Page 1

A PUBLICATION OF SHANGHAI AMERICAN SCHOOL

FEBRUARY 2013

chun jie kuai le!

Happy Spring Festival!

Sink or swim?

A passion for fashion

learning in Pakistan

A look at Chinese traditions and celebrations at SAS. pp. 12–13

Student engineers are put to the test with their kayak project. pp. 16–17

First grade students strut their stuff on the catwalk. p. 29

A family foundation provides free education to children. pp. 42–43


SAS_Josh_VA.ai 30/10/2012 AM 1:13:23

Thank you PureSmile for fitting your schedule around me and getting me in and out quick. I love my new smile! w sm mile!

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

- Joshua Barnett, SAS Pudong

CMY

K

PURESMILE OFFERS STATE OF THE ART ORTHODONTICS, CHILDREN’S & COSMETIC DENTISTRY

www.puresmile.com

American Dental Association (ADA) accredited dentist

US trained Dental Implant Specialist US Board Certified Orthodontist


VOL 4, NUMBER 5 FEBRUARY 2013

4 5 6

On the cover: Students practice making the dragon dance for the Chinese New Year assembly. Photo by Fredrik Jönsson The Eagle is produced by the SAS Communications Office, based on both the Puxi and Pudong campuses. Information in the magazine is primarily about SAS people and organizations. We encourage parents, students, teachers, and administrators to submit stories and photography. All submissions will be edited for style, length, and tone. Articles and stories from the Eagle also appear on our Eagle Online website, at www.eagleonline.org. The Eagle Production Team Managing Editor: Kathy Vitale Graphic Designers: Fredrik Jönsson and Cindy Wang Advertising Manager: Ji Liu Executive Editor: Steven Lane Production Schedule 2013 March issue: Copy deadline February 4 April issue: Copy deadline March 11 May issue: Copy deadline April 15 June issue: Copy deadline May 20 Pudong campus: Shanghai Executive Community, 1600 Ling Bai Lu, San Jia Gang, Pudong, Shanghai 201201. Tel: 6221-1445. Puxi campus: 258 Jinfeng Lu, Huacao Town, Minghang District, Shanghai 201107. Tel: 6221-1445. Email: eagle@saschina.org

Shanghai American School An

Inte r na ti onal

C o m m u n i t y

Integrity: Learning as/from children Kerry Jacobson

In partnership with parents: Literacy and learning Andy Torris

Understanding (and appreciating) your child's pursuit of identity John Everett

11 12 14 18 23 24

Resolutions: Embarking on a new year with new goals

30 33 34 38 40 49

Let’s ‘face’ it, expressing emotions is such a ‘relief ’

Macrina Wang

Celebrating Chinese New Year Angela Xiao

Science exploration at Chongming Island Coke Smith

What money can buy — a future Robert Li

Girl Scouts’ bake sale a sweet success Isabelle So

Roots and Shoots encourages SAS community to get ‘carbon credits’ Venus Tse, Johnson Moon, and David Yang

Jason Maddock

Fifth grade students place first in Chinese poetry contest Poem Lin

ES Pudong presents ‘It’s a Classic!’ Julie Wild

Give one bag, get two smiles Christy An and Elena Huang

H4H: Making a difference in Bali Josephine Matuschek and Quinn Matuschek

SAS staff competes in Shanghai International Marathon Maria English

Also: Editor's note; Eight women and a book: On a mission towards flourishing; Students raise money, donate to Hurricane Sandy relief efforts; Animal Rescue calendar raises more than 20,000 RMB; Habitat for Humanity: Adopt-A-Brick; Playing for a greener world; Words and art showcased at 2012 SEC competition; Aqua Eagles break records, win 2nd place; Varsity girls’ basketball team eyes upcoming victories; Annual Fund; and Spirit Week photos.


‘Tungstite’ the kayak: sink or swim?

16

for kids by kids: living their dreams

29

The wealth of education

42

By Shane Oh

By Shauna Covell

By Misha Iqbal


Integrity: Learning as/from children BY KERRY JACOBSON, SUPERINTENDENT

D

uring the many months of our strategic planning process — the time when the SAS mission was crafted — many words were considered for inclusion in the mission statement itself. Each word and each concept was discussed for its clarity, directness, and importance. No word was included by chance. One word that gathered much attention was integrity, as in: “Shanghai American School inspires in all students … a commitment to act with integrity …” Integrity is not an easy concept to define, but it is one of those ideas that are evident when you see it. In a dictionary, integrity will include qualities of honesty, moral principles, and being “of good character.” It comes from the same root as the word integrate — both words capture the idea of “wholeness.” Integrity will presume that a person acts with consistency and conscience… in an integrated fashion. To me, integrity has always meant that we do what we say we will do. Perhaps the best way to think about integrity is through the words of others: • “Real integrity is doing the right thing,

knowing that nobody’s going to know whether you did it or not.” – Oprah Winfrey

4

• “A great man is always willing to be

little.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

• “Time is always right to do what is

right.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

• “I am different from George Washington.

I have a higher, grander standard of principle. Washington could not lie. I can, but I won’t.” – Mark Twain

When confronted with difficult dilemmas regarding schools, my father used to advise me: “Kerry, if you make your decisions based on the true needs of children, you will be right.” In many ways, I believe that children are often our best moral compasses, our real leaders when we strive to lead lives of integrity. Some years ago, a story that illustrates the power of children to educate us all about integrity, came from a basketball game. Two rival schools were competing in a hotly contested game with loud and raucous crowds supporting each team. The score seesawed back and forth all the way through the final quarter. As time was about to expire, the home team was behind by one point and one of their players took a final shot. The ball rolled tantalizingly around the rim, fell away, but was tipped in by a teammate. The referees signaled the two points and the home crowd went wild in celebration. The referees quickly looked at the clock and realized that time had

expired sometime during this last sequence. Because of the intense noise of the fans, neither official was able to hear the buzzer that signaled the end of the game. Neither could determine whether the tip-in had occurred during game time or not. The referees approached the scorer’s table, where a somewhat disconcerted 17-year-old high school student operated the clock. Fans from both schools hung over the railings emitting menacing catcalls. The student was enrolled in the home school and his face clearly betrayed the pressure of the moment. However, he clearly and forthrightly, if also hesitantly, stated that the time had expired before the tip-in had occurred. The referees waved off the last shot, giving the victory to the visiting squad. The two intense coaches huddled with the officials, who explained the results, the observations of the student timer, and the final outcome. The referees fully expected a tirade from the hometown coach. Instead, the coach walked to the table, wrapped his arm around the student timer, broke out into a wide smile and said to the referees, “Guys, I’d like to introduce you to my son.” In school, opportunities for the practice of integrity are many: timeliness in projects, honesty in footnoting, assisting a classmate who is struggling, asking for help when needed, holding the door for others, cleaning up one’s own messes in the art room or cafeteria, or sitting by someone new at lunch. Each action that we take that reflects our core values also builds our character and creates integrity within us. Integrity is within ourselves, making us who we are. Integrity grants us the freedom to live our dreams. H. Jackson Brown, Jr., puts it well: “Live so that when your children think of fairness, caring, and integrity, they think of you.”

Mission Shanghai American School inspires in all students: • A lifelong passion for learning • A commitment to act with integrity and compassion • The courage to live their dreams

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


In partnership with parents: Literacy and learning BY Andy Torris, Deputy Superintendent, Pudong campus

I

n the early years of my involvement with SAS, it was drilled into all of our brains that the mission of the school began with the phrase “in partnership with parents.” While the mission statement has changed, the focus and promise of that engagement with our parent partners is no less important. It is why I was intrigued to see the latest research on parent involvement in early literacy. The research has stressed that children need to be given more specific skills while being read to in order to be successful with early literacy. What could this look like in your home? If you have an early reader, like I do, in your home, it is highly important that you — at the very least — read with your child regularly. I would strongly suggest that daily reading with your children would be best, but we also have to be realists, and recognize that we have busy lives. Nonetheless, reading is important, and I would urge you to consider picking up a book with your child and enjoying not only the company, but also the connection a common story can bring to your family. This connection, with family and literacy, will help your child work his or her way through the difficult first steps of reading and writing. Researchers also suggest that parents should also work to focus on specific words as they read. In doing some research for this article I stumbled upon an interesting blog post from Edutopia.org. The authors at Edutopia have suggested some strategies for enhancing literacy for beginning and more experienced readers: • Point to each word on the page as you

read. This beginning literacy strategy will assist children with making print/story/ illustration connections. This skill also helps build a child’s tracking skills from one line of text to the next one.

• Read the title and ask your child to

make a prediction. Beginning and seasoned readers alike need to make predictions before reading a story. This will go a long way to ensuring

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

that a child incorporates previewing and prediction in his or her own reading practices both now and in the future. • Take “picture walks.”

Help your child use the picture clues in most early readers and picture books to tell the story before reading.

• Model fluency while reading, and

bring your own energy and excitement for reading to your child. Both new and seasoned readers struggle with varying pitch, intonation, and proper fluctuations when they read aloud. Older readers will benefit from shared reading (taking turns).

• Ask your child questions after reading

a neural interconnectedness between reading and writing. SAS Reader’s and Writer’s Workshop The school has been involved in the full implementation of the Reader’s and Writer’s workshop model for several years, supported by the principals, vice principals, and literacy coaches along with our talented classroom teachers on both campuses. If you need further help or support for literacy concerns I urge you to contact your child’s classroom teacher.

For more reading tips, go to the Eagle Online: www.eagleonline.org

every book. Reading comprehension is the reason we read — to understand.

• Connect reading and writing if

possible. The connection between reading, writing, and discussion should be incorporated with daily literacy practice. Have a child dictate to a parent who writes in a journal or on a sheet of paper. Modeling the formation of sentences, aligned with the words of a story, is crucial for a child to begin making

PHOTOS by TAYLOR HAYDEN

5


Understanding your child’s pursuit of identity BY John Everett, middle school counselor, Puxi campus

T

eenagers must forge their own identity. They have to; it’s one of their defining roles as teenagers. Gone are the days of immediately identifying themselves with their parents’ thoughts and beliefs. Now, they must examine the values they were raised with and judge for themselves whether or not they are going to keep those values. There’s no way around it — what is often referred to as “teenage rebellion” is a tough pill for most parents to swallow. Believe it or not, though, a little bit of teenage rebellion can actually be a good thing. For adolescents to establish their own identity, they must question the identity they were raised with. Parents can either accept that this is a normal part of human development and work with their children as they develop a sense of autonomy or they can fight to hold on to the control they had over their child when he was younger and more closely tied to the parents’ identity. Parents who choose to fight the developmental changes of their children run the risk of emotionally distancing themselves from their children. To avoid this, parents should work with their adolescents to talk them through their questions and give them clear boundaries in which they can explore. By affirming the need to maintain a caring connection with their child, parents can expect their child to see them as trustworthy partners who will help them without judgment. For many parents, this is easier said than done. When someone begins to forge her own identity, she also begins taking ownership of her own life. This could mean your teenager will start to question your ideas and beliefs, including beliefs about academic achievement, sexuality, 6

career aspirations, or religion. It may seem like an impossible undertaking, but it is possible to actually grow closer to your child as he forges his own identity. Parents often ask counselors for strategies for working with their child during this phase of adolescence. Below are some ways you can help your child transition into a thoughtful, independent thinker. Stay Connected Maintaining a strong, healthy relationship is absolutely the most important step in helping your child with any transition, especially the transition to adulthood. Take the time to understand who your child is at this stage in her life. Try to make choices that connect you with your child instead of pull you away from your child. When we are frustrated, or want someone to change, we often choose one of these negative habits to get what we want: nagging, criticizing, blaming, complaining, threatening, punishing, or rewarding to control behavior. All of these habits do more harm than good by distancing us from those who are important to us. Paradoxically, as your child moves toward independent thought, your child will need you more than ever. Your child will also, most likely, only go to you for support if she feels connected to you. Instead of the negative habits listed above, try these seven ways to connect instead: supporting, encouraging, listening, accepting, trusting, respecting, and negotiating differences. Communicate Your Feelings This transition is almost as hard on the parents as it is on the child. There will be times where you are frustrated; however, if you are staying connected and listening to your child, your child may be more apt to listen to you as you calmly explain why this transition is hard. Question Without Judgment Learn to work with your child. If you encourage your teenager to ask questions and do your best to answer them without judgment, your child will most likely see you as an ally. Your child may question things that you hold dearly. Your child may

choose your values as part of his identity, but ultimately, it will be your child’s choice. Offer Opportunities for Choice within Safe Boundaries Adolescents are starting to think for themselves more than any other time in their lives. They must learn to make choices and accept the consequences. Whenever possible try to allow your child to have a say and make decisions. If your child has a difficult time, you may need to help. You could offer a “forced choice” where you offer two options that you find acceptable and your child decides between them. One word of caution, though — just make sure that the choices you allow your child to make are within boundaries you find acceptable. I think it’s safe to say we all want the children in our community to grow into well-rounded, responsible members of society. In order for this to happen, our children will need to develop the ability to think for themselves. Much to many parents’ chagrin, this often manifests itself through teenage rebellion. Minor instances of rebellion do not have to be negative, however. When parents are there for their children by helping them process these new thoughts and by providing them with safe boundaries, they set their children up for the greatest chance at lifelong success. If you would like to talk about any of the ideas presented in this article, please stop by my office or any other counseling office at SAS.

