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Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2018 The Pennsylvania State University Shane King


Shane King Vie

sjk5444@psu.edu

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724.421.7975

126 Applewood Lane Slippery Rock, PA16057

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D appled light reflects off of a trickling stream deep in the forest. The croak of a frog, the chirp of a bird flying away from a sudden jolt of sound from an alarmed deer. This was my childhood. Filled with adventure, surrounded by nature.

M y adventures now have taken me halfway around the world. Each adventure helping me find my path in the field of landscape architecture. I pay attention to every detail; every interaction. I think about the history and the culture. I think about the fragile ecosystems that are fragmented around the globe. These characteristics are what I strive to learn when I begin my design process to create something that adds to the special identity of a place.

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Content Academic Work Samples

01

Leave the Light On Washington D.C. Redevelopment Project

01-13

02

Indigenous Philadelphia Zoo Project

14-23

03

Heritage Plaza Aloona Plaza Project

24-31

Professional Work Sample

04

Crafton Rain Garden Pittsburgh Community Park Stormwater Design

32-35

Additional Work

05 06

Stormwater Management GIS

36-37 38-39

Stiftplantz Study Abroad Project in Bonn, Germany

40-43


01

Leave the Light On Barry Farm Redevelopment: Memorial to the Original 500 Families Anacostia, Washington, D.C. Fall 2017 I Larch 414 I Professor Dan Marriott

Beginning in 1867, 500 African American families began constructing their homes by lantern light in Barry Farm. Since then demographic changes and gentrification have slowly eroded the memory of the original Barry Farm community.

This project is a studio project where we

worked with BSD (Bradley Site Design) and P.O.A.H. (Preservation of Affordable Housing) for a new mixed income development. My project counteracts the loss of memory of this significant site; like a spotlight I am revealing what is in the dark.

*My project is on the BSD website

1


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Street View of Barry Farm

Multifamily Housing + Potential Community Retail and/or Commercial Use

N

Row Dwelling + Integrated Garage Flats Row Dwelling + Ancillary Unit Above Garage

2


The Significance of Barry Farm: Historical Analysis Barry Farm Homestead

Emancipation Day

The U.S. Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands bought 375 acres of farmland from the Barry family. Land was leased or sold for $125 to $300 per acre to newly freed slaves. Barry Farm quickly became D.C.’s first AfricanAmerican home-ownership community.

The story of Barry Farm starts April 16th, 1862 when president Lincoln signed a bill outlawing slavery in the District of Columbia. 3,162 slaves were freed eight and a half months before any other state in the confederacy.

Worked During the Day, Built at Night

1862

Barry

Farm

1870

e of

is The R

1867

By 1870 more than 500 families settled in the new community. Many people worked in the Navy Yard and gas facilities in D.C.. Using candles and gas lanterns, African Americans worked hard to build their homes after work days.

Churches and Schools were built

Overcrowding The freedom Washington D.C. offered attracted enslaved African Americans from nearby Virgina and Maryland; causing a population boom in the alleys of Gerogetown and Washington City. As a result, the United States government took initiative to seek land east of the Anacostia River to relieve the congestion.

3

1894 Property Lines in relation to the proposed Barry Farm plan.


Infrastructure

Noted writer and abolitionist Frederick Douglass moved to Barry Farm and became the first African American to own land in the area. In 1988 his home became a National Historic Site and an icon of Barry Farm.

The first trolley cars were introduced to the area, but many public utilities still weren’t existent even in the 1920’s. The community was fully supported to improving social conditions, however, there was less will to support physical conditions.

1943

1898

1877

Frederick Douglas

The Declin e

of Barry

Farm

The National Capital Housing Authority Built the 432 unit development, Barry Farm, 1943 During World War II the U.S. Government constructed “Barry Farms” housing in Barry Farm to relieve overcrowding in D.C.. Urban renewal in Southwest brought more families, spurring the overbuilding of multifamily housing. These developments, along with the Suitland Parkway and Anacostia Freeway, greatly changed the neighborhood.

Suitland Parkway

4


Master Plan

Concept sketch: Salvaged heritage trees form a hand emerging from the ground holding a lantern. Inside the lantern is a one way image that transports you back in time.

