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ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN PORTFOLIO FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE | UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA

SHANE CUENCA 7800735


STATEMENT OF INTENT Growing up, I was exposed to parents that loved buying, selling, and redesigning properties. Coming from the Philippines and as first-time buyers in Winnipeg, my parents would buy cheap houses that were not in exquisite condition. I remember the seven-year-old me being fascinated at the fact that a runned-down house that once looked scary could be transformed into a beautiful and comfortable home. As I got older, learning from my four-year drafting class in high school and watching programmes relating to designing spaces on TV allowed me to realize that spatial design is critical. The reveal moment of a redesigned or designed kitchen, office, bedroom or space leaves clients fluttered, surprised, and in awe. This heart warming reaction is what intrigues me the most about spatial design—it is not only about making a space look pretty, but also derives from making connections with people aesthetic-wise, health-wise, and personal-wise. In the future I intend to design small-scale spaces and provide help to people with my design capabilities in designing attractive and meaningful spaces. I am eager to learn about mixing materials, furnishing spaces, and how texture, colour, and lighting can create a comfortable and eye-catching space for a client.


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 P1. BODY + SPACE: Reciprocal Cognizance

3 WORKSHOP 1: Paperfolding

11 P2. MATERIALS + MEANING: Corn Fairies

21 WORKSHOP 2: Plaster Casting

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49 P5. LANDSCAPES + ECOLOGIES: Green Right District - Seating View

63 WORKSHOP 4: Operative Design

65 P6. LIVING + DWELLING: Secret Home

77 URBAN MEDIA LAB

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P3. SPACE + EMERGENCE: Heaven

CREATIVE WORKS

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P4. STRUCTURE + THRESHOLD: Lounge-Walk

BIBLIOGRAPHY

47 WORKSHOP 3: Mapping - Seven Walks


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RECIPROCAL COGNIZANCE P1. Body + Space Brief: How much do we know about the human body, its dimensions and potentials? What are the particular relationship between our body and space? What are the ways that we can examine and understand our body, and tap into its potentials and hidden dimensions? Groups will observe, document, and discuss the body-space relationship regarding particular presences/absences of the body in space. 1 This project examines the sight-hearing relationship as the sole means to understand the spatial environment. Group: Mia Papasotiriou + Valerie Allen + Yan Wu Duration: September 11 - October 2, 2017

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EXAMINING THE EYES AND EARS The group began the project by measuring and examining each group member’s eyes and ears, how they are set, and how in comparison, they are different from one another.

Inspiration Takehito Etani’s Mastecator and Jean Tinguely’s Meta Matics were the group’s inspiration as both artists body apparatus’ aesthetic were its mechanism.2, 3

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Ian: • Width: 2.8 cm • Height: 6.9 cm

Valerie: • Width: 3.4 cm • Height: 6.2 cm

Mia • Width: 3.4 cm • Height: 6.2 cm

Shane: • Width: 3.5 cm • Height: 6.7 cm

Ian: • Width: 3.2 cm • Height: 0.7 cm

Valerie: • Width: 3.1 cm • Height: 1.0 cm

Mia: • Width: 3.0 cm • Height: 1.1 cm

Shane: • Width: 3.3 cm • Height: 1.1 cm


RESEARCH AND IDEAS To gain an understanding of the structure and function of the eyes and ears, research had to be done. By reading Juhani Pallasmaa’s Eyes of the Skin, the group discovered the sight-hearing relationship, in which “the eye reaches, but the ear receives” and how the visual sense is at the top of the senses hierarchy. The group was first keen on interchangeable lenses, inspired by Benjamin Franklin’s glasses, and a moving bat ear piece, where altering one of the senses would affect the other. One of the ideas was to have wooden dowels that were attached to a lens and the ear piece, so that when the dowel is placed at the back of the helmet, the lens would open up while at the same time changing the shape of the ear piece.

Wooden Dowel idea

Final idea 4


ITERATIONS The struggle faced in the process of developing Reciprocal Cognizance was the challenge of combining both functionality and aesthetics.

First Iteration The group played with different opacities of lenses to see how different amounts of light affect how one hears. A soundproof headphone was used to experience different levels of hearing. The problem with this iteration was that the eye and ear piece were not connected as one cohesive piece.

Second Iteration The group decided to only focus on a normal and a super opaque lens instead of different coloured lenses. Welding goggles were used to accomplish this idea. Furthermore, a construction-grade ear protection was used, because it was the closest to the soundproof headphones used during the first iteration. 5


PROCESS Before constructing Reciprocal Cognizance, a welder’s helmet was chosen as the final base of the model as it blocked out most peripheral light. A construction grade ear protection was also chosen as it provided a soundproof seal around the ear. The model was spray painted white to contrast the black acrylic lens and to give it a clean look. Ironically, one of the challenges faced in constructing the apparatus was keeping the model clean from dirt and fingerprints. Moreover, the ear piece was attached to the helmet in a way that it only fit tight to the wearers ears. In sum, the model required a great deal of sanding and spray painting to achieve its pristine look, and to acquire a model that gives the appearance that the ear piece and the helmet was originally intact.

