Issuu on Google+

ANNUAL REPORT

2012/13


Table of contents From the superintendent

2

From the board chair

3

Puxi campus

4-5

Pudong campus

6-7

Curriculum and professional development

8-9

SAS Core Values

10-11

Compassion and generosity

12-13

Responsibility and empowerment

14-15

Intrinsic value

16-17

Diversity

Collaboration

18-19

Integrity

20-21

22-23

Creativity and passion for learning

24-25

Global citizenship

Performing and visual arts

26-27

28-29

Academic achievement

30-31

Development

32-33

Sports and activities

Financial results

34-35


page

2

Highlights of the Year August 10: Orientation – Pudong campus August 13: Orientation – Puxi campus August 12: School on a Mission Day September 7: Bonding Day September 14: Stirred from a Dream dance performance September 17: Founders’ Day October 1-5: Habitat for Humanity trips October 13: Pudong PTSA Fall Carnival October 19: Relay for Life – Pudong October 20: Puxi PTSA International Fair October 30: Mid-Autumn Festival November 1-3: Aida – HS Puxi November 3: Students perform at Marine Corps Ball November 9-11: GINSING Ali Baba and the Magic Cave – MS Puxi AMIS Jazz Festival, Kuala Lumpur Wear Blue Day

From the superintendent A famous quote from the classic novel and movie Field of Dreams asserts: If you build it, they will come. Shanghai provides abundant evidence of this truth. I have also found this to be true: If you say it, you will become it. SAS demonstrates this truth. Both of these statements underscore the power of language and of the commitment to an ideal. Publicly stating our beliefs and aspirations helps us to live by and achieve them. At SAS, we have seen the truth of this in the way that our mission, core values, and strategic plan have so quickly become part of our culture. I’m sure you have heard these phrases many times now: “passion for learning,” “commitment to act with courage and integrity,” and “the courage to live their dreams.” You have probably also heard many of the words and phrases from our core values — words like compassion, collaboration, integrity, global citizenship, creativity, and critical thinking. I know, too, that you have seen these words in action — seen students, faculty, and parents acting with integrity, being compassionate, or thinking critically. The pages of this Annual Report are filled with examples of the many ways our students live our mission and our values. You will also find in this report much evidence of our students’ achievements. As always, our students have excelled across many fields. They have achieved remarkable scores on AP and IB exams. They have been accepted to the finest universities in the United States and the world. They have won championships on basketball courts and soccer fields. They have been accepted to highly selective bands and orchestras and put on enough plays, dances, and concerts to keep us all entertained for a year. But our mission also challenges them, and all of us, in a different way — in how we work with others, how we set goals and standards for ourselves, how we learn to anticipate change and adapt to it when it comes. These skills are just as valuable, if not more so, than the more traditional academic skills schools have always taught. As Dr. Yong Zhao reminded us last year, universities are looking for much more than good grades these days, and companies are looking for much more than degrees from good schools. Our mission and core values have become part of who we are, in part because we said they would be. Our community’s strategic planning process gave us all these words to live by, and we have done so. If integrity is doing what you say you are going to do, then SAS is living its mission. Dr. Kerry Jacobson, Superintendent


page

3

From the board chair Another wonderful year at Shanghai American School is coming to a close. For our family, this ending will be particularly final: My son will be graduating this year and going on to university, while I will be stepping down from the Board. So this is a bittersweet time for us, but also a proud one, as I reflect not only on this past year, but also the 13 years we have been involved with the school. Since we joined SAS in 2000, the school has grown tremendously — to nearly 3,400 students, taught by 400 wonderful teachers in stateof-the-art facilities across two spacious campuses. Our school has now nurtured hundreds of graduates who have gone on to many of the finest universities in the world and to stellar careers in every field imaginable. Our exam pass rates and other academic indicators are the envy of schools everywhere. These basic hallmarks of academic excellence will probably never change, and we will continue to strive for them. But we also have an eye to the future, and to a changing world. We know that colleges and employers demand more than just tough courses and good grades nowadays — they want candidates who can think for themselves, and be adaptable and creative in the face of change. This is why our new mission and core values reflect our belief in the values and skills that our graduates will need in a shifting, globalizing world. These documents speak of intangible qualities like integrity, creativity, compassion, diversity, empowerment, and, of course, passion for learning. Our mission and core values grew out of a comprehensive strategic planning process that occupied much of our community for more than a year — a process that represents one of the proudest moments in my involvement with SAS. I was honored to be a member of the core planning team that developed our mission and core values and proud to be part of a community that so wholeheartedly embraced the process and the possibilities it offered. At the beginning of this school year, we closed our Centennial celebrations on the 100th anniversary since the founding of SAS — on September 17, 1912. Parades, costumes, and music marked the occasion. The school is clearly a very different place than it was then — much larger, more diverse, and with a more global focus. But, judging from the pre-1949 alumni who continue to visit SAS, the values that drive our school have not changed a bit. I am confident that these values will serve the school well as it embarks on its next 100 years. David Liu, Board Chair