MIDDLE SCHOOL COUNSELORS PUDONG CAMPUS

Katelyn Regan katelyn.regan@saschina.org Timber Monteith timber.monteith@saschina.org PUXI CAMPUS

John Everett john.everett@saschina.org Karen Kinsella karen.kinsella@saschina.org

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


Editor’s note BY KATHY VITALE, EAGLE, MANAGING EDITOR

We are starting another great year at SAS. To some of us, it began on January 1st, while for others it begins with Spring Festival. No matter how you commemorate the New Year, it is usually a time for a fresh start. Eagle writer Macrina Wang puts our commitments to the test in her article about New Year resolutions (p.11), while Angela Xiao teaches us the rich history behind Chinese

celebrations (pp. 12-13). In this issue you will notice more themes besides 2013. Readers will be inspired by what our students and staff did during their holidays. Misha Iqbal shares with us the touching story about her family’s foundation in Pakistan, alongside teacher Tina Bui (pp. 42-43), while sister team Quinn Matuschek and Josephine Matuschek engage us in their trip to Indonesia (pp. 40-41). It’s not just the trips, but also the clubs on our SAS campuses that are intriguing. From a kayak project by Shane Oh and Peter Wan (pp.16-17) to the Girl

Scouts’ bake sale (p.23) — each of them show us what it means to work hard and reach for our goals. It is refreshing to see even our youngest students getting involved and creating new ideas, like the elementary school fashion show. This is just the beginning of a fantastic year. And with that, come some changes with the Eagle. I’ve enjoyed being the editor for the past few months, but I have to leave the “nest” to pursue another opportunity. It’s been a wonderful experience working at SAS. I’m thankful. It truly is a place where we can live our dreams… and go beyond them.

Board Meeting Dates for 2013 Board Meeting #6: Monday, February 25, 2013 @ 6:30 PM Puxi Campus, New High School Building, First Floor Conference Room A103 Board Meeting #7: Monday, March 25, 2013 @ 6:30 PM Pudong Campus, High School Library Garden Room Board Meeting #8: Monday, April 29, 2013 @ 6:30 PM Puxi Campus, New High School Building, First Floor Conference Room A103

Board Meeting #9: Monday, May 27, 2013 @ 6:30 PM Pudong Campus, High School Library Garden Room Board Meeting #10: Saturday, June 8, 2013 @ 8:00 AM Kerry Center, Jun He Law Offices, 32 F No. 1515 Nanjing W. Road Agendas and minutes of all Board meetings are available through the Parent Portal of Powerschool under SAS BoardPages.

癸 已

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

7


Eight women and a book: On a mission towards flourishing BY Hae Sung Park, SAS parent

D

id you know that positivity can help you become more creative, authentic, resilient, and healthy — and build stronger relationships? Understanding how to cultivate positivity in your life can help you and your children build the best future possible. Eight women — school psychologist Sarah Pearlz, elementary counselor Eileen Knobloch, Korean liaison Kay Huh, and five mothers: Kathy Gavin, Binh Tu, Wei Liu, Wenjen Hwang, and I — are on a mission to share the good news about the benefits of positivity to the Korean, Chinese and English speaking communities at SAS. Equipped with the highly respected book, Positivity, by a world-renowned researcher and leader in the field of positive psychology, Dr. Barbara Fredrickson, and thanks to the book having been translated into Korean and Chinese, we were able to share the benefits through book clubs in our native languages. Equipped with Positivity we were excited, motivated, and fearless to lead our own book clubs last fall because we had no doubts about the benefits — to create our best lives, raise our children based on their strengths rather than their weaknesses, and to build a healthy community. Here are some of the key benefits to a positive life:

strengths are, take a free online survey, developed by Dr. Martin Seligman and Dr. Chris Peterson with support from the Values in Action Institute (go to www.eagleonline.org). Spot strengths in your children and talk to them about their strengths.

Meditation Meditation can change your brain structure by increasing concentration, memory, and positive emotions. It is a practical way to increase openness and openness gives birth to positivity. If meditation isn’t your thing, try breath“Positivity Parenting Book Club” members pictured (front ing techniques, or take a row, left to right): Eileen Knobloch, Wenjen Hwang, Binh Tu, Kathy Gavin, and Hae Sung Park. Second row (left to catnap during the day. Just right): Kay Huh, Wei Liu, and Sarah Pearlz. 15 minutes can reenergize provided by the SAS Yearbook you. If you’re at work, close your eyes for a few minutes Laughter was always necessary, and someor put your head down on your desk. times a tear was too. I was humbled and impressed by the Are you languishing or flourishing? – Korean moms in my group. It’s not easy to Take the positivity ratio and find out. open up and talk about your deepest conYou can discover your positivity ratio by cerns and insecurities especially in a culture taking a two-minute test online (go to the of people that pride themselves on privacy Broadening your mind. Being positive Eagle Online). Taking this test a few times and perfection. They were open, honest, opens our hearts and our minds. We find a week can help you identify and manage funny, smart, and determined to live their creative solutions to problems we face, your positivity ratio. Being aware of your best lives. whereas when we are feeling negative we momentary emotions will reveal opportuWhether you are American, Korean, can’t seem to see even the elephant sitting nities to raise your ratio. Chinese, or any other nationin the middle of the room. ality, we all share many of Improving your health. Now “Your emotions are far from random. They stem the same struggles, joys, and pains. By coming together and there are scientifically proven to a large degree from your daily activities and sharing our stories, listening health benefits to positivity: your entrenched mental habits. The more you and giving each other advice, lower levels of stress hormones, value positivity the more often its upward spiral guided by a highly respected higher levels of growth horbook — we have reached new mones, an enhanced immune will lift you to new heights.” system, and lower inflamma— Barbara Fredrickson heights, but the journey is far from over. tory response to stress. More The mission towards hugs means lower blood flourishing is gaining momentum at SAS, pressure! Living positively with Sarah and Eileen at the helm. We learned a lot from Positivity, but we Teachers have and will continue to focus Knowing your strengths. Knowing also learned a lot from each other, from on character strengths in the classrooms and using your strengths empowers and our council of eight and from the moms in and another book club is in the works. energizes you, whereas trying to get our book clubs. We had a lot of heartfelt More opportunities to come ... through the day based on your weaknesses discussions, and we were honest about our exhausts you. If you’re not sure what your insecurities, fears, hopes, and strengths. 8

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


Shanghai American School August 2013 Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

31

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

30

Mon

July/August

July 31 First Day for New Faculty August 5 First Day for Returning Faculty August 9 New Student Orientation – Puxi August 12 New Student Orientation – Pudong August 13 First Day for Students

October

November

7 Parent Conferences (school in session) 8 Parent Conferences (no school) 15 End of ES and MS Trimester 1 29 American Thanksgiving Celebrated (no school)

December

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

6 School Resumes/First Day, 2nd Semester 30–31(春节)Chinese New Year Holiday (no school)

1

2

3

4

5

February

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

3–5 Chinese New Year Holiday (no school) 6–7 PD Day, no school for students

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

March

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

14 End of ES and MS Trimester 2 24–28 Spring Vacation (no school)

April

3 Parent Conferences (school in session) 4 Parent Conferences (no school) 7(清明节)Tomb Sweeping Day Observed (no school) Fri

Sat

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

June

2 (端午节)Dragon Boat Festival 13 End of School Year – Students 1/2 Day

---------------------------------------------End of year – 180 Contact Days 190 Teacher Work Days

Holiday – no school for students & teachers

1 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

199

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

Sun

Mon

Tue

March 2014 1 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31 April 2014

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Sun

Mon

Tue

Thu

Fri

Sat

1

2

3

May 2014

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

June 2014

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

New student orientation – Puxi

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

First day for students

29

30

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

End of trimester (ES and MS)

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Wed

1

1

2

Sat

Sat

Professional development day for staff, no school for students First day for new faculty – new teacher orientation begin New student orientation – Pudong

1

Fri

Fri

Sat

Sat

Thu

Thu

Fri

Fri

Wed

Wed

Thu

Thu

Sat

Tue

Wed

Wed

Fri

Mon

Tue

Tue

Thu

Sun

Mon

January 2014

Wed

May

1 May Holiday (no school)

Sun

Mon

Tue

LEGEND

December 2013

Sun

Mon

1–4 National Day Break (no school)

January

November 2013

February 2014 Sun

September

13 End of 1st Semester 16 Start of Winter Holiday

October 2013 Sun

Important Dates

19 (中秋节)Mid-Autumn Festival 30 National Day Break (no school)

September 2013

29

2013–2014

Parent/teacher conference – no school for students Late afternoon conferences – by appointment only

July 2014 Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

1

2

3

4

5

First day of 2nd semester

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

End of school year – students leave at 11:30 a.m.

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Official Chinese holidays – school closed

&

Email: info@saschina.org Website: www.saschina.org Puxi campus: 258 Jinfeng Road, Huacao Town, Shanghai, China 201107, (86-21) 6221-1445, Fax (86-21) 6221-1269 Pudong campus: 1600 Lingbai Road, Sanjiagang, Pudong New Area, Shanghai, China 201201, (86-21) 6221-1445, Fax (86-21) 5897-0011


10

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


Resolutions: Embarking on a new year with new goals How will you become “a better you” in 2013? BY Macrina Wang, Grade 7, Puxi campus

A

s the last of the firecrackers exploded into the Shanghai sky in a shower of sparks, 2013 arrived with a resounding bang. A new year is a fresh start for all of us. It brings forth an opportunity to start fresh. Making a finite list of New Year’s resolutions in some ways seems to restrict the endless possibilities, but they can also ignite the willpower within us to strive towards our goals and to persevere. New Year’s resolutions — what are they even for? Are they made to be broken within the first five minutes? To make us feel guilty for our flaws? They are made, I think, to push us. They provide tangible goals to be accomplished, and propel us all to become someone better, in even the most seemingly insignificant way. Resolutions can renew our sense of purpose. The New Year that has just commenced brought forth a tidal wave of resolutions on the SAS Puxi campus:

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

“My resolution is to be able to not treat failure as though it’s the end of the world,” said Bridget Wu, freshman class president. “I also want to learn for the sake of learning rather than simply because I’m expected to learn.” Cheeling Wu, 7th grader and devoted member of the SAS Puxi Aqua Eagles team, contributed, “I would like to be a more dedicated swimmer.” “I resolve to leave my work at school, and play my trumpet more frequently,” said Mr. Rick Glascock, middle school band teacher. “Je veux être organisée et plein de joie (I wish to be more organized and full of joy)!” confided Ms. Michelle Murray, middle school French and Spanish teacher. “This year I would like to be a better person. I would like to change the world around me, and to do that, I’m going to start by changing myself,” said Vivian Zhou, 8th grader.

Tuoya Tala, parent, said, “I would like to exercise more and contribute more to SAS as a parent.” Josephine Koh, parent, said, “I want to be more beneficial to the society.” “I want to be a better person by accepting people as they are,” Vanessa Li, 7th grader, said solemnly. Madeline Chen, 9th grader, pitched in: “This year, I want to be more focused on my academic work in school and work as hard as I can.” My New Year resolution is to contribute to the world in some way. Maybe by of writing another article for the Eagle, or picking up trash in the park. As you reach the end of this article, I hope this invokes thoughts within yourself about what you resolve to do differently in 2013. Happy New Year!