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FINAL APPARATUS Reciprocal Cognizance enhances the idea that an inverse relationship exists between sight and hearing. Where blocking one sense by closing the eyes would enhance hearing and vice versa, helping the wearer concentrate within its surroundings and change the way one perceives space. The wearer will selectively choose either to hear to orient or to see to understand the space, by pulling on the string that hangs at the back of the apparatus. As the wearer pulls on the string, the lens will open and the silicone putty blocks the hole in the ear piece, blocking the sounds and vice versa.

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IN CONTEXT Navigating through University Center with the lens closed was difficult since the wearer had to navigate the place with the apparatus while only being able to hear normally. The wearer was walking at a slower pace and became more aware of sounds that the wearer never really focused on before. On the other hand, with the lens open and the hearing plugged, the wearer did not know if the wearer was speaking loudly or quietly. The wearer could not wear the apparatus for too long as that wearer had trouble breathing and noticed that while wearing the apparatus, it attracted many people’s eyes. Taking this project further, the group would like to develop the apparatus to be universal to fit and having a better breathing system.

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PAPERFOLDING Workshop 1 “All designers fold. That is, all designers crease, pleat, bend, hem, gather, knot, hinge, corrugate, drape, twist, furl, crumple, collapse, wrinkle, facet, curve or wrap two-dimensional sheets of material and by these processes of folding, create three-dimensional objects. These objects will perhaps not be origami-like in appearance, or the folding may only be a detail, but most will nevertheless have been folded - wholly or in part - in some way. Since almost all objects are made from sheet materials (Such as fabric, plastic, sheet metal or cardboard), or are fabricated from components used to make sheet forms (such as bricks - a brick wall is a sheet form), folding can be considered one of the most common of all design techniques.� -Archipelago W. Duration: October 11-13, 2017

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CORN FAIRIES P2. Materials + Meaning Brief: The project pursues a purposeful integration of materials exploration and toy design. Students are encouraged to explore the limits of materiality, through temporal modification, transformation, and progression of the chosen material(s), and to discuss the ideas and understandings of form, deform, and dematerialization. From this, groups will experience the material properties first hand and use this knowledge to conceptualize and design a toy application for a user-group of choice.4 This project explores the unforeseen ability of the corn husk material and extends its capacity by conceptualizing a night light toy for children. Group: Tiffany Maybituin Duration: October 11- November 6, 2017

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MATERIAL EXPLORATION The group assignment was to investigate and experiment with three materials: rice, plastic bag, and corn husk. The group was required to perform various tests to further maximize the potentials and discover the limitations of the group’s selected materials. The operations done for the test was: to boil, to grind, to dehydrate, to melt, and to mix. By observing the characteristics, researching, and testing of the four materials, the group agreed to use corn husk as the final material choice for the toy that the group needs to conceptualize and design.

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MATERIAL EXPLORATION CORN HUSK EXPERIMENT A series of experiments were done to discover the limitations and maximize the full potential of corn husks. The group first started by mixing grounded corn husks with different materials such as: rice, corn starch, coffee, silicone, wood glue, detergent, baking soda, vinegar, and lye, to try and create a solid sheet of corn husk. These sets of experiments did not work as most were too brittle or took too long to dry. With further research into the material, the group discovered that one could create paper out of corn husks due to the fibers that are embedded in it. In the process of creating paper, the group was able to separate its fibers from its other plant materials. From this, the group decided to use the fibers of corn husks to develop a thread.

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PROCESS CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT & ITERATIONS The group was required to develop a character for the toy that led to the concept and design of the group’s toy. Age Group: Children, 4-12 years old Name: Cornelia Type of Toy: Passive Context: Indoor/Outdoor- Indiana, USA Cornelia is an orphaned lonely child who likes to tag along with her brother whom she only plays with. Kids in the orphanage find her weird because she obsessively loves corn and believes in creatures like corn fairies. She is secretly afraid of the dark and at night, and a fairy friend protects her from the night monsters.

Cornelia

Different Ideas of the Toy Sketches of the ideas of the toy helped determine the shape and purpose of the final product. The group decided that the final apparatus should resemble a corn while also acting as a night light. Inspired by traditional corn husk dolls and amigurumi dolls, two different prototypes were crocheted to determine the final form of the apparatus and the light placement.

Drawing of Cornelia and final design of the toy by: Tiffany Maybituin 15


PROCESS CORN HUSK TO YARN To transform the corn husks to yarns, its fibers were needed to be extracted. To do this, the corn husks were boiled with washing soda to break down the corn husk from its plant state down to its fibers. The corn husks were then put in a blender to separate the fibers from its excess plant material. From this, long strands of fibers were separated and a collective of strands were twisted together to form a thread. Each thread needed to be knotted together to form a single continuous thread. To achieve a soft texture, the threads were mixed with a plant fiber, cotton, creating a yarn. This yarn was used to crochet the toy. The group also experimented with naturally dyeing cotton to achieve different colours of the toy.

