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 Catalogue
 2009‐2010
 
 19175
Third
Street
 PO
Box
141
 Oro
Grande,
CA
92368

 



Table of Contents MISSION
STATEMENT ............................................................................................................ 5
 MISSION­BASED
INSTITUTIONAL
LEARNING
OUTCOMES ......................................... 5
 Preeminence
and
Infusion
of
Pioneer
University’s
Mission ..................................... 7
 PROGRAM
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
FOR
THE
GRADUATE
SCHOOL
OF
 EDUCATION ............................................................................................................................... 8
 Instructional
Leadership ................................................................................................................8
 Organizational
Leadership ............................................................................................................8
 Professional
Inquiry ........................................................................................................................8
 CONNECTION
OF
GRADUATE
SCHOOL
OF
EDUCATION’S
PROGRAM
LEARNING
 OUTCOMES
TO
INSTITUTIONAL
MISSION­BASED
LEARNING
OUTCOMES ........... 9
 CONNECTION
OF
MASTER
OF
EDUCATION
COURSES
TO
THE
GRADUATE
 SCHOOL
OF
EDUCATION’S
PROGRAM
LEARNING
OUTCOMES ................................10
 CONNECTION
OF
DOCTOR
OF
EDUCATION
COURSES
TO
THE
GRADUATE
 SCHOOL
OF
EDUCATION’S
PROGRAM
LEARNING
OUTCOMES ................................11
 Program
Evaluation..............................................................................................................12
 PROGRAM
EVALUATION
CHART ............................................................................................... 14
 THE
PIONEER
APPROACH...................................................................................................15
 Leading
with
Innovative
Practice ............................................................................................. 15
 Challenging
Common
Assumptions ......................................................................................... 15
 Developing
Strong
School
District
University
Partnerships ........................................... 15
 MASTER’S
OF
EDUCATION
(M.Ed.)
PROGRAM .............................................................16
 ADMISSIONS ..................................................................................................................................... 16
 Admissions
Policy ........................................................................................................................................ 16
 General
Requirements
for
Admission ................................................................................................. 16
 Admission
Process....................................................................................................................................... 16
 Admission
Criteria ....................................................................................................................................... 17
 Transfer
of
Credit ......................................................................................................................................... 17
 STUDENT
LIFE ................................................................................................................................. 17
 GRADUATION
REQUIREMENTS.................................................................................................. 17
 Program
Components
And
Requirements ........................................................................................ 18
 Presentations
of
Learning ........................................................................................................................ 18
 Deviation
from
the
Course
Sequence................................................................................................... 18
 The
Master’s
Committee
and
Assessing
Student
Learning ........................................................ 18
 The
Research
Project/Thesis .................................................................................................................. 18
 COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
MASTER
IN
EDUCATION
(M.Ed.)
PROGRAM ..................20
 Course
Sequence............................................................................................................................. 23
 DOCTOR
OF
EDUCATION
(Ed.D.)
PROGRAM.................................................................24
 DOCTOR
OF
EDUCATION
HANDBOOK ..................................................................................... 24
 ADMISSIONS ..................................................................................................................................... 24
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Admissions
Policy ........................................................................................................................................ 24
 General
Requirements
for
Admission ................................................................................................. 24
 Admission
Process....................................................................................................................................... 24
 Admission
Criteria ....................................................................................................................................... 25
 Transfer
of
Credit ......................................................................................................................................... 25
 STUDENT
LIFE ................................................................................................................................. 25
 GRADUATION
REQUIREMENTS.................................................................................................. 25
 Program
Components
And
Requirements ........................................................................................ 26
 Presentations
of
Learning ........................................................................................................................ 26
 Deviation
from
the
Course
Sequence................................................................................................... 26
 The
Doctoral
Committee
and
Assessing
Student
Learning ........................................................ 26
 Candidacy
Requirements
for
a
Doctoral
Student ........................................................................... 26
 Dissertation
Proposal ................................................................................................................................. 26
 Dissertation..................................................................................................................................................... 27
 Final
Dissertation
Approvals
and
Procedures ................................................................................. 27


COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
FOR
DOCTOR
OF
EDUCATION
PROGRAM.......................28
 Course
Schedule
­
YEAR
1............................................................................................................ 32
 Course
Schedule
­
Year
2 ............................................................................................................. 33
 Course
Schedule
­
Year
3 ............................................................................................................. 34
 GENERAL
INFORMATION ....................................................................................................35
 STUDENT
SERVICES ....................................................................................................................... 35
 PIONEER
UNIVERSITY
POLICIES................................................................................................ 35
 Attendance
Policy......................................................................................................................................... 35
 Transfer
of
Credit ......................................................................................................................................... 35
 Grading
Policy................................................................................................................................................ 35
 Academic
Credit............................................................................................................................................ 36
 RULES
OF
OPERATION
AND
CONDUCT.................................................................................... 36
 Intellectual
Property
Statement ............................................................................................................ 36
 Code
of
Academic
Integrity ...................................................................................................................... 36
 Internet
and
Electronic
Mail
Usage
Policy......................................................................................... 37
 Internet
and
E‐Mail
Rules ......................................................................................................................... 37
 Respect
for
Self
and
Others...................................................................................................................... 38
 Sexual
Harassment ...................................................................................................................................... 38
 Cancellation
Policy....................................................................................................................................... 39
 Refund
Policy ................................................................................................................................................. 39
 STUDENT
GRIEVANCE
AND
APPEAL
PROCEDURES............................................................. 40
 PIONEER
UNIVERSITY
TUITION
&
SCHOLARSHIPS............................................................. 44
 Master
of
Education
Program ................................................................................................................. 44
 Doctor
of
Education
Program ................................................................................................................. 44
 Board
of
Directors
and
Faculty.........................................................................................45
 Board
of
Directors
and
Officers................................................................................................. 45
 Faculty
–
Graduate
School
of
Education ................................................................................. 45
 Acknowledgements ..............................................................................................................49
 


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Dear Prospective Student, Pioneer University has one School – The Graduate School of Education (GSE). The GSE provides a unique educational opportunity for the credentialed teacher or administrator seeking to become a professional educator. The professional educator is defined by the knowledge and expertise he/she brings to the table in the areas of curriculum, instruction, cognition and pedagogy as well as his/her understanding of school finance, law, business, and administration. The professional is the complete package and is ready to lead in the classroom or organization based on current knowledge of the latest educational research. Similar to the other professions (law, medicine, engineering, architecture, etc.) the professional educator at the K-12 level has a unique skill-set that is honed both as a learner in taking specialized coursework and as a practitioner under the tutelage of a more experienced professional. Some professions call these practicum internships, residencies, or associateships, but the end result is the same: a fully educated and trained professional who displays both the confidence and the expertise to be counted as a full member of that profession. Pioneer University provides a course of study that is tightly coupled with practical application to prepare the professional educator for the demands of K-12 schooling and begins the process of professional dialogue, collaboration, and consultation that defines our profession at the highest level. The program disassociates itself from the notion that teachers are separate from school administrators. Instead, students will learn that administration is an extension of teaching and that professional educators are able to move seamlessly between the many facets found in the K-12 educational environment. The curricular emphasis of the program follows the research of Dewey, Piaget, Vygotsky, Papert, and others who posit that students learn best by doing. Project-based learning and both group and individual inquiry will be emphasized. The graduate student will learn how to both mentor and be mentored, how to work collaboratively with other professionals and how to conduct research to support his/her instructional and organizational decisions. The program is developed around a cohort who will move through the graduate experience together. Professionalism requires commitment and the student must commit to being a contributing and dedicated member of the cohort. Classes that are missed may not be made up until they are offered again in the next cohort and will, undoubtedly, delay a student’s graduation date. In addition, students should be fully aware that this endeavor is a new one. As such, Pioneer University is not yet accredited by a regional accreditation agency. While the University is actively pursuing this goal, the student should carefully consider the non-accredited status of the University before completing an application. We look forward to working together with serious students who have a desire to become true education professionals. For more information call our offices at 760-524-1008 or visit our website at PioneerUniversity.net. Sincerely,

Kim P. Moore, Ph.D. President

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MISSION STATEMENT Pioneer University seeks to have a transformational impact on all who teach, learn, discover and work here so they are prepared for both local and global service. We seek to accomplish this by these four things: • • • •