Highlights of the Year November 19-23 THIMUN Singapore December 4-7 Santa’s Workshop – Pudong December 15 Habitat Build in Bali SEC competition January 28-February 1 MUN The Hague January 31-February 2 Little Shop of Horrors - HS Pudong MUN Qatar February 7-8 Chinese New Year Celebrations February 25 Annual Fund launched March 2 Winter Charity Auction March 14-16 Fringe Festival – Puxi March 22 Date with Dad – Puxi March 27-April 8 Fringe Festival – Pudong April 17-19 Fiddler on the Roof – MS Pudong April 19 The Butterfly Lovers May 16-17 Snow White and the 7 Dwarfs – MS Puxi May 23 Annual General Meeting June 2 Graduation


Puxi campus It has been another great year of learning and growing for the students of SAS Puxi campus. Academic achievements are an important element of a successful school. However, the true measure of an American school is the opportunities that the students have to demonstrate their abilities and learn new skills in a wide range of academic and cocurricular areas. This year our students have excelled in the classroom, on the stage, and on the court, and literally had opportunities to travel the world. These opportunities and accomplishments were made possible because of a talented faculty who generously gave of their time and their talents beyond the classroom and the regular school day. A highlight on the Puxi campus this year was our hosting of the 2013 Association of Music in International Schools (AMIS) Orchestra Festival. Since our students first started auditioning six years ago, middle and high school students on the Puxi campus have earned more seats in the in the prestigious AMIS festivals than any other international school in the world. This year, through a blind audition process open to international schools all over the world, our middle school students earned 25 percent of all the available band, orchestra, and choir seats, while the high school students held almost 20 percent of all seats. At the festival, the students worked with a world-class conductor, and over three intensive days learned the benefit of hard work while working collaboratively with people they had just met. The SAS community greatly enjoyed the performance of these talented musicians. On the sports front, the biggest news was our varsity boys and girls basketball teams each winning their Super APAC tournaments this year, beating out 11 other teams. This was the first time one school has won both parts of the super APAC tournament. Both teams had struggled for consistency during the season, but once the tournament started, the students played hard and worked effectively as a team. Overall, many students in all three divisions participated in sports at all levels, with benefits for their health and physical development, as well as teaching them lessons about teamwork and discipline that will help them be successful in the classroom and beyond. In keeping with our philosophy of real life learning, many of our students were able to venture beyond the walls of the school this year, traveling throughout China and around the world. Habitat for Humanity builds took students to the Philippines, Nepal, Bangladesh, Malaysia, and Indonesia. Students also visited the Jacaranda school in Malawi and taught the students there. Middle school students went to Jakarta for a theater festival. Elementary, middle, and high school swimmers have competed in meets in Singapore, Taipei, and Bangkok. Our sports teams have traveled to Japan, Vietnam, and South Korea, where they made new friends staying in the homes of other students. The most significant travel experience this year has been the opportunity enjoyed by 16 of our middle school students, who spent a month in a village outside of Dali, Yunnan province, living and learning with the locals as part of our Microcampus program. All of these trips provide the students with the experience of meeting new people, learning about different cultures, and explore different countries. Dr. Alan Knobloch, Deputy Superintendent