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PACKAGING The Corn Fairies packaging was designed to tell a story. The house-shaped box acts as Cornelia’s house while at the same time houses the Corn Fairy. Through the window, Cornelia sees fairy dusts and as a child follows it, the fairy dusts lead to the opened window where the child would be able to see the Corn Fairy. The box was first originally white with coloured details, but the group agreed that the box should resemble more of a ‘farm’ themed aesthetic. The box was made out of MDF and laser cut. The brown colour of the material helps to set the ‘farm’ theme. At the front of the box is the ‘Corn Fairies’ brand and logo. To secure the packaging, a corn husk thread was used.

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FINAL PRODUCT Corn Fairies is intended to help children overcome their fear of the dark by broadening the user’s imagination through believing in a magical character, the ‘Corn Fairy’, that will help guide a child in dark places. Corn Fairies functions as a friend, a night light, and a toy for a child’s comfort. The final product of Corn Fairies is coloured white to further enhance a child’s imagination by giving them the ability to customize their ‘Corn Fairy’ by using natural dyes. This allows children to attach meaning to the toy personally and emotionally.

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IN CONTEXT The final form of Corn Fairies allows children to be able to hold on to the toy in an easy and comfortable position, whether that is in the dark or by carrying it along with the user whereever. When lit in the dark, the crochet design helps to soften the light being shone and creates a mesmerizing pattern. Overall, the group struggled with combining the cotton with the corn husk threads. With time being a constraint, the group was only able to crochet one form of the toy, however, the project was a success. For future improvements, the group would add more flaps to fully resemble a corn-like toy and another lighting device that will light up the toy through a squeezing action of the child.

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PLASTER CASTING Workshop 2 “But in the great Sperm Whale, this high and mighty god-like dignity inherent in the brow is so immensely amplified, that gazing on it, in that full front view, you feel the Deity and the dread powers more forcibly than in beholding any other object in living nature. For you see no one point precisely; not one distinct feature is revealed; no nose, eyes, ears, or mouth; no face; he has none, proper; nothing but that one broad firmament of a forehead, pleated with riddles...� -Herman Melville Duration: November 10-15, 2017

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HEAVEN P3. Space + Emergence Brief: What are the contextual attributes and agencies that construct our spatial experience? How do they affect our sense of spatial presence? Can we question/ change the nature of our presence by transforming the spatial attributes? Can we actively engage in the construction of a spatial experience? Can we dislocate ourselves from a space, its context, through spatial effects? Can we immerse into an experience that is unfamiliar, strange, and surreal and so on? Students will explore the ideas of immersive experience within a limited space: their own room.5 Shane Cuenca Duration: November 10 - December 18, 2017

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INSPIRATIONS AND SPACE To better understand the spatiality and nature of the existing space, a photo joiner and draft of the room had to be done. From research, heaven is seen as a place where all things are new—there are no tears of pain and there is perfect peace. By taking inspiration from artists such as Tomas Saraceno, Charles Patillion, Kohei Nawa and Caitlind Brown, clouds became the main feature of the installation as it symbolizes clear thinking, emotional purity, and the gateways to heaven. Clouds are also ephemeral, it is constantly moving, short-lived, and leave no trace; a metaphor for problem’s to disappear.

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INTENT Heaven is an installation intended to create a heavenly experience, where one could get away from the stresses and problems experienced within everyday life. It emphasizes the idea of comfort that a person would feel within the space—the bedroom. The installation is focused mainly on the bed, as a place where one rests, finds peace, and can unwind. The goal of the installation was to create the illusion that the bed is floating in air within the clouds as a way of examining life from a higher perspective.

PLAN

Diagrams

0’

1’

8’

Collage 26


ITERATIONS AND MODEL

Batting First experimented with batting to try to create realistic-looking clouds. It could not hold the cloud’s form and did not have a design quality to it.

Tissue Paper The crumpled tissue paper helped to define textures and provide a design quality. The problem with this material was that it ripped easily. 27

Final Model


PROCESS MAKING THE CLOUDS

To make the clouds, a wire frame first had to be constructed. This helped shape and hold the cloud’s form. After, the frame was wrapped with interfacing and white kraft paper and was stapled inside to create the crumpled effect. Warm string lights were then wrapped around the wire so that the lighting would be distributed inside the clouds. When lit, the crumpled effect creates shadows and emphasizes different textures that are similar to real clouds.

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PROCESS SETTING UP THE INSTALLATION Cumulus and stratus clouds were the chosen clouds to be in the installation as cumulus clouds only appear during sunny days and stratus clouds appear in the sky like blankets of clouds. The warm lighting in the installation promotes relaxation, helping to achieve a comfortable atmosphere. In the installation, the size and number of clouds were at random as clouds in real life do not have a definite size or number. However, the clouds were carefully placed within the space to achieve the ethereal-like quality with some on the ground, at head-level and on the ceiling. Lights were also placed surrounding the bed to achieve the illusion that it is floating high in the air.

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HEAVEN FINAL OUTCOME

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EXPERIENCE The installation generates a calming atmosphere after a long day. Waking up, the clouds above the bed makes the viewer stare at the installation and contemplate on life. As the heater turns on, the clouds produce a movement that are similar to real clouds. For future improvements, an eco-friendly material could be used as the installation required more than 70 meters of interfacing and kraft paper. Overall, the installation was a success.