We are dedicated to student learning and achievement. We learn to both better and serve our community and world. We combine experiential learning with rigorous scholarship in all of our programs to produce educated learners who are awake to new possibilities. We are guided by our values at every level to promote a diverse, challenging, supportive, and entrepreneurial environment of openness, respect, accountability, and academic freedom. MISSION-BASED INSTITUTIONAL LEARNING OUTCOMES

The pursuit of Pioneer University’s overall Mission is embodied in its commitment to prepare students for a life of learning and service in an expanding global community. To succeed in its Mission, the University provides an environment sustained by its Mission. By fostering such an environment, the University aims to encourage its students to achieve the following institutional learning outcomes: 1) As an institution dedicated to student learning and achievement, graduates of Pioneer University will be able to: a) Evaluate problems using the disciplinary knowledge gained in their course of study. b) Explore the cognitive perspectives of their field of study by examining both historic and current literature c) Nurture a passion for lifetime learning and intellectual achievement 2) As an institution producing learners who will both better and serve our community and world, graduates of Pioneer University will be able to: a) Convey their interpretation and opinions to a diverse audience b) Analyze issues, develop and convey solutions to both local and global problems using the methodologies, tools, and techniques of an academic discipline. c) Engage actively in the local community with an eye to their community’s place in the global web of life. 3) As an institution that combines experiential learning with rigorous scholarship in all of its programs to produce educated learners who are awake to new possibilities, graduates of Pioneer University will be able to: a) Display creativity in developing imaginative self expression and independent thinking b) Contribute to the academic discussion in their chosen field(s) of study c) Translate knowledge into judgment and action 4) As an institution guided by our values at every level to promote a diverse, Page
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challenging, supportive, and entrepreneurial environment of openness, respect, accountability and academic freedom, graduates of Pioneer University will be able to: a) Maintain the principles of intellectual honesty, democracy, and social justice b) Participate in human society in the natural world as socially responsible individual citizens c) Contribute original ideas to issues popular and unpopular while maintaining individual integrity Pioneer University’s Mission and Mission-Based Learning Outcomes permeate the entire curricula. From the moment a student steps onto campus and into a classroom, picks up a syllabus, and engages in learning, the Mission of the University is apparent. The University ensures that the Institutional Mission and Institutional Mission-Based Learning Outcomes are apparent to students by embedding them in Program Learning Outcomes, Course Outcomes, Course Design, Course Content, and Evaluation (See Figure 1 Below).

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Figure 1 Preeminence and Infusion of Pioneer University’s Mission

Blue
=
Mission
 Permeates
Institution


Institutional
 Mission


Red
=
Evaluation
of
 How
Well
Mission
is
 Accomplished


Institutional
 Mission­Based
 Learning
 Outcomes


Program
Learning
 Outcomes
for
the
 School
of
 Education


Course
Outcomes


Derive
Content


Course
Design


Formative


Summative
 Evaluation
 


Processes


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Products



PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Students in Pioneer University’s Graduate School of Education will develop professional skills in the application of these program learning outcomes. Instructional Leadership 1.1. Understands and develops a curricular design base for educational inquiry 1.2. Develops expertise in student learning and pedagogy within the frame of Project Based Learning principles and other “Learning by Doing” models. 1.3. Develops expertise in the growth and maturation of student epistemology Organizational Leadership 2.1 Develops a basic understanding of school finance, law and business 2.2 Begins the practice of professional productivity 2.3 Understands and practices the principles of school community, including mentoring, collaboration, and leadership Professional Inquiry 3.1 Develops the skills necessary for inquiry on both the macro and micro levels 3.2 Connects the theory and practicum of educational inquiry to inform educational practice 3.3 Executes Research to provide a basis for instruction These program learning outcomes - instructional leadership, organizational leadership, and professional inquiry - form the foundation of the Education curricula. They inform the student learning outcomes, activities and assignments in each course syllabus.

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Table 1 CONNECTION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION’S PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES TO INSTITUTIONAL MISSION-BASED LEARNING OUTCOMES Mission Based Goals 1a 1b 1c 2a 2b 2c 3a 3b 3c

Instructional Leadership 1.1 1.2 1.3

Organizational Leadership 2.1 2.2 2.3

X

X X X

X X X

X

X X X

X X X

4a 4b 4c

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X

X X

X X

X

Professional Inquiry 3.1

X

X

X

X X X

X X X

X X

3.3

X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X

X X X

X X X

X X

X X X

3.2

X X X

X X

X X

X

X


Table 2 CONNECTION OF MASTER OF EDUCATION COURSES TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION’S PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES M.Ed Courses EDU 500 EDU 505 EDU 510 EDU 515 EDU 520 EDU 525 EDU 530 EDU 535 EDU 540 EDU 550 EDU 555 EDU 560 EDU 565 EDU 570 EDU 600 EDU 605 EDU 650 EDU 660 Thesis

Instructional Leadership 1.1 1.2 1.3 X X X X

X X X X

Organizational Leadership 2.1 2.2 2.3

X

3.1

X X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

Professional Inquiry

X

X X X

X

X X

X X X X X X X X X X X

3.3

X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Students Must Demonstrate Expertise in All 3 General Areas of Instructional Leadership, Organizational Leadership, and Professional Inquiry

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X

3.2

X


Table 3 CONNECTION OF DOCTOR OF EDUCATION COURSES TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION’S PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES Ed.D. Courses EDU 700 EDU 705 EDU 710 EDU 715 EDU 720 EDU 725 EDU 730 EDU 735 EDU 740 EDU 745 EDU 800 EDU 805 EDU 810 EDU 815 EDU 820 EDU 825 EDU 830 EDU 835 EDU 840 EDU 900 EDU 905 EDU 910 EDU 915 EDU 920 EDU 950 DISSERTATION

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Instructional Leadership 1.1 1.2 1.3 X

Organizational Leadership 2.1 2.2 2.3

X X

X

X

X X X

X

X

X

X X X

X X X X X

X X

X X X X X

X

X X X X X

X X X X

X X

X

3.3

X

X X

3.2

X

X

X

3.1

X X X X X

X

Professional Inquiry

X X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Students Must Demonstrate Expertise in All 3 General Areas of Instructional Leadership, Organizational Leadership, and Professional Inquiry in presenting an original piece of research that contributes to the body of knowledge in the field of Education.


Program Evaluation A.

The faculty at Pioneer University takes great pride in ensuring that the University’s mission, mission-based learning outcomes, and program learning outcomes flow from the learning outcomes of each course offered. Furthermore, to make certain that course instruction and student work is of the highest quality, the University has put in place a schema to evaluate student work, program effectiveness, and program learning outcomes, institutional outcomes, and the mission of the University.

B.

Each course will have clearly stated Course Learning Outcomes that are a subset of one or more Program Outcomes. Course work required of students will be clearly tied to these Outcomes. Both program outcomes and course learning outcomes will be included in each course syllabus.

C.

Students in each course will produce work products that will allow the instructor to form either formative or summative evaluative judgments regarding the progress of the student. Formative products, in combination with student/faculty discussions during office hours, will allow the instructor to address the specific needs of each student and to make instructional sea changes throughout the course to ensure a high level of student learning. Summative products (final research papers, course examinations, etc.) will be used to evaluate both the quantity and quality of the student’s mastery of the Course Learning Outcomes.

D.

At the end of each course the instructor will issue a grade to each student based on his/her assessment of the student’s mastery of the Course Learning Outcomes as follows:

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1.

Grade A Exceeds Standards: Outstanding knowledge of course outcomes demonstrated; all assignments turned in on time; professionalism, effort and application above and beyond course requirements reflected in class participation and outside written work.

2.

Grade B Meets Standards: Good knowledge of course outcomes demonstrated; all assignments turned in on time; professionalism, effort and application of course requirements reflected in class participation and outside written work.

3.

Any grade less than a “B” will be not be accepted for credit towards graduation. Students will have an opportunity to make up and grade less than a “B” in the subsequent five-week period of time. After five weeks the grade will become permanent and the student will either need to make up the course in subsequent years,


or if the deficiencies persist, the student may be asked to leave the program. E.

Faculty members will complete the “Faculty Course Outcome Summary Form” for each course taught. This form will summarize the degree (on a scale of 1 to 5) to which students in the course mastered each Course Learning Outcome. The form, accompanied by copies of supporting student work products will be forwarded to the University’s Committee on Institutional Research for evaluation.

