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Unit Lesson Plan

30 Ways In 30 Days Shalonda Farrow’s Unit Lesson Plan For Dr. Unrath Overview of Art Education 4734


Hypothetical Class: At Risk Inner City Youth Latchkey Program Total of 12 students: 7 boys, 5 girls One student that is deaf One student that has dyslexia One student with ADHD My hypothetical class will consist of a varied group of k-8th grade students who have a varied background in the arts. Many students are in the program because it provides care and education while their parents are working so that they are not left in unsupervised environments. This program is designed to be a link between home and school. Some students are genuinely interested in art and what the program has to offer. The class is also a mixed between males and females, as well as culturally mixed between African American, Caucasian, Hispanic and other ethnicities/minorities. Goal and Rational for this Unit: Through the medium of photography this unit aims to enhance students viewing of the world around them by, challenging students to think about how one can photograph a specific item numerous ways. The purpose of this unit is for students to contemplate the idea of perspectives in their everyday thinking. Students will embark on this journey by deciding on an object that they find interesting and would enjoy photographing for 30 days in 30 ways. This unit activity provides students with the opportunity for learning about how to consider alternative perspectives. The teaching of perspectives is important because if students are able to do so they open themselves for better opportunities in life all around! The exercises coupled in lesson will help students begin their discourse with visual perception and visual literacy language usage! Furthermore this unit dealing in perspectives is somewhat of double whammy as in through the discussion of perspectives and the medium of photography I aim to edify students about how they can use their creativity as a means for making meaningful art! While making sure the students know that the importance is on them the artist and their work! The students engaging in the tactic of perspectives is not separate from daily life, but being able to comprehend the world of multiple perspectives can inform and enhance every aspect of these students life. This unit should leave students conscious that they are not just passive recipients in the world but active interpreters who can generate, alter, and communicate their ideologies. “People do not have the exact same thoughts and feelings about everything. They have different ideas and opinions based on their experiences in life. Taking another’s perspective means trying to see things from his/her point of view. When we are willing and able to see things from another’s perspective, we can learn things we didn’t know before.” Lastly this unit meets many of the National and State Standards and GLE’s because of the focus at hand perspectives. Within the states’ requirements they talk about being able to communicate, problems solve, integrate, and RECOGNIZE the PERPSECTIVES of others.


National Standards for Arts Education: * They should be able to communicate proficiently in at least one art form, including the ability to define and solve artistic problems with insight, reason, and technical proficiency. * They should be able to develop and present basic analyses of works of art from structural, historical, and cultural perspectives, and from combinations of those perspectives. This includes the ability to understand and evaluate work in the various arts disciplines. * They should have an informed acquaintance with exemplary works of art from a variety of cultures and historical periods, and a basic understanding of historical development in the arts disciplines, across the arts as a whole, and within cultures. * As a result of developing these capabilities, students can arrive at their own knowledge, beliefs, and values for making personal and artistic decisions. In other terms, they can arrive at a broad based, well-grounded understanding of the nature, value, and meaning of the arts as a part of their own humanity. The Show-Me Standards: GOAL 1: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to gather, analyze and apply information and ideas. 5. Comprehend and evaluate written, visual and oral presentations and works 6. Discover and evaluate patterns and relationships in information, ideas and structures 7. Evaluate the accuracy of information and the reliability of its sources 10. Apply acquired information, ideas and skills to different contexts as students, workers, citizens and consumers GOAL 2: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to communicate effectively within and beyond the classroom. 1. Plan and make written, oral and visual presentations for a variety of purposes and audiences 3. Exchange information, questions and ideas while recognizing the perspectives of others 4. Present perceptions and ideas regarding works of the arts, humanities and sciences 7. Use technological tools to exchange information and ideas GOAL 3: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to recognize and solve problems. 1. Identify problems and define their scope and elements 2. Develop and apply strategies based on ways others have prevented or solved problems 3. Develop and apply strategies based on one's own experience in preventing or solving problems 4. Evaluate the processes used in recognizing and solving problems 5. Reason inductively from a set of specific facts and deductively from general premises 6. Examine problems and proposed solutions from multiple perspectives 7. Evaluate the extent to which a strategy addresses the problem 8. Assess costs, benefits and other consequences of proposed solutions GOAL 4: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to make