page

5


page

6


Pudong campus The Pudong campus programs continue to develop in ways that many of us could not have dreamed of a decade ago. Driven by our successful efforts to attract and retain amazing teachers, our programs have blossomed and helped make Shanghai American School a “destination” school for our students, their families, and our teachers. The elementary school in Pudong underwent a leadership change this year with the arrival of new principal Shawn Colleary. With his vice principal, Jason Robinson, Shawn gently led his division through a smooth year of learning and growth. The elementary divisions have successfully implemented a newly revised mathematics program, and made some significant long-term decisions that will guide change in the next few years. At the middle school, after years of growth, we now have full classes at all three grade levels. Principal Jeff Rosen, vice principal Karl Poulin, and their team have successfully led their faculty and students through a fun and engaging “interdisciplinary week” in which students explored certain topics from multiple academic perspectives. It is hard to find a resting and quiet classroom in our middle school, where learning is active and students are highly engaged. High school Principal Jonathan Borden welcomed new vice principal Tonya Parham this year. This administrative team continues to focus their division on high academic expectations, strong school spirit, and community service. This division’s challenge this year has been the full implementation of the new arts and PE programs that were reviewed last year, and continued focus on college and career goals. The Pudong fine arts department has been deeply involved this year in the planning and development of the Pudong campus Performing Arts Center (PAC). The PAC groundbreaking will occur as early as August 2013, and thanks to the efforts of our project managers, the team of teachers, administrators, a very dedicated parent, and the PAC staff from the Puxi campus, the project will be one that this community can be very proud of. The performing arts and visual arts programs on the Pudong campus continue to thrive and grow across all the disciplines. Student activities and athletics continue to mature as well. Pudong celebrated some amazing victories this year and some trying defeats. One way or another the students learned valuable life lessons that will serve them well as the move into a world of great uncertainty. The skills of dedication, goal-setting, teamwork, collaboration, and creativity will serve our students well as they transition to university and grow into productive adults. Andrew Torris, Deputy Superintendent


Curriculum and professional development SAS kicked off the 2012/13 school year with a special orientation day — School on a Mission (SOAM) Day. Nine courageous and inspirational teachers delivered short TED talk-style presentations, sharing professional and personal anecdotes that brought the SAS mission vibrantly alive. The presentations highlighted the importance of everyone in the SAS community being open to new learning, compassionate, and ready to seize opportunities to both follow their own dreams and learn from others. SOAM set the stage for a fabulous year of learning. Whether reviewing curriculum, implementing new programs and changes in the curriculum or planning professional learning opportunities for teachers, the school mission is at the center of what we do. > Curriculum Implementation. This year the school implemented new curriculum in a number of subject areas, based on comprehensive curriculum reviews conducted last year. In visual arts, one recommendation was to incorporate a deeper connection to Chinese culture into the program. To help build a shared understanding of what this meant, Puxi and Pudong visual arts teachers travelled to the “pottery village” of Jingdezhen and worked with local ceramic artists. This shared experience has been the basis for developing a more cohesive and deliberate connection to Chinese art and culture into the visual arts program. In mathematics, the implementation has focused on aligning units to the recently adopted common core standards. At the kindergarten through grade 7 levels, the teachers have worked to align units and assessments to the new standards and have vertically aligned their units to ensure that progression through the grades is seamless. Physical education and health teachers successfully implemented a new program in SAS’s classrooms, gymnasiums, and sports fields that will improve the wellness, physical fitness, and academic readiness of our students. Faculty have aligned units of study in pre-K–12 to the newly adopted standards from the National Association of Physical and Health Education. > Curriculum Review. Reviewing the science curriculum was a major focus this year. An expert consultant, Erma Anderson, guided us in developing the best possible program for our students, with a focus on wonderment, inquiry, applied science and engineering, interconnections, and knowledge. The new curriculum will start being incorporated into the science program in the latter part of next school year. The librarians and technology resource facilitators began a review of their programs this school year, with a target completion date of January 1, 2014. The leaders of these reviews are seeking to renew their focus on print and digital resources, research strategies, lifelong learning skills, and personal/professional development for our employees. Both programs provide important learning and professional resources for our entire community. > Assessment and Standards-Based Reporting. SAS continued to move towards integrating a standards-based reporting model, with the middle schools on both campuses scheduled to pilot the new model, in the specialist subjects only, for the 2013-2014 school year. The SAS Assessment Policy is an integral component of the educational process with the primary goal to support and enhance student learning. > WASC Accreditation. Next school year will mark the last year of our current accreditation from the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). SAS will begin the next round of the self-study process next school year, culminating in a selfstudy team visit in the spring of 2014.