F.

In addition, following the completion of each course students shall complete the “Student Course Outcome Summary Form.” This form will ask the student to grade him/herself (on a scale of 1-5) on each Learning Outcome for that course.

G.

The Committee on Institutional Research will examine both the student and instructor’s assessment of learning and will provide the Provost with a correlation of the two products. In addition, the Committee will evaluate the student work submitted and provide feedback regarding its quality to the instructor with a copy to the Provost. Each course will be evaluated annually using this method.

H.

Feedback from this process will be used to inform instruction, reform curriculum, and review and update program offerings.

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Figure
2
 PROGRAM EVALUATION CHART

Mission­based
Learning
 Outcomes


Student
Summative
 Assessments
 Student
Work
Products
 &
Formative
Assessment
 


Instruction


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Program­based
 Learning
Outcomes


Committee
on
 Institutional
 Research


Course
Syllabus


Faculty Course Outcome Summary Form


Student Course Outcome Summary Form


Mission
 


Course
Learning
 Outcomes



THE PIONEER APPROACH Leading with Innovative Practice Pioneer University is committed to providing its students with learning experiences that are personalized, authentic, and relevant. Our students pursue a project-based curriculum, explore their own questions through research and other forms of inquiry, and produce a variety of products that demonstrate their learning. Pioneer University believes strongly in experiential learning and the ability of the student to apply theory to practice. Our students complete coursework to broaden and deepen their understanding of teaching, learning, research, and organizational leadership as they participate in the life of an effective school. Just as we expect surgeons to have hands-on experience in their residencies, Pioneer University Graduate School of Education provides its students with hands-on, practical experiences in the real world of innovative schools. Challenging Common Assumptions During the late 1800’s and all of the last century, public schools developed certain common mores that are now taken for granted as part of the mainstream culture of the public school experience. Some of these include: • The teacher as the provider (rather than the facilitator) of information • Education as a competitive (rather than a cooperative) endeavor • The classroom teacher as a skilled worker (rather than a professional) Pioneer University prepares professional educators who facilitate student learning by collaborating with colleagues, doing timely research, and both consume and produce research within the educational community. Developing Strong School District University Partnerships Pioneer University is committed to developing strong relationships with school districts that embrace the design principles of Pioneer University. Pioneer University seeks cooperation with school districts to develop an educational equivalent to the “teaching hospital.” Currently, Pioneer University has an ongoing and strong relationship with the Oro Grande Elementary School District and is working directly with three of the District’s schools: Oro Grande Elementary School, Riverside Preparatory School, and Mojave River Academy.

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MASTER’S OF EDUCATION (M.Ed.) PROGRAM ADMISSIONS Admissions
Policy
 Candidates are admitted to Pioneer University on the basis of well-defined admission criteria. The admission of students from a diverse population is encouraged. The institution determines that candidates (1) meet high academic standards, as evidenced by appropriate measures of academic achievement, and (2) demonstrate strong potential for professional success upon graduation, demonstrated by personal characteristics and prior experience. General
Requirements
for
Admission
 The minimum requirements for admission to Pioneer University are in accordance with university regulations as well as Title 5, Chapter 1, Subchapter 3 of the California Code of Regulations. Specifically, a student shall at the time of enrollment: 1) have completed a Baccalaureate Degree, 2) be in good academic standing at the last college or university attended, and 3) have attained a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the last 90 quarter (60 semester) units attempted. Applicants who do not qualify for admission under the provisions cited above may be admitted by special action if, on the basis of acceptable evidence, they are judged to possess sufficient academic, professional and other potential to merit such action. Petitions for admission by special action should be directed to the Dean. Admission
Process
 Interested candidates must submit a completed application. Applications received by the priority deadline of May 15th, 2009 will be given first consideration. Applications received after this date will be accepted and considered on a space-available basis. Pioneer University will begin to review applications on May 15th, 2009. Shortly thereafter, Pioneer University will notify applicants if their application is complete and request phone or on-campus interviews with selected candidates. After all the interviews have been conducted and Pioneer University has made its admission decisions, Pioneer University will notify all candidates of their admission status via the U.S. mail.

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Admission
Criteria
 Admission criteria and procedures are defined and described in the application packet and on the Pioneer University website. Interested persons can request an application packet via the phone, e-mail, or in person. The application will include an essay that will ask candidates to write and reflect upon their past educational and/or work experiences and their vision for their career upon graduation from Pioneer University. All candidates for the M.Ed. must submit the following to Pioneer University prior to the admissions deadline: • • •

Official transcripts (with B.A./B.S. posted) sent to the Pioneer University admissions office. Pioneer University application with completed essays. Two (2) confidential references, one of which must be from a current or previous employer.

Transfer
of
Credit
 Pioneer University will not accept credits from other institutions and students will not be awarded credits for prior experiential learning. STUDENT LIFE Pioneer University Graduate School of Education is intentionally small and intimate. This gives students an opportunity for professional discourse with professors and fellow students on issues relating to education. To facilitate these discussions students in the Master of Education program are invited to have dinner each Thursday with faculty and students and to engage in professional conversations regarding both K-12 and university education. During this informal time students who so desire may present their presentations of learning (see below). GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS All graduates of Pioneer University are expected to demonstrate a deep understanding of the three program learning outcomes that guide the program: Instructional Leadership, Organizational Leadership and Professional Inquiry. Through coursework, projects, examinations, practical experiences, and independent research/inquiry, students will demonstrate their expertise in the design principles.

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Program
Components
And
Requirements
 There are three main components to our M.Ed. Program: 1) a set of required courses (46 semester units) taken in a specified sequence; 2) participation in the academic life of the Department including Presentations of Learning; and 3) a Master’s Thesis. Each component is mandatory and substitutes are not allowed. For example, it is not possible to replace the Presentation of Learning with a paper or set of papers, or substitute an exam for the thesis Presentations
of
Learning
 Twice a year master’s candidates will complete a Presentation of Learning (POL), during which they publicly present work completed during the previous months. The POL is a public celebration of the student’s accomplishments and growth. It is also a time for reflection and discussion. As the student reflects on their journey through the program, the audience engages in questions and dialogue with the student about various aspects of their work. Deviation
from
the
Course
Sequence
 As Pioneer University is a small school by design, only one section of each course is offered each year. Therefore, students must enroll and receive a passing grade in every class offered in their program in order to graduate on time. Under certain circumstances, students may take a leave of absence. The Dean of Pioneer University will evaluate these requests on an individual basis. The
Master’s
Committee
and
Assessing
Student
Learning
 Each master’s committee consists of the candidate’s Pioneer University faculty advisor, an additional Pioneer University faculty member, and one or more additional persons of their choice, all of whom must hold a master’s degree or higher. The Pioneer University faculty advisor will take an active role in supporting and advising the student throughout the year. The
Research
Project/Thesis
 Students within the master’s program will design, implement, and publish a thesis based on a research project. The student will identify his/her project topic/question, develop a research proposal, and refine this proposal during research courses. Before beginning his/her research thesis project in his/her second year, the student will present his/her final research proposal to the master’s committee. Once the committee agrees that the proposal is sufficiently developed, the student may enroll in the master’s thesis project course, EDU 660. The thesis is a written document intended for an educational audience. It must include an introduction, a review of relevant literature, an explanation of methodology and analysis, Page
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an interpretation of results, and a discussion of conclusions and implications. The text must adhere to the APA style guidelines outlined in the latest edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. That said, the final product may take a variety of forms.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MASTER IN EDUCATION (M.Ed.) PROGRAM EDU 500 The Professional Learning Environment (4) This yearlong course prepares students for the role of mentor by participating in the mentor/mentee relationship from the prospective of the mentee. Students will complete cycles of inquiry focusing on the following elements: Core academic content and subject specific pedagogy, creating a healthy learning environment, using technology in the classroom, and supporting equity and diversity. EDU 505 Project Based Instruction I (2) This course will focus on project design: brainstorming ideas for projects, mapping content to standards, strategies for grouping students, integrating content, developing timelines and due dates, incorporating rubrics and other assessment tools into project work. EDU 510 Philosophy and History of Education (2) This course is designed to provide a foundational understanding of the field of education in two broad but interconnected areas: the intertwined history and philosophy of education and how these interact within their sociological and cultural contexts. EDU 515 Using Data, and Authentic Assessment, and Portfolios (2) This course will focus on the power of using effective data collection and analysis in the decision-making process. Students will examine a variety of teacher-collected data as well as methods and purposes for school-wide data collection. Students will collect and analyze data from classrooms and schools to provide curriculum and program recommendations based on their findings. EDU 520 Project Based Instruction II (2) Teachers will deepen their understanding and knowledge of project-based work by exploring issues of content, rigor, design, and student ownership. Using a consultancy model, teachers will have the opportunity to reflect on past projects to plan and improve future ones. EDU 525 Using Research (2) This course introduces students to the basic techniques of conducting and analyzing educational research. The course will provide students with the basic information needed to understand the process involved in conducting research and enable students to read, understand, and critique the literature of educational research. EDU 530 Research Methods (2) Page
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This course is designed to provide students with the basic information needed to understand the processes involved in conducting the student’s own research project(s). Students are exposed to applications of statistical techniques, including descriptive, correlation, and inferential techniques as they apply to educational research. This course will encourage contagious intellectual enthusiasm and creativity, an orientation that requires a seriousness of purpose and reverence for learning. EDU 535 Literacy in the 21st Century (2) This course offers intensive instruction in reading and language arts methods that are grounded in methodologically sound research and includes exposure to instructional programs adopted for use in schools. EDU 540 Research I – Design and Methods (2) Participants design a research project. In the process, they learn to value their own voices and the questions they generate about their professional practice. Learning about the research process lays the foundation for using structured inquiry as a strategy for enhancing learning environments. EDU 550 Curriculum Foundations (2) This course is designed to prepare students with both practical and theoretical understanding of curriculum in schooling. The course offers a study of the various approaches of curriculum construction, design, and organization in the schools by examining the principles of curriculum improvement, change, and evaluation. The focus is on the theories, research and, best practices related to planning and developing curriculum and its implementation in schools and classrooms in order to address the needs of students in diverse communities. EDU 555 Curriculum Design and Technology (2) This course engages students in the instructional design process for developing and delivering effective learning experiences in the classroom. In collaboration with classmates, students create technology-enhanced curricula while justifying their design decisions. EDU 560 Introduction to Law and Policy (2) Students become familiar with landmark court cases, legal opinions and legal principles relating to education law. In addition, students explore the political processes involved in policy and legislative formation at the local, state, and federal levels.

