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SHANNON FAY Architecture Student Portfolio


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Table of Contents Resume/About...............................................................................4 Fall 2015 - Visitor Center...............................................................7 Spring 2016 - A Place to Dwell......................................................8 Spring/Summer 2016 - Guaranty Building Exhibit Model..............9 Fall 2016 - Buffalo Industrial Heritage Museum.........................10 Spring 2017 - Italy Study Abroad Work Collection........................14 Fall 2017 - The Network: Eastern Hills Mall Reuse......................18 Spring 2018 - Compost Research Startup...................................24 Fall 2018/Spring 2019 - Thesis: From Boomer to Bust................30 Paintings & Contact Information.................................................32

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SHANNON FAY Education.

Bachelor of Architecture SUNY College of Technology at Alfred (Alfred State) Concentration: Visual Communication Graduation: May 2019 GPA: 3.9

Skills & Abilities.

Skills Technical writing, photogrammetry, presentation assembly, hand drafting, perspective drawing, model making, lasercutter, 3D printing

Programs

Revit

Recap

AutoCAD Dynamo Meshmixer

Photoshop Illustrator Indesign

Sketchup Blender Lumion Rhinoceros

Work Experience.

Bergmann Associates 2 Winners Circle, Albany, NY Durations: Title:

Summer 2018, Winter 2018 Architectural Intern

Tasks:

Company-wide graphic standards development, construction document develop- ment, renderings, office layout/ space planning, materials research, post construction inspection visits

Projects:

Bergmann Albany Office design/relocation, First NY FCU, Bergmann Revit Standards Manual

New York State Office of General Services (OGS) Corning Tower, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY Duration: Title:

Summer 2016, Summer 2017 Design and Construction Group Intern

Tasks:

Field visits, renderings, QC reviews, construction document development

Projects:

Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (various projects), Restoration of the New York State Capitol Building

Writing Center Tutor Alfred State College, Alfred, NY Duration:

4

Fall 2018, Spring 2019


198 Hayes Road Schuylerville, NY 12871 518/316-1758 Shann@nycap.rr.com

Other

Guaranty Building Interpretive Center Model Alfred State College, Alfred, NY Duration: Title: Tasks:

Spring 2016 Technician to Professional Model Maker A group of 12 students assisted David Carli, an Alfred State professor and professional model maker, in the production of a 1/4 inch scale museum quality model of Adler and Sullivan’s Guaranty Building in Buffalo, NY; building documentation, drafting AutoCAD drawings, model prototyping/fabrication in a variety of materials. The model is now displayed in the exhibit on the 1st floor of the Guaranty Building.

Study Abroad Spring 2017, Sorrento Italy at the Sant’Anna Institute Tasks:

2D and 3D digital documentation, historic/reuse documentation, photogrammetry, point cloud manipulation from drone footage, “digital diamonds”

IAPT 50th Anniversary Conference Attendee at the 2018 International Association of Preservation Technology Conference, held in Buffalo, NY

Member American Institute of Architecture Students Alfred State Architecture Club Preservation League of New York

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What is this?

About Me

Portfolio of student work

My greatest interests in architecture stem from a deep love for and fascination with old buildings. I blame this on the fact that I lived in an Gothic church built in 1871 until I was eight which was converted into two houses by my father and uncle. I also traveled a lot as a kid, having been to forty-two states and ten countries before I was twenty-one years old.

WHO: Shannon Fay ARCHITECTURAL INTERESTS: Historic Preservation Adaptive Reuse Sustainability Universal Design Technical Writing OTHER INTERESTS: Painting Rock Climbing Plant mom Dogs Ice cream Traveling/Exploring 6

Through various experiences such as studying abroad in Italy, attending the 50th annual IAPT conference in Buffalo, NY and having an internship working on restoration projects in the NYS Capitol Building, I discovered that my passion for old buildings could be put to use in the form of adaptive reuse, historic preservation, and sustainability. My goal in the field of architecture can be summed up by helping communities to reuse/ retrofit their existing building stock to better fit their current needs. By doing this we can give old buildings new purpose and life while making them more energy efficient and adaptable to the changing needs of society, in the hopes of creating a more sustainable architectural rhetoric that will hopefully become more widely practiced in the future. We already have existing buildings, so why not use them?


Fall 2015

VISITOR CENTER: Villa di Pollio Felice Project Statement: The ruins of the Roman Villa di Pollio Felice are an informal attraction located on the Bay of Naples just outside the Italian city of Sorrento. The villa is a prime example of the Roman building methods of that age. This project was to create a visitor center for the ruins on a given site located along the small access road that leads to the ruins.