page

9


SAS CORE VALUES

page

10


Embracing diversity enriches individuals and communities > Ties with Jacaranda. In his prize-winning essay, “The Day I Wore My Best Clothes,” John Samson, a student at the Jacaranda School for Orphans in Malawi, captured an experience from his early years that is about as different from life at SAS as can be imagined — orphaned, begging for food, walking barefoot to a hospital to get medicine to fight his HIV infection. Despite their very different circumstances, SAS and Jacaranda students have built strong relationships over the years and learned important lessons from each other, while SAS has supported Jacaranda through donations of money, books, and equipment. > United Nations Day. Like an intricate mosaic, SAS is made up of people from many different cultural backgrounds, and more than 40 nationalities. On UN Day, elementary school students on the Pudong campus explored and celebrated this diversity by creating a mural out of small paper dolls decorated to reflect their various cultures. The display showcased not only the impressive diversity of the school, but also the power of collaboration to create something that is greater than the sum of its parts. > Living in China. SAS offers many opportunities for students to explore their host country, through Chinese culture curriculum, local field trips, and China Alive trips to all corners of the country. This year, building on last year’s pilot project, two groups of 16 middle school students spent a month on the Yunnan village of Xizhou, living among the locals and “learning without walls” in a new Microcampus experience that promises to change the way students learn and see the world around them.


Acts of compassion and generosity of spirit create a better world

> Community Support. When Puxi 5th grader Emma Goldager was diagnosed with cancer and spent much of the year in a Singapore hospital, the SAS community came together to help support her through one of the hardest challenges a child can face. Emma’s teacher and classmates videoconferenced with her every day to keep her in touch with the class, and helped her keep up with schoolwork as much as she could — even sending her a package of silkworms for a special project. The community also raised funds to have some of Emma’s friends visit her in Singapore.


page

13

SAS CORE VALUES

> EggsChange. Through the EggsChange program, student service volunteers from both campuses have helped raise the standard of living for dozens of farmers in Jiangxi province, and provided SAS teachers and families with fresh organic eggs each week. At the program’s peak, more than 100 boxes of eggs were distributed each week, providing a healthy sum for the Jiangxi farmers to reinvest in their families and communities.

$ Bags of Gifts. SAS ramped up its longstanding support this year of The Giving Tree, a charitable organization that works with the Community Center of Shanghai to bring gifts and supplies to needy migrant children during the holiday season. Teachers, parents, and students purchased items, stuffed and labeled bags, and delivered more than 1,200 bags of clothing, toys, and school supplies to migrant schools in the city.


When individuals take responsibility for their own decisions, they are empowered to make positive impact A Fruits of the Earth. Middle school student Kendrick Tan took what started out as a class project to a new level with the development of his on-campus garden. With the help of several SAS staff gardeners, Kendrick grew pumpkins, radishes, corn, and other Chinese vegetables on a patch of soil outside the gym. The harvested vegetables were donated to a local Zhudi town seniors’ home. > Wake Up SAS! Pudong campus middle school students take an active role in an important part of their school experience: morning announcements. With the help of a teacher, students write, edit, read, and film the daily morning announcements in a high-energy broadcast, Wake Up SAS! They act as the eyes, ears and mouth of the school, bringing attention to celebrations, issues, and the intricacies of day-to-day life on their campus. > Money for Trees. During a fundraising walkathon, Puxi 4th grader Isabelle So raised RMB 20,000 to help plant trees in Inner Mongolia for the environmental organization Roots and Shoots. So’s total was nearly one quarter of the 87,000 RMB raised by the entire Puxi elementary school. Driven to maximize the value of the pledges she got from friends and family, and the matching funds from her father’s company, Isabelle walked laps of the track at every opportunity, before school, after school, and during breaks.


page

15

SAS CORE VALUES


SAS CORE VALUES

page

16


Each individual has intrinsic value and the potential to contribute to society > Making an Impact. An elementary academic support class spent an entire unit exploring the ways in which a single person can have a positive impact on the world around them. Their culminating project was a fundraiser for a local orphanage that provides care for disabled infants. By asking for just a little bit of support from many individuals, they were able to raise more than 5,500 RMB for the charity, and answer for themselves the question, “Can kids have an impact on the world around them?” $ Reading Buddies. Each month Pudong campus high school students in the Giving Individuals a Future to Succeed (GIFTS) Reading Buddy program take the time to read to their “buddies” in first grade. Through reading, the students get to know and celebrate each other as individuals. GIFTS also donated a small library of books for SAS support staff, reaffirming their commitment to literacy and the value literature brings to everyone. > Live Wires. SAS alumna Anne Wire and her husband Hugh visited SAS in April for the ninth annual Alumni Lecture. They spoke to students and teachers on both campuses about their lifetime of service, both in the American civil rights movement and in rural China. Students learned a powerful lesson about the potential of every individual to contribute to and even change society.