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EDU 565 Equity and Diversity in Educational Instruction (2) This course explores the implications of culture – particularly the relationship between “home culture” and “school culture” – for teaching and learning. Participants consider the background experiences, skills, languages and abilities of diverse student groups, and discuss pedagogical approaches that provide both access and challenge for diverse learners. In particular, the course will focus on how teacher and student expectations affect student achievement. EDU 570 Financing and Business (2) This course examines school and district finance and budgeting. The course will also explore fiscal relationships to county, state and federal agencies, as well as budget control, school revenues and expenditures and budgetary procedures and processes. EDU 600 Mentoring, Coaching and Evaluating Instruction (4) This year-long course provides students with training and experience in mentoring colleagues through complete cycles of inquiry focusing on the following elements: Core Academic Content and Subject-Specific Pedagogy, Creating a Healthy Learning Environment, Using Technology in the Classroom, Supporting Equity and Diversity, Supporting English Learners, and Supporting Students with Special Needs. Students will explore the best practices in mentoring across content areas. EDU 605 Professional Productivity (2) This course explores the issue of productivity in education including professional responsibilities in publishing and presenting scholarly work. The use of journals, conferences, and other professional discourse opportunities will be examined. EDU 650 Research II – Application (2) Using what was learned in Research I – Design and Methods, students will conduct a pilot research project based on a topic of their choosing. Students will also learn about various data analysis techniques and begin to link their findings to their essential questions and the relevant research literature. This pilot project will set the stage for the Master’s thesis project students will undertake in their second year of the program. EDU 660 Master’s Thesis Project (6) In this course, students will complete their action research thesis project.

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49



Course Sequence


 Pioneer
University

 Course
Schedule
for
the
2009­2011
Cohort
 
 Time
of
Year
 EDU
505
–
7/27‐ 31/09
 EDU
500
–
8/4,
9/8,
 10/20,
12/1,
1/26,
 3/2,
4/20,
5/25
 EDU
510
–
8/6,
8/13,
 8/20,
8/27
&
9/3

 EDU
515
–
9/10,
9/17,
 9/24,
10/15
&
10/22
 EDU
520
–
10/29,
 11/5,
11/12,
11/19
&
 12/3
 EDU
525
–
12/10,
 12/17,
1/14,
1/21,
 1/28
 EDU
530
–
2/4,
2/11,
 2/18,
2/25,
3/4
 EDU
535
–
3/11,
3/18,
 4/8,
4/15
&
4/22
 EDU
540
–
4/29,
5/6,
 5/13,
5/20
&
5/27
 EDU
600
‐
7/27,
7/29,
 9/14,
11/9,
1/18,
 2/22,
4/12
&
5/17
 EDU
650
–
8/5,
8/12,
 9/21,
10/26
&
11/30
 EDU
660
–
12/7,
 12/14

 EDU
550
–
8/19,
8/26,
 9/2,
9/9
&
9/16
 EDU
555
–
10/14,
 10/21,
10/28,
11/4
&
 11/11
 EDU
560
‐
12/2,
12/9,
 12/16,
1/13
&
1/20
 EDU
565
‐
1/27,
2/3,
 2/10,
2/17
&
2/24
 EDU
570
–
3/3,
3/10,
 3/17,
4/7
&
4/14
 EDU
605
–
4/21,
4/28,
 5/5,
5/12
&
5/19
 
 
 


Classroom
Course
 Project
Based
Instruction
I
(2)


Overlay
Course
 


Professional
Learning
Environment
 (4)


Philosophy
and
History
of
 Education
(2)
 Using
Data,
Authentic
Assessment,
 and
Portfolios
(2)
 Project
Based
Instruction
II
(2)


Using
Research
(2)


Research
Methods
(2)


Literacy
in
the
21st
Century
(2)


Research
I
(2)


Mentoring,
Coaching,
&
Evaluating
 Teachers
(4)


Research
II
(4)


Further
meetings
will
be
scheduled
 with
advisor
 Curriculum
Foundations
(2)


Thesis
(6)


Curriculum
Design
&
Technology
 (2)


Introduction
to
Law
and
Policy
(2)


Equity
and
Diversity
in
Educational
 Instruction
(2)
 Finance
and
Business
(2)


Professional
Productivity
(2)



 Total
Units
–
28+18
=
46
Units




 



 


Regular
Courses
meet
on
Thursday
5:00
p.m.
–
9:30
p.m.
plus
10
hours
by
arrangement
with
small
cohort.
 Overlay
Courses
meet
on
Tuesday
5:00
p.m.
–
9:30
p.m.

plus
20
hours
by
arrangement
with
small
cohort. 


Page
23
of
49



DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (Ed.D.) PROGRAM DOCTOR OF EDUCATION HANDBOOK To ensure that all Doctor of Education Students at Pioneer University have a clear understanding of the rigorous requirements for this program, the University has prepared a Handbook with detailed information for students. Students are strongly encouraged to review the Handbook prior to application. ADMISSIONS Admissions
Policy
 Candidates are admitted to Pioneer University on the basis of well-defined admission criteria. The admission of students from a diverse population is encouraged and actively sought. The institution determines that candidates meet high academic standards as evidenced by appropriate measures of academic achievement, and demonstrate strong potential for professional success in schools upon graduation, demonstrated by personal characteristics and prior experience. General
Requirements
for
Admission
 The minimum requirements for admission to Pioneer University Doctor of Education Program are in accordance with university regulations as well as Title 5, Chapter 1, Subchapter 3 of the California Code of Regulations. Specifically, a student shall at the time of enrollment: 1) have completed a Master’s Degree, 2) be in good academic standing at the last college or university attended, and 3) have attained a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the Master’s program completed. Applicants who do not qualify for admission under the provisions cited above may be admitted by special action if, on the basis of acceptable evidence, they are judged to possess sufficient academic, professional and other potential to merit such action. Petitions for admission by special action should be directed to the Dean. Admission
Process
 Interested candidates must submit a completed application. Applications received by the priority deadline of May 15th, 2009 will be given first consideration. Applications received after this date will be accepted and considered on a space-available basis. Pioneer University will begin to review applications on May 15th, 2009. Shortly thereafter, Pioneer University will notify applicants if their application is complete and request phone or on-campus interviews with selected candidates. After all the interviews have been conducted and Pioneer University has made its admission decisions, Pioneer University will notify all candidates of their admission status via the U.S. mail.