11


Celebrating Chi 2013, the year of the snake BY Angela Xiao, Grade 8, Puxi campus

T

he first day of the year is viewed by many as a time for renewal, a fresh start, a clean slate. In China, the New Year date changes each year according to the lunar calendar. This year, it will fall on February 10th. The Chinese celebrate not only the solar New Year that is celebrated in the US and many parts of the world, but also the lunar New Year known as chunjie (春节) or Spring Festival. Chun (春) means spring, jie (节) means holiday. Spring Festival, also known as Chinese New Year, falls on the first day of the lunar calendar, which was most commonly used in China until the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is the most important traditional Chinese holiday of the year. This year we will commemorate the year of the snake. The snake is the sixth of the 12 Chinese zodiac signs. The snake is often depicted as evil, but it’s also known as calm, wise, and cautious. The Chinese believe that the first day of the lunar calendar marks the end of winter and the beginning of spring. Traditionally, the celebration of the

12

Spring Festival lasts 15 days. Each day has its tasks and traditions to be completed, which vary slightly depending on region. It is all concluded on the 15th day, which is also known as yuanxiaojie (元宵节), or Lantern Festival. Sweet tangyuan (汤圆) are eaten, their white color and round shape meant to mimic the full moon on that night, and lanterns are hung to guide spirits home. Different areas of China have many different customs when welcoming chunjie (春节); however, some traditions are uniform throughout the country. Family is the main focus of this holiday; it is a time for families to reunite and celebrate life. Families gather to eat a huge meal, tuanyuanfan (团圆饭), on the eve of the New Year, with dishes like hot pot, cured meats, and other foods with symbolic meaning. Fireworks are also set off to bid farewell to the old year and welcome the new one. Children are given red envelopes — hongbao (红包)— filled with yasuiqian (压岁钱), money, that is supposed to keep them young, so that they can be carefree longer. This is only the beginning of the festivities; the

following days are filled with family and friends sharing meals and stories of the past year and their hopes and dreams for the upcoming year. Though SAS is an international school, Spring Festival is obviously significant for several reasons. The most important reason we celebrate Spring Festival here at SAS is to show our respect for the “host” culture, their values and traditions. “We should respect our host country’s cultural practices,” explained Tom Musk, grade 8 social studies teacher. Bo Green, grade 8 math teacher, also believes the holiday helps build stronger bonds between cultures. “I think it helps to bind us as a global community; it’s not only mainland Chinese who celebrate it,” he said. Whether respecting traditions and values or building bonds between cultures, chunjie festivities are a great way to build cultural understanding. At SAS, Chinese New Year is celebrated across all divisions on both campuses. The Puxi campus will have three assemblies on February 8, and cul-

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


inese New Year tural related activities in classrooms. Students will make dumplings, raise money for charities, and write duilian (对联), which is a calligraphy couplet, or two vertical banners, placed along either side of a doorway, usually on red paper with well-wishes. During the Chinese New Year assemblies, we will also thank the ayis and guards for the work they have done throughout the year. Our celebration assembly contains not only traditional elements but also has modern performances. “There’s a lot of dancing this year,” shared middle school Chinese teacher and Chinese New Year assembly coordinator Celina Li. “There will even be a Gangnam Style dance!” SAS Pudong will have a combined K-12 Chinese New Year assembly, February 7. We will showcase student talent from each of our divisions. Around the holiday each division will come up with their own classroom activities to celebrate and create cultural understanding and connections. We asked some grade 10 students and teachers what they were looking

forward most to this Chinese New Year; here is what they said. “Visiting and reuniting with family and friends.” – Celina Li, Chinese teacher “The delicious food.” – Catherine Xu “Family dinners.” – Sabrina Tang “The displays of fireworks!” – Candace Wang “Making food!” – Rui Daniel “I’m going to Vietnam, to Ho Chi Minh City. It is so beautiful.” – Linda GreerWegener, social studies teacher “Seeing relatives.” – Michael Hong “Money!” – Sandra Wei “I don’t celebrate it personally, but I’m happy to take the vacation!” – Tom Musk, social studies teacher “I celebrate traditionally with close Chinese friends.” – Bo Green, math teacher No matter what the reason, all eyes will be focused on the celebration. It’s a time for renew our hopes for the coming year. May 2013 be a wonderful year for you and your family.

Chinese New Year Celebrations Pudong Assembly Thursday, February 7 K-12: 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Puxi Assembly Friday, February 8 High School: 8:10 a.m.–9:10 a.m. Elementary School: 9:45 a.m.–10:45 a.m. Middle School: 1:55 p.m.–2:55p.m. Performing Arts Center

PHOTO by karrina xie

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

13


Science exploration at Chongming Island Students investigate the wetlands BY Coke Smith, IB environmental systems and AP environmental science instructor, PUDONG CAMPUS

I

nvestigating the wetlands ecosystem, students from Pudong’s IB environmental systems and AP science classes took a trip to Chongming Island to explore. Students went to the Dongtan Wetlands Reserve and National Wetlands on November 16 for a day of serious field science. They conducted at everything from flora and fauna surveys to original scientific investigations. As part of the IB program, students are expected to perform scientific investigations known as “internal assessments.” These IA’s, as they are known, are expected to be original scientific investigations that require students to design rigorous investigations, implement their own protocol and methodologies, collect and process field

14

data and finally present, analyze and evaluate their data and findings. Prior to the all-day field trip to Dongtan, the IB students spent class time designing their investigations, assembling their materials, and making necessary plans in preparation of getting out to the field to get their data. And they did an outstanding job making use of their field time to collect some fascinating data that is to be processed and presented. Our students designed many original and interesting investigations. For example, one student is investigating the impact of varying amounts of dissolved oxygen in water on the diversity of micro- and macroscopic fauna found in the locations studied. Another student investigated the

degree to which total suspended solids (water turbidity) impacted the amount of photosynthetic plankton in the water. One IB student investigated the degree to which the flora of the area affected the wind velocity and potential for wind as an alternative energy source for the area. The studies were diverse and fascinating indeed. All students were expected to design their own study, so no two students had the same objectives or protocol. As their teacher, I was very proud of how our students took the skills and knowledge learned over the past year and a half, and were able to apply these areas of new expertise in an authentic field scenario. Good job IB ESS year two students! Our APES students had a different activity while in Dongtan. In our course, we had been studying the details of ecosystem and community ecology, so the students spent their time documenting the various levels of the trophic pyramid, trophic relationships as well as the various types of symbiosis, such as parasitism, mutualism and commensalism. Students also worked hard to create a detailed

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


species list so that they could apply complex formulae, such as the Simpson’s Diversity Index, to determine the overall biodiversity of Dongtan’s fauna. All of this information culminated in a detailed college-level field report. While the day was drizzly and chilly, our students worked hard and made the best of it. Students were treated to many species of birds and insects while at Dongtan. We missed the peak of the migration by a few weeks but the students were still able to view several hundred waterfowl and wader bird species. They were treated to the bugling-call of a hidden common crane as well. And one pair of students were lucky to see a very elusive mammal, the rare Chinese bamboo rat!

Top: APES student Taylor Barlow documents bird species in the vast Dongtan Wetlands reserve. Middle: Pudong AP and IB environmental science classes celebrate a successful day in the Dongtan Wetlands. Above: IB ESS students Roger Zahn and Shreya Vardhan check for water turbidity as part of their IA on comparative water quality. The long-tailed shrike (left) and little egret are among the many bird species at Dongtan. Left: Xiao Bei McKean and Sofia Rada take samples and look to see if biodiversity is impacted by dissolved oxygen differences. Far left: A common stonechat.

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

PHOTOS BY Coke Smith

15


PHOTOS BY Shane Oh

‘Tungstite’ the kayak: Sink or swim? Defying skeptics, students reach goal with boat construction BY Shane Oh, Grade 11, Pudong campus

P

eter Wan first suggested to me that we make a kayak back in August 2012. We both saw it as an opportunity and decided to challenge ourselves. And with that decision came obstacles and skeptics along the way. Some asked, “What are you doing?” Others said, “I don’t think that’s going to float.” Regardless of the critics, we spent much time working in Mr. Happer’s room, to the point that it wasn’t out of ordinary to occupy his room every after-school period. Dubbed “Tungstite,” the kayak stretches more than 2.5 meters with two giant barrels attached to each side. The mineral tungstite that the kayak is named after has the chemical formula WO3•H2O, which is a play on “Peter Wan and Shane Oh on water.” It is composed of more “modern” materials than a traditional Inuit vessel: camping tarp for sealskin, PVC pipe for whalebones, and zip ties for stitches. It is powered by a two-sided paddle, and can go as fast as 2m/s (record set by Peter). 16

Success did not come easily. Nevertheless, failures motivated us to improve the design in many ways. I remember the day after we had built the skeleton, we were surprised to discover that the entire skeleton was broken: the duct-taped junctions could not withstand the stress of the bent plastic pipe. This process of “retrogression,” or going back to the beginning, happened three times. Although it was frustrating, later we came to realize that there was a fundamental error in our design. We immediately fixed it by using copper rods, instead of duct tape, to connect the bent PVC pipes together. Trial-and-error type enhancements did not stop there. In September, thanks to coach George Carpouzis, we were authorized to test our kayak in the school pool. Stability was a problem. More practice would surely have resulted in improvements, but because we had neither the time nor authorization to practice in the pool on a regular basis, it was crucial that

we enhance the structural stability. Peter suggested that we attach outriggers, devices fixed parallel to a boat’s hull to stabilize it. Owing to the fact that our inventory does not include professional materials, such as fiberglass, we had to improvise. A material we could use as outriggers soon became obvious: water barrels. After some drilling and hammering and taping and gluing, we had the impression that the kayak was indestructible — a speculation yet to be tested in the field. The building of “Tungstite” did not only include construction; that is, we had to consider the physics behind it. We used “force diagrams” to analyze and diagnose some problems with our first prototypes, especially its tilting to the rear and instability. The outriggers solved both problems by providing an upward force at the rear and by providing lateral support, respectively. Testing the kayak in the pool was a great success: it performed outstandingly. Although our lofty goal was accomVOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


plished, in terms of our engineering experience, many tasks are yet to be completed, as we still are amateurs, training to be better. We did not work alone: we couldn’t have completed this project without help from friends and teachers. Thank you to our fellow engineering club members and others for helping us in the construction and testing, pool teachers for allotting their time on helping us, and finally, Mr. Happer for mentoring us for the past few months. “Tungstite” is now on display in between the two physics rooms. We urge you to take some time to see the kayak yourself.

If you're interested in the Engineering club, look for this story on the Eagle Online.

The author, Shane Oh, is a junior on the Pudong campus. Together with Peter Wan, they are the creators of Engineering Club, in which students can freely design, construct, and test their products. Members of our club have created products like a mood light (Nicholas Lim), black powder (Shane Oh), and a tool rack (Michael Chang).

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

Above: Pudong's Engineering Club members have meetings each week and also have several after-school projects. Photo on left page: Peter Wan, grade 11 Pudong campus, paddles the kayak in the middle of the SAS pool.

17


What money can buy — a future

Social Responsibility Foundation members take a trip to Shanxi Province BY Robert Li, Grade 11, Puxi campus

I

t may not seem like much, but 100 kuai can go a long way. A small amount of money can change lives. On December 15, a group of Social Responsibility Foundation (SRF) student members, headed to Xixiang County in Shanxi Province. SRF, a nongovernmental organization, promotes the development of young people’s social responsibilities and publicizes the idea of reducing poverty through microfinance in rural China. Through an online microfinance platform called Yinongdai, we lend small amounts of money, as little as 100 RMB, to the poor. The money goes to residents from 10 different provinces in China in order to support their farming and small businesses. With the money we lend to them, rural borrowers can choose to buy seeds, livestock, or start up a local store. It is difficult for the poor to improve their own conditions because it is tough for

them to get a loan from the bank. This is exactly why microfinance is so valuable to those living in poor rural communities. During the trip, we visited several borrowers of our microcredit loans, who plant tea, raise pigs and chickens, and grow mushrooms and mu’er (木耳) — an edible fungus. These borrowers came from impoverished households and are mostly women. Although they had no money, no power, and limited education, they shared a sense of responsibility for their family, a will to fight poverty, and gratitude for people helping them. Lenders on the Yinongdai platform are mostly city dwellers willing to lend a hand. Loan amounts usually do not exceed 4,000 RMB. The duration of the loan is generally around one year, and the annual rate of return for lenders is two percent. Yinongdai helps local Microfinance Institutions (MFI) seek support from lend-

ers nationwide, thereby providing a solution to MFIs’ capital shortage problem. The local MFI in Xixiang County is the Xixiang Women’s Development Association, a semigovernment agency. In 2012, they gave out 12 million loans to local farmers. Each year, we organize field trips to the countryside in these provinces and visit our borrowers. Our field trips are rewarding, educational, and inspiring experiences. Participants get to see what life is really like for the poor. Volunteers also realize the impact of microfinance loans. More than 400 SRF volunteers from eight different countries have invested more than 200,000 RMB and have helped at least 1,500 women in the last three years. If you are interested in participating in what we do, or have any questions about our organization, please do not hesitate to contact us at srfchina@gmail.com.