Collaboration is key to overcoming complex challenges and achieving common goals


page

19 SAS CORE VALUES

> Cross-campus Quartet. Bringing the two SAS campuses together can sometimes be a challenge, given the 60+ kilometers that separate them. Four young musicians, from both campuses, bridged the gap when they came together to play a concert to raise money for charity. Cellist Alex Yang (grade 11), violist Julia Deng (grade 12), and violinists Malena Cheng (grade 8), and Angie Zheng (grade 7), raised more than 2,000 RMB playing a repertoire of Haydn, Bach, and Brahms. $ Real Life Science. High school science teachers from both campuses combined their Edge for Excellence funds to take students on an inaugural trip to the Lake Tai Science Field Station this year. On a mountainous peninsula along the lake’s northern shore, students

monitored the effects of development on the area’s ecosystem, giving them a chance to do “real science” and contribute to a greater understanding of the region in a meaningful way. > Model United Nations. This year more than 230 SAS students from both campuses participated in Model UN conferences around the world. Working with representatives from many countries on complex issues, students reinforced the important skills of collaboration and compromise, as well as honing their skills in research, writing, and debate. Students attended 11 conferences and even hosted one of their own, representing countries from Australia to Syria.


SAS CORE VALUES

page

20


Integrity is the foundation of enduring relationships, quality institutions and well-functioning communities > SAS Honor Council. Over the past two years, high school students on both campuses have developed an honor council and honor code to help students learn ethical academic habits and achieve the promise embodied in our mission statement, specifically to “inspire in every student a commitment to act with compassion and integrity.” > Learning from Children. In a February column for the Eagle, Superintendent Kerry Jacobson focused on the word integrity in the SAS core values. He noted the word’s connection with integrate, both words capturing the idea of “wholeness,” an important piece of the SAS educational philosophy. Dr. Jacobson noted that young children, who react from the heart and have not yet learned to dissemble, can be “our best moral compasses, our real leaders when we strive to lead lives of integrity.” > Integrity on Screen. Puxi high school students Ryan Chong, Eric Li, and William Sheng tackled the issue of integrity in a creative and powerful way in their short film, “Academic Integrity,” about not cheating on tests. Their film won first place in the best public service announcement category at the Shanghai Student Film Festival in April. $ Animal Rescue. The Animal Rescue Club at the Pudong campus high school continued to grow and expand its efforts to rescue animals from the streets of Shanghai, as well as run awareness programs, shelter visits, and a trapneuter-release program. More than 100 students were involved in the club, which raised almost 50,000 RMB through activities including carnival games, Jars for JAR, All-School Animal Rescue Spirit Day, and the ever-popular annual PETS of SAS calendar.


As global citizens we have a duty to care for the earth and its inhabitants to ensure the wellbeing of humankind


page

23 SAS CORE VALUES

> Reclaiming the Desert. SAS continued its strong support for the Shanghai chapter of Roots & Shoots this year, helping the Million Tree Project reach its goal — of fighting desertification by planting a million trees in Inner Mongolia — nearly two years early. In five years, SAS has raised funds to plant more than 17,000 trees, which will clear 4.5 million kilograms of carbon dioxide from the air over their lifetime. In October, Roots & Shoots clubs from both campuses received the Green Star School award for their work, presented by Roots & Shoots founder and legendary primatologist Jane Goodall.

$ Building Habitats. Nearly 150 SAS students took part in 11 Habitat for Humanity trips this year — including to Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Nepal, China, Malaysia, Cambodia, and the Philippines. Students dug trenches, made bricks, carried away debris, built scaffolding, and most of all, made lifelong memories and lasting friendships. Since 2001, SAS students have made nearly 100 Habitat trips all over Asia and helped provide countless homes for families in need.