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49



Admission
Criteria
 Admission criteria and procedures are defined and described in the application packet and on the Pioneer University website. Interested persons can request an application packet via the phone or e-mail or in person. The application will include an essay that will ask candidates to write and reflect upon their past educational and/or work experiences and their vision for their career upon graduation from Pioneer University. All candidates for the Doctor of Education degree must submit the following to Pioneer University prior to the admissions deadline: • • •

Official transcripts (with all earned degrees posted) sent to the Pioneer University admissions office. Pioneer University application with completed essays. Two (2) confidential references, one of which must be from a current or previous employer.

Transfer
of
Credit
 Pioneer University will not accept credits from other institutions and students will not be awarded credits for prior experiential learning. STUDENT LIFE Pioneer University Graduate School of Education is intentionally small and intimate. This gives students an opportunity for professional discourse with professors and fellow students on issues relating to education. To facilitate these discussions students in the Master of Education program are invited to have lunch each Friday with faculty and students and to engage in professional conversations regarding both K-12 and university education. During this informal time students who so desire may present their presentations of learning (see below). GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS All graduates of Pioneer University are expected to demonstrate a deep understanding of the three design principles that guide the program: Instructional Leadership, Organizational Leadership and Professional Inquiry. Through coursework, projects, practical experiences, and independent research/inquiry, students demonstrate their expertise in the program learning outcomes.

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25
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49



Program
Components
And
Requirements
 There are three main components to our Ed.D. Program: 1) a set of required courses (60 semester units) taken in a specified sequence; 2) a qualifying examination taken at the end of the student’s second year in the program; and 3) a dissertation. Each component is mandatory and substitutes are not allowed. For example, it is not possible to replace the qualifying exam with a paper or set of papers, or substitute additional exam(s) for the dissertation. Presentations
of
Learning
 Twice a year doctoral students will complete a Presentation of Learning (POL), during which they publicly present work completed during the previous months. The POL is a public celebration of the student’s accomplishments and growth. It is also a time for reflection and discussion. As the student reflects on their journey through the program, the audience engages in questions and dialogue with the student about various aspects of their work. Deviation
from
the
Course
Sequence
 As Pioneer University is a small school by design, only one section of each course is offered each year. Therefore, students must enroll and receive a passing grade in every class offered in their program in order to graduate on time. Under certain circumstances, students may take a leave of absence. The Dean of the Graduate School of Education will evaluate these requests on an individual basis. The
Doctoral
Committee
and
Assessing
Student
Learning
 Each doctoral committee consists of the candidate’s Pioneer University faculty advisor, another Pioneer University faculty member, and one or more other persons, all of whom must hold an earned doctoral degree. The Pioneer University faculty advisor will take an active role in supporting and advising the student throughout the year. Candidacy
Requirements
for
a
Doctoral
Student

 


A doctoral student may be admitted to candidacy if he or she is in regular status, has passed the written and oral examinations, and has completed all of the required coursework. 
 Dissertation
Proposal

 


A dissertation proposal must be approved in advance of the dissertation by the student’s faculty advisor and doctoral committee. The dissertation proposal presents the background, objectives, scope, methods and time lines of the dissertation research.

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26
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49



Dissertation
 Original research carried out by a student at the doctoral level is documented by a dissertation. A dissertation is characterized by a clearly stated proposition or hypothesis that is investigated using analysis and synthesis of data or other scholarly evidence. The dissertation must demonstrate mastery of the relevant literature and the ability of the student to independently and successfully address a substantial intellectual problem with concepts and methods that are accepted in the major field of study. 


Final
Dissertation
Approvals
and
Procedures
 A dissertation that has been successfully defended by the student at the final oral examination must be approved in final form by all members of the doctoral committee, and by the Dean of the Graduate School of Education. The dissertation in final form must also conform to the standards of Pioneer University as determined by the dissertation editor. Because the dissertation is expected to be available to other scholars and to the general public, the entire dissertation must be submitted with appropriate fees to UMI, and must also be available in the Pioneer University library.

Page
27
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49



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR DOCTOR OF EDUCATION PROGRAM EDU 700 Constructivism (2) This course is a collaborative exploration of representative literature in the constructivist tradition. We will assess various approaches, discuss their strengths and weaknesses, and examine areas of convergence and divergence. EDU 705 Coaching, Mentoring, and Peer Conversation (2) Students are introduced to supervisory peer coaching models that support informed decision-making. Participants learn to build trust by developing rapport, to facilitate learning by questioning and developing greater precision in language, and to develop autonomy by increasing their sense of efficacy and self-awareness. EDU 710 Applied Coaching in the Educational Setting (2) In this course students will use the information gained in EDU 705 to coach K-12 faculty with the purpose of achieving gains in student achievement, efficacy, and motivation. Through this process the student will become a more reflective and proactive professional. EDU 715 Cognitive Perspectives (2) The focus of the course will be on the theoretical frameworks of student learning from a cognitive perspective. The course will examine fundamental cognitive concepts and how these ideas evolved over time. The inventiveness of children’s thinking and the sophistication of their interactions will be shown as rich resources, often under-utilized, in typical classroom instruction. The theories of Dewey, Piaget, Vygotsky and others will be discussed. EDU 720 Elements of School Business (2) Students will examine the areas of transportation, school maintenance, school operations, food services, school attendance, student services, athletics, band, ASB, and other elements of the school financial picture and solve case studies from real-world experiences. EDU 725 Historical Perspectives on Curriculum and Instruction (2) Students will focus on pivotal moments in American history and their influence upon the development of educational thought and practice. Key course topics will include: Colonial period, Common school movement, Compulsory Education, Education and Democracy, and Control of the Curriculum.

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49



EDU 730 Seminar in Law and Policy (2) Students will apply knowledge of educational law and legislative policy to solve case studies that present real-world scenarios. EDU 735 Seminar in Educational Technology (2) This course examines the design of applied technology-based learning systems, informed by current views of learning, technology, and cognition. Students will synthesize their knowledge of technology, learning and research in collaborative settings. EDU 740 Seminar in School Business (2) Students will apply knowledge of budgets, state financing, grants, technology, and categorical funding to build the budget and finance a school in the 21st century. Student’s budgets will be subjected to the whims of the financial market, the manipulations of the legislature, and the general economic upturns and downturns to prepare them for the financial realities of running a school. EDU 745 Grant Development in Education (2) This course addresses the process for writing and submitting grant proposals, including training grants, demonstration projects, research grants, and curriculum development projects. EDU 800 Seminar in Project-Based instruction for the College and University Student (2) Students will collaborate with a Pioneer University faculty member to design and instruct a master’s level course in the area of instructional leadership. EDU 805 Advanced Professional Productivity (2) Students will prepare papers and presentations for publication in scholarly publications (journals articles, books, chapters); making professional presentations at state, national, and international professional conferences and before school boards, and state and federal governing bodies. EDU 810 Shaping Learning through Curriculum, Instruction, and Schooling (2) This course explores three critical elements of curriculum and instruction: the role of schooling in shaping students' opportunities to learn, content selection, and structuring instruction.

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29
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49



EDU 815 Seminar in Human Resources (2) This course will examine the processes of personnel administration in the educational setting. Additionally, students will demonstrate a high level of understanding of staff evaluation, due process, and personnel selection practices. EDU 820 International Comparative Education (2) This course examines the comparative study of social, political, and cultural factors that influence international education. Emphasis will focus on reform movements and curriculum and pedagogical characteristics of schools throughout the world. EDU 825 Seminar in Special Education (2) This course will provide opportunities for students to encounter and solve issues in special education. Students will examine the diverse needs of special education students as well as the legal issues surrounding the delivery of special education services. EDU 830 Qualitative Designs (2) Students will learn the theory and practice of qualitative research including the use of longitudinal studies, narrative inquiry, ethnography, and case studies. EDU 835 Quantitative Designs (2) Students will gain a conceptual understanding of fundamental quantitative methods typically employed in educational and psychological research settings including foundations of educational measurement, types of educational measures, and both experimental and non-experimental designs. EDU 840 Dissertation Design Students will learn the design principles of how to design and complete an original dissertation. EDU 900 Seminar in Project-Based instruction for the College and University Student (2) Students will collaborate with a Pioneer University faculty member to design and instruct a master’s level course in an area of instructional leadership, organizational leadership, or professional inquiry.