PHOTOS BY robert li

Above: Workers in the field picking edible mu'er (木耳) and mushrooms. Photo on right page: Li Wenqin in one of her tea fields. Li has become a role model in her village because of her hard work.

18

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


L

While SAS student Robert Li was in Shanxi Province he met Li Wenqin, who owns her own tea plantation. She inspired him with her rags-to-riches story. Wenqin is someone whose message will motivate others to strive for more in life.

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

i Wenqin is a tea grower in Xixiang County, Shanxi Province. Before 2006, she worked in a toy factory in Guangzhou with a salary of 500 RMB per month. She was too poor to send her daughter to higher education after she graduated from middle school. In 2006, she returned to her village and rented about 1/3 of an acre land to plant tea. Initially, she sold fresh green tea leaves to purchasers, but her business was not successful. One year later, she found another opportunity at a 6.7 acre tea plantation. She had to pay 5,000 RMB up front in order to rent the land. She wanted to take the deal, but didn't have enough money, and her request for loans was turned down by local banks due to lack of collateral. In the end, Li was able to obtain a 3,000 RMB Yinongdai microcredit loan to supplement funds she borrowed from her relatives, enabling her to become a contractor of the plantation. During the summer of 2007, Li earned 26,000 RMB in revenue and 12,000 RMB in net income. With the income, she sent her daughter to a three-year program in a local vocational school to study tea planting and processing techniques. The tuition was 1,500 RMB per semester. She would not have been able to afford school unless she borrowed. Over the years, Li made more money and rented more land to grow tea. She mastered mechanized high-quality tea processing techniques. Li’s business increased in value. She bought all equipment to process green tea from fresh leaves and built a tea factory of more than 300 square meters. Now she has annual income of 500,000 RMB and has just bought a new townhouse. The Yinongdai microcredit loan made a difference in her life. Li’s entrepreneurial success greatly encouraged her fellow villagers. During the teapicking seasons every year, about 300 women worked part-time in her plantation of 50 acres. She now has 15 full-time workers. Li also helped hundreds of tea farmers in seven nearby villages by teaching them tea-growing techniques for free and introducing improved seedlings. Li’s diligence and hard work earned her the trust and reliance from villagers. Three thousand RMB helped a poor woman to obtain respect, equality, and the opportunity to rise out of poverty. Li is not the only one who has benefited from the rural microfinance project. Currently, more than 500 poor women in Xixiang County have obtained microloans through Yinongdai.

19


Art Cards

50 rmb Cards are sold in sets of 14 and represent SAS’s mission statement. Buy yours today at the Pudong Eagle shop. *Proceeds support the Giving Tree Service Club.

Student artists: Dolli Player (painting), Deric Chan (photo)

Tel/Fax: (86) (21) 6221 2953 Daily from 11:00 am - 10:00 pm Bei Qing Rd American School

Yun Le Rd

Jin Feng Rd

Thailand’s Food... “Glorious Food”... has never been... this close...

Bao Le Rd Forest Manor Shanghai Racquet Club

5 Mins walk from Shanghai American School, Puxi

20

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


Students raise money, donate to Hurricane Sandy relief efforts BY Max Yasunaga, Grade 11, Puxi Campus

I

t changed the landscape of the United States’ eastern coastline. It devastated homes and lives. Today, thousands of residents are still trying to rebuild after Hurricane Sandy barreled through in late October 2012. A storm of this magnitude triggered a generous response from SAS students. In response to the devastation, the Hurricane Sandy Relief Group, or HSRG was organized. A few high school students decided to take on this initiative. We created, and are selling, a 2013 desk calendar with photography from the photo club and other SAS high school students. We also made and are selling Love USA T-shirts. We are fortunate that the SAS PTSA and American Chamber of Commerce have supported our endeavors. HSRG eventually generated and donated 15,000 RMB to the Empire State Relief fund, which was started by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. There is still time to help and contribute.

Shirts are still on sale for 50 RMB, the calendar is 30 RMB. If you’re interested in helping or donating, email: stoneyan2007@yahoo.com.

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TRAUGOTT

Animal Rescue Calendar raises more than 20,000 RMB BY Regan Plekenpol and Nick Warner, Grade 12, Pudong campus (Animal Rescue Co-Presidents)

Y

our pets’ adorable faces have graced 340 homes and raised more than 20,000 RMB. Thanks to everyone who supported the Animal Rescue club’s 2013 calendar fundraiser. Part of the proceeds, 3,000 RMB, were given to our partner, Jaiya’s Animal Rescue. We also gave a portion to shelters in Thailand and in Shanghai. The money will also be used for adoption and health programs to help hundreds of local animals without homes. The funds will also funnel back into our club’s Trap, Neuter, and Release (TNR) program at school and neighborhood animal support. We thank the SAS community for contributing and participating. It was a team effort. A special thanks to Stacie Nakai and Marney Rosen, who worked tirelessly on completing another successful calendar!

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

THANK YOU ! 21


Photos provided by Habitat for Humanity Pudong

Habitat for Humanity: Adopt-A-Brick BY Anna Dining, grade 12, Pudong Campus

T

ing in. Adopt-A-Brick is a fundraiser by Habitat for Humanity China. By paying 3.12 RMB you can essentially “adopt” a brick. It takes an average of 20,000 bricks to build a Habitat house in China, and each dollar donated is put directly towards buying the bricks needed. At SAS Pudong, the Habitat Club now revolve all of our fundraisers around this cause — the annual PTSA fall The Pudong Habitat for Humanity Council is promoting its Adopt-A-Brick carnival, bake campaign. sales, and a

he Habitat for Humanity Club at SAS Pudong has been busy this year. We decided it was time to take action and start raising money specifically for the country we are all liv-

22

haunted house for the middle school, just to name a few. Most recently, in conjunction with many other clubs and the PTSA, we set up a table at Santa’s Workshop. Instead of setting up a table selling gifts to raise money, we asked both the students and parents to give donations, which directly went towards China’s Adopt-A-Brick fundraiser. We asked for a minimum of 10 RMB. We received several large donations and would like to thank the SAS community, for their generosity and participation in this fundraiser. Let us continue, as the Habitat for Humanity mission states, to “bring people together to build homes, communities and hope.”

For further information on Adopt-A-Brick read this story on the Eagle Online: www.eagleonline.org

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


PHOTO BY CHRISTY SO

Girl Scouts’ bake sale a sweet success BY ISABELLE SO, GRADE 5, PUXI CAMPUS

W

e often think of Girl Scouts going door-to-door selling their signature cookies, but in Shanghai it is different. Girl Scouts are prohibited to sell these coveted desserts overseas, so we have to get a little more creative. At SAS, my 5th grade troop made more than 600 desserts, including cupcakes, cookies, and cheesecake, for our bake sale — and sold out quickly! The sale was a huge success and will be one of the most memorable experiences of the year. My favorite part of preparing for our fundraiser was baking at home with my mother and licking the frosting off the spoon. My friend Jacklyn Mok liked the learning experience: “The best part for me was being able to sell and learn about the business,” she said. With a steady stream of customers wanting desserts, it was a little overwhelming, for some. “At first I was a bit nervous

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

and teaching others. Being a Girl Scout because there were so many people, but really follows the same mission statement after a few minutes I really liked it,” shared as SAS. It has helped me build courage, Poem Lin. confidence, and the character that makes Fortunately, our hard work paid off. the world a better place. We earned enough money to pay for our On behalf of the Girl Scouts, thank camping registration fees. Each year we try you for your continued support! to camp out at different locations around Shanghai. Since most of our money is spent on materials, uniforms, and badges, which are from the US, we do not have enough funds to spend on other activities. With this bake sale, we were able to raise 3,040 RMB for our camping trip. “It was nice to see how organized and successful the girls were in achieving their goal,” said Puxi Vice Principal Mr. D’Ercole. I really like being a Girl Scout because it gives me a chance to Fifth grade Girl Scouts made dozens of desserts for be a leader and experience fun their bake sale to raise money for their camping trip. activities like camping, bake sales, 23


Roots & Shoots

SAS Roots & Shoots students dune-walk on the Gobi desert edge in Kulun Qi, Inner Mongolia. PHOTO provided by Jon Nordmeyer

24

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


Club encourages SAS community to get ‘carbon credits’ BY Venus Tse, senior, Puxi campus; Johnson Moon and David Yang, seniors, Pudong campus

T

he Shanghai Roots & Shoots chapter reached its first goal of one million trees in 2012, which was two years ahead of our target. Now, we have another target — plant one million more! If you’re not familiar with it, the Shanghai Roots & Shoots has been actively involved in Million Tree Project (MTP), which gives individuals and organizations the opportunity to not only reduce carbon footprints by planting trees in northern Inner Mongolia, but also to help fight the growing problem of desertification in the region. The project has received tremendous support from individuals, companies, and organizations since 2007. Here at SAS, we have continued to support this initiative. During our five years of participation, we have been able to purchase and plant more than 17,000 trees, which equates to clearing almost 4.5 million kilograms of carbon dioxide. We have donated the most trees of any organization in Shanghai. As a gesture of environmental goodwill, the administration has worked with the Roots & Shoots club to further neutralize carbon emissions by donating two trees every time a student

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

or faculty goes on a school-related flight. The MTP has already had a great impact on Kulun Qi, northern Inner Mongolia, by being able to turn more than 675 hectares (10,000 square meters) of desert back into forest. In addition to helping curb CO2 emissions, the trees that are planted help stop soil erosion, halt the expansion of the desert, and provide land for other plants to be intercropped. The trees have already started healing the area, reducing the occurrences of sandstorms from 15 times in 1990 to 4-5 in 2012. This year, members of the high school Roots & Shoots would like to encourage all members of the SAS community to participate in saving our environment by offsetting the emissions caused by their holiday travels. We are happy to arrange a convenient way for you to do so via the Roots and Shoots MTP and give a donation of 25 RMB as a “carbon credit,” which will result in a tree being planted for you in Inner Mongolia. The 25 RMB not only pays for the tree itself, but also the continuous care and maintenance of the tree throughout its lifetime. We also welcome SAS families to visit the MTP

website (go to the Eagle Online), where you can enter your travel information to calculate the number of trees your family would need to plant in order to offset the carbon footprints of your particular vacation. The donation process to MTP has been designed in a donor-friendly way — if you are a Puxi elementary school or middle school family, then you should expect an envelope with the instructions to come home shortly with your child, or you can simply make a donation to the MTP at the SAS finance office. Puxi high school students can make a donation directly to the finance office, or participate by buying a raffle ticket from any high school Roots & Shoots member. If you are a Pudong campus family, an envelope, most handmade of recycled paper, will be given to the youngest child of your family. Simply put your donation in the given envelope, seal it, and then drop it off in any one of the three divisional offices. It’s an easy step to save our environment and make ourselves “carbon neutral” today! 25


Playing for a greener world Cross-campus quartet raises funds to plant trees in Inner Mongolia BY Ally Zhu, Grade 7, Pudong Campus

A

fter three months of rehearsing and practicing, four SAS string players took to the stage last December, putting on a wonderful concert at the Green Court Club House to raise money to plant trees in Inner Mongolia. Cellist Alex Yang, grade 11, violist Julia Deng, grade 12, and violinists Malena Cheng, grade 8, and Angie Zheng, grade 7, performed five pieces: • String Quartet in C major Opus 20, No. 4,

“Sunrise” by Franz Joseph Haydn

• Suite No. 2 in D minor for Unaccompanied

Cello, BWV 1008, by Johann Sebastian Bach

• “Woodland Sketches” by Edward MacDowell • String Quartet No. 2 in A minor, Opus 51,

PHOTO By ally zhu

by Johannes Brahms • “Tango” by Michael McLean

Months earlier, the quartet sat down and sight read through an assortment of pieces, and then picked the ones that they liked the most. They put in plenty of hard work, meeting at different houses every week and practicing for two and a half hours weekly. They enjoyed the work, though. “Working together was not especially hard; everybody’s nice and easy to talk to,” said Julia Deng, violist. What was difficult was finding time to practice. “We’re all busy, so it’s difficult to get the four of us together because some of us usually have to go somewhere for MUN (Model United Nations) and APAC strings etc.,” said violinist Malena Cheng. Adding to the difficulty, the four instrumentalists were from different campuses: Malena Cheng, Alex Yang, and Julia Deng were from Pudong campus and Angie Zheng from Puxi. The four musicians had a lot of fun, improved their knowledge of music, and at the same time, raised money to make the world a better place. The money they raised went to the Shanghai Roots & Shoots Million Tree Project to buy trees to make up for the carbon dioxide released into the environment. Twenty-five RMB pays for one hybrid poplar tree, which will clear the air of 250 kilograms of carbon dioxide over the course of its life. The four musicians raised around 2,000 RMB that night, paying for more than 80 trees. 26

Above: (left to right): The string quartet of Malena Cheng, Angie Zheng, Julia Cheng, and Alex Yang perform at the Green Court Club House.