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THE CINEMATIC EXPERIENCE The flipbook provides viewers an immersive cinematic experience. Comprised of 60 images, the flipbook moves the viewer through the space, showings its context and the view of the installation from below.

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LOUNGE-WALK P4. Structure + Threshold Brief: How can a public structure typify a threshold experience in our environment? How can the needs of users be met while respecting the ongoing program around them? How do we move through spaces? How (how much) can we affect our inhabitation by modulating/changing the elements in threshold and/ or sequencing space? This project creates the opportunity to envision and realize a public structure that meets interventional qualities, transformation, adaptation, and succession specific to the Faculty of Architecture. Groups are asked to design a structure that engages the outbuildings (Arch 2, CAST, JAR and Education) in this context through an attempt to raise awareness of the various possibilities for such spaces, and what it can state about the future/ambition of the Faculty.10 Group: Johanna Besiata and Danna Ambrosio Duration: January 3 - January 24, 2018

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INTENT

HELEN GLASS CENTRE

EDUCATION BUILDING 1

Lounge-Walk is a public structure that aims to connect JAR and C.A.S.T to break the uncertainty that faculty of Architecture students feel about C.A.S.T. and to have the facility be recognized as an important part of the faculty as a whole.

HELEN GLASS CENTRE

EDUCATION BUILDING 1

ARCH 2

ARCH 2

RUSELL BUILDING

SERVICE STREET 4S

EITC

PARKING LOT 'J'

In the group’s initial site analysis, the group noticed how the Centre for Architectural Structures and Technology building (C.A.S.T) was forgotten and disregarded in the group’s context plan. The group observed that there is a hierarchy between the Faculty of Architecture buildings with the John A. Russell building (JAR) at the top of the hierarchy, Architecture 2 in second, the Education building in third, and C.A.S.T. in the bottom of the hierarchy.

PARKING LOT "O"

STANLEY PAULEY CENTRE

PARKING LOT 'J'

MUSIC BUILDING

MUSIC BUILDING

In the end, the group chose to connect JAR and C.A.S.T., because JAR is frequently used for public lectures, studio reviews and exhibitions. Lecture rooms in JAR are also used by non-faculty students and bus users also use JAR to go to the tunnels. Meanwhile, C.A.S.T. is important to the faculty as it participates in an expanding constellation of world-class research facilities within and beyond the university. C.A.S.T. also seeks to promote research benefiting students, researchers, the industry, the public and the planet.

CAST BUILDING

STANLEY PAULEY CENTRE

PARKING LOT "O"

CAST BUILDING

DAFOE ROAD

DAFOE ROAD

Initial Context Plan

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EITC

SERVICE STREET 4S

RUSELL BUILDING

01 5 10

20

50m


INITIAL THRESHOLD EXPERIENCE

Faculty of Architecture Staff:

Faculty Students:

Faculty Members and the Public:

This collage represents how faculty staffs feel inside the JAR building— enclosed despite the open windows.

This collage portrays faculty students needing to head outside for a fresh air from studio.

This collage represents the uncertainty and curiosity from many of what C.A.S.T. is and what is inside the space.

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SITE ANALYSIS The first step was to gather information regarding the circulation and movement of different user groups within JAR and C.A.S.T. The group also looked at the users of each space, the vegetation around both buildings, the sun path and orientation throughout the year, and the wind direction. These information helped figure out what was lacking in both spaces, and to develop strategies and options for the development of the connection.

W 150

7464

ABANDONED ST

ABANDONED ST

ABANDONED ST

W 150

7464

W 150

7464

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mh mh

mh

mh mh

cb

cb

PARKING LOT 'J'

PARKING LOT 'J'

PARKING LOT 'J'

PARKING LOT "O"

DAFOE ROAD

INITIALCirculation CIRCULATION Initial LEGEND FOASTAFF Staff FOA FOA FOASTUDENTS Students NON-FACULTY STAFF/STUDENTS/BUS USERS Non-faculty Staffs/Students/Bus Users

PARKING LOT "O"

PARKING LOT "O"

Services Building

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Service Street 4S

Service Street 4S

Service Street 4S

cb

Services Building

DAFOE ROAD

Services Building

DAFOE ROAD


SUN PATH AND WIND DIRECTION Determining the sun path throughout the year helped outline the generous amount of sunlight that shines on the site throughout the year. The peak of the sun during the day plays a factor in the placement of the structure within the site and the importance and placement of shades within the structure.

JUNE 2017 WIND DIRECTION

Knowing the wind direction also helped contribute to the placement of windows for natural ventilation in the connection.

JANUARY SUN PATH

JUNE SUN PATH

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June 2017 Wind Direction

TIME: 9:00 AM

TIME: 9:00 AM N

W

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JUNE 2017 WIND DIRECTION

JANUARY 2018 WIND DIRECTION

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TIME: 3:30 PM

TIME: 3:30 PM

January 2018 Wind Direction W

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JANUARY 2018 WIND DIRECTION

Lorem ipsum

Lorem ipsum

January Sun Path

June Sun Path 38


ITERATIONS The group played with different possible forms, connections and levels that led to the final form and design of Lounge-Walk. The group aimed for the connection structure to be multifunctional while meeting the needs of faculty students and staffs as well as the public overall. In the end, the group chose the hexagon form as it achieved the goal of creating a unique form while also maximizing the space that students and staffs can use.

Inspiration

Initial Iterations

The group was inspired by OMA’s 11th Street Bridge Parks’ multifunctional bridge design.11

Initial iterations done by the group were often big in size and where some exhibit an additional ‘loud area’ to the library.

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ITERATIONS POSSIBLE FORMS

Skylight Panels on Roof This iteration involves skylight panels on the roof to keep the connection as opened as possible. The first level in this iteration has a directional emphasis to the engineering buildings, making it welcoming to engineering students who also utilize C.A.S.T., allowing to form new relationships between Faculty of Architecture students and engineering students.

Louvered Panels Taking the skylights panel idea from the previous iteration, the group designed skylights that guide users inside the space when lit during the day. Vertical louver panels were also added, reflecting JAR’s panel design while also helping to shade the users of the space from the sun. The willow trees in front of JAR will be reclaimed to use as the material for the vertical louver panels. This iteration also involves the use of ramps making it handicapped accessible.

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DIAGRAMS Lounge-Walk is a connecting structure between JAR and C.A.S.T that acts both as a skywalk and a lounging area for the public. It is designed to be a third piece to JAR and C.A.S.T. where faculty and non-faculty staff and students can socialize, eat a meal, and take a break—an extension to JAR’s library which has the opposite atmosphere. By placing a coffee kiosk, the space still maintains its “public space” identity rather than a space that is meant only for Faculty of Architecture staff and HELEN GLASS students to utilize. CENTRE EDUCATION BUILDING 1

The two stairs from both ends of Lounge-Walk allows the connection to meet halfway within the height difference between JAR and C.A.S.T., acting as new thresholds between the two buildings. Furthermore, the placement and canopies of the trees also act as shades during the summer, allowing users to connect with nature inside the space.

mh

cb

CH 2

RUSELL BUILDING

SERVICE STREET 4S

EITC

PARKING LOT 'J'

PARKING LOT "O"

MUSIC BUILDING

STANLEY PAULEY CENTRE

CAST BUILDING

DAFOE ROAD

DAFOE ROAD

SPATIAL DIAGRAM LEGEND

Lounge-Walk Plan Convertible Patio

Open Lounge and Study Coffee Kiosk Entry/Exit of the Lounge-Walk

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SITE CIRCULATION LEGEND SPATIAL DIAGRAM LEGEND CIRCULATION DIAGRAM Circulation Diagram SPATIAL DIAGRAM LEGEND General Movement Convertible Patio 200 Level LEGEND Movement towards lounge/study University of Manitoba staff and students Convertible Open LoungePatio and Study Open Lounge Study Coffee Kiosk and University of Manitoba staff and students Coffee Kiosk Entry/Exit of the Lounge-Walk Entry/Exit of the Lounge-Walk

SPATIAL DIAGRAM LEGEND

SITE CIRCULATION LEGEND Lounge-Walk Circulation SITE CIRCULATION LEGEND General Movement General Movement General Movement Movement towards lounge/study Movement towardslounge/study lounge/study Movement towards

Convertible Patio Spatial Diagram SPATIAL DIAGRAM LEGEND

200 Level 200 Level

Open Lounge and Study Convertible Patio Convertible Patio Coffee Kiosk Open Lounge Lounge and Open andStudy Study Entry/Exit of the Lounge-Walk Coffee Kiosk Coffee Kiosk Entry/Exit of Entry/Exit ofthe theLounge-Walk Lounge-Walk

SITE CIRCULAT

General SITE CIRCUL

Moveme Gene Move


VIGNETTE PERSPECTIVE The group was required to develop drawings that capture the essence and experience of Lounge-Walk from an exterior and an interior perspective.

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C

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A C Drawing by: Johanna Besiata

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ELEVATION From a south and west elevation view, Lounge-Walk achieves the rectangular block appearance that both JAR and C.A.S.T. is known for.

West Elevation: Walking through the Tree Tops

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0 1

5

10m


South Elevation: View of Lounge-Walk Walking Towards JAR

0 1

5

10m

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MATERIAL BREAKDOWN

TAR SHINGLES

WOODEN LOUVERS (WILLOW)

GLASS

CONCRETE SLAB FLOORS

CONCRETE STAIRCASE REINFORCED CONCRETE COLLUMNS

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MODEL Lounge-Walk was designed to look lightweight mimicking JAR’s design that makes the structure appear as if it was floating. In contrast to JAR and C.A.S.T., the group designed the space to be open, solving the enclosed feeling that staffs and students felt inside the two buildings. The cantilevered staircase entrance to JAR incorporates two new staircases in addition to the original centered staircase, reinforcing the strong axis that exists between JAR, the engineering buildings, and the staff parking lot. In the warmer months, users of Lounge-Walk can utilize the bottom area as place to sit, eat, and socialize. Taking this further, incorporating a ramp to the design can be implemented to make Lounge-Walk handicapped accessible.

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WALK INTO


MAPPING - SEVEN WALKS Workshop 3 “Make a map, not a tracing...What distinguishes the map front he tracing is that it is entirely oriented toward experimentation in contact with the real. The map does not reproduce an unconscious closed in upon itself; it constructs the unconscious. ...Map is open and connectable in all of its dimensions; it is detachable, reversible, and susceptible to constant modifications. ... A map has multiple entryways, as opposed to the tracing, which always comes back to the same. The map has to do with performance, whereas the tracing always involves an alleged ‘competence’.” Group: Danna Ambrosio, and Johanna Besiate Duration: January 29 - 31, 2018

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GREEN RIGHT DISTRICT - SEATING VIEW P5. Landscapes + Ecologies Brief: How do we define a ‘place’? Can we imagine extreme catalytic local conditions (spatial/formal/temporal) that instigate larger (peri) urban transformation? How might the spirit or identity of place (genius loci), the history and roots of a location, and the wider landscape setting influence and inform design? Groups will document, model, and map both the historical and current social and ecological edge conditions and immediate context of the confluence of Winnipeg’s two river systems: the Assiniboine and the Red. As a group students will develop (map) a projective (future) social-ecological strategy for the site. Individually, students will propose an intervention responding to be a representative of the projective strategy developed by the group.12 Group: Dominik Broughton, Jose Rielle Aridru, Hanna Hendrickson-Rebizant Duration: February 2 - March 12, 2018

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INTENT Seating View transforms the negative stigma of the CN Railway Bridge located at Waterfront Drive to a green foot bridge that allows for an easier access to both sides of the Red River and a public stop that facilitates users to connect with and utilize the river. The start of this project involved the group exploring Waterfront Drive. The group decided that this area would be an appropriate spot for an intervention as the group felt that the area was not utilized to its full potential, being that the site is a great location filled with many restaurants, parks and commercial buildings— has a potential for community gardens, public art, new attractions, and better transportation.

East Exchange Site Context Map

West Side of the River

East Side of the River 51

1


SITE ANALYSIS From the Red River’s riverbank ecology study, the site analysis revealed its effect to commercial zones in the area as well as its residents. The group learned that the riverbank’s continued erosion over the years can restrict commercial zones and residents to be situated close to the river, losing the neighbourhood’s connection and interaction with the river. As a consequence, there would be a decrease of urban nature zones. The group’s research of different parts of the site- Hell’s Alley, Alexander Docks, and CN Railway Bridge also revealed the site’s negative connotation in terms of crime over the years.

RED RIVER SECTION 2018

Timeline of Hell’s Alley and Alexander Docks

Erosion of the Red River Riverbank Over Time

Alexander Docks

Waterfront Dr.

Business Area

Riverbank

Unused Space

Drawing by Dominik Broughton

Red River

Eroded Riverbank

2018 Section of Red River 52


SITE ANALYSIS MAPPING The riverbank ecology study of the site led the group to map the commercial zones, transportation, urban nature zones, and residential density in the area. The group mapped what the future of each in 2068 would look like if no action was done and vice versa.

Commercial Zones

Transportation

1913

2018

1941

2018

2068 - Bad Future

2068 - Good Future

2068 - Bad Future

2068 - Good Future

Existing Commercial Zones Streetcar Bike Path Road Bus Stop Restaurants

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Entertainment

Industrial

Commercial

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RESIDENTIAL DENSITY 1950 RESIDENTIAL DENSITY Urban Nature Zones

1947

2018

2068 - Good Future

2068 - Bad Future

2018 2018

1950

Residential Density

2018

1950 - BAD 2068

2018 - GOOD 2068 2068 - GOOD

2068 - BAD

2068 - GOOD

2068 - Bad Future

2068 - Good Future

Existing Types of Parks in the Area

Sports Field

Nature Park

Neighbourhood Park

Memorial Park

Wild Forests

River Trail Park

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GROUP STRATEGY Green Right District aims to increase residential density, tourist visitations and remove the site’s negative stigma through interventions such as: pedestrian bridges, public art and memorial pieces, community gardens, and alley transformations.

2068 Good Future

Commercial Zones

Transportation 55

Community Gardens

Public Art and Memorial Piece

To bring people together, reduce crime rates, and provide opportunities for both recreational gardening and food production in underutilized spaces.

To attract and teach tourists and the public of the importance of site.

Transportation: Pedestrian Bridge

Alley Transformations

To enhance public access to the water, both sides of the river, and walking connection.

To create destinations, give personality, and enhance the functionality of alleys for residents and tourists to gather in.

Urban Nature Zones

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PROJECTIVE FUTURE

2068 Bad Future

2068 Good Future

This collage represents the year 2068 if no changes to the site will be done.

This collage represents Green Right District in 2068 if the group strategy were to be implemented.

Collages by: Jose Rielle Aridru, Hanna Hendrickson-Rebizant

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GROUP MODEL The group site model displays the vegetation on the riverbank and the location of each group member’s site interventions.

Overall site context Seating View’s site intervention

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INDIVIDUAL INTERVENTION SITE CONTEXT AND ITERATIONS From research, the location of Seating View, the CN Railway Bridge, is one of the locations within the group’s site with a negative connotation--negative because it is loud, dirty, and polluting. Seating View aims to remove this negative connotation by redesigning the bridge to be utilized as a pedestrian bridge by the community and a green park bridge.

Residential Density Commercial Zones

Transportation

Urban Nature Zones

Collages

Sketches of Iterations

Past, present, and future collages of the genius loci of the CN Railway Bridge.

These iterations consists of an amphitheater and a restaurant on the first and second level of the bridge to bring people closer to the water.

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PLANS AND SECTIONS The design of Seating View consists of three levels. In each level, a stepped viewing platform allows users to access different levels of the bridge. These stepped viewing platforms facilitates users to interactively watch the river’s high and low water level.It also acts as a stop from the top of the bridge as a place to overlook the river and the Esplanade Riel Bridge from the second level, or the Stephen Juba Park in the first level.

Inspiration The design of seating view was inspired by James Corner Field Operations’ High Line Park. High Line park is built on an abandoned elevated railroad line.13

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First and Second Level Plan

Third Level Plan

The first level of Seating View allows users to use the water. In the summer, the first level acts as a dock for users to go fishing and kayaking in. The first level raises during spring and winter to act as a big viewing platform—a solution to the ice break up and agressive spring water levels.

The top of the bridge encompasses enclosed and open vegetations. Open vegetations allow for different breathtaking views of Winnipeg, while enclosed vegetations allow for some privacy and the feeling of connectedness with nature, transforming the negative stigma through greenery and transportation.

The second level of the bridge can be accessed directly from the sidewalk and consists of trees to draw the public in and a stepped viewing platform to access the top of the bridge. The stepped viewing platform on this level was designed to have plantings distributed across different steps.

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STEPPED VIEWING PLATFORM OVERLOOKING STEPHEN JUBA PARK

East Section View Showing the Three Levels

FISHING / KAYAK DOCK


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ENCLOSED VEGETATION

STEPPED VIEWING PLATFORM OVERLOOKING THE ESPLANADE RIEL FISHING /KAYAK DOCK BRIDGE

PEDESTRIAN

Context Section of Seating View through the CN Railway Bridge

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MODEL Taking this project further, viewing platforms and an ice cream shop can be implemented to the design of the top of the bridge to attract more people. Overall, Seating View was a success.

A view of Seating View from the top

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PERSPECTIVE The perspectives capture that essence and experience of Seating View from all levels of the bridge.

Rendering of Seating View

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OPERATIVE DESIGN Workshop 4 “The core idea for this (workshop) is the use of operative verbs as tools for designing space. These operative verbs abstract the idea of spatial formation to their most basic terms, allowing for an objective approach to create the foundation for subjective spatial design. The spatial operations are not ends unto themselves, but are instead a set of illustrated beginnings to activate architectural inquiry, assembled to ignite the design process.� -Anthony Mari Group: Josh Lingal Duration: March 14-16, 2018

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SECRET HOME P6. Living + Dwelling Brief: How can we frame a sense of ‘dwelling’ in contemporary conditions (social, technological, and environmental? What is a ‘meaningful relationship’ between wo/man and the given environment today? How can we establish/construct ‘meaningful relationship’ (spatial and/or social) in our living environment? Students will explore the concept of dwelling, particularly the idea of co-habitation, and design a dwelling. Students will select a set of characters of their choice, highlighting and resonating within the project’s context and capture the subject’s pattern of ‘co-living’ and the ‘lifestyles’ within the design environment.14 Shane Cuenca Duration: March 14 - April 6, 2018

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The start of this project involves choosing a painting to generate the subject’s, personality, hobbies, daily routine, and companion. From Tal R.’s painting, Victory Over the Sun, a site that was well suited for the character had to be chosen within Westminster Avenue. In the end, the chosen site was a small space located between 162 Home Street and Westminster Avenue.

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Secret Home proposes a spatial arrangement onto 162 Home Street, Winnipeg Manitoba, exhibiting the duality of Tal’s personality, and the specific relationship between the character’s only family member, Grandpa Juan.

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CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT The character’s (Tal) personality, needs, and relationship with its cohabitation (Grandpa Juan) helped develop the design of the dwelling. From this, the dwelling needed to be situated close to Juan’s house, contain a puzzle room for both characters to share, a secret Facebook room, and a stargazing area for Tal.

Victory Over the Sun Interpretation12

Tal - Narrative Collage

Since birth, Tal was abused, and lived in a foster home. This painting depicts the day of Tal’s eighteenth birthday as he celebrates the day he was kicked out of his foster parents’ home. With no money and a place to live, Tal was forced to find a job and meets the owner of a bakery, Grandpa Juan. Like Tal, Juan too does not have any family members. Together Tal and Juan became each other’s companion.

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Age: 30 Characteristics: Clever, generous, mysterious, and sincere Hobby: Building puzzles with grandpa Juan and stargazing to calm himself What matters the most to this person? Family and identity Secrets: Tal often visits Facebook after work to look for his true parents. He wants to be perceived by the community and Juan as a happy guy, but deep inside, he is lost and miserable. 68


ITERATIONS The aim was to design a dwelling that exhibited the character’s dual life. Each iteration consists of two sections: a section that is openly visible to the community and shared with Juan, and a section that is closed off to the public/inaccessible to Juan. Initial iterations also considered the character’s and the dwelling’s interaction with the people that walked on the sidewalk. The Big Picture Window iteration is what led to the final form of Secret Home. The all glass structure allows the community to view the dwelling from the sidewalk to the street. A closed and opened box situated in the center of the structure becomes the focal point of the dwelling, resonating with the character’s goal of being perceived as a “happy guy who has nothing to hide”.

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PLAN Most spaces (kitchen, dining room, laundry, etc.) are shared by both characters in Juan’s house. The only shared space in Secret Home is the main level. The design changes the existing entryway to Juan’s house in which Juan enters from Secret Home and through a small hallway. This hallway in between the two structures act as a new threshold. Meanwhile, the second level consists of Tal’s private spaces, which are inaccessible to Juan through the use of stairs. To maintain the computer room’s secrecy, the computer room is located behind Tal’s stuffed closet.

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Second Level Plan 4. Area for stargazing/resting area 5. Closet stuffed with many clothes 6. Secret computer room 7. Personal bathroom to ponder about life 8. Hallway to overlook Westminster Ave.

Main Level Plan 1. Tal and Juan’s Puzzle Room 2. Foyer 3. Hallway leading to Juan’s House

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ELEVATION From outside, the closed space is viewed as a yellow rectangular box. The colour yellow allows for Juan and the community to not speculate that Tal is hiding any secrets and to only perceive Tal as a happy man. Inside, the closed space is dark and cold, representing Tal’s true feelings. Secret Home’s tapered end was designed to be seen from afar by people walking on the sidewalk. The sloped roof allows for a big south-facing picture window for Tal to overlook Westminster Ave. and interact with the community. The dwelling stands on a rectangular concrete slab that allows it to look lightweight.

South Elevation

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MODEL In the summer, the canopy of the trees help shade the opened spaces. In the winter, curtains can be used to shade from the sun. The fully glazed windows also allows the use of daylighting. During the day, the skylights in Tal’s stargazing room provides warmth to the cold spaces, helping Tal to realize Juan’s unconditional love. In the fall, leaves from the trees would fall on the skylights and reflect different shadows into the bedroom.

Site Model

Second Level Detail Model

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PERSPECTIVE & RENDERING The floors, bathroom and bedroom walls are made of concrete to represent and portray the sadness and coldness that Tal is experiencing. On the other hand, the secret facebook room is a small, narrow space where its walls are painted black to maintain its secrecy. Taking this project further, the programming of the hallways as how it is seen from the community can be improved. Overall, this project was a success.

Tal’s Stargazing Room

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Secret Computer Room


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URBAN MEDIA LAB Sketches and Photography Our environment is characterized with constant change and how one perceives it is also dynamic. Lighting techniques in photography allows one to be more aware of how light can be easily manipulated by changing the ways one sees subjects in the environment. Furthermore, shading in drawings reveal forms of subjects in our environment by simply turning a 2D object to a 3D object by creating depth and value to it. Duration: August 27 - September 9, 2017

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CREATIVE WORK Nail Art

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CREATIVE WORK Spatial Design

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BIBLIOGRAPHY 1

“P1. Body + Presence.” University of Manitoba. Accessed April 30, 2018. https://universityofmanitoba.desire2learn.com/d2l/le/content/262225/viewContent/1298812/

View?ou=262225. 2

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3

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explore/jean-tinguely/?lp=true. 4

“P2. Materials + Meaning.” University of Manitoba. Accessed April 30, 2018. https://universityofmanitoba.desire2learn.com/d2l/le/content/262225/viewContent/1298813/

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Tomás Saraceno. “Black Flag Series (working title)”. 2006, Digital Image. Available from: Tomas Saraceno, http://tomassaraceno.com/projects/cloud-cities/

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100000-white-balloons-installation/ 8

Kohei Nawa. “Foam”. 2014, Digital Image. Available from: Dezeen, https://www.dezeen.com/2014/01/07/kohei-nawas-foam-installation-created-a-cloud-like-

landscape-of-soapy-bubbles/ 9

Caitlind Brown. “Cloud”. N.d., Digital Image. Available from: Caitlind R.C. Brown & Wayne Garrett, https://incandescentcloud.com/aboutcloud/

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“P4. Structure + Threshold.” University of Manitoba. Accessed April 30, 2018. https://universityofmanitoba.desire2learn.com/d2l/le/content/262225/

viewContent/1298815/View. 11

“11th Street Bridge Park.” OMA. Accessed April 30, 2018. http://oma.eu/projects/11th-street-bridge-park.

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“P5. Landscapes + Ecologies.” University of Manitoba. Accessed April 30, 2018. https://universityofmanitoba.desire2learn.com/d2l/le/content/262225/

viewContent/1298816/View. 13

“About the High Line | Friends of the High Line.” The High Line. Accessed April 30, 2018. http://www.thehighline.org/about.

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“P6. Living Dwelling.” University of Manitoba. Accessed April 30, 2018. https://universityofmanitoba.desire2learn.com/d2l/le/content/262225/viewContent/1298817/View.

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University of Manitoba ED2 Portfolio - Shane Cuenca  
University of Manitoba ED2 Portfolio - Shane Cuenca  
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