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49



EDU 905 Introduction to Descriptive and Inferential Statistics (2) Introduces descriptive statistics including graphic presentation of data, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and prediction, and basic inferential statistics, including the t-test. EDU 910 Applied Inferential Statistics (2) Studies sampling theory and inferential statistics; advanced applications for testing of hypotheses regarding central tendency, variability, proportion, correlation, and normality; chi-square and the analysis of frequency data; multiple regression and prediction; introduction to the analysis of variance; and related computer programs for statistical analysis. EDU 915 Advanced Cognitive Studies (2) This course provides an opportunity for the doctoral student to thoroughly explore the cognitive epistemology of a single discipline by examining both historic and current literature on his/her subject of choice. EDU 920 Dissertation Seminar (2) The dissertation proposal will be completed during this course. EDU 950 Dissertation (10) EDU 975 Dissertation (2) This course will be for students who have not completed their dissertation during EDU 950.

Page
31
of
49



Course Schedule - YEAR 1 
 Pioneer
University
 Doctor
of
Education
Program
 Course
Schedule
for
the
2009­2012
Cohort
 
 Time
of
Year
 EDU
700
–
7/20‐24/09
 EDU
705
–
7/20‐24/09
 EDU
710
–
Meet
10
times
 during
year
by
 arrangement.
 EDU
715
–
8/7,
8/14,
 8/21,
8/28
&
9/4

 EDU
720
–
9/11,
9/18,
 9/25,
10/16
&
10/23
 EDU
725
–
10/30,
11/6,
 11/13,
11/20
&
12/4
 EDU
730
–
12/11,
12/18,
 1/15,
1/22,
1/29
 EDU
735
–
2/5,
2/12,
 2/19,
2/26,
3/5
 EDU
740
–
3/12,
3/19,
 4/9,
4/16
&
4/23
 EDU
745
–
4/30,
5/7,
 5/14,
5/21
&
5/28
 


Classroom
Course
 Constructivism
in
Education
(2)
 Coaching,
Mentoring,
and
Peer
 Conversation
(2)
 


Applied
Coaching
in
the
 Educational
Setting
(4)


Cognitive
Perspectives
(2)


Elements
in
School
Business
(2)


Historical
Perspectives
on
 Curriculum
and
Instruction
(2)
 Seminar
in
Law
and
Policy
(2)


Seminar
in
Educational
 Technology
(2)
 Seminar
in
School
Business
(2)


Grant
Development
in
Education
 (2)
 Year
1
Total
Credits
=
22



 Regular
Courses
meet
on
Fridays
1:30p.m.
–
6:00p.m.
 Plus
10
hours
by
arrangement
with
small
cohort.


Page
32
of
49


Overlay
Course
 
 



Course Schedule - Year 2 
 Pioneer
University
 Doctor
of
Education
Program
 Course
Schedule
for
the
2009­2012
Cohort
 
 EDU
800
‐
7/20,
7/21,
+
 teach
class
+
one
meeting
by
 arrangement
 EDU
805
–
7/22
+
4
 meetings
by
arrangement


EDU
810
–
8/6,
8/13,
 8/20,
8/27
&
9/03
 EDU
815
–
9/10,
9/17,
 9/24,
10/15,10/22
 EDU
820
–
10/29,
11/5,
 11/12,
11/19,
12/03
 EDU
825
–
12/10,
 12/17,
1/14,
1/21,
1/28
 EDU
830
–
2/04,
2/11,
 2/18,
2/25,
3/04
 EDU
835
–
3/11,
3/18,
 4/8,
4/15
&
4/22
 EDU
840
–
4/29,
5/6,
 5/13,
5/20
&
5/27
 


Teaching
the
College
and
 University
Student
(2)


Advanced
Professional
Productivity
 (2)
 


Shaping
Learning
through
 Curriculum,
Instruction,
&
 Schooling
(2)
 Seminar
in
Human
Resources
(2)


International
Comparative
 Education
(2)
 Seminar
in
Special
Education
(2)


Qualitative
Design
(2)


Quantitative
Design
(2)


Dissertation
Design
(2)


Year
2
–
Total
Credits
=
18



 Regular
Courses
meet
on
Fridays
1:30p.m.
–
6:00p.m.,
plus
10
hours
with
cohort
by
 arrangement.


Page
33
of
49



Course Schedule - Year 3 
 Pioneer
University
 Doctor
of
Education
Program
 Course
Schedule
for
the
2009­2012
Cohort
 
 Time
of
Year
 EDU
900
–
7/20‐7/21
 EDU
905
–
8/5,
8/12,
 8/19,
8/26
&
9/2
 EDU
910
–
9/9,
9/16,
 9/23,
10/14
&
10/21
 EDU
915
–
10/28,
 11/4,
11/11,
11/18
&
 12/02
 EDU
920
–
12/9,

 12/16,
12/23,
+
2
 meetings
by
arrangement
 
 EDU
950
1/13
–
5/21
 EDU
975

 
 


Classroom
Course
 
 Introduction
to
Inferential
Statistics
 (2)
 Applied
Inferential
Statistics
(2)


Advanced
Cognitive
Studies
(2)


Dissertation
Seminar
(2)
 


Written
and
Oral
Exams
 Dissertation
(10)
 Dissertation
Registration
(2)
if
 Dissertation
not
completed
during
 this
semester
 Year
3
Total
Credits
=
20
 Total
Credits
=
60



 
 



 
 Regular
Courses
meet
on
Fridays
1:30p.m.
–
6:00p.m.
 Plus
10
hours
by
arrangement
with
small
cohort


Page
34
of
49


Overlay
Course
 Teaching
the
College
and
 University
Student
(2)
 



 



GENERAL INFORMATION STUDENT SERVICES Due to the small number of students enrolled at Pioneer University, our programs are highly personalized. Pioneer meets the academic and non-academic needs of our students through two means: the individual attention of either the President or the Dean and a structured mentoring/advising program. Since the size of Pioneer University is small by design, the President and the Dean can dedicate significant time to each student in the program by monitoring their progress through formal and informal means. Should a student have needs or concerns of a more personal nature (counseling, substance abuse, etc.), Pioneer University maintains a list of external agencies to which students may be referred. Pioneer University also has a student grievance procedure found later in this catalogue. PIONEER UNIVERSITY POLICIES Attendance
Policy
 There will be strict adherence to program attendance policies. If a candidate misses more than twenty percent of a course, s/he will be required to take the course the following year. Students may request a waiver to this policy by completing a waiver request and submitting it to the Dean. Transfer
of
Credit
 Pioneer University will not accept credits from other institutions and students will not be awarded credits for prior experiential learning. Grading
Policy
 Pioneer University courses will be graded in one of two ways, dependent upon the duration and content of the course. Some courses will be graded pass/fail while others will be graded on an A, B, F basis. Pioneer University uses a 4.0 grading scale. Students who do not complete a course with a grade of B or better will have 5 weeks to make up the work required in the course or they may receive an F for the course. Two or more failed classes may result in a student repeating the course or being dropped from the program. Grade A Exceeds Standards: Outstanding knowledge of course learning outcomes demonstrated; all assignments turned in on time; professionalism, effort and application above and beyond course requirements reflected in class participation and outside written work. Grade B Page
35
of
49



Meets Standards: Good knowledge of course learning outcomes demonstrated; all assignments turned in on time; professionalism, effort and application of course requirements reflected in class participation and outside written work. Academic
Credit

 Any grade less than a “B” will be not be accepted for credit towards graduation. Students will have an opportunity to make up and grade less than a “B” in the subsequent fiveweek period of time. After five weeks the grade will become permanent and the student will either need to make up the course in subsequent years, or if the deficiencies persist, the student may be asked to leave the program. RULES OF OPERATION AND CONDUCT Intellectual
Property
Statement
 All intellectual property which is generated at school, or related to school, including, without limitation, all equipment, documents, books, computer disks (and other computer-generated files and data), and copies thereof, created on any medium and furnished to, obtained by, or prepared by any student in the course of or incidental to student matriculation at Pioneer University, belong to Pioneer University. Code
of
Academic
Integrity
 The students of Pioneer University, united in a spirit of mutual trust and fellowship, mindful of the values of a true education and the challenges posed by the world, agree to accept the responsibilities for honorable behavior in all academic activities and to assist one another in this Code of Academic Integrity. Violations of the Code of Academic Integrity may take several forms, of which plagiarism is perhaps the most likely. Any of the following, without full acknowledgment of the debt to the original source, counts as plagiarism: • Direct duplication, by copying (or allowing to be copied) another’s work, whether from a book, article, web site, another student’s assignment, etc.; • Duplication in any manner of another’s work during an exam; • Paraphrasing of another’s work closely, with minor changes but with the essential meaning, form and/or progression of ideas maintained; • Piecing together sections of the work of others into a new whole; • Submitting one’s own work which has already been submitted for assessment purposes in another subject; • Producing assignments in conjunction with other people (e.g. another student, a tutor) that should be your own independent work.