PHOTO provided by Jon Nordmeyer

Left: Roots & Shoots volunteers plant trees for the Club's Million Tree Project (MTP) in Kulun Qi, Inner Mongolia.

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


SAS’s THIMUN leaders take their causes to Singapore Students debate and deliberate about world issues BY Catherine Li and Jennifer Gu, Grade 11, Puxi campus

A

t the first — and arguably the most anticipated — event of the school year, 29 students from SAS Puxi’s Varsity Model United Nations team attended one of the largest and most successful UN simulations in Asia. Students traveled to Singapore for the The Hague International Model United Nations (THIMUN-Singapore) conference. From November 19-23, the group, chaperoned by directors Mr. Maloney, Mr. Cook, and Mr. Israel, comprised both newbies and veterans alike. For the newer members, it was their first experience at a full-size international conference. Each of them was able to exercise the skills that they had learned to contribute to their respective forums. “I was really impressed with our students’ effort, enthusiasm, and success,” said Mr. Israel, the varsity team’s newest director. “Many of our MUN members showed that they will make amazing global leaders in the future.” For more seasoned members, it was a chance to put their experience to the test. “The conference level was, by far, one of the most rigorous and entertaining that I have experienced, so far,” said junior Su Min Park. “[THIMUN-Singapore] is a definite must-go for all those with a passion for good MUN-style debate." Throughout the days of debate and deliberation, delegates collaborated to produce effective and innovative resolutions before a house of more than 100 people. Eight students held appointed positions, and many others debated in higher forums such as the Economic and Social Council and the Security Council. As deputy president of the Human Rights Council, I (Jennifer Gu) guided the delegates in lobbying and debating world issues such as the right to birth registration and the rights of disabled people to participate in public decisions. Sophomore Keith Wong presided over the General Assembly 2nd committee as a deputy chair. Delegates debated issues such as the maintenance of trade routes at sea and the protection of coastal settlements from climate change. SAS Puxi also displayed a strong pres-

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

ence in the International Court of Justice (ICJ), which is a specialized legal committee. For each trial, four advocates — two on each team — lay out a carefully crafted argument before an attentive panel of 16 judges. They submit evidence, examine witnesses, and deliver impassioned speeches, experiencing firsthand the rigorous preparation and the verbal sparring that characterize the role of a lawyer. This year, senior Kay Lee served as the president of the ICJ. She orchestrated the preparation process and oversaw every element of the court’s proceedings, from admitting evidence to the judges’ deliberation. Senior Timothy Yin and myself (Catherine Li) were also appointed to the ICJ as the advocates of Costa Rica, where we won our case against the advocates of Nicaragua. The case concerned Costa Rica’s rights on the San Juan River — a river where Nicaragua is rightfully sovereign, but where Costa Rica is free to navigate for the purposes of commerce. Finally, seniors Ryan Nam and Weilin Tu Ye and junior Su Min Park were active contributors as experts in the prestigious

Advisory Panel. There, they focused their efforts on issues in the Indian Ocean region, including nuclear proliferation, disaster relief, and poverty. Debate in the Advisory Panel is conducted clause-byclause, rather than by entire resolutions, and appointment to the committee is highly selective. Outside the conference room, SAS delegates spent their nights roaming the Christmas-lit streets of Singapore. Our hotel, situated on Orchard Road, was within walking distance of some of the most extravagant malls and food courts in the area, and a 20-minute cab ride could cover any other destination in the city. The shopping and the food — including laksa, fried octopus, chicken rice, and gelato — make the Singapore conference a perennial favorite. THIMUN-Singapore 2012 was a resounding success. Though the closing ceremony and midnight flight home were understandably tearful, the Puxi varsity team has plenty to look forward to with our own SAS-hosted SHAMUN in March. The MUN year has only just begun.

SAS Puxi Varsity Model United Nations team attended a conference in Singapore in November. PHOTO By by Catherine Li

27


Little Shop Poster_outlined.indd 1

28

1/22/13 10:01 AM

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


For kids by kids: Living their Dreams Grade 1 students strut their stuff on the catwalk BY Shauna Covell, Grade 1 teacher, Puxi Campus

W

hat began as a casual conversation on a bus turned into a full-fledged fashion show in the Performing Arts Center black box theatre last December, complete with tickets, lights, music, and dancers. SAS Puxi first grader Olivia Hundley has always been interested in fashion. She

and her friends love to make paper dolls with different outfit choices for them. One day she was doing just that with her father on the SRC shuttle bus when they thought of the idea to put on a show for charity. Several weeks later, the dream became a reality with the combined efforts of many students, parents, and teachers. A passion for fashion runs high among the children in grade 1. Once the idea got out, many creative artists wanted to participate. In the end, 13 designers presented outfits at the black box in the PAC. The students designed their outfits themselves, had them made at the fabric market (with some parental assistance), and then modeled their creations on the runway. The future of fashion includes: Sophia Johannesen, Tiana Advani, May Wang, Michelle Cheng, Kimberly Tong, Carina Hall, Jimmy Xue, Scarlett Huang, Mehek Chotrani, Claire Wu, Adeline Liao, Victoria Lai, and, of course, Olivia Hundley. Several designers used their siblings as models. The Glamour Girls — Hayden and Emme Hefte, Carina Hall, and Olivia Hundley — performed a special dance during intermission. Emmett and Dezi Pearlz, with the help of Mia Dungan, prepared and sold lemonade. Eighth grade

students acted as the backstage crew, helping the models with their costume changes, and 1SC sold tickets door-to-door in the elementary school. It was truly a group effort. In total, the children earned 1,600 RMB in ticket and beverage sales. All of the proceeds will be used toward a new roof for the first grade classroom at the Jacaranda School in Malawi. Approximately 70 people attended, but many others donated money to the cause, epitomizing compassion and integrity. Budding designer Victoria Lai put it best when she remarked,

“When girls are young, they read fairy tales about princesses and dream to become them one day. Today I would like to thank SAS for giving me the opportunity to make this dream come true!” In grade one, we have the courage to live our dreams.

Top: Princess Victoria Lai works the runway. Above (left to right): Sophia Johannesen sparkles in her sequined frock. Claire Wu shows off her beautiful white gown and bouquet. Fashion show creator Olivia Hundley strikes a pose. Carina Hall models her evening gown. PHOTOS BY Dave Mention

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

29


High Relief Sculptures

Cheerful

By Lauren Pong

Ahhh

By Linden Li

Wondering

By Yehonatan Rahanin

Silly

By Eric Shen

30

Loosen Up

By Yoon Jin Lim

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


Let’s ‘face’ it, expressing emotions is such a ‘relief’ BY Jason Maddock, Middle school art teacher, Pudong campus

A

s long as I can remember, artistic expression has been a great tool for interpreting and expressing emotions. When I was in middle school I drew characters to express my mood. I recall those memories with a smile because it was so much fun to see my emotions from a different perspective. Faces are perhaps more expressive than words. Sometimes, it is far too difficult to make words express how we are feeling, while our faces say it all. Adolescence can be a bumpy ride, but art takes you out of the back seat and gives you control over expressing your feelings. For trimester two, the 6th grade art students explored emotions by using different types of relief sculpture. “High relief” is a term used when forms stand far out from the background. Using clay and additive sculpture techniques the students sculpted faces that emerged from a flat surface. Not only did these faces literally project outward, they also powerfully projected certain emotions. “My sculpture represents a worried and terrified human face. I felt like I was making a new discovery and I was connected to my

face. I usually worry about little things,” shared student Linden Li. Before we started sculpting, the students reviewed the proportions of the human face, but I was surprised at how natural it seemed for them to sculpt noses, eyes, and wrinkles, and place them on a face. Walking around the room I could see the students were really enjoying themselves. The second phase of the unit involved the use of subtractive sculptural techniques to create a low relief sculpture of an emotion. “Low relief ” is a term used when sculptural forms stand out just slightly from the background, thus appearing shallow. After a few quick gesture drawings of the emotions they wanted to explore, the students chose one to draw on a clay tile. “When making my face sketches, we had to make sure that we were going fast and not worrying about the product,” said student Lauren Pong. Layer by layer the young artists removed clay with a metal carving tool. Subtractive sculpture requires a lot of focus; the students were engaged as they slowly subtracted each bit to reveal the image.

Alice Jeong's Sculpture (Low Relief)

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

“It was fun to do the project since it was the first time for me to do this kind of thing,” shared student Alice Jeong. Artistic expression is a way to understand emotions, and can provide a healthy way for students to process the sometimes elusive emotions they have at certain stages of life. As for the adolescent stage, “middle school can be a tumultuous time for teens (and parents)!” said middle school counselor Timber Monteith. “Emotions are heightened with the onset of adolescence as hormones rage inside young people’s bodies. Even though the emotional response you get from your adolescent can be unpredictable, what we do know for sure is that there are several effective ways to help students get the healthy emotional release they need.”

Puxi middle school counselor John Everett also discusses the topic of parenting teenagers in this issue’s Counselor’s Corner.

Lauren Pong's Sculpture (Low Relief)

31


PHOTO BY Fredrik Jönsson

Words and art showcased at 2012 SEC competition BY Kathy Vitale, Eagle Managing Editor

M

usic from the Nutcracker ballet filled a packed Performing Arts Center (PAC) on the Puxi campus. But this wasn't for a holiday performance; this marked the annual Shanghai Education Commission’s (SEC) Chinese culture poetry and poster competition. The event, called “2012 Touch Chinese Culture,” showcased students’ work from 20 international schools in Shanghai. Nearly 400 students participated in the poster competition, which had four categories: kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, and high school. The theme was “Shanghai in My Eyes” — how students view the city. “In my eyes Shanghai is where the world comes together and makes one city. A city full of happiness, joys, and love. A city full of foods, snacks, pastries, and different tastes,” was written on one of the pieces of art showcased. From brush strokes to sketches, there was an array of interpretations. One student drew a man eating a hairy crab. Several posters showed Shanghai’s busy highways and sprawling skyscrapers around the Bund. Another student included KFC, while others

32

painted bikes, panda bears, and Yu Garden. The poster competition, organized by SEC and the Shanghai Yew Cheung International School, had 48 first-prize winners, 72 runners-up, and 78-third prize winners. Besides the colorful pictures, there were also some wonderful performances by the SAS symphony. With enthusiasm, orchestra director Mary Siew and several student-musicians awed the crowd with songs from the Nutcracker ballet — “March” and “The Waltz of Flowers” — by Tchaikovsky. “They’re really good,” a group of girls, sitting in the back of the theater, whispered. The musical entrance helped kickoff the awards ceremony, which signified the international schools’ appreciation for the Chinese culture. SAS Deputy Superintendent Alan Knobloch told the audience, “International schools in China have a large and wonderful classroom outside the campus. Culture, history, and language are best learned through first hand experience. By connecting to our host country and culture, we can improve our students’ educational experience.”