The design connects the historical elements located on the site together using historic property maps from 1894 and satellite images of Anacostia. The site topography also heavily influenced design details.

Connecting Historical Elements Primary Path Secondary Path 1.

Reflecting Pool: Anacostia River Reference

The original families in 1870 crossed the Anacostia River to get home to Barry Farm.

Heritage Tree

2. Memorial Landscape "Worked during the day, built at night." Original Property Line

Original House Foot Print

Original House Foot Print

A thriving community was built.

3.

Programs

Active

Passive

Plaza

Treed Seating Areas

Community Pavilion and Interactive Ghost Structure

Rain Garden

Open Lawn

Reflecting Pool Meadow

5


sjk5444@psu.edu

Memorial Lighting

Tree Plantings London Plane Trees River Birch Trees

Located within the meadow, covering 12,000sqft

Heritage Tree

Apple Trees Honeylocust Trees 6


Site Topography

23' Grade Change

The pavilion is a symbol of community and rightfully located on the highest point of the site.

Pavilion Area

Lighting Plan

8

Apple Orchard

Ghost House


Meadow with 500 lights (Steepest Part of Site)

Seating Area Reflecting Pool

LP

Rain Garden and Reflecting Pool

HP

The steep topography of the site is used to an advantage by placing a rain garden at the lower side of the park. The storm water is filtered to supply the reflecting pool with clean water, similar to a natural pool.

GabionWalls Walls Gabion

9


Memorial to the Original 500 Families


Pavilion and Ghost House

A Place of Gathering and Celebrating Throughout the Seasons Fall

12

Summer


Ghost House Light illuminates on what would have been a wall in the two room house. The windows provide a one way image to the landscape so when people look out it will be as if they are transported back in time.

13


02

Indigenous Philadelphia Zoo Redevelopment Philadelphia, PA Fall 2016 I Larch 414 I Professor Neil Korostoff

The Philadelphia zoo is a relic of the

Victorian age of the city; preserving a piece of history. We can deepen this history even further by telling the full story of Philadelphia and how it once hosted an entirely different civilization called the Lenni Lenape (also known as the Delaware Indians).

My design breaks away from traditional zoo design to give recognition to the mistreated Native Americans that had a big role in American history, and also to teach visitors. Through cultural elements, materiality, folk lore, and the animals I am able to tell the Native Americans story and their sustainable way of living in touch with the local ecology. *My project was nominated by Professor Korostoff for an ASLA student award this year.

14


Arc hite ctu re Vic tor ian a hia, Pen nsy lvan i elp Phil ad

Aerial Photo of the Southern End of the Philadelphia Zoo

15


Analysis of Philadelphia's History and Ecology

lo Co

Colonial Arrival Colonists and the Lenni Lenape depended on one another for protection and survival.

1750

1700 82

16

16 27, ct.

The Lenni Lenape thrived...All while being sustainable. They were in complete harmony with their environment in which they lived in for thousands of years.

eO

1650

rriv ts A nis

Pre-Colonial Arrival

The Wampum Belt Peace Treaty


sjk5444@psu.edu

The Native Side of Philadelphia

Northern Catalpa Catalpa speciosa

American beech Fagus grandifolia

Red Maple Acer rubra

Eastern White Pine Pinus strobus

English Elm Ulmus procera

White Ash Fraxinus americana

Red Oak Quarcus rubra

White Oak Quarcus alba

Lenni Lenape Native Americans

The death of William Penn meant the end of all peace treaties and the decline of the Lenni Lenape.

1800

1 Million

Red Fox

Bison and Elk

Black Bear

Otter

Bobcat

Industrialization

30,000 live in Oklahoma today

Colonists and the Lenni Lenape depended on one another for protection and survival

.5 Million

Mountain Lion

1.5 Million

Mig

n of ratio

pe

i Lena

Lenn

1850

White Tailed Deer

*Lenni Lenape Population

17


Project Limits

Amenities

Cafe Museum Restroom Seating Areas

Wolves

10.92 Acres

Topography

Walking Trails

Main Trail

Canopy Trail Experiential Trails

Topo Analysis by Shiang MLA 2017

Existing Trees

Educational and Folklore Nodes

Folklore Node Educational Node

18

Native American folk lore and historical footnotes give further insight into the life and relationship the Lenni Lenape Indians had with the environment while giving the zoo a narrative. The folklore nodes are located next to the animals they are telling a story about.