Solution: This region of Italy has culture rooted in fishing, lemon and olive trees, and of course, Italian architecture. The concept for this center is structure, something all three of those things have in common. The structure of a fish informed the layout of the center, while that of a tree informed the intricate columns within the interior of the building. The duomo, a main feature of Italian architecture, is paid homage to by the domes that adorn the roof of the visitor center and act as skylights.

Site Plan 0’

25’

50’

Type:

Commercial, Visitor Center, Gallery

Design Team: Shannon Fay Caitlin Cole

Deliverables:

hand drawings, renderings, structural model, site model

Programs:

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Spring 2016

A PLACE TO DWELL: Polish Inspiration Project Statement:

Solution: This design incorporates various elements of traditional Polish architecture including coining, a tall/skinny rectangular shape, windows with multiple muntins, an arched stone entrance, pronounced brick roof details, and slanted roofs with dormers (incorporated as skylights). The split house style with one generation living downstairs and another upstairs reflects the two level block houses of post WWII Poland that had two families residing in them - one upstairs, one down.

Type:

South Elevation

Burke Parkway

This project was to utilize a three-dimensional, nine square grid to design a dwelling, while drawing inspiration from our family heritage. Therefore, this design drew from Polish vernacular architecture. The clients given were a girl, her mother, and her grandparents.

Dean Street

East Elevation

Residential, Polish vernacular

Design Team: Shannon Fay

Deliverables:

Sections, interior and exterior renderings

Programs:

8

West/East Section

North/South Elevation


Spr/Sum 2016

Guaranty Building Exhibit Model Project Statement: The Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York is a historically significant piece of architecture due to the fact that it was one of the first skyscrapers. This was achieved by using steel frame construction techniques, eliminating the need for load bearing walls. Hodgson Russ LLP, a law firm, now owns the building and created an interpretive center on the first floor of the building to explain its history. A group of Alfred State College students was asked to create a 1/4” scale model of the building for the exhibit, under the guidance of professional model-maker and Alfred State professor, David Carli.

Solution: The majority of the model’s facade consisted of 1/32” thick plywood which was stained, lasercut and etched to represent the intricate terracotta tiles and patterns that adorn the building.

Study Model

Type:

Commercial, Museum, Model making

Design Team: Eryn Cochran Brandon Oddo Nicholas Graziose Colin Davidson Michael Bowman Shannon Fay Chris Platt Josh Greenaker Ryan DeBree Mary Allen Christiana Mehmel Stacy Duink

Deliverables:

On site photo

AutoCAD pattern

Assembled model

My Contributions: • • • •

Building documentation First floor facade detailing in AutoCAD (above) Wood staining Lasercutting/etching pieces

1/4” scale model

Programs:

Lasercutter, modeling by hand

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Fall 2016

Buffalo Industrial Heritage Museum Background Buffalo, NY, located along the historic Erie Canal, was home to the development of many industries during the American Industrial Revolution. These industries include aerospace, train locomotive, grain storage, steel, automobiles and shipping via Lake Erie and the Erie Canal.

Buffalo, NY

Project Design a museum to acknowledge/showcase Buffalo’s industrial heritage on a given site along the Buffalo River.

Solution To transport it’s visitors back to the industrial era, the design of the museum’s exhibits calls for aesthetically recreating the structures within which the industrial products were produced or the services were provided, with an emphasis on industrial materials such as steel, concrete, and brick. The building’s linear layout respects the shape and slope of the site and highlights views such as that of the Buffalo River, an abandoned rail lift bridge, and a grain silo cluster across the river.

Type:

Commercial, Museum

Design Team: Shannon Fay

Deliverables:

iver

10

lo R

Programs:

fa Buf

drawings, renderings, structural model

Site Location


BUFFALO INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE MUSEUM

6

13

5

1

12

4 2 7

3

14 10

Site Plan 0’ 1 2 3 4 5 6

-

15

11

9

100’

8

200’

Entry Road Bus Parking Visitor Parking Staff Parking Overflow Parking Bridge Ruins Display

7 - Shipping/Loading Area 8 - Grain Silo Vista 9 - Plane Display 10 - Front Entrance 11 - Cafe Outdoor Seating

12 13 14 15 16

-

Train Display Abandoned Train Tracks Active Train Tracks Train Viewing Platform Rail Bridge

Bu

ffa

lo

Ri

ve

r 16

26

27

25

24

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24

11

9

B S

21

19

20

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22

22 15

17

14

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11

6

7

C 12

16 J

5

S

3

4

3

8

10

1

Floor Plan 0’

30’

60’

S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

-

General Storage Lobby/Gift Shop Cafe Toilets Coat Closet Mechanical Rm 1 Orientation Large Meeting Rm Large Gallery Small Gallery