Knobloch also thanked SEC for the educational competitions the organization has created and promoted, so students can learn the Chinese language and culture. Part of cultural learning was the poetry competition. Students recited some of their work on stage — some of the poems were a juxtaposition of China’s ancient culture with today’s. A group of elementary students recited an adorable rendition of a Chinese poem. One bobbed her head, while others smiled, and spoke in unison. SAS had several poetry wins. Each student who graced the stage to get an award beamed with excitement. “On behalf of the SEC, congratulations and heartfelt gratitude to students, teachers, and tutors,” said Lili Chen (陈 莉莉), deputy director of international exchange from SEC. Prior to the ceremony, there was a ribbon cutting. The Star Wars theme song played as members from the SEC and two students stood on a red carpet with red ribbons and bows. Firework-like confetti came from canisters to mark another successful competition. It was an event worth celebrating. VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


PHOTO BY Heidi peng

Fifth grade students place first in Chinese poetry contest BY Poem Lin, Grade 5, Puxi Campus

E

ight students, 88 lines to memorize of a famous Chinese poem, and several hours of practice — all paid off with one big win. In September, my Chinese teacher announced that there would be a poetry recital contest going on. When my CL5 friends and I heard about it, we decided to join and take part in it. So, I gathered seven other girls from 5th grade: Megan Wang, Isabelle So, Chloe Tung, E-Jen Liu, Jamie Liu, Joey Tan, and Celina Zhuang. I chose a poem with 88 lines called Pi Pa Xing (琵琶行), by a famous Chinese poet, Bai Ju Yi (白居易). My friends and I practiced at school every available lunch recess in the weeks leading up to the contest. My mom and Ms. Li, who was in charge of this activity in the elementary school, explained the poem and recited some parts of it to help us understand it and make our performance outstanding. We practiced, memorized, and recited the poem mostly on our own, with the help of our parents and Ms. Li. I even made a Powerpoint presentation with music. The music was fitting because it had an ancient Chinese instrument in it, called the pipa. WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

parents were sure we would make it to the Before long, the contest was here. top three. But, the waiting days turned Competitors of SAS Puxi boarded buses into weeks, which nearly turned into a to a school called Shanghai JinCai Intermonth. Finally, on November 13, my national School (SJIS) in Pudong where Chinese teacher announced the good news the event was held. The eight of us were — our team won first place for the whole nervous and a bit freaked out when we first competition! went onstage. We found that there were many people gathered in this performing arts center that’s not much bigger that the elementary school gym. We were the first few on stage and everyone was staring at us when we were reciting the lines of the poem. Fortunately, everything went well and hardly any mistakes were made. After our recital was finished, we walked down the small stage and burst out with laugher, discussing our performance. After the recital, we Top (from left to right): Isabelle So, Megan Wang, Poem Lin, waited for the score every Chloe Tung, Jamie Liu, E-Jen Liu, Celina Zhuang, Joey Tan. day. We bugged Ms. Li and asked her to call the judges, Bottom: Ilustration of the poem Pi Pa Xing (琵琶行). even though most of the 33


ES Pudong presents ‘It’s a Classic!’ BY Julie Wild, Pre-K–3rd Music Teacher, Pudong campus

A

few weeks ago, the mother of a second grader told me about a conversation between her husband and her son at the dinner table: “So, what is your class working on for the fall concert?” “Lots of stuff, but my favorite is the song we’re saving ‘til the end. You wouldn’t know it. It’s called ‘We Will Rock You.’ I think Mrs. Wild wrote it.” “Of course I know it! And Mrs. Wild did not write it. Guess what? We used to sing that song during halftime at our basketball games when I was in high school.” “Nah … This is a different one.” “Really?” (Dad sings a few bars) “That’s it! Wow, I didn’t know that song was so old!” (pause) “Time for bed.” Conversations such as this took place in homes all over Shanghai months before the pre-k to 4th grade fall concert week. Because Mr. McCuaig, 4th and 5th grade music teacher, and I purposefully chose music we hoped would be familiar to our audience, a whole new level of parental interest and anticipation was reached. “It was fantastic to have so much teacher and parent support for this concert, you could tell that everyone knew it was going to be special,” said parent and elementary librarian Kimbra Power. The concert opened with our 4th graders singing a classic from Africa entitled “Fanga Alafia.” There was nothing

34

traditional about Mr. McCuaig’s creative arrangement. The pit “orffestra,” which is a small percussion ensemble, was made up of drums, electric keyboards, boomwhackers (percussion tubes), and recorders for this impressive number. The few students who did not play instruments sang out with confidence as they welcomed our audience with masterfully executed, vibrant movements. Fourth grade teacher Edna Lau put it best: “It was so powerful to see the energy and love for music move from stage to audience. Talk about inspiring students to explore another art form and giving them a chance to follow their dreams! Every kid was shining [his or her] own light and it was spectacular! I had goose bumps!” The second 4th grade selection was simply breathtaking. I’m sure Rogers and Hammerstein didn’t envision the Pudong version of “Do-Re-Mi,” but I have no doubt they would have joined our audience in thunderous applause. Again, the orffestra was dynamic and precise and the singer and actors captured all the magic of the classic so many of us have watched and rewatched over the years. At this point in the concert, a single spotlight turned on Power as the opening bars to “Sing!” originally performed by the Carpenters, began to play. Those in the audience were so captivated by her strong alto voice they were taken completely offguard when the stage lit up to reveal kindergarteners, 1st, and 2nd graders flooding the stage, adding their voices to the effort.

By the end of the song, there was barely a dry eye in the house. Next, our pre-K, kindergarteners and 1st graders belted out the popular childhood classic “If You’re Happy and You Know It.” Adding their own little spin, soloists sang about other emotions as well, like anger, sadness, and cheerfulness. When asked about her favorite part of the concert, kindergarten student Rose Boyer didn’t hesitate, “It was so silly when we shook our bottoms at the moms and dads after we said ‘the end.’” There’s nothing quite like a kindergartener’s sense of humor! Our young performers had barely left the stage before the 2nd graders burst into the ever-popular “Zip-a-dee-do-dah!” The complex chore-

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


ography executed by these budding stars was truly impressive. Equally noteworthy were talented soloists Elaine Gombos and Daniel Wu. In stark contrast to the 2nd grade performance, third graders took their places, recorders under their arms, with all the focus and formality of professional instrumentalists. Considering most of them had only begun playing the recorder this autumn, their two-part version of “Ode to Joy” was most impressive. Even grumpy old Beethoven would have approved. Our next selection, performed by both 2nd and 3rd graders, filled the stage with energy and light. “Joy to the World,” also known as “Jeremiah was a Bullfrog,” had the audience grinning from ear to ear. Our version of this classic featured 12 soloists and more than 30 dancers who dazzled us with cartwheels, splits, bridges, and break-

dancing. It was exhausting just watching them! One of our third graders, Shreya Bhan exclaimed: “I felt very proud and happy. I never felt that way before.” The final concert selection was overwhelming considered to be the pre-K–3rd grade favorite. All of pre-K, kindergarten, 1st, 2nd and 3rd graders singing “We Will Rock You”? Nine soloists? What was I thinking? Truth be told, it wasn’t until the day before the concert that I actually knew for certain everyone would fit on the stage! In the end, all of our planning and hard work paid off. The energy that radiated from our stage was unbelievable. What a finale! Our young musicians performed twice on concert day and gave 100 percent both times. The response from the audience was overwhelming. “The fall concert was absolutely spectacular! It is always such a great pleasure to see all the children up on stage showing off their tremendous musical talent,” parent Simone Loftus said. “The music concert is the highlight of my daughter’s year; she gets the opportunity to shine!” “The fall concert at the SAS elementary school typified all that is good about education,” shared principal Shawn Colleary. “The performance made me laugh and made me cry. To see our students perform with unbridled confidence gives me hope for their futures. Our students are fortunate to experience the talents and skills of our two incredible music teachers: Ms. Julie Wild and Mr. Ian McCuaig.” Congratulations, everyone, on a job well done. You rocked!

Top left: Third graders show us their moves. Top: Luke He belts out his solo in “Joy to the World.” Bottom left: Soloist Kaley Leblanc sings “Do-Re-Mi.” Right (top to bottom): Fourth graders perform “Do-Re-Mi.” Third graders play “Ode to Joy” on their clarinets. Luke plays the drums. Coke and Quinn playing xylophones. Pre-K students dance to the music. PHOTOS by amy hossack, coke smith, som sukjaroen, and Justin wild

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

35


Where

in 36

glet? Ea

Pose with our school’s mascot, the Eaglet, and share your photos with eagle@saschina.org. You could be featured in the Eagle magazine, or on our SAS Facebook page (www.facebook.com/saschina)!

e

We want your photos!

world is e th th

Eaglets are on sale at the Eagle Shop for 60 RMB. Get yours before Chinese New Year.

Please provide the following information with your picture: Name, date, location, and list of names of each person in your photo.

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


YOUR NAME HERE

Major gift opportunities available now, including the naming of the new Pudong PAC. Contact Development Director Cindy Easton to discuss your gift at 6221-1445 ext. 2256.

s n o t e T e h t n i r e m m u S SAS with

Summer Academy @ SAS — June 24 to July 26

Learn and explore in the Tetons this summer on a four-week environmental excursion – part of the Summer Academy @ Shanghai American School. Other great opportunities include sailing, swimming, science, musical theater, intensive Mandarin, and a new 2013 offering: Students on Ice – an incredible opportunity to explore the culture and environment of the Arctic on a two-week expedition by ship. Find out course details and how to register at www.saschina.org/SummerAcademy

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

37


PHOTOS BY Christy An and Elena Huang

Give one bag, get two smiles Pudong students inspired by the Giving Tree BY Christy An and Elena Huang, grade 5, Pudong campus

N

early 600 bags full of clothing, shoes, and toys were handed out to students at the Fu De Primary School in December, thanks to the Giving Tree, a charitable organization that works with the Community Center of Shanghai to bring gifts to low-income children during the holiday season. SAS Pudong elementary school Eagle leaders, members of the 7th and 8th grade choir, and many high school volunteers and teachers gave up recesses and weekends to help pack bags, drop off our gifts, and meet the students at Fu De Primary School, a local school that is close to our Pudong campus. Donations for the bags were made by SAS parents, teachers, and students, who purchased clothing, hats and gloves, and toys for the Fu De students. Once the 588 bags were packed, it was time to hand them out. All of us grabbed two to eight bags and walked over to the school grounds. We saw Chinese students welcoming us with their warm smiles and waves. Some of us even said “Ni Hao!” When we arrived in the school, we helped sort the bags and deliver them to the correct classrooms. We called out name after name. When all of the students received their bags, they peeled open the tied knots and let out laughter and joy. Young boys and girls threw their precious 38

bags high up in the air and jumped, sang, and danced. Some even threw their old dictionaries out the window as they realized the bag contained new, clean dictionaries. The girls grasped their books and held them up like it was a golden trophy they just earned. Girls cuddled white, stuffed bears and boys went outside to play with their soccer balls. Some showed off their colorful pencils to one another. They wanted to wear their new clothes instead of their own uniforms. While the boys played with their yoyos and transformers, the girls rocked their little dolls in their arms and whispered, “Go to sleep, go to sleep.” Seeing the smiles on their faces filled our hearts with joy. We couldn’t believe how happy they were with one toy. It made us realize how fortunate we are to have so much. Some of us felt like crying, seeing all of them so excited. A young girl, probably around 3rd grade, gave me (Elena) a lollipop. I thanked her, and she said in response: “No, I want to thank you.” It was startling for us to see their dirty, small classrooms. We couldn’t see any white boards, only old-fashioned green chalkboards. The paint on the walls was peeling off and rooms were decorated only with ripped flowers. Each class has 30-40 students in a room half the size of our SAS classrooms. When we peered into their desks, the only things we could find

SAS has worked with the Giving Tree for several years now. This year, the two campuses combined to donate more than 1,200 bags, nearly 10 percent of the total of 15,000 bags donated by the organization to needy children in the Shanghai area. Thanks to all the many parents, students, and teachers who donated.

were a few worn-out textbooks. It is nice to know our gifts will be put to good use. The other performance was a ceremony to welcome and thank our Giving Tree students. Speeches were made and translated from Chinese to English, so students could understand. Three of the classes of the Fu De Primary School performed delightful dances. They had practiced just for us. The dances were spectacular. Children shouted “Thank you!” as we waved them goodbye. It was a wonderful day, for them and us, too. VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


PHOTO By Sylvia Hendricks

The Giving Tree BY Jamie Liu, grade 5, and Julia Liu, grade 3, Puxi campus

The giving tree stands tall and free. It brightens our day, makes us smile with glee, And the giving tree always tries to feed Those that are in need The giving tree has many seeds of love. That spread around the world, flying like doves, The seeds then enter our hearts. We seek these seeds to fly out of the dark The giving tree is now in jeopardy. Many ignore their hearts’ seeds, you see, So take a moment and search your soul Go down deep, go down low Because you might be surprised to see That you have found your giving tree seed Let us help the giving tree It has helped us, and it is now in need, So, with our hands, let us rebuild The love and warmth that once covered the fields In honor of our giving tree.