Master Plan Buffalo and Elk Beer Garden Demonstration Plots

Otters Snack Stand and Restrooms Turtle and Native Fish Exhibit Beavers

White Tail Deer Birds Fox

Bobcats

Bobcats

* Entrance Bear

Bald Eagle

Back of House

Cultural Plaza Flex Habitats

Animal Housing Back of House Access 19


The Cultural Plaza Replacing the former parking lot is a community oriented space that commemorates the Lenni Lenape Indians and gives insight into their culture.

Three Sisters Cafe Serves locally grown food

20


sjk5444@psu.edu

Bald Eagle Exhibit Free to the public:

Lenni Lenape Village Representation

Three Sisters Cafe

Sitting in the cave is a unique experience; there are views into the bear exhibit and a waterfall that flows over an opening in the cave to provide an acoustic effect within the structure. 21


Materials

2

Cobbstone represents the paving material commonly used in Philadelphia in the 1800s

Land Bridge

Decomposed granite gives a more natural look and intimate feeling to the landscape.

Stone paving with Black Granite lines to represent Wampum Belts appearance and meaning

1

Cultural Plaza Colors and Design The materials and colors for the cultural plaza are based on the art and clothing the Lenni Lenape would make.

22

The building serves as a small museum and a gathering place for modern day Native Americans, in addition to being an entrance.


1 Trails Canopy Walk

Bridge to Experiential Path

Main Path

Bobcat Experiential Trail Path

Everywhere you look there is a new item to learn about or see. The mature tree canopy gives the animals a home and city dwellers a serene place to escape the concrete jungle.

2 Beer Garden

The cobblestone paving and the stone structures transport visitors to life in the 1800s. While adults drink beer they can watch the buffalo and elk in their 4 acre exhibit.

23


03

Heritage Plaza Plaza Redevelopment Altoona, PA Spring 2016 I Larch 311 I Professor Korostoff and Padt

The once booming town of Altoona has

fallen victim to the postindustrial age. Vacant buildings and run down infrastructure currently overshadow the bright past and the natural beauty that surrounds the town. With the guidance from the residents of the town, I was able to pinpoint the wants and needs for the new plaza to revitalize the downtown area.

My design brings the surrounding

landscape into the downtown area while keeping the cultural and historical values of the cities past. The geographical and ecological elements from the landscape brings educational and interactive features that are interesting for all ages.

24


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Family observing Altoona on the Allegheny Mountains in the late 1800's.

25


Master Plan Altoona

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Seating Movable Seating Amphitheater Rock Geographical Rock Seating

Geographical Elements Valley Allegheny Plateau Appalachian Mountain (Ridge and Valley system) Streams, Pond, Lakes

Amenities Restroom Cafe (Reused Train Cart) Pavilions (Multi-use) Performance Stage Amphitheater 26


27


Heritage Plaza Entr y

Material changes, the sound of running water, greenery, and the rock formations all grab pedestrians attention and gravitate them in towards the plaza while walking on the main sidewalk in downtown Altoona.

Rain Garden 28

Entry Area

Intimate Seating Area


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Secluded Seating/ Study Area

The landforms comes alive at night with LED lights wrapping around it to create a unique atmosphere.

A limestone engraving of Altoona with the historical train tracks (corten steel) are embedded in the entry area of the plaza in its correct geographic position.