A

2

10 - Temporary Gallery 11 - Medium Gallery 12 - Balcony Gallery (above) 13 - Janitor Closet 14 - Mechanical Rm 2 15 - Dirty Workshop 16 - Restoration Rm 17 - Crate/Uncrate 18 - Shipping/Receiving

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

-

Workshop Crate Storage Staff Lounge Toilets Mechanical Rm 3 Staff Office Admin Office Director Office Small Conference Rm

A

Rendering View

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FALL 2016

A

B

C

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BUFFALO INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE MUSEUM

Exterior Perspective

A

B

B A

Key plan

Section A

Section B 13


Spring 2017

STUDY ABROAD

Church Documentation: San Francesco Background

Adaptive reuse is a common term in the field of architecture in the United States, especially with the growing emphasis on sustainability. However, in civilizations in Europe which are significantly older than the U.S., adaptive reuse has been an innate part of life for thousands of years. The Italian peninsula has been populated by various civilizations for centuries and there is much to be learned from the architecture that has been built/reused there.

Project

Thoroughly document in 2D one of the many churches in Sorrento, Italy, via drawings as well as researching the history of the building, and the past and current uses.

Type:

2D documentation Historic Research

Design Team: Shannon Fay Mary Allen Eryn Cochran

Deliverables:

comprehensive 2D documentation, written history

Programs:

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Spring 2017

STUDY ABROAD

Pantheon Digital Recreation Project

The Pantheon in Rome, Italy is a historic piece of architecture. Its concrete, coffered dome was an engineering miracle at the time of construction and continues to amaze architects and laypeople today. For this project, the design team was required to digitally document the Pantheon in 3D.

Solution

The design team used various forms of photography to test/create 3D digital models of the Pantheon via photogrammetry and mesh manipulation. A fly-through animation of the model gives viewers a unique view of the interior of the Pantheonone that is physically impossible to obtain on site.

Photogrammetry Experimentation Various photo taking devices (a DSLR camera, an iphone, & an Osmo) were used to take series of photos from different angles. These collections of photos were experimented with to see which angles, distances, and devices were the most success -ful in creating a 3D digital model via photogrammetry.

Findings The type of camera used had little effect on the models. Overlap of photos is key for registering locations of photos. Repetitive patterns can be tricky to capture, registration marks would have helped. Although we went as early as possible, the amount of people visiting the site interfered with the clarity of the model for the lowest six feet. In the end, pieces from three different models had to be spliced together to create the most complete 3D model.

Type:

3D Digital Documentation

Design Team:

Shannon Fay Colin Davidson

Deliverables:

3D digital model, fly through animation, process documentation

Model 2

Model 1

Programs:

Oculus Model Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v =BRtNh-Osivs&feature=youtu.be Pantheon Full Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v =Ss_2rWVHSlE&feature=youtu.be

Model 3 15


Spring 2017

STUDY ABROAD

Digital Diamonds Project

Italian architecture boasts a plethora of styles each with their own version of intricate detailing. In digital 3D form, capture these architectural gems, or “digital diamonds,” so that they may be preserved and shared with the world.

Diamond: Elephant wall detail Location: Norman-Swabian

Castle, Bari, Italy

Solution

Photogrammetry was once again used for the capturing of these “digital diamonds.” A series of photographs was taken for each object and then Autodesk Recap was used to create 3D digital models of the gems. These models were then sent back to our technician on Alfred State Campus in New York State so that he could 3D print them to share with our architecture department.

Recap model, no photo texture

Type:

3D Digital Documentation

Design Team: Shannon Fay

Deliverables:

3D digital models of architectural details

Programs:

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Diamond: Four-faced balcony Location: Sorrento, Italy

With photo texture


Spring 2017

STUDY ABROAD

Sketches

Naples

Florence

Naples

Sorrento

Ischia

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Fall 2017

The Network: Eastern Hills Mall Reuse Project The Eastern Hills Mall in Clarence, NY is one of many malls across America that were built in the hay day of suburban development in the ‘50s and ‘60s after WWII. Many of these malls are now falling victim to increasing trends toward both urban living and online shopping. Because of this, the Eastern Hills Mall is now considered a “dead mall.” This project called for a redesign of the Eastern Hills Mall site to better reflect and serve the needs of not only its current community, but also its potential future communities as well.

Solution Thirteen students worked as a team to redevelop the site into a lifestyle center, called the Network. The Network is a campus shaped around universal design and technology with a focus on sustainability, creating a community, fully accessible to people of all abilities, that will truly be the first of its kind. It will also provide Clarence with much needed elements that it is currently lacking, such as housing density, public park spaces, and walkable retail, without intruding upon the community that is already established there.