Page
36
of
49



Note: Students are responsible for following the code with all assignments and in all disciplines. [This page gives examples of acceptable and unacceptable uses of sources in writing: www.oregonstate.edu/admin/stucon/plag.htm] This brief guide from the Paul Robeson Library also provides an excellent overview: www.libraries.rutgers.edu/rul/libs/robeson_lib/flash_presents/text_plag.html Consequences: First Offense: Student (1) receives a zero (failing grade) on the assignment/project and (2) professor contacts advisor and the Dean of the Pioneer University. Second Offense: Student (1) receives a zero (failing grade) on the assignment/project and (2) a meeting is scheduled with student and the Dean of the Pioneer University, during which additional consequences will be determined. Third Offense: Varies from failure of course to separation from Pioneer University. Internet
and
Electronic
Mail
Usage
Policy
 We are pleased to offer the students of Pioneer University access to the school computer network for electronic mail and the Internet. Access to e-mail and the Internet will enable students to explore thousands of libraries, databases, and bulletin boards while exchanging messages with Internet users throughout the world. Internet
and
E‐Mail
Rules
 Pioneer University students are responsible for their behavior on school computer networks just as they are everywhere in the school environment. Communications on the network are often public in nature. The network is provided for Pioneer University students to conduct research and communicate with others. Access to network services is given to students who agree to act in a considerate and responsible manner. Access is a privilege – not a right. Access entails responsibility. Individual users of all Pioneer University computer networks are responsible for their behavior and communications over these networks. It is presumed that users will comply with school standards. Beyond the clarification of such standards, Pioneer University is not responsible for restricting, monitoring, or controlling the communications of individuals utilizing the network. Network administrators may access storage areas to review files and communications to maintain system integrity and to ensure that users are using the system responsibly. Users should understand that there is no expectation of privacy for files that access or pass through the Pioneer University servers. Within the parameters of the above statements, freedom of speech and access to information will be honored whenever possible. Page
37
of
49



When using the University’s network the following are prohibited: • Sending or displaying offensive messages or pictures • Using obscene language • Harassing, insulting or attacking others • Damaging computers, computer systems or computer networks • Violating copyright laws • Using another’s password • Trespassing in another’s folders, work or files • Intentionally wasting limited resources • Employing the network for commercial purposes Violations may result in a loss of access as well as other disciplinary or legal action. Respect
for
Self
and
Others
 Behavior: Pioneer University students and staff are expected to respect others and support teaching and learning. Prohibited behavior includes offensive language, ignoring a staff request, threats, slander, sexual harassment or misconduct, lying, theft, and fighting. Weapons: Guns, knifes, explosives, or weapons of any type are not permitted in the school, on the campus, and anywhere on the premises. Violations will lead to dismissal. Items that appear to be weapons are prohibited as well. Drugs, alcohol, and tobacco: Drugs, alcohol, and smoking are prohibited in or on Pioneer University campus. Violation of the principles of “Respect for Self and Others,” may lead to student discipline, up to and including dismissal. Sexual
Harassment
 Pioneer University is fully committed to all federal, state, and local human rights and equal opportunity laws. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, amended 1991, and Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 are strictly enforced. This legislation specifically prohibits sexual discrimination in employment, and educational programs and services respectively. Students have the right to gain access to and complete an educational program at Pioneer University. Interference with students' admission to and successful completion of their education by any person through unlawful sexual conduct will not be tolerated. The University will initiate disciplinary action against persons found to have interfered with a student's education through any means of sexual harassment or intimidation.

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Cancellation
Policy
 You may cancel your contract for school, without any penalty or obligations on the fifth business day following your first class session as described in the Notice of Cancellation form. Read the Notice of Cancellation form for an explanation of your cancellation rights and responsibilities. If you have lost your Notice of Cancellation form, ask the school for a sample copy. Any notification of withdrawal must be made in writing. You will be provided a cancellation form at the first day of class. Should you choose to cancel, please submit the form to: Pioneer University PO Box 141 19175 Third Street Oro Grande, CA 92368 After the end of the cancellation period, you also have the right to stop school at any time, and you have the right to receive a refund for the part of the course not taken. Your refund rights are described in the contract. If you have lost your contract, ask the school for a description of the refund policy. If the school closes before you graduate, you may be entitled to a refund. Contact the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education at the Post Office Box 980818, West Sacramento, CA 95798-0818. Refund
Policy
 Students have the right to rescind their tuition agreement up to five business days from the first day they attended class. At that time, the student is entitled to a full refund of his or her tuition payment. Students who withdraw from the program after five business days shall be assessed a prorated hourly charge for the hours of the program attended.

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STUDENT GRIEVANCE AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Pioneer University provides a means by which students may file a grievance for academic and student life issues. Examples include the appeal of an academic dismissal, academic integrity violation, or denial of a petition for a grade change. (For challenging a grade after discussing the grade issue with the instructor). An appeal is a student-initiated response to a faculty, department, or institutionally determined decision. A justifiable cause for grievance shall be defined as any act which, in the opinion of the student, is a response to behavior that is claimed by the student to adversely affects the student him/her and is perceived as capricious, prejudicial, or arbitrary action on the part of any university employee or an arbitrary or unfair imposition of sanctions. I. Initial Grievance and Appeal Procedures The grievance process described in Section II below should be used after the following means have been exhausted. In the area of academics, protocol requires that student concerns, or grievances, or appeals be taken up first with the faculty member within 15 business days after the incident occurred. Outside of academic matters, the student should first address his/her concerns with the dean. Failure to resolve an academic grievance or appeal after meeting with the faculty member requires a meeting with the dean. Failure to resolve a non-academic grievance or appeal after meeting with the dean will then require the filing of a grievance. II. Guidelines for Filing a Grievance In the event that the above procedures fail to resolve the problem, the student will indicate in writing the nature of the grievance, the evidence upon which it is based, and the redress sought, and submit the document(s) to the President of the University. At that time, a Grievance Committee will be formed and proceed according to the guidelines stated below. Filing a grievance shall be initiated only after other attempts to resolve the matter have been exhausted. The student has no more than 10 working days after meeting with the individual he/she believed to have given him/her cause for grievance or 15 working days after the incident that occasioned the grievance in which to file his/her written statement. The grievance process is initiated by submission of a written statement to the President of the University. The statement must include: • • • •

Names of the parties involved. A clear statement of the nature of the grievance. A narrative of the incident including what occurred, when it occurred, where it occurred, and who was present. Evidence on which the grievance is based.

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• • • •

Why this constitutes capricious, prejudicial, or arbitrary action on behalf of a staff or faculty member. What has been done to resolve the grievance? The desired outcome(s). Written permission from the student authorizing distribution to members of the Grievance Committee any relevant information from the student’s education record.

The chair of the Grievance Committee will submit a copy of the grievance to each person who will serve on the Grievance Committee for this incident, as well as to the faculty or staff members involved, the chair of the department involved, and the dean of the school or college involved. The chair will schedule a meeting of the Grievance Committee within 10 working days of the date on which the petition was filed. Only the parties named in the grievance, members of the Grievance Committee, witnesses invited by the Grievance Committee, and the dean, shall attend meetings of the Grievance Committee. If a grievance is filed, either party may seek a support person who must be a faculty member or student. (The support person is present to offer assistance and encouragement to either party during the committee hearing. The function of the support person shall not include that of advocacy nor shall the support person have a role in the committee’s meetings). No one other than members of the Grievance Committee may be present during deliberations. The student shall not bring legal counsel nor have a student or faculty represent him/her as counsel. Likewise, the Grievance Committee shall not have legal counsel present. If a student whose case is to be heard approaches a committee member prior to a meeting, the member shall refuse to discuss the issue and should disclose, at the time of the meeting, that he/she has been approached. Any committee member who has a potential conflict of interest, or who holds a bias or preconceived notion as to the facts of the case and has formed an opinion about them, or who may hold ill will toward the grieving student or the party alleged to have given cause for the grievance, must disclose to the chair the nature of such feelings, bias, or potential conflict. He or she must be excused from participation upon request by such member, or at the discretion of the chair, and replaced by the chair with a substitute committee member of comparable station to the extent possible under the circumstances.