Amphitheater Area

Cafe Seating 29


Plants and Materiality ...reflect the composition of soils and rocks in the mountains and valleys and the plants that grow in the appropriate soils. Allegheny Plateau Plants (Acidic Soils) -Flame Azalea Rhododendron calendulaceum -Purple Coneflower Ecinacea purpurea -Winterberry Ilex verticillata -Mountain Laurel Kalmia latifolia -High Bush Blueberry Vaccinium corymbosum -Blue Wild Indigo Baptisia australis

Central Hardwoods Quaking Aspen Populus tremuloides

P3

M1

Sandstone Ridges

P4 P1

Central Hardwoods Eastern Redbud Cercis canadensis

Riparian Forest

Thornless Honeylocust Gleditsia triacanthos

P5

30


Central Hardwoods -Pagoda Dogwood Cornus alternifolia -Yellowtwig Dogwood Cornus Sericea

P2

M2

Limestone Pavers and Decomposed Limestone

Riparian Forest River Birch Betula nigra

P6

31


04

Crafton Rain Garden Internship Project I The Penn State Center Pittsburgh, PA I Summer 2017

The main project I took part in was the design of a rain garden and regrading of a parking lot in a community park. My design was chosen to be built by the city council with the collaboration of Gateway Engineering. I was responsible for keeping the project under budget and finding the plants and materials. My design used native plant species suitable for the varying depths of the rain garden and locally sourced materials.

Landscape Planting Cost Estimate Crafton Park Rain Garden

Plant Form/ Item

Size

Condition

Quantity

Unit Price (Pre-installation)

Trees Betula nigra

15 gallon

3

$155.00

Quart

8

$18.99

$54.51

Shrubs Cornus stolonifera Perennials Mix One: Echinacea purpurea PowWowÂŽ White

Landscape Plug

394

Eupatorium 'Phantom'

Landscape Plug

63

$41.70

Baptisia australis

Landscape Plug

98

$62.19

Phlox divaricata 'Blue Moon'

Landscape Plug

216

$52.17

Tiarella codifolia 'brandywine'

Landscape Plug

144

$101.23

Osmunda cinnamomea

Landscape Plug

546

$60.56

Carex amphibola

Landscape Plug

1416

$44.99

Solidago odora

Landscape Plug

47

$58.40

Mix Two:

Overall To

Overall To

Additional Costs 4"-5" River Stone Pea Gravel

32

7 tons

$65.00/ Ton

4 Tons

$44.00/ Ton

Total costs including plants and river


sjk5444@psu.edu

Unit

Total, Volunteer Installed (1.2x Multiplier for soil, materials, etc.) Total, Contractor Installed (2x multiplier for soil, materials, etc.)

1

$558.00

$354.00

ea.

$182.30

$303.84

72

$392.47

$654.12

32

$100.10

$166.80

50

$149.26

$248.76

72

$187.81

$375.62

72

$242.95

$485.90

32

$1,235.42

$2,470.00

32

$2,428.80

$4,049.10

50

$70.08

$116.80

otal: Volunteer- Installed Plantings $9,224.94

otal: Contractor- Installed Plantings

r rock:

$5,547.19

260

$546.00

$910.00

176

$211.20

$352.00

$6,304.00

$10,486.00

33


34


I n addition to being a functional piece of

The rivers are represented through river rock. Goldenrod was selected to be the plant at “the point” with its tall stems and golden color that represents downtown Pittsburgh. The river rock also helps distinguish different areas of the garden to make it a little easier to maintain and identify the plants.

the landscape that addresses stormwater management, it also adds visual interest to the site. No matter the season there will be something to look at; the plants chosen for the design are based on color and bloom time. Observers will be able to notice a subtle design detail that mimics the three rivers that has become a symbol of Pittsburgh.

(1)

10'

14'

17'

16'

14'

Robinia pseudoacacia

18' (1)

Robinia pseudoacacia

(3) Betula Nigra

(5) ACER RUBRUM

(5) Cornus sericea

800

(1) Tsuga canadensis

(1)

(1)

(1)

Robinia pseudoacacia

Robinia pseudoacacia

(1)

Robinia pseudoacacia

(1) Robinia pseudoacacia

Robinia pseudoacacia (1) Robinia pseudoacacia

LEGEND:

Cornus sericea Betula nigra

LANDSCAPE NOTES:

Mix One 585 sq.ft.

1,053 sq.ft.

Carex amphibola

Osmunda cinnamomea

1,581 sq.ft.

Existing Tree

1.