Type:

Clarence Demographics

My Contributions: • Universal design research • Overall site layout collaboration • “The Cloud” design, with partner Colin Davidson • Programed space ratio development, with partner Chris Platt • Phasing plan for initial proposal & future development • Editor of design process book, made by the project team • One of five presenters to Clarence Town Board & public of Clarence

Technology Companies

Urban Design, Lifestyle Center Mall Reuse

CLARENCE

Design Team:

Shannon Fay Mary Allen Colin Davidson Ryan DeBree Christopher Platt Michael Bowman Sean Keurzdoerfer Matthew Doe Daniel Garcia Paige Pensgen Amanda Federico Brandon Oddo Nicholas Graziose

Deliverables:

drawings, renderings, 3D printed model

Programs:

BUFFALO

Sustainability

Universal Design % of Population with Disabilities

CLARENCE 24%

USA 21%

< 65 (no disability) > 65 (assumed has form of disability) < 65 with disability

Clarence Population Age

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THE NETWORK

Phase 1 Residential Office 39,188 sq. ft. Amenity Retail

Phase 2 Residential Office Amenity Retail

184,800 sq. ft.

105,016 sq. ft.

Parking Medical

194,708 sq. ft.

Parking Medical

248,193 sq. ft. 350,000 sq. ft.

Residential

156,000 sq. ft. 193,284 sq. ft. 213,250 sq. ft. 299,186 sq. ft. 155,000 sq. ft. 0 sq. ft.

Phase 3

Phase 4

Residential Office Amenity

43,000 sq. ft.

Residential Office

43,000 sq. ft.

0 sq. ft.

Retail

0 sq. ft.

Amenity Retail

Parking Medical

0 sq. ft.

82,550 sq. ft. 55,692 sq. ft.

Parking Medical

0 sq. ft.

819,597 sq. ft.

0 sq. ft. 75,000 sq. ft. 0 sq. ft.

Office / Tech 1,133,619 sq. ft.

426,800 sq. ft.

Original Mall Outline

Retail 493,894 sq. ft.

Amenity 373,958 sq. Ft.

Network Site Plan Site Includes:

300 units high density residential 300 units of low density residential 1.1 million sqft office/tech space 500,000 sqft retail

Parking 478,193 sq. ft.

Grocery store Community spaces (accessible) 2,250 parking spaces (4 garages & street parking) Small medical facility

Medical

350,000 sq. ft.

REsidential

Office/Tech

Retail

Amenity/Community

Parking

Medical

13%

35%

15%

12%

15%

10%

40% built environment

60% non-built environment

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FALL 2017

se 1 Phase Phase Phase 1 1 1:

Phase 2 2 2:2 Phase Phase Phase

Residential 184,800half sq. ft.184,800of sq. ft. the mall to create Residential Residential Renovate one a . ft. Office 39,188 sq. ft.39,188 sq. ft. Office Office scaled down community in itself with hous105,016 sq. ft. Amenity sq. ft.105,016 sq. ft. Amenity Amenity ing, 105,016 retail, office space, community spaces, 194,708 sq. ft. Retail 194,708 sq. ft.194,708 sq. ft. Retail Retail a recreation248,193building, two parking garages sq. ft. Parking 248,193 sq. ft.248,193 sq. ft. Parking Parking 184,800 sq. ft.

Medical Medical

and a grocery store. anchor stores 350,000Three sq. ft. Medical 350,000 sq. ft.350,000 sq. ft. stay open for revenue generating.

Phase 3 3: 3 3 Phase Phase Phase

sq. ft.156,000 sq. ft. Residential Residentialmall 156,000 Finish renovation. Develop two parks: sq. ft. 193,284 sq. ft.193,284 sq. ft. Office one Office to 193,284 create an inviting presence along 213,250 sq. ft. Amenity Amenity 213,250 sq. ft.213,250 sq. ft. Transit Road, and the other for recreation. 299,186 sq. ft. 299,186 sq. ft.299,186 sq. ft. Retail Retail

43,000 sq. ft. Residential 43,000 sq. ft.43,000 sq. ft. Residential Residential Technology innovation display 82,550 sq. ft. Office 82,550 sq. ft.82,550 sq. ft. Officeoffice Office (more space). Complete 55,692 sq. ft. Amenity Amenity Amenity55,692 sq. ft.55,692 sq. ft.

Parking Parking155,000 sq. ft. 155,000 sq. ft.155,000 sq. ft. 0 sq. ft. ing and construct 3rd 0 sq. ft. 0 sq. ft. Medical Medical

Parking

156,000 sq. ft.

Begin construction of lower density housparking garage.

center, the building of residential space on the site. 0 sq. ft. Retail Retail Retail0 sq. ft.

Medical

0 sq. ft. 0 sq. ft. Parking Parking 0 sq. ft. 0 sq. ft. Medical Medical

0 sq. ft. 0 sq. ft. 0 sq. ft.