Top left: A girl from the Fu De Primary School opens the gift bag from SAS students in Pudong. Top right: SAS Puxi students donated hundreds of bags full of school supplies, toys, and clothes for students at a nearby school. Middle: Excited by his gifts, a boy waves and smiles. Bottom: The bears are a hit! Girls cuddle with their new stuffed animals.

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

39


PHOTOS BY BRIDGET MATUSCHEK

H4H: Making a difference in Bali Families donate their vacation time to build BY Quinn Matuschek, grade 10 , Puxi campus

T

he holiday break was a way for us to donate our time and do something great for others. Over the December break a group of us, representing Habitat for Humanity, went to northern Bali — to the village of Gobleg in Banjar Buleleng. The weeklong trip focused on two jobs: digging ditches for water pipes and building a house for a family of three. We helped Ketut Ardika, his wife Wayan Tusti, and their daughter, Made Linda Ning’ Atari. Their second child is on the way. We built them a three-room house with a porch. We mixed cement, made rebar forms, laid wet cement, and stacked bricks. After a seven-hour workday, with an hour for lunch, we would go sightseeing. It wasn’t all work. We went to places like Gitgit Twin Waterfalls, to see some monkeys other wild animals, or went to the hot springs. Our hotel was right on the beach. Most of the Habitat group was able to go on early morning dolphin-sighting sessions. There was beachcombing, and insane lightning storms, as well as massive downpours. At the twin waterfall-hiking site, some of us jumped in the pools minutes before the rain started. The hot springs we visited were crowded, but interesting. Our walk 40

to and from the hot springs included a lot of the local vendors shouting at us, “Lady! You wanna buy a T-shirt? You wanna buy a shawl?” The food in Bali was pretty delicious; there was curry-flavored rice, spicy chicken, and most notably, the sweets — Balinese

people love sugary flavors. Overall the week was really enjoyable, with everyone getting to know each other, as well as plenty of great food and cultural experiences. Bali was a great trip, and personally I recommend it for anyone wanting to travel there.

Journal of Josephine Matuschek:

T

oday was the first day of work. We went up a long winding road to get to the site. The drive was about an hour and 45 minutes. When we got there it was high in the mountains and we split into two groups. One group helped to build the water plumbing for a family of nine or 10, and seven other families, while, the other group was building a house and a septic tank for a family of three. I mixed cement and bent wires for four long poles, which were tied together. These would be each of the four corners of the house. At lunchtime, we hiked down to first family’s house. The Habitat people provided lunch. It was chicken, corn, yellow rice, and tempeh, a meaty soybean product. Some kids from this family had a few badminton rackets and a birdie. They had tied a string between two poles and were playing badminton. I played with them. Some were my age, and some were a bit younger. At the end of the day, my friend Carly and I were giving rocket ship rides to the little Balinese girl from the first family. Bali is very humid. There is a temple around every corner. The culture is very different from Shanghai. This is the only island in Indonesia that is 95 percent Hindu, while most of the rest of Indonesia is Muslim. Our hotel is on the beach. After we worked, we stopped on our way to the hotel at a hot springs. It was kind of dirty and murky because of the spring water. Everyone took a shower right after.

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


Opposite page: The Habitat for Humanity team takes a break from their hard work in Bali. Right, top to bottom: Mr. Horton, Josephine Matuschek, Carly Gilbert, Bridget Matuschek, and Ethan Willis work together. Rob Matuschek, Josephine Matuschek, and Quinn Matsuchek get their hands dirty digging. Volunteers relax for a moment. Josephine Matuschek plays badminton with the local Balinese children from the Gobleg village. Above: Josephine Matuschek shows off her instant picture frame.

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

“The holiday break was a way for us to donate our time and do something great for others.” — Quinn Matuschek, Grade 10, Puxi Campus

41


PHOTOS BY IQBAL FAMILY

The wealth of education

A SAS family donates time, provides free education to kids in Pakistan BY Misha Iqbal, Grade 8, Pudong Campus

W

hile visiting Karachi, Pakistan, in 2003, my grandparents were driving through a not-soprivileged neighborhood, where they saw children running barefoot, begging for money or selling small homemade items to make a living. When asked why they were not at school, the children replied they didn’t have money for school. This inspired my grandparents to start the Ishaq Foundation, an institution where they would provide free education to such children. But it wasn’t as easy as they thought it would be. In fact, the hardest part for them was to get these children to come to school. They visited homes in the slums and begged the parents to send their kids to school, but the parents refused, saying these children were their source of income. This was heartbreaking. And my grandmother, a teacher by profession and a philanthropist at heart, made a commitment. She told the parents that whatever money these kids make in a day, she would pay them if they sent them to school. That is what began a beautiful journey of sharing the wealth of education. Starting with just 10 children, my grandparents rented a small house and started teaching

42

these children. They also provided them with two meals and a uniform to wear. Today, there are more than 300 children attending that school. These children are not only given basic education; they are also taught other skills, such as carpentry, sewing, and cooking. Since its start, my grandparents independently supported and funded the school. Even now, after retiring, they still don’t ask for funds directly. Instead, they have the students fundraise themselves through creating crafts to sell and other activities. This past winter holiday, my family, 7th grade teacher Ms. Tina Bui, and I went to Karachi and visited the school. My contribution was working with the children. The time that I spent with the children at the school benefited not only them but also me: watching their faces gleaming and so eager to learn really put all of this in perspective for me. Working with the kids was a wonderful experience and made me realize how privileged I am to go to such an amazing school. Although they don’t have the best resources, these kids are still happy that they are receiving a basic education.

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


The story you haven’t heard about Pakistan A trip makes for a humbling, rewarding experience for an SAS teacher BY Tina Bui, Grade 7 Humanities Teacher, Pudong Campus

F

or some, the thought of Pakistan conjures up images of war and terror, and not without reason. One can’t flip through the news without hearing about blasts or extremist groups in this south Asian nation. But there also exists a more peaceful, humane side of this alluring country — a country with a kind, hospitable nature; delectable, intense spices; and a rich, proud culture. This winter, I was fortunate to have the chance to see these things for myself. In December, I joined my friend Maliha Iqbal, a kindergarten teacher at Pudong elementary school, and her children Iraj, Misha, and Pareesa as they visited their family in Karachi and spent time at the Ishaq Foundation, the school that their family founded in response to the growing poverty affecting the children in Pakistan’s largest city. I was quite excited to finally make my way to the country, though I was more thrilled to be visiting this particular elementary school, which Maliha had spoken of before. I wanted to work with the children and meet their teachers, who, I learned, earn about $100 a month. I wanted

to see what the school’s conditions were like, know how many girls attended school, and help in whatever capacity I could. So from the moment we eagerly peeked our heads into the classroom on the first day, the students on the first floor beamed, eyes glued to us, having heard that special visitors were coming to spend time with them. Their wide eyes were overshadowed only by their bright, excited smiles as they all bellowed in unison, As-salam alaykum!, the traditional Arabic greeting. The school, a three-story building located in the north Nazimabad section of Karachi, houses students from kindergarten to grade 6. Each room has the basic amenities of a classroom: carpeted floors, a chalkboard, windows, and electricity. Some have chairs and desks, though others have low tables, where the students write sitting on the ground. I spent most of my week on the second and third floors, working with children in the upper grades on various literacy and math lessons, while Maliha focused on the younger ones. Iraj, Misha, and Pareesa floated around the classrooms, with Misha oftentimes helping me as the interpreter.

Though the students spoke and understood English at a basic level, there were moments where phrases and directions were simply lost in translation. Yet, once activities started, they were on a roll, calling out answers and participating in excitement. Even their teachers participated. They would watch and learn different strategies to approach teaching a concept and jot ideas down in their notebooks. My time there was short, but I found the experience to be most humbling and rewarding. The children, no matter how few resources they have, want to be there. They want to learn, interact with their peers, and share what they know. They want to spontaneously learn how to count to 10 in Mandarin and figure out why fractions add up the way they do. They want to share why their inkblot didn’t look like spilt milk, but instead, a squirrel or shark. Just as they enjoyed discovering something new, I appreciated the opportunity to share those moments with them. Before I left, I told them that I hope to return in the future and learn more from them. Inshallah (God willing), they told me. Inshallah.

Opposite page: A student at the Ishaq school completes a class assignment. Above: SAS student Iraj Iqbal gives guidance to one the students. Middle left: Smiling and thinking, this student is hamming it up for the camera. Left bottom: SAS Pudong teacher Tina Bui reads to the class.

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

43


SPONSORED ARTICLE

IWS and SAS partnership

T

he Institute of Western Surgery (IWS) annually provides SAS with an in-kind gift, a charitable donation of its services, which includes two athletic trainers (Caleb Lott and Joe Panchella), free sports medicine clinics for students and staff on both campuses, a concussion program, and a first-aid program.

university athletes; they have worked in premiere sports medicine clinics, and have extensive experience in working with students who have injuries and need rehabilitation. We give a commitment to the school through our training program, by providing content in the Eagle magazine, and through our concussion program.

The president of IWS, Scott Rein, sat down with Eagle editor Kathy Vitale to talk more about this partnership.

Q: Why is the relationship between IWS and SAS important?

Q: What is the Institute of Western Surgery’s partnership with SAS? A: IWS partners with SAS to provide services from American certified athletic trainers … Each of our trainers holds a master’s degree and has at least two years of experience in working with high school athletes or

A: First off, my kids go to SAS. I want my kids to have access to the best health care. Secondly, I want everyone to know we (IWS) are here. And since moms make the majority of health care decisions in the household, it’s good to let them know about this partnership.

Q: What’s the message you want to tell the SAS community? A: World-class specialist healthcare is now available in China. Finally, you have access to foreign experts in pain management, sports medicine, and orthopedics who live and practice here in Shanghai. For back pain, there used to only be Chinese medicine, massages, acupuncture, physiotherapy, or surgery. Now, you can have access to an American board-certified back pain specialist. Our orthopedic surgeon is the former chairman of the European Sports Medicine Association and Dr. Jones, our Australian primary care sports medicine specialist, has had the leading practice in Shanghai for more than five years. We have excellent doctors and great patient service in an extremely safe environment.

Q: Why does IWS like to help students? A: Our athletic trainers and physicians are trained to focus on sports and they enjoy it. They like taking care of athletes and, when they are injured, helping them recover. This is a place where athletic trainers can work with and take care of high school athletes. And if we don’t take care of school athletes like my sons — my wife makes me sleep on the couch. For more information about the Institute of Western Surgery (IWS), please visit: www.westernsurg.com. To discuss in-kind gifts with SAS please contact Development Director Cindy Easton at cindy.easton@saschina.org or 6221-1445, ext. 2256.

IWS trainer Caleb Lott helps rehabilitate an injured student athlete.

44

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


SAS has a partnership with the Institute of Western Surgery (IWS) through the services it receives from Caleb Lott and Joe Panchella, two US-trained and certified athletic trainers who work with SAS as part of the IWS athletic training program. WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

45


Aqua Eagles break records, win 2nd place BY Abby Nellis, and Lily Aronovitz, Grade 3, Puxi campus

T

he Puxi Aqua Eagles broke records and came in 2nd place at the Tiger Sharks Invitational Swim Meet in Taipei, Taiwan. The invitational lasted for three days in late November, early December. Nearly 25 schools participated. On the first day, swimmers woke up around 5:30 a.m. to get to the pool. Most of the events were long distance — ranging from the 800 meter freestyle to the 200 individual medley. Of the few Aqua Eagles who swam that day, they did well. The next two days were busy for the swimmers with the 100 and 200 individual medleys, along with other races. Fortunately, we were able to rest in between some of the events. After a long few days of swimming, we were treated to a delicious buffet dinner after our awards ceremony. It was icing on the cake when we beat our rival International School of Beijing (ISB).

Award winners: yy 8 & Under: Abby Nellis, 2nd place, and Audrey Teo, 3rd place yy 9-10: Isabelle So, 1st place, Madison Yeung, 3rd place, Royce Shey, 1st place and Ethan Yong, 2nd place yy 11-12: Tina Wang, 1st place, Sophia Miller, 2nd place, Jun Sung Tak, 1st place, and Albert Yun, 3rd place yy 13-14: Meghan Ingram, 2nd place, Josephine Mah, 3rd place and Tristan So, 2nd place

Records set by Aqua Eagles: Boys 9-10: 400 Free — 5:34.91 Royce Shey Girls 9-10: 100 Fly — 1:21.51 Isabelle So Girls 13-14: 100 IM — 1:10.06 Josephine Mah Boys 13-14: 100 Back — 1:02.89 Tristan So Girls 13-14: 200 Free Relay — 1:58.62 J. Mah, J. Nellis, C. Markmann, and M. Ingram Girls 11-12: 400 IM — 6:17.41 Julia Markmann Boys 11-12: 400 IM — 6:27.43 Austin Yeung Girls 11-12: 200 Medley Relay — 2:16.74 S.Miller, T. Wang, I. So, and J. Markmann Boys 11-12: 200 Medley Relay — 2:12.58 A. Yun, J. Tak, M. Hong, and A. Yeung Girls 13-14 200 Medley Relay — 2:08.86 J. Nellis, A. Serbent, J. Mah, and M. Ingram

Top (left): G-Ping Lee swims butterfly during the Tiger Sharks Invitational. Top (right): Julia Nellis is one of the Aqua Eagles who helped break the 200 free relay record. Top (bottom left): Isabelle So finishes first place in her freestyle event. Top (bottom right): Lily Aronovitz swims to the wall for her big finish. Bottom: Lily Aronovitz and Abby Nellis hold onto their awards at the winners' ceremony. PHOTOS BY LIGEK WONG

46

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


Love for the game

Student shares her passion for squash BY Sho Sho Ho, Grade 6, Puxi campus

W

hat is pictured on the right is a sport that combines the finesse of ping-pong and badminton, the mental skills and precision of golf, the agility and beauty of soccer, and the raw power of tennis — it’s squash! Squash is a fast-paced racquet sport, played by two people in an indoor court with four walls, where ball speeds can reach 170 mph. According to the the New York Times, the sport is more than just a trend. Membership in US Squash, the sport’s governing body has increased 20 percent over the last two years. It’s tough for me to pin down the one particular aspect of squash that makes it my favorite sport over tennis, soccer, golf, and swimming. Maybe it’s that using your brain to outsmart your opponent is just as important as one’s athleticism. Or maybe it’s the patience and mental agility that squash teaches you — how to wait for your opponent to make a small mistake and then pounce on the opportunity with a winning shot. And then there’s that feeling I get after hitting a winning kill shot. But, I think my favorite part might be seeing my dad huff and puff as my drop shot leaves him panting and defeated! My parents are thrilled that I chose squash as my new passion. My mom took up the sport with me because it gets her in

better shape than yoga or Pilates, and it’s a heck of a lot more fun. Both of my parents were amazed when I showed them the colleges you can go to if you play squash well since it is one of the most recruited sports among top colleges. All of the Ivy League schools are ranked in the top 10 among college rankings for men’s and women’s squash, as well as great schools like Stanford University and Williams College. I train at the Asia-Pacific Squash Academy (APSA), a not-for-profit that offers group and private lessons at the Shanghai Racquet Club. The coaches include former players from Ivy League teams and from the UK. These days, whenever I have the chance, I sling my squash bag over my shoulder and head over to the Shanghai Racquet Club to chill out and play squash with my buddies. Even after just an hour, I’m exhausted. It’s no wonder Forbes Magazine rates squash as the world’s healthiest sport for fitness! So come and join me on the courts and try playing squash. I know you’ll love squash too! Find our more information about APSA in this story on the Eagle Online: www.eagleonline.org

Sho Sho Ho plays squash regularly at the Shanghai Racquet Club. PHOTOS provided BY sho sho ho

We’re getting social @ SAS! www.facebook.com/saschina

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

47


Varsity girls’ basketball team eyes upcoming victories BY Michael Branch, Puxi Varsity Girls’ Basketball Coach

F

ive weeks down. Four weeks off. Four weeks back on. This year’s SAS Puxi girls’ basketball season recommenced on January 7 after a long lay off due to final exams and winter break. A bit out of shape, and needing some time to become re-acquainted with the basketball court, the girls began taking the necessary steps to get back into game shape for the month of January, a huge month in terms of basketball. Coach Shuang and I stressed to the girls: Each day on the court is one step of many in preparation for this year’s Super APAC tournament to be held at Hong Kong International School (HKIS) from January 30 through February 3. The tournament, features all 12 of the girls’ teams from the two APAC divisions. After going 2-2 in the first half of the

season, with two strong victories against SAS Pudong and SMIC Private School, and two narrow losses by a combined total of five points to Concordia International School Shanghai (CISS) and Melody, an adult team in Shanghai, the Lady Eagles look to build on that strong first half and really challenge for the top spots in the coming tournaments. The first test will be at China Cup, hosted this year by IS Beijing, where SAS will face its first major tests of 2013 against HKIS, ISB, and Western Academy of Beijing. The season culminates in Hong Kong with the Super APAC tournament. SAS will open play against ISB and the Canadian Academy to determine in which bracket they will play for the remainder of the tournament. It will not be easy to place

in the top spots for this tournament, with so many other strong teams competing. SAS is led this year by junior point guard Jessica Lu, who is averaging 17 points and five steals per game. Jane Yang is having an excellent season thus far, averaging 12 points and seven rebounds per game. Newcomer Raina Roberts, a senior forward, has quickly become a force on the starting five, and returning starter Kiah Love-Latzke is always consistent with her contributions. Captain Yurina Roche has been slowed by injuries in the first half of the season, but the team will welcome her shutdown defense back onto the court for the rest of the season. The team wants to thank all of the parents, faculty, staff, and students who have supported the team this year.

The SAS Puxi Varsity Girls' Basketball team went 2-2 at the beginning of the season. They will head to the Super APAC tournament in Hong Kong in early February.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY Michael branch

48

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


SAS staff competes in Shanghai International Marathon BY Maria English, MS/HS Library, Puxi campus

C

ongratulations to the 21 SAS faculty and staff (eight from Pudong and 13 from Puxi) who participated in the annual Shanghai International Marathon on Sunday, December 2nd. The race options included a 5K Fun Run, half marathon (21.1 km), or the full marathon (42.2km) — with the majority of us opting to run the half marathon. For many, this was our first race and we had spent months training — starting as slow as a few miles a week and then increasing, run by run, the overall distance. Not only does the training increasing physical fitness levels, but it also gives the confidence and mental training one needs to complete a long distance race. As Polly Johnston describes, “I have always worked out, but have been more of a fast walker than a runner. Then, about four months ago, I started really running and found that I loved it.” The day started out rather glum with a steady rain and wind that brought the temperature down to just above zero degrees Celsius. Regardless of the weather, there was excitement in the air as the estimated 30,000 runners from around the world huddled together on the Bund for the start of the race. The course wound its way

Team SAS Pudong: Tress Ahles, Timber Monteith, Karl Poulin, Michelle Wrzesinski, Beth Tucker, Katelyn Regan, and Ben Regan (not pictured: Stacie Nakai). PHOTOS PROVIDED BY MARIA ENGLISH

through the Bund area, along Nanjing Road, past Jing ‘An temple and the infamous Huai Hai Road, and ended at the Shanghai Stadium in Xujiahui. Along the route, runners were greeted by drumming groups, cheerleaders and general spectators

Team SAS Puxi, Back row: Alice Hootsman, Christine Doleman, Polly Johnston, Alan Knobloch, and Javier Castro. Middle row: Maria English, Yvonne Zhu, Ada Ma, Kathy Love, and Eileen Knobloch. Front row: Terry Lu and Ricky Wang. (not pictured: Andy Lewis).

WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

shouting an encouraging “jiayou (加油)!” “There was a festive buzz in the air. The temperature and air quality was perfect for running. It was a beautiful course for sightseeing in downtown Shanghai,” commented Michelle Wrzesinski, running the half marathon for the second time. The race was both physically and mentally challenging. Despite the challenge, many of the runners finished the race, many with faster times than anticipated. Notable accomplishments include Christine Doleman and Eileen Knobloch placing number 17 and 89 respectively, within the top 100 of all women running the half marathon race. “The hardest part of the run was between miles 10 and 11, but I was able to remind myself to slow down and just keep going. Before I knew it, I was almost done. Running across the finish line gave me an incredible feeling of accomplishment, and I highly recommend it to anyone who thinks they might like to give it a try,” said Eileen Knobloch. Overall, it was an experience for each of us that tested us physically and mentally, challenges we overcame with hard work.

49


2013 Edge for Excellence Annual Q&A with Development Director Cindy Easton

The Eagle sat down with Development Director Cindy Easton to answer questions about the 2013 Edge for Excellence Annual Fund, a three-month campaign to raise the level of excellence at SAS. This year the Annual Fund will launch on February 25, 2013.

6

Q A Q A

What is the goal of this year’s Annual Fund?

Q A

Can I earmark my Annual Fund contribution for a specific project?

Q A

I’d like to make a large one-time gift to SAS. How can I do that?

Q A

Will the amount my family gives be made public?

Our goal is ambitious, but achievable. We want to raise US $250,000. With your help, we can do it!

Why an Annual Fund? The Edge for Excellence Annual Fund is our yearly appeal to raise money for “extra” programs, items, and opportunities for our students that are not covered by the core operating budget. These extras keep SAS on the cutting edge of international education. Last year we funded several wonderful teacher proposals, such as seed money for new playground equipment on each campus, iPads in libraries and early childhood classrooms, gardens and outdoor learning spaces, new PE technology, and the Wuxi field station.

Yes, this year you can have a more active role in deciding how your gift is used. We recognize that some donors want to select where their money goes, so contributions this year can be earmarked for use in five specific areas: • General Excellence — use my donation where needed most • Excellence in Academics — to support artists/scholars in residence in academics and the arts • Excellence in Athletics — to support enhancements to our athletic programs • Excellence in Innovative Learning — to support educational programs like the Wuxi Field Station, the Microcampus, and other new and innovative learning programs • Excellence in Outdoor Learning — to support gardens, playground equipment, and outdoor learning spaces

Major gifts and contributions to the SAS Endowment Fund are two different ways to create a lasting legacy at SAS. If you would like to make a major gift, please contact me at cindy.easton@ saschina.org to discuss possibilities.

We publicly acknowledge all our donors in a list of names published in the Eagle and in the Annual Report, but we do not share the specific dollar amount of contributions. Your gift may be anonymous if you would prefer — just let us know. VOL 4, NUMBER 2: OCTOBER 2012


Fund launches this month Q A Q A

How much should I give? Over the past four years, Annual Fund gifts from current parents have ranged from US $15 to $100,000, with the average gift being about US $200. We ask every SAS family to participate each year at a level that is personally significant.

Some people ask, “Why don’t we just raise the tuition?” Because giving to the Annual Fund is more than just “paying a bill.” It is about making a conscious choice to invest in our community. By supporting the school through voluntary contributions, each family can give according to their financial ability. In addition, Annual Fund gifts are tax deductible. Because SAS is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, the IRS recognizes your donation as a charitable gift.

For any additional information please visit www.saschina.org/giving or contact Cindy Easton directly at 6221-1445, ext. 2256.

Help SAS reach for excellence Annual Fund launch date: February 25, 2013 Goal: US $250,000 How to give: Visit www.saschina.org/giving WWW.EAGLEONLINE.ORG

Above: SAS students in one of the new garden spaces paid for by Annual Fund dollars.

7


Spirit Week

To download these and other photos go to www.eagleonline.org.

PHOTOS BY EMMA CASTRO AND FREDRIK JÖNSSON

52

VOL 4, NUMBER 5: FEBRUARY 2013


• Feb 23 – May 18

Sat or Sun


Eagle February 2013  

Eagle February 2013

Advertisement