THE CONTRACTOR SHALL COMPLY AT ALL TIMES WITH APPLICABLE FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL LAWS, PROVISIONS, AND POLICIES GOVERNING SAFETY AND HEALTH, INCLUDING THE FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY ACT (PUBLIC LAW 91-54), FEDERAL REGISTER, CHAPTER XVII, PART 1926 OF TITLE 29 REGULATIONS, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION, AND SUBSEQUENT PUBLICATIONS UPDATING THESE REGULATIONS.

2.

THE CONTRACTOR SHALL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR EXAMINING THE AREAS AND CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH THE PROJECT IS TO BE CONSTRUCTED PRIOR TO THE SUBMISSION OF THE BID. SUBMISSION OF A BID SHALL BE CONSTRUED TO MEAN THE CONTRACTOR HAS REVIEWED THE SITE AND IS FAMILIAR WITH CONDITIONS AND CONSTRAINTS OF THE SITE.

Mix Two

546 sq.ft.

Solidago odora 91 sq.ft.

*See planting list for mix quantities

3.

PRIOR TO THE INSTALLATION OF PLANT MATERIAL, THE CONTRACTOR SHALL ACCURATELY LOCATE ALL EXISTING UNDERGROUND UTILITIES, INCLUDING ALL RECENTLY INSTALLED UTILITIES. THE CONTRACTOR SHALL IMMEDIATELY NOTIFY THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT OF ANY CONFLICTS WITH THE PLANT MATERIAL. ANY UTILITIES DAMAGED AS A RESULT OF PLANTING ACTIVITIES SHALL BE REPAIRED AND/ OR REPLACED BY THE CONTRACTOR AT NO ADDITIONAL EXPENSE TO THE OWNER.

4.

TREE PROTECTION FENCING MUST BE IN PLACE PRIOR TO ANY DEMOLITION OR LAND DISTURBANCE.

5.

NO CHANGES TO THE LANDSCAPE DESIGN SHALL BE MADE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT.

6.

ALL PLANTS INDICATED ON PLANS SHALL BE GROWN IN CLIMATES SIMILAR TO PROJECT AREA.

7.

PLANT COUNTS ARE FOR REFERENCE ONLY. THE CONTRACTOR IS REQUIRED TO FULFILL THE INTENT OF THE DRAWINGS. ANY DISCREPANCIES IN THE NUMBER OF PLANTS SHOWN ON THE DRAWING AND THE PLANT LIST SHALL BE BROUGHT TO THE ATTENTION OF THE OWNER PRIOR TO SUBMITTING A BID OR BEGINNING INSTALLATION.

8.

ALL PLANT MATERIAL SHALL CONFORM TO OR EXCEED THE AMERICAN STANDARD FOR NURSERY STOCK (LATEST EDITION) AS PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. DO NOT INSTALL DAMAGED, WILTING OR UNHEALTHY PLANTS.

9.

IN THE EVENT THAT A PROPOSED PLANT CANNOT BE ACQUIRED, SUBSTITUTION FOR GENUS, SIZE OR SPECIES SPECIFIED SHALL ONLY BE SUBSTITUTED WITH AN EQUIVALENT PLANT WHICH MUST BE APPROVED BY THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT IN WRITING.

10. PLANTING MAY ONLY OCCUR DURING THE FOLLOWING PERIODS: MARCH 15 – JUNE 15 AND SEPTEMBER 15 – NOVEMBER 15. EXCEPTIONS WILL BE MADE BUT MUST BE APPROVED IN WRITING PRIOR TO ANY INSTALLATION. PROCEED WITH PLANTING ONLY WHEN EXISTING AND FORECASTED WEATHER CONDITIONS PERMIT PLANTING. 11.

12.