Expand campus to north and south Extend automated bus loop

Phase 4 4: Phase Construct â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Cloudâ&#x20AC;? and 4th parking garage. 426,800 sq. ft.sq. ft. dential 426,800 426,800 sq. ft. Residential Residential Residential Office

43,000 sq. ft.

Amenity Retail

0 sq. ft.

Parking Medical

819,597 sq. ft.

0 sq. ft. 75,000 sq. ft. 0 sq. ft.

493,894 sq. ft.sq. ft. ail 493,894 493,894 sq. ft. Retail Retail 20

Extend bike paths to proposed paths within greater Clarence Create new public road from Main St. to residential sector

sq. ft.sq. ft. Office / Tech 1,133,619 1,133,619 sq. ft Office Office / Tech /1,133,619 Tech

Future Development

373,958 sq. Ft.sq. Ft. Amenity 373,958 373,958 sq. Ft. Amenity Amenity


THE NETWORK

“The Cloud” The Cloud is a fully accessible, 800,000 square foot, four floor office building designed to be an innovation and development center for the accessibility departments of technology companies who already have presences in the nearby area such as Yahoo, Alphabet, Amazon and Tesla. The developments could then be tested right on the surrounding campus. The Cloud will feature large, spiraling ramps that encircle four elevators throughout the building, providing a variety of fully accessible jobs within Clarence. The design also includes retail and restaurants on the first floor, a large park in the center courtyard of the building that is open to the public, and a parking garage attached to the Cloud via a tunnel to the third floor.

A

A

4

3 FLOOR 1:

2

A

Retail/restaurants, incubator spaces, courtyard

FLOOR 2: A

A

Private offices, collaborative spaces

A

1

FLOOR 3:

A

Private offices, publicly accessible maker space

FLOOR 4:

A

Private offices

Section “A”

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FALL 2017

Cloud Concept 1. PROGRAM

2. SPACIAL LAYOUT

4. CONNECT

5. ACCESSIBLE

3. SPREAD

Cloud Courtyard

Cloud Aerial View Plaza Outside Cloud 22


THE NETWORK

Public Presentation Four other students from the design team and I presented the project to the Town Board of Clarence in a meeting that was open to the public. Project team and professor at Town Board Presentation

Deliverables: Presentation boards Multiple 3D printed massing models of the site and its context Models of three site street sections 3D fly through animation of the site: https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=sk_aupHoFGU

Design Process Book The design team compiled their research and design processes into a book.

Design Book: https://issuu.com/ shannonfayarchportfolio/docs/network_ design_book

Contents Introduction

Research

1.1 Forward

4

1.2 project brief

5

Analysis

2.1 History Suburbia History of malls Retail trends

8 15 25

2.2 precedents Architectural precedents Crocker Park Redevelopment of dead malls

33 35 49 53

2.3 Universal design Accessibility

71

2.4 Technology Leaders in technology Tech presence in buffalo Technology to consider

83 86 87

2.5 Sustainability Large sites Solar energy daylighting and natural lighting Rain water Grey water reclamation Porous pavement solutions Geothermal heating and cooling Wind energy Urban farming What food can be grown indoors?

89 93 95 96 98 99 100 101 103 106

Design

3.1 CLARENCE History of Clarence Eastern hills mall Proximity to buffalo Context of Clarence

107 109 111 112 113

3.2 The Site Eastern hills mall Existing conditions

119 121

3.3 SITE ANALYSIS Regional analysis Climate analysis Immediate site

123 127 129

3.4 stakeholder

133

1.2 3.5 program

The Network . .

135

Project brief

4.1 Executive Summary

140

4.2 Parti Universal Design TECHNOLOGY SUSTAINABILITY The Network

141 143 145 147

4.3 DESIGN FORM CONCEPT SITE DESIGN CIRCULATION PEDESTRIAN SPINE LANDSCAPING STREET FURNITURE STREETSCAPES PROGRAMMING PHASING PHASE 1 PHASE 2 PHASE 3 PHASE 4 FUTURE DEVELOPMENT MODELS

149 151 153 155 157 158 159 161 163 165 169 172 173 175 177

4.4 EXHIBITION

179

4.5 CONCLUSION

181

Research

2.4

Technology

Leaders in Tech

introduction

There are many aspects of technology that influence our daily lives. When analyzing the Eastern Hills Mall site, there are multiple levels of technology to be analyzed and to take into consideration. For this we must consider leaders in technological building, the increasing tech presence in Buffalo, and technologies that we are starting to see develop, especially those related to helping people with disabilities.