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III. The Grievance Committee Membership: The Grievance Committee shall consist of the following persons: • • •

The dean who will serve as chair (non-voting except in case of tie due to an absence) Two faculty members (or two staff members if the grievance is about staff) Two students

Voting: All members (except the dean responsible for the effected program or designee, who is non-voting) shall have an equal vote and there shall be no alternates or substitutes unless one member must disqualify him/herself due to conflict of interest. Timeliness of Meeting: The meeting will be scheduled within 10 working days following the filing of a written statement. The chair is authorized to extend any time periods provided in the policy if he/she determines that good cause exists (e.g., delay in meeting due to unavailability of an essential party or committee member). IV. Committee Process The grievance procedure shall act as a vehicle for communication and decision-making among students, staff, and faculty, and provide, through prescribed procedures, a process through which a student-initiated grievance can be resolved internally within an appropriate department. The grievance process is initiated by submission of a grievance statement in writing to the dean. The statement must contain the names of the parties involved, narrative about the incident, and the remedies requested. The dean will submit a copy of the grievance to each member of the Grievance Committee prior to the hearing. Thereupon, the committee will be activated and a meeting will be held to consider the matter. The involved student and university employee may be present at the committee meetings, except during deliberation. The meetings shall be held at times when both parties can be present. Either party may seek a support person who must be an university employee or student. The function of the support person shall not include that of advocacy nor shall the support person have a role in the committee’s meetings. Accurate minutes of the grievance procedure shall be kept in a confidential university file of the committee’s proceedings. The hearing may also be audio recorded at the option of the chair of the Grievance Committee.

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In cases of conflicting information and/or when additional information is desired, the committee may request testimony from additional witnesses having information pertinent to the grievance. No printed materials or notes may be taken from the meeting (other than the official minutes). The parties and committee members may not discuss the case outside the meeting. The committee will decide on the matter by simple majority and confidential vote. Both parties will be notified, in writing, within one week of the decision. The committee’s vote is confidential and the decision shall be final. V. Failure to File Grievance Any student who has a grievance complaint against the university must follow this procedure or will waive any claim against the university.

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PIONEER UNIVERSITY TUITION & SCHOLARSHIPS Master
of
Education
Program
 Pioneer University tuition for the Master’s Program is $287.00 per unit, which includes tuition, books and other required handouts. The total cost of the program is $13,200. Pioneer University is providing a 25% scholarship ($3,300) to all students in the first cohort (2009-2010). The following costs are not covered in tuition: equipment, housing, transportation, supplies, and other miscellaneous expenses. Your tuition is mandatory and refundable. See the refund policy on the previous page. Tuition is payable to Pioneer University. Students may be billed monthly for tuition payments if arrangements are made with the University. Doctor
of
Education
Program
 Pioneer University tuition for the Doctor of Education Program is $330.00 per unit, which includes tuition, books and other required handouts. The total cost of the program is $19,800. Pioneer University is providing a 25% scholarship ($4,950) to all students in the first cohort (2009-2010). The following costs are not covered in tuition: equipment, housing, transportation, supplies, and other miscellaneous expenses. Your tuition is mandatory and refundable. See the refund policy on the previous page. Tuition is payable to Pioneer University. Students may be billed monthly for tuition payments if arrangements are made with the University.

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Board of Directors and Faculty Board of Directors and Officers J. Peter Lounsbury, Chairman of the Board of Directors Kim P. Moore, Ph.D., Director and President of the University Jason A. Moore, Ed.D., Director and Executive Vice President and Provost Carl Ackermann, Director Joseph Andreasen, Director Greg Lundeen, Director Edna Rodriguez, Director Vacant Director Vacant Director Faculty – Graduate School of Education Kim P. Moore Professor of Education Ph.D., Education: Educational Psychology, 1997 University of California, Riverside M.A., Education: Educational Technology California State Polytechnic University, Pomona B.A., Biblical Languages and Literature Loretto Heights College Areas of Specialization: Cognitive Psychology, Psychometrics, Research Design, Educational Systems Administration. Jason A. Moore Associate Professor of Education Ed.D., Education: K-12 Leadership in Urban Settings, 2007 University of Southern California M.A., Educational Administration: Curriculum California State University, San Bernardino B.A., Liberal Studies California State University, San Bernardino Areas of Specialization: Curriculum and Instruction, Teacher Education, History of Education, Research Design.

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Victor Palmer Assistant Professor of Education Ed.D., Education: Teaching and Learning, 2000 University of Southern California M.A., Educational Administration Azusa Pacific University B.A., Modern Languages University of Texas, El Paso Area of Specialization: Teaching and Learning, Human Resources in Education, Differentiated Instruction, Equity, Diversity, and Design Principles. Frank A. Mora Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education Ed.D., Education: Educational Psychology, 2007 University of Southern California M.A., Multicultural Education California State University, Dominguez Hills B.A. History: Emphasis in Latin American and Southeast Asian History California State University, Long Beach Areas of Specialization Multicultural Children’s Literature, Technology for Educators, Equity and Diversity. James D. Reed, II Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education Ed.D., Education: Policy, Planning, and Administration, 2007 University of Southern California M.A. Educational Administration: Pupil Personnel Services California State University, Los Angeles M.S., Criminal Justice: Administration California State University, Los Angeles B.A., Criminal Justice & Political Science California State University, Fullerton Areas of Specialization Action Research, Administration of Human Resources, School Business and Finance.

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Sheri A. Wilkins Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education Ph.D., Education: Special Education, 2007 University of California, Riverside M.A., Special Education: Mild/Moderate Handicaps California State University, San Bernardino B.S., Special Education: Intellectual Handicaps Utah State University Area of Specialization: Special Education, Teacher Education, Peer Coaching and Mentoring. Joseph B. Andreasen Adjunct Lecturer of Education M.A., Educational Administration, 1991 California State University, San Bernardino B.A., Liberal Studies California State University, San Bernardino Areas of Specialization Human Relations, Alternative Education S. Shawn Bell Adjunct Lecturer of Education M.S., Special Education, 2003 National University B.S., Communications California State University, San Bernardino Area of Specialization: Special Education, the professional learning environment, action research S. Michael Buckhave Adjunct Lecturer of Education M.A., Education: Educational Leadership, 2005 California State University, San Bernardino B.S., Kinesiology California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Area of Specialization: Authentic Assessment, Using Data in Analyzing Student Achievement, Technology.

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Greg Lundeen Adjunct Lecturer of Education M.S., Human Resources Management, 1999 Chapman University B.A., Management of Human Resources: Organizational Development Fresno Pacific College Areas of Specialization School Business, School Construction and Design, Human Resources Patricia Lundeen Adjunct Lecturer of Education ABD, Educational Leadership: Reading and Literacy, 2008 Azusa Pacific University M.A., Education: Educational Technology California State Polytechnic University, Pomona B.S., Social Sciences California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Area of Specialization: Reading and Literacy, Elementary Grades Instruction Amy E. Weidman Adjunct Lecturer of Education M.A., Education: Curriculum and Instruction, 1990 University of California, Riverside B.A., Music: Elementary Education Whitworth College Areas of Specialization: Curriculum and Instruction, Gifted and Talented Education, Music Education Note: Only faculty members with terminal degrees instruct Ed.D. courses.

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Acknowledgements


 In constructing this handbook the faculty and staff of Pioneer University looked at numerous catalogues and handbooks for both content and style features. Pioneer University would specifically like to thank the following institutions as their literature proved to be easily adaptable to own Mission and Purpose: Creighton Christian College, High Tech High Graduate School of Education, University of Southern California, BYUHawaii and California State University, Channel Islands. 


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09-10 Catalog