Creativity, critical thinking, and a lifelong passion for learning are essential to personal fulfillment and to meet the challenges of the future > Catching Leprechauns. Around St. Patrick’s Day in March, kindergarteners on the Pudong campus set out on a mission: to trap leprechauns. Presented with strong evidence that these small creatures had invaded their classrooms, students had to use their critical thinking skills to design a good leprechaun trap, and use their creativity to build the trap from items found around the classroom. While, sadly, none of the traps successfully snared a leprechaun, students showed their ability to solve problems creatively and critically. > First Grade Fashion. First grader Olivia Hundley was discussing her love for fashion with her father when she got the idea of putting on a real fashion show with her classmates. She and several other students designed their own outfits and worked with their parents to buy the material and have the clothes made. Tickets, music, and refreshments completed the show. Best of all they raised 1,600 RMB for the Jacaranda School. > Floating a Boat. Two Pudong campus high school students showed creativity, critical thinking, and passion in their desire to fulfill what at times seemed like an impossible task that they had set for themselves: construct a homemade, fully functioning kayak out of piping, plastic, and duct tape. After a few false starts, the students were able to use their knowledge of physics to design and create a stable kayak that could successfully float and reach speeds of up to two meters a second in the pool.


page

SAS CORE VALUES

25


Performing and visual arts The performing and visual arts programs at SAS continued to go from strength to strength. The sheer number and scope of performances, concerts, and exhibitions this year was breathtaking. Across all divisions, hundreds of SAS students performed in plays and musicals; orchestral, band, and choir concerts; dance recitals, and other productions. Hundreds more showed their artwork in exhibitions large and small. SAS students were well represented in AMIS fes-

tivals — highly selective festivals produced by the Association for Music in International Schools all over the world. SAS students performed in the AMIS Boys’ Choir Honor Festival in Zurich, a Jazz Festival in Kuala Lumpur, and several festivals in Dubai. And in March, for the first time, SAS hosted the AMIS Honor Orchestra Festival, with guest conductor John Bergin. Of the 100 or so musicians selected by blind audition for this performance, 35 were SAS students. In all divisions, students took to the stage, producing fringe festivals, short plays, and major productions. Some highlights: Pudong elementary school students brought new life to many songs that their parents remembered in the musicals It’s a Classic! and The Sound of Music.


page

27

Puxi elementary students rocked the house with Schoolhouse Rock and tugged heartstrings with Annie. Puxi middle school brought magic to the stage in Ali Baba and the Magic Cave and Snow White and the 7 Dwarfs. Pudong middle school students played, sang, and performed in the classic musical Fiddler on the Roof. Puxi high school students retold the “timeless love story” of ancient Egypt in their production of Aida. Pudong high school students brought a new Shanghai twist to the dark musical comedy Little Shop of Horrors. On the silver screen, 23 SAS students won awards in the

Shanghai Student Film Festival. And one recent alumna briefly reached the pinnacle of showbiz — based on her winning 30-second video, 2012 SAS grad and film student Hearin Ko was selected out of 1,100 students to present awards onstage at the Oscars. Many students and faculty performed for the sheer love of it. Dozens of Pudong students performed at the annual “Pudong Rocks!” talent show. The Puxi campus held its first ever open mic night, 16 students performing in a PAC back room converted into “The Underground.” Nearly 50 teachers sang, danced, acted, and improvised in the Second Annual Faulty Follies. And on both campuses, lunch hours were enlivened by flash mobs, harmonica players, and other bursts of creative activity.


page

28


Sports and activities Activities at SAS are an important part of our efforts to provide opportunities for balance in students’ lives, as well as the health benefits of regular exercise. The majority of students play at least one sport over the course of the year, and many of them play three or more. And almost all students participate in at least one of the more than 100 clubs and after school activities we offer. From photography to yoga, Botany Club to Junior Statesmen of America, there is literally something for everyone. SAS participates in a number of sports leagues, both locally in Shanghai, and around Asia. Our participation in the Asia Pacific Athletic Conference gives our high school students access to matches against high-caliber opposition from large international schools across China and eastern Asia. Our middle school students can sample from a number of sports — like coed touch rugby, table tennis, soccer, or floor hockey — through our participation in the China International Schools Sports Association (CISSA), which arranges matches and tournaments against schools in the Shanghai area. And at the elementary level, our students play intramural sports, as well as in organized sports events against local schools, such as on the very popular “Soccer Days.” APAC also provide opportunities for students to perform in fine arts festivals with students from other schools in the Asia region. SAS students performed with merit this year in choir, orchestra, theatre, dance, and band. On the Puxi campus, perhaps the sporting highlight of the year was the dual boys’ and girls’ championships in the APAC Super Basketball Tournament, a special format that is played every three years. Puxi teams also won APAC championships in girls’ tennis, girls’ table tennis, and boys’ track, as well as the SISAC title in girls’ volleyball. On the Pudong campus, teams were APAC champions in boys’ baseball, varsity girls’ volleyball, girls’ soccer, and girls’ track & field. The Pudong girls’ cross-country team went undefeated in winning the APAC championship and both the girl’s and boys’ teams won the Shanghai International School Activities Conference (SISAC) championships. The tennis team won the SISAC title for the fourth year in a row. Both swim teams celebrated tremendous years as always, achieving personal bests, breaking records, and placing in the top three in almost every meet. As a combined team, the SAS swim team took first at the Annual International School of Bangkok Splash Swim Meet, and the Puxi team narrowly pipped runners-up SAS Pudong to first place in the Shanghai Swim League Championships, hosted by SAS. Finally, three SAS Puxi swimmers were part of a relay team that broke a 35-year-old record at the Western Regional Junior Olympics in the United States.