A PRE-EMERGENT HERBICIDE SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SHRUB BEDS AND MULCH AREAS PRIOR TO THE INSTALLATION OF PLANT MATERIAL. HERBICIDE IS TO BE APPLIED PER MANUFACTURER’S SPECIFICATIONS. PROPOSED HERBICIDE SHALL BE APPROVED BY THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT AND OWNER PRIOR TO APPLICATION. TOPSOIL SHALL MEET ASTMD 5268, HAVE A PH RANGE OF 5.5-7, CONTAIN A MINIMUM OF 4% ORGANIC MATERIAL AND

BE FREE OF ANY STONES OVER 1” IN ANY DIRECTION AND FREE OF DEBRIS AND NON-ORGANIC MATERIAL. A SOIL SAMPLE SHALL BE TAKEN BY THE CONTRACTOR PRIOR TO PLANTING AND SENT TO A SOIL TESTING LABORATORY RECOGNIZED BY THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. IF REQUIRED, SOIL AMENDMENT TYPES AND QUANTITIES TO BE SUBMITTED FOR REVIEW. 13. PRIOR TO INSTALLATION OF ANY PLANT MATERIAL, THE CONTRACTOR SHALL CONFIRM ADEQUATE DRAINAGE IN ALL PITS AND PLANT BEDS. NOTIFY THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT IF BEDROCK IS ENCOUNTERED OR IF PROPER DRAINAGE CANNOT BE ACHIEVED. 14. PLANT TREES AND SHRUBS AFTER FINISH GRADES ARE ESTABLISHED AND BEFORE PLANTING LAWNS UNLESS OTHERWISE APPROVED BY THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT. 15. PLANTING MIXES: PLANTING MIX FOR BACKFILLING PLANT PITS OF DECIDUOUS TREES AND SHRUBS SHALL BE IN THE PROPORTION OF FOUR PARTS BY VOLUME OF TOPSOIL AND ONE PART BY VOLUME OF PEAT MOSS PLUS ONE POUND OF 10-6-4 FERTILIZER PER CUBIC YARD. PLANTING MIX FOR BACKFILLING PLANT PITS OF NEEDLED EVERGREEN PLANTS SHALL BE IN THE PROPORTION OF TWO PARTS BY VOLUME OF TOPSOIL AND ONE PART BY VOLUME PEAT MOSS PLUS ONE POUND OF 10-6-4 FERTILIZER PER CUBIC YARD. ALL AMENDMENTS SHALL BE THOROUGHLY MIXED. 16. REFER TO EROSION AND SEDIMENTATION CONTROL PLAN FOR LIMITS OF DISTURBANCE. ALL DISTURBED AREAS SHALL BE FINE GRADED AND SEEDED WITH PERMANENT SEED MIX UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED ON PLANS. PRIOR TO INSTALLATION OF SOD OR SEED, ALL LAWN AREAS SHALL RECEIVE TOPSOIL TO A DEPTH OF 4” AFTER LIGHT ROLLING. DO NOT COMPACT. THE AREAS SHALL BE DISKED AND RAKED SMOOTH TO A UNIFORM GRADE AS SHOWN ON THE GRADING PLAN. 17.

A 3” THICK DOUBLE SHREDDED HARDWOOD MULCH BED SHALL BE PROVIDED IN ALL AREAS CONTAINING TREES, SHRUBS AND UNDER BUILDING OVERHANGS.

18. PLANT IDENTIFICATION TAGS SHALL BE LEFT ON UNTIL INSTALLED PLANTINGS ARE INSPECTED BY THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT. ALL TAGS SHALL BE REMOVED AFTER APPROVAL. 19.

WARRANTY PERIOD FOR TREES AND SHRUBS IS ONE YEAR. WARRANTY PERIOD FOR GROUNDCOVER, LAWNS, GRASSES AND PERENNIALS IS 6 MONTHS. WARRANTY PERIOD FOR REPLACEMENTS SHALL BE EQUAL TO THE ORIGINAL WARRANTY PERIOD.

20. A SATISFACTORY LAWN IS DEFINED AS A HEALTHY, UNIFORM, CLOSE STAND OF GRASS FREE OF WEEDS AND SURFACE IRREGULARITIES WITH COVERAGE EXCEEDING 90% OVER 10 SQUARE FEET WITH NO BARE SPOTS EXCEEDING A 5”X5” SQUARE.

Know wha

21. REFER TO LANDSCAPE DETAIL SHEETS AND SPECIFICATIONS FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PERTAINING TO INSTALLATION OF LANDSCAPE INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO MULCHING, STAKING AND SETTING/ SPACING OF PLANTS.

