luxury
item.


 
Key
Marke)ng
Problem:


 


 
The
iPhone
emphasizes
in
their
commercials
frivolous
applica=ons
 and
features
that
may
not
be
perceived
as
worth
the
cost.

The
 iPhone
is
perceived
favorably,
but
not
something
that
the
target
 really
needs
to
have
(and
sacrifice
other
things
in
order
to
afford
 one).




 


 
Audience
Defined:
 




 
Profile
#1
 •  
Male
and
female
college
students,
ages
18‐25

 •  
Living
in
the
United
States
 •  
Exis=ng
customers
or
those
buying
iPhone
for
the
first
=me
 •  
Want
to
have
the
latest
in
technological
products
 •  
Image
conscious
 •  
Perceive
Apple
products
and
the
iPhone
to
be
hip
and
cool
 •  
Value
the
image
of
the
phone
more
than
all
of
its
applica=ons
and
 features
 •  
Parents
have
extra
income
to
spend
on
phone
bills



Brian
is
18
years
old
and
about
to
begin
his
freshman
year
in
 college.

He
already
has
an
Apple
MacBook,
but
he
is
living
off
 campus
and
commu=ng
to
school
this
year
and
doesn’t
want
to
 carry
his
computer
to
class
with
him
because
of
the
chance
that
it
 may
break
or
be
stolen.

He
loves
his
MacBook
and
is
loyal
to
the
 Apple
brand,
and
he
was
intrigued
when
he
saw
the
iPhone
 commercials
displaying
the
various
applica=ons
and
features
of
the
 product.



 
He
decided
to
go
to
the
Apple
Store
with
his
parents
during
their
 back
to
school
shopping
trip
to
find
more
informa=on
on
the
 iPhone.

Aper
talking
with
a
specialist,
they
decided
that
the
iPhone
 would
be
a
great
investment
for
them
because
it
had
all
of
the
tools
 that
Brian
would
need
for
his
schoolwork,
as
well
as
entertainment
 for
the
down=me
in
between
classes,
and
he
would
be
able
to
keep
 in
touch
with
his
parents.

 

 
Aper
the
first
semester
with
his
iPhone,
Brian
is
very
sa=sfied
with
 his
purchase.

He
leaves
his
phone
out
on
his
desk
to
check
the
=me,
 but
also
to
show
everyone
that
he
has
one.

Whenever
possible,
he
 u=lizes
his
applica=ons
and
loves
to
educate
others
about
his
phone.






Profile
#2
 •  •  •  • 

Business
workers,
ages
25‐45
 Living
in
the
United
States
 Exis=ng
customers
or
those
buying
iPhone
for
the
first
=me
 Ease
of
use
is
very
important
 
Maureen
is
a
37‐year‐old
lawyer
living
in
New
York
City.


She
is
also
 the
single
mother
of
a
7‐year‐old
girl,
Carolyn.

Needless
to
say,
her
 life
is
very
busy
and
she
has
trouble
keeping
all
of
her
 responsibili=es
organized.

Aper
leaving
the
house
several
=mes
for
 the
past
three
weeks
and
forgetng
at
least
one
thing
each
day,
she
 decided
it
was
=me
to
get
a
mobile
device.

This
way,
she
would
 leave
the
house
each
day
with
only
that,
her
keys,
briefcase
and
a
 cup
of
coffee.
 
Maureen
bought
an
iPhone
when
it
was
first
released.

Aper
that,
 she
found
herself
using
her
iPhone
for
everyday
tasks
such
as
 messaging
her
friends,
recording
and
sharing
videos
with
her
 daughter,
and
brushing
up
on
the
news
while
she
was
on
the
 subway
going
to
work.

She
also
relied
heavily
on
the
calendar
 feature
and
organiza=onal
tools.
 
Aper
using
the
iPhone
for
about
a
year,
she
immediately
bought
the
 iPhone
3G
when
it
was
released.

The
features
of
the
iPhone
allow
 her
to
save
money
with
the
applica=ons
and
features
included
with
 the
phone,
and
she
also
losses
the
hassle
of
having
to
remember
 separate
items
everyday.

To
her,
the
iPhone
is
a
great
investment
 for
a
valuable
product.



What
do
we
Expect
the
Adver)sing
to
Accomplish?
 
To
ship
the
brand
percep=on
of
the
iPhone
as
an
unnecessary
item
 of
luxury
to
an
item
that
you
need.

We
want
to
promote
the
 features
that
perform
tasks
that
you
need


 
Promise
of
the
Product:


 
The
promise
of
Apple
and
the
iPhone
will
always
be
quality
and
 customer
service.

Now,
we
want
these
two
quali=es
to
be
 considered
a
necessity
for
customers
looking
for
a
Smartphone,
and
 will
therefore
need
to
get
an
iPhone
 
Execu)onal
Considera)ons:
 
Remain
consistent
with
the
iPhone’s
current
commercial
image
 
Angle
the
features
as
something
that
the
consumer
needs
 
Juxtapose
the
user‐friendliness
and
simplicity
with
its
capabili=es

 
Tone:
simple,
minimalis=c,
easy
to
use,
essen=al,
cool,
trendy,
state
 of
the
art
 
Crea)ve
Objec)ves:
 
Ship
the
percep=on
so
that
consumers
perceive
that
the
iPhone
 accomplishes
everything
you
need.
 
Establish
the
iPhone
as
the
premier
and
sole
product
in
the
 Aggregated
Electronics
category.


 


 
Crea)ve
Strategies:
 
Steer
away
from
ads
that
highlight
the
entertainment
value
of
the
 iPhone
 
Compare
values
of
the
iPhone
to
Smartphone
compe==on
but
also
 the
non‐mobile
entertainment
and
office
tools



iPhone Strategy