Academic achievement SAS students continued to excel academically in 2012/13. For the third time in the past four years, 100% of students passed the IB diploma, with an average score nearly five points above the world average. On the

advanced placement exams, 90% of takers scored 3 or above. More than 98% of SAS students matriculate to a university. The majority are in the United States, but many students go to Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, or various countries in Asia. Recent graduates are studying in 16 countries overall. In 2012, one third of SAS students were accepted to at least one of the top 30 universities in the United States and more than 60 percent to one of the top 50 universities.


page

31

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) 1441 1200

950 844

40

300

20

90%

80

60

40

40

20

20

2010 2011

Points

800 700

632

600

523

552

552

420

2012

35

34

30

30

35.5

35.5

35 30

30

34.9 30

30

2011

2012

20

353

300

15

200

10

100

5 2008 2009 2010 2011

2009 2010 2011

40

25

500

0

2008

AVERAGE SCORE

NUMBER OF STUDENTS PARTICIPATING

400

0

2012

100% 98.5% 100% 100%

SAS

2008 2009

93.5%

80

60

0

Students

100

WORLD

87%

91%

SAS PASS RATE

SAS

94%

2011 2012

WORLD

100

2008 2009 2010

SAS

Percentage

PERCENTAGE SCORING 3 OR ABOVE

88%

0

2009 2010 2011 2012

SAS

2008

78

60

600

0

83

75

WORLD

900

84 80

SAS

1109

93

WORLD

1200

100

WORLD

1500

Number of Students

NUMBER OF SAS DIPLOMA CANDIDATES

Percentage

Exams

NUMBER OF AP EXAMS GIVEN

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB)

2012

0

2008

2009

2010


page

32


Development Shanghai American School’s development (fundraising) efforts continued to put down roots this year, with the establishment of an advisory Development Council and the funding of several important projects through the Edge for Excellence Annual Fund. The annual fund helps SAS community reach for excellence by supporting programs and opportunities that are not covered by the core operating budget. Development funds help us accomplish our strategic plan and allow us to deepen our commitment to the SAS core values and mission. This year saw the expansion of the Yunnan Microcampus program, which began in the 2011-2012 school year with a pilot class of 11 students. In April and May, 16 grade 8 students from each campus spent a month living and learning in the village of Xizhou, in a remote corner of China’s Yunnan province. This experience provided an opportunity for our students to slow down and discover themselves, their host country, and their place in the world through inquiry-based and service learning projects, outside of a traditional classroom setting. This program was made possible through annual fund donations by alumni and current parents. Back in Shanghai, the annual fund helped to create the Roots and Shoots Centennial Garden on the Pudong campus. In an open space, seven raised garden beds were constructed and filled with mint, basil, carrots, pumpkins, cucumbers, kale, and chard. The project allowed students to learn not only about agriculture, but also commerce through the weekly farmer’s market and providing vegetables to the campus cafeteria. Through the garden, students and teachers are changing the way we think about green space and food. The Annual Fund has also supported many other environmental endeavors, including the Wuxi Lake Tai Science Field Station inaugurated by students and teachers from both campuses this year. On a mountainous peninsula along the lake’s northern shore, students launched a long-term ecological study through which they will monitor the effects of industry and tourism on the area’s ecosystem. This projects will give students have the chance to do “real science” that contributes to a greater understanding of the region in a meaningful way. Other funded projects included • An outdoor nature learning center • Seed money for playground equipment • A pilot project for e-portfolios • Technology enhancements in early childhood classroom • An in-residency with a professional theatre projectionist from New York All of these initiatives are a part of Shanghai American School’s commitment to development activities to support our strategic plan. The new Development Council, made up of parents and administrators, has begun the implementation of a five-year development plan with the aim of developing relationships with parents, alumni, staff, friends, and supporters of the school. Long-term this will enable us to secure the additional resources needed to support the strategic development objectives and priorities of SAS.


page

34 EXPENSES by category 2012/13 FIXED & OTHER EXPENSES 5% INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES 9% INDIRECT OPERATIONAL EXPENSES 13%

SALARY & BENEFITS 73%

BALANCE SHEET as of July 31, 2013 (projected) ASSETS CASH AND RECEIVABLES

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS $95,300,000

LOANS PAYABLE ARAs/SEAT GUARANTEES

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT

$30,100,000 1,100,000

86,200,000

OTHER ASSETS

3,700,000

TOTAL ASSETS

$185,200,000

UNEARNED FEES

51,200,000

OTHER LIABILITIES

11,000,000

NET ASSETS - CAPITAL

91,800,000

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

$185,200,000


Financial results School year 2012/13 income for operations at SAS is projected at US $81.4 million (all figures are in US dollars). The annual operating result for fiscal year 2012/13 is projected at negative US $5.5 million. This deficit reflects additional taxes to be paid for the 2012/13 school year (SY) that are not funded by the approved tuition schedule, as well as deferred taxes for the prior school year. In the 2012/13 fiscal year, SAS increased instructional staffing; improved instructional resources; enhanced the compensation of teachers and staff; completed the planning, design, and funding of a new performing arts center; and made numerous improvements to the school programs and facilities. All of these were accomplished with the school’s own funds, while we continued to reduce the school’s debts. More than $500,000 was invested in additional materials for the school’s libraries as well as $1.4 million in additional hardware, software, and network systems to improve education technology. More than $900,000 was invested in professional development to support the continuing improvement of faculty skills. Another $1.5 million was invested in textbooks and teaching materials. In total, expenses related to direct instruction accounted for 72 percent of the total operating costs. To maintain a quality educational program, financial stability is crucial. For the 2012/13 school year, despite the unfunded tax payments, SAS is projected to end the year in a relatively strong financial position, as reflected in the balance sheet at left. The school managed its finances in a very prudent manner, assisted by the Finance Committee, composed of outstanding financial and education professionals from the school community. Over the last five years, the school has made significant strides in securing the long-term financial stability of this institution. These improvements are evident in the following key measurements (SY2012/13 compared to SY2008/09): • Net assets increased by $27 million (+42%) • Emergency fund increased by $5 million (+57%) • Liquid assets increased by $28 million (+41%) • Debts decreased by $23 million (-43%) With funds prudently set aside from tuition receipts, the school will also have adequate financial resources to fund the continuing improvement of both campuses in the next several years. > Operational Efficiency. The school has taken advantage of its added size to improve its operational efficiency over the last six years, while SAS teacher-student ratios have remained relatively stable. In addition, the school continues to secure competitive bids for a number of essential services on a regular schedule, so as to ensure that service costs are kept at very competitive levels. Service proposals receive thorough scrutiny and vendor contracts are awarded based strictly on guidelines established by the Board. > Tuition Funds Excellence. SAS is a not-for-profit institution and its education services and facilities are funded primarily through tuition revenues. Every dollar received is put back into the school and in providing services to the students. Although our tuition rates are among the most competitive among international schools in Shanghai, SAS continues to provide the most comprehensive educational programs and services, the best facilities, and the most qualified faculty among these schools. Measured in RMB terms, the school’s tuition rates increased modestly. This low rate of increase is substantially below the inflation rate for the period and was supported by improving operational efficiency and by revenues from additional students, as well as by the fortuitous strengthening of the RMB against the dollar. Going forward, SAS will continue to lead in the implementation of best practices to ensure that tuition receipts are allocated to maximize the benefits for the students.


Shanghai American School inspires in all students: • A lifelong passion for learning • A commitment to act with integrity and compassion • The courage to live their dreams.


Pudong Campus

Shanghai Links Executive Community, 1600 Lingbai Road, Sanjiagang, Pudong New Area, Shanghai, China 201201 Tel: 6221-1445, Fax: 5897-0011

Puxi Campus

258 Jinfeng Road, Huacao Town, Minhang District, Shanghai, China 201107 Tel: 6221-1445, Fax: 6221-1269 www.saschina.org

admission@saschina.org


Shanghai American School Annual Report 2012-2013