Call b

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GRAPHIC SCALE 10

0

5

10

20

40

( IN FEET ) 1 inch = 10 ft.

35


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Stormwater Management Education Building and Parking Lot Grading Fall 2016

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TC 1107.98 BC 1107.48

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TC 1108.70 BC 1108.20

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TC 1108.92 BC 1108.42 DI

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TC 1110.82 BC 1109.32

LP 1107.50

TC 1110.11 BC 1109.61

TC 1110.24 BC 1109.74

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TC 1109.32 BC 1108.82

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TC 1109.35 BC 1108.85

TC 1109.79 BC 1109.29 TC 1110.01 BC 1109.51

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Bottom of Wall: Top of Wall:

TW TS

Top of Sidewalk:

BS

High Point:

HP

LP 1105.5 LP 1105.5 RDI

Proposed Contours:

DI

TC 1106.87 BC 1106.37 TC 1106.81 BC 1106.31 TC 1106.89 BC 1106.39

TC 1107.01

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TC 1106.33 BC 1106.33

1' Contour Lines:

Lp 1105.5 RDI

5' Contour Lines

DI

RDI

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TC 1107.19 BC 1106.69

TC 1106.66 BC 1106.16

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TC 1107.17 BC 1106.67 DI

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TC 1106.66 BC 1106.16

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TC 1106.77 BC 1106.27

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Scale:1:30

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rs

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0%

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% 2.86

5.00%

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Retaining Wall

11

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TC 1108.60 BC 1108.10

LPS

High Point Swale

1102.50 LPS

5.00%

77 27

TC 1106.77 BC 1106.27

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%

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Low Point Swale

1106

RDI

4 10

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1107.68

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Raised Drain Inlet RDI

TC 1107.13 1108.18 BC 1106.63

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Drain Inlet

1106

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10

TC 1106.50 BC 1106.20

TC 1107.03 BC 1106.53

ADA Parking Site Boundary

1 10 104 97

%

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98

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7.32

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37


05

GIS Agricultural Preservation Fall 2015

I t has been well established why agricultural land

is important to be preserved; the population of the world is growing at a rapid rate and available farm land located in prime agricultural soils is dwindling at an equally alarming pace. Centre County in Pennsylvania is prized for its prime agricultural soils, but as the town of State College grows farms are being threatened. Developers are buying the land and irreversibly converting it to parking lots and shopping malls.

Suitability Analysis U sing GIS I identified where the prime soils,

unprotected farms, and what the current and uses are to create a suitability analysis to pinpoint the ideal areas to place agricultural easements on. This ensures that agricultural land remains for the future.

38


Slope

sjk5444@psu.edu

Soils Poor Soils Moderate Soils Prime Soils

Land Use 14% Existing Farm Land (white) 12% Urban/ Vacant 74% Forest Cover

39


06

40


S t i f t p l a n t z A LIVING PLAZA Urban Plaza Design for Stiftplatz Bonn, Germany Spring 2017 I Larch 414 I

Am

en

iti

es

This project transforms a parking lot into a gathering space that is comfortable to be in no matter the climate. The green infrastructure elements the plaza is composed of lives and breathes in downtown Bonn.

Lawn Amphitheater Indoor Space

f ra

str

uc

tu

re

Slide

en

In

Green Roof

G

re

Green Wall

Tr e

es

Rain Garden

Existing Proposed


A Place of Comfort Through the Seasons

Circulation and Zones

Perspective of Zone Three

42


Stormwater Management

Topography

Layers of Green Roof

Xero Flor Greenroof Benefits

Sedum and Moss

• • • • •

Xeroterr Gray Medium Water Retention

Absorbtion of noise and heat Retains fust from cities 20 l/m^2 rainwater retention Simple maintenance Reduces heat by 20 perecent

Fleece Drain Mat Root Barrier

Clay Model of Structure

43


Shane King The Pennsylvania State University Bachelors of Landscape Architecture sjk5444@psu.edu 724.421.7975 126 Applewood Lane Slippery Rock, PA 16057

Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2018  
Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2018  
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