buffalo, ny

This urban design project is based on the idea that the American mall is dying and suburbia as it exists today is unsustainable. Since its birth in the 1950s, suburbia has been referred to as the American dream. It is focused around families owning individual houses surrounded by lush lawns and commuting to work every day via the automobile. For a variety of reasons, including environmental concerns and high costs of living, preferences of lifestyle have shifted from the typical automobile-centered American suburbs toward more pedestrian focused urban environments. This, as well as the rise in accessibility of the internet, has caused malls across America to suffer and enter into a decline as more and more people gravitate toward outward facing stores in walkable environments and online shopping becomes easier and quicker for the consumer. This is creating abandoned or emptying malls that are now being dubbed “dead malls.” The question facing society today is what to do with these spaces now that they are no longer being used.

the region in 1989. The mall was a success for two decades with its peak being in the 1980s. However, in the past two decades it has dwindled to a collection of trinket shops scattered among dying anchor stores. This can be traced back to the development of local competition, an increase in consumer demand for online shopping rather than brick and mortar stores, and the push away from suburbia. Although it is still in operation today, the Eastern Hills Mall is now considered a dead mall.

This project is based on answering that question for the Eastern Hills Mall in Clarence, New York. Clarence is a second ring suburb of the city of Buffalo in Western New York and is located within Erie County. The Eastern Hills Mall was one of the first malls in the county, having opened in 1971, and it was also the largest until another mall was built in

The scope of this project mimics an urban design The libraryscale. houses Xinhua bookstore, project onnew a smaller Theastudents’ task was the Tongling College Library, & the the mall Tongling Public Library. Spaces the library are tailored to peoto turn and its surrounding site intowithin a plecenter of all in abilities and ages. These spacescominclude lecture halls and gallerlifestyle an attempt to create a livable iesthat for respects students,the a children’s zone,economic, listening rooms for audio experiences, munity demographic, and acontext sectionofforthe people are visually impaired. The library is complete and social town who of Clarence and the with places to eat, to shop, and to be entertained and is meant to be a place surrounding region. where people could spend the day. It is located in the suburban outskirts of Tongling. This may seem like a poor location if malls are used as a precedent. Malls are generally located within suburbs and are inaccessible to many people due to lack of public transportation, one of the reasons most malls have failed. However, the city has has provided three public bus lines from downtown Tongling out to the library to provide transport for those living in the city. These bus lines total over a hundred trips per day to the new facility. (Figure 9)

5

While almost every aspect of the facility was designed with technological influence, some features are truly advanced and offer a new level of innovation. The buildings have bathrooms with smart-toilets and sinks in which “…the temperature and water pressure can be controlled via automatic controls” (3). In one of the main lobbies of the campus “you are greeted by a large screen that showcases the recent searches that users make on Google Search. This screen is all about live updates and thus changes happen extremely fast. It can be observed that most of the searches that pop up are related to the general terms that people search for, on a day to day basis” (3).

In addition to the mall, another need of the town of Clarence is an increase in housing density to accommodate the rising demand to move into the town. Clarence could also use more retail as well as more walkable areas. Until now these walkable areas have only been found in the small hamlets that exist within Clarence. All of these factors - the mall and its site, the need for housing, and the lack of walkable areas -made the town of Clarence ideal for the students’ study of urban design.

Facilities that are driven by innovative technology are becoming increasingly popular in North America. With the presence of so many successful technologyrelated companies with headquarters in the United States, it makes sense for these companies to utilize their own technologies in their own campuses as a showcase of innovation. Companies like Google, Amazon, and Apple have been heavily investing in their own technology for the greater wellbeing of human kind and much of their technology can be incorporated into architecture and the built environment to improve people’s daily lives. Google invested in their technology and employees when the company built their “Googleplex” campus in Mountain Valley, California. At the time of its creation, the campus was to serve as an office space for its employees. Google took an unorthodox

83

NEW TONGLING LIBRARY

Architect: Yue-Design Co., LTD

Eastern Hills mall Clarence, NY 6

Google also emphasized sustainability within its campus design. There is a plethora of green space on the campus which under normal circumstances could mean a lot of wasted energy on conventional lawn upkeep. However, Google showed their creativity by

approach to their idea of a workplace with offering amenities to the employees that have never been integrated into an office setting. These amenities consisted of residential spaces, outdoor recreation, a spa, fitness center, cafes, auditoriums, green space, and innovative office spaces. “The reasoning for this was the idea that within the loosely structured university system, there are resources available to allow the individual to conceive, investigate, and execute the impossible—and that is how Google was originally conceived” (1).

“These companies utilize their own technologies in their own campuses as a showcase of innovation.”