decisions and act as responsible members of society. 1. Explain reasoning and identify information used to support decisions 2. Understand and apply the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in Missouri and the United States 4. Recognize and practice honesty and integrity in academic work and in the workplace 5. Develop, monitor and revise plans of action to meet deadlines and accomplish goals 6. Identify tasks that require a coordinated effort and work with others to complete those tasks 8. Explore, prepare for and seek educational and job opportunities Knowledge Standards: Fine Arts: In Fine Arts, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation, which includes knowledge of 1. Process and techniques for the production, exhibition or performance of one or more of the visual or performed arts 2. The principles and elements of different art forms 3. The vocabulary to explain perceptions about and evaluations of works in dance, music, theater and visual arts 4. Interrelationships of visual and performing arts and the relationships of the arts to other disciplines 5. Visual and performing arts in historical and cultural contexts Communication Arts: In Communication Arts, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation, which includes knowledge of, and proficiency in 4. Writing formally (such as reports, narratives, essays) and informally (such as outlines, notes) 5. Comprehending and evaluating the content and artistic aspects of oral and visual presentations (such as story-telling, debates, lectures, multi-media productions) 6. Participating in formal and informal presentations and discussions of issues and ideas 7. Identifying and evaluating relationships between language and culture Social Studies: In Social Studies, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation, which includes knowledge of 2. Continuity and change in the history of Missouri, the United States and the world 6. Relationships of the individual and groups to institutions and cultural traditions 7. The use of tools of social science inquiry (such as surveys, statistics, maps, documents)


GLE’S: STRAND III. Artistic Perceptions 2A. Analyze and evaluate art using art vocabulary Grade K: Identify the subject of artworks Grade 1: Identify the following in artworks: Lines, Shapes, Colors, Patterns Grade 2: Identify the following in artworks: Geometric shapes, Geometric forms, Foreground and background, Real textures, Contrast/ variety of colors Grade 3: Identify the following in artworks: Warm and Cool Colors, Symmetrical Balance, Invented textures, Horizontal, Diagonal, and vertical lines, Contrast/ variety of sizes Grade 4: Describe the use of the following in artworks: Outlines, Organic shapes, Organic forms, Tints and shades, Values, Positive and negative space, Radial balance, Center of interest/focal Point, Contrast/ variety of values, Complex patterns, Facial proportions Grade 5: Describe the use of the following in artworks: Contour lines, Symbolic shapes, Illusion of form, Implied/simulated textures, Intermediate and Neutral colors, Asymmetrical Balance, Contrast /variety of textures, Perspective: change in size, Point of view. STRAND I: Product/ Performance 1. Select and apply two dimensional media, technique, and processes to communicate ideas and solve challenging visual art problems HS Level 2- Create or modify an image using art software- Art software refers to a program such as Adobe Photoshop HS Level 3- Create expressive/symbolic art using art software- Art software refers to a program such as Adobe Photoshop STRAND I: Product/ Performance 3A. Communicate ideas about subject matter and themes in artworks created for various purposes Grade K- Portrait: Create an original picture of self or other person Landscape: Create a picture showing outside Non-Objective: Create a design using lines Grade 1: Portrait: Create an original artwork showing family members Grade 3: Figure: Create an original artwork of a figure in an action pose Landscape: Create an original cityscape Non-Objective: Create an original artwork using line, shape and color Grade 4: Portrait: Create facial features in correct proportion Exaggerate, distort, or simplify features to create an abstract portrait Still Life: Exaggerate, distort, or simplify observed objects to create an abstract still life Landscape: Create an original seascape Grade 5: Portrait: Create a portrait from observation Still Life: Create a still life from observation that shows the illusion of form Landscape: Create an original outdoor scene to show the illusion of space Grade 6: Create original artwork using the following subjects: realistic portrait, abstract portrait Grade 7: Create original artwork using the following subjects: human figure, still life from