Design

It is very important for an innovative company, like Google, to be able to offer their employees a space that respects their own beliefs and visions as a company. Other unusual amenities that Google provided are education opportunities to its employees, “colorful Google Bikes... Google merchandise… Self-driving robotic cars” (2) and wireless internet access across its entire campus, both The streetscape design includes a comprehensive indoor andplan outdoor. that focuses on the future of auto mobility and pedestrians. The plan is integrated with the site for Research the best safety, functionality, and form. The design team divided the streets into three uses based on level of activity, including a main street, shared street, and townhouse street; all of which integrate parking, green buffers, vehicular, and pedestrian circulation. In addition, each of these streets include zero step transitions, promoting pedestrian circulation by maximizing accessibility.

Streetscapes

The goal with all street types on this project was putting The Ono-Sake Warehouse the focusison accessible pedestrian travel of every kind located between including the com- wheeled mobility. Frequent vehicular road mercial and residential crossings and short traveling distances were achieved district in Tsukuba. A citythe street design. To adapt to the scale of the through located in the Ibaraki presite the integration of an autonomous bus system within fecture, in Japan.these Eureka streets makes this site accessible to all. and G architects wanted to go for a minimalistic approach on the exterior and interior features. The warehouse consists of offices, logistics warehousing, shops, and a large storage for liquor. Its designed with a storefront and wide open spacspace Pedestrian Parking Vehicular Vehicular Loading Pedestrian Building es that are visible from theGreenstreet Main Vehicular Road which attracts local visitors and drivers. The spaces are customized to people who have physical disabilities. The interior has very wide halls of comfortable circulation, and an elevator for people who are physical impaired. The structure is made with wood, steel, and The main street can be found along transit road. This street plaster work. The Ono-Sake Warehouse not only invites peois the most segregated in terms of modes of transportation. ple in from around the neighborhood, but it also gets other The street consists of two-way vehicular travel separated by people from urban areas to visit the warehouse. (Figure 10) a median, a buffer zone at the edges that in some instances will be parking, loading zones, or green infrastructure. Finally, the street includes a bike lane and pedestrianAroute. series of massing models were created to show

Models

Analysis

Immediate Site

bon ton retail

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rocky’s sports bar

ONO-SAKE WAREHOUSE

resteraunt

er

mm

su

winter

Macy’s Macy’s

sears

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the overall form of the Network included in the surrounding context of Clarence. The main massing model shows each of the individual buildings included in this design proposal. The new design is highlighted in white while the surrounding context is massed in grey.

Green space

Pedestrian

Shared

Buffer

Pedestrian

Building

Vehicular meets sub spine

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Shared streets The shared streets are found surrounding the residential neighborhood. They are limited access and consist of a one way shared lane, that can be utilized by cars, bikes, wheeled mobility devices, and even people on foot. Either side of the street is lined with flexible lanes that transition between parking, loading, or green infrastructure. There is then a dedicated pedestrian lane on either side of the street.

Building

Green space

Parking

Shared street

Pedestrian

Building

Townhouse Street

Design

Townhouse streets The townhouse streets act very similarly to the shared street , but do not have dedicated pedestrian lane. They are completely shared between vehicles and pedestrians. On a smaller scale, three models were created to represent small sections of the streetscapes to show the relationships between landscape, automobiles, and pedestrian elements.

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Architect: Eureka and G Architects

retail

retail

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retail

NORTH

Apple Incorporated has also been a company involved in utilizing cutting edge technologies into their facilities. In 2013, a new campus was to be constructed as the head-quarters of apple operations in Cupertino, California. The facility is shaped like a giant circle, and often referred to as a spaceship. The “Infinite Loop” facility, designed by the famous architect Norman Foster, includes a section that is devoted to research and development of apple products. Apple, under Steve Jobs’ leadership, was a company very interested in incorporating green design into their facilities through good and

Figure 1

Main streets

Universal Design Technology Sustainability

hiring actual goats to help trim all of the landscaping. Also, as a part of making the lives of the employees easier, the complex features The Growing Connection campaign, napping pods, and slides as a form of circulation from higher floors to lower floors as seen as in Figure 2 (3).

corridor shops Mix

Solar

Existing mall

On site the sun comes from the south year round, with less exposure in the winter months.

In addition to the anchor stores, the mall consists of a TV Station, food court, movie theater, an SPCA and a collection of other shops.

Micro climate

Ground surface Conditions

Large asphalt parking lot and large black rooftop cause excess heat to build up on the site.

Surface water is directed to storm drains and flows under Transit Road or directed to the retention pond on the east side of the site.

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129

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Spring 2018

Compost Research Startup Project Sugar Hill in Almond, NY is an open plot of land ready for development and located across the street from a business incubator facility. In a partnership with the facility, Sugar Hill is to be used for the development of buildings tailored to successfully incubated businesses from across the street. Design a startup building for a business that may develop in Almond, NY, on a given plot of land on Sugar Hill.

Solution The site is located in Alleghany County, NY, which is a predominately agricultural area. The abundance of agriculture makes this an ideal spot for a compost research startup that will benefit the surrounding community. Composting is one of the most sustainable processes in nature. To reflect this, the facility will employ features that reduce energy consumption to make the building as sustainable as possible.

Sugar Hill Site

Type:

Sustainability, Community, Research

Design Team: Shannon Fay

Deliverables:

comprehensive design and documentation, renderings

Programs: Farm Locations 10 mile radius

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COMPOST RESEARCH STARTUP Massing Concept:

Site Plan

1 2 3 4 5

-

Reuse Removed Trees Green House Outdoor Testing Rainwater Collection PV Panels

6 - Ice Pond 7 - Venturi Wind Effect 8 - Bioswales Around Paving 9 - Green Roof 10 - Storage Shed 11 - Paved Area

Ice Pond

Site Section A

Site Section B 25


SPRING 2018 1 2 3 4 5

1 3

2 5 4

-

Vestibule Lobby Toilets Conference Rm Storage

6 7 8 9

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Admin Office Open Office Staff Lounge/Kitchen Balcony/Lounge

6

7

9

8

Accessible Office Furniture

Third Floor

12

16

18

17

10 11 12 13 14

11

15 14

13

10

-

Open Office Area Small Lab Storage Record/Archives Janitor Closet

Second Floor

15 16 17 18

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Toilet Toilet Storage Wet Lab

Accessible Restrooms

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27

20

19 20 21 22 23 24

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Medium Lab Viewing Area Large Lab Storage Mechanical Rm 1 Crating/Uncrating

25 26 27 28 29

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Workshop/Maint. Shipping/Receiving Mechanical Rm 2 Elevator Mechanical Paved Unloading Area

23 22 24

19 25 21

26

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First Floor 26

Accessible Compost Bins


COMPOST RESEARCH STARTUP

2

1

4

3

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SPRING 2018

Details

DETAIL 1: Compost Heat Harvesting

DETAIL 2:

DETAIL 3:

Dry Sprinkler System

Radiant Floor Heating

Section E

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SECTION CUT: Overall Structure


COMPOST RESEARCH STARTUP

Structure

waterproof membrane

Not to scale

See First Floor

See Second Floor

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Fall 2018 - Spring 2019

Thesis

From Boomer to Bust: A study of universal design in building reuse Problem The overarching problem that this thesis addresses is the lack of adaptability in architecture and how this can effect environmental sustainability, the economy and the human factor in our buildings. The human population is constantly changing and with it, its needs. Our architecture must be adaptable to those changing needs if we are to encourage the reuse of our existing building stock rather than perpetuating the tradition of tearing down a functionally obsolete building and creating a new one. To do this we can incorporate universal design principles into our designs. Thus, if anyone could use any building to its highest possible functioning due to universal design, then any building could be adapted to a new use more cheaply in the long run than tearing it down and building new.

Hypothesis If universal design principles can be used in building reuse projects then we can increase the adaptability of our existing building stock, and thus be more sustainable, more cost effective, and more usable for all.

Methodology Type: Senior Housing, Adaptive Reuse, Historic Preservation, Universal Design

Design Team: Shannon Fay

One recent example of population needs changing is the fact that the Baby Boomer generation, the largest in history, is reaching retirement age and, therefore, could soon be in need of senior housing – a lot of it. While we have some senior housing we certainly don’t have enough. However, what we do have, in NYS particularly, are vacant school buildings. As Baby Boomers entered school age many schools were built in the 50s to the 70s to accommodate that load. However, as they left school age, the subsequent generations did not produce enough to fill their void. Thus, may schools across the US are now vacant. This project proposes to take one of those vacant school buildings and convert it into senior housing. This uses two extremes of “need” in society – one of independent, able-bodied young people and one of more dependent, older, potentially disabled persons – to truly test the viability of adapting our existing building stock with universal design.

Site Buffalo Public School #187 at 333 Clinton St, Buffalo, NY

Advisors: Sue Akiyama, RA, MArch - Kerry Traynor, MS, MArch- Valerie Fletcher -

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Professor at Alfred State College; Managing Principal for Akiyama Architects, CA Clinical Associate Professor of Historic Preservation, School of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning at SUNY Buffalo; Founder of kta preservation specialists, Buffalo, NY Executive Directer of the Institute of Human


Buffalo Public School #187

More coming soon! 31


Paintings

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Shann@nycap.rr.com 518/316-1758 198 Hayes Road Schuylerville, NY 12871 33

Profile for Shannon Fay Student Architecture Portfolio

Shannon Fay - Student Portfolio 2019  

Shannon Fay - Student Portfolio 2019  

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