observation Grade 8: Create original artwork using the following subject: realistic landscape, abstract landscape HS Level 1: Create original artworks using the following as subject matter: Portrait, still life, landscape, non-objective, architecture HS Level 2: Communicate ideas through the creation of a: Portrait, still life, landscape, nonobjective, architecture HS Level 3: Combine subject matter in original artworks to communicate ideas (e.g., figure and/or architecture in a landscape) HS Level 4: Select subject matter to communicate personal ideas through a series of original, related works STRAND I: Product/ Performance 3C. Communicate ideas about subject matter and themes in artworks created for various purposes Grade 7: Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about the following themes: Group Identity, Nature Grade 8: Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about the following themes: Environment, Time (e.g., past, present, future) HS Level 1: Create original artwork that communicates ideas through themes (e.g., identity, power, time, nature, illusion) Hs Level 2: Create an original artwork that communicates ideas through the following themes (e.g., cultural identity, social commentary, ceremony/ritual, myth/legend, reflection/ Transparency) HS Level 3: Create original artwork that communicates ideas through themes (e.g., national identity, spirituality, vision, progress, human condition, narrative) Hs Level 4: Develop a theme through a series of original artworks that communicates personal ideas Addresses complex visual and/or conceptual ideas, Shows imaginative, inventive approach, experimentation, risk taking, sensitivity and/or subtlety STRAND II. 1D. Select and use elements of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork Grade 1: Identify and use texture Grade 2: Identify and use actual texture Grade 6: Identify and use real/ actual texture HS LEVEL 4: Use textures expressively to communicate ideas STRAND II. Elements and Principles 1E. Select and use elements of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork Grade K: Identify and use color Grade 1: identify and use primary colors Grade 2: identify and use secondary colors Grade 4: Identify and use tints and shades HS Level 1: Identify and use color theory including color value, and color schemes HS Level 2: Identify and use color theory including color intensity and split-complementary color scheme, Identify and use local color


HS Level 3: Identify and use arbitrary color and symbolic color HS Level 4: Use color expressively to communicate ideas STRAND II: Elements and Principles 1G. Select and use elements of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork HS Level 1: Identify and use positive and negative space in two-dimensional work Identify and use perspective techniques to create the illusion of space (one-point linear perspective, overlapping, and change of size, detail, placement, value contrast) HS Level 2: Identify and use positive and negative space in three-dimensional work Identify and use perspective techniques to create the illusion of space (two-point linear perspective, overlapping, and change of size, detail, placement, value, contrast, color) HS Level 3: Design negative and positive space from all viewpoints in three-dimensional work from observation, identify and use appropriate perspective techniques to create the illusion of space HS Level 4: Use space expressively to communicate ideas STRAND II. Elements and Principles 2A. Select and use principles of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork Grade 1: Identify and demonstrate the concept of middle or center Grade 3: Identify and use symmetrical balance Grade 5: identity and use asymmetrical balance Grade 6: Identify and use symmetrical balance Grade 7: Identify and use radial balance Grade 8: Identify and use asymmetrical balance HS Level 1: Differentiate among and use symmetrical (formal), asymmetrical (informal), and radial balance HS Level 2: Use elements to create compositional balance HS Level 3: Use balance to support the communication of an idea HS Level 4: Use balance expressively STRAND II. Elements and Principles 2B. Select and use principles of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork HS Level 1: Identify and create emphasis (focal point) through contrast and convergence HS Level 2: Identify and use emphasis (focal point) through isolation and location HS Level 3: Use emphasis to support the communication of an idea HS Level 4: Use emphasis expressively Rational for Artist and Artworks used meet the unit goal: There are many artist that deal with perspective either directly in ways that their works are critiques of an ideology that causes their viewers to look at and think about a topic in a different perspective. Then there are artist whose works indirectly gets the importance of perspective across without being the main focus of the piece. Students will be introduce to such artist as: Kirsten Berg, Anish Kapoor, Carrie Mae Weems, Kara Walker, Barber Kruger, Diane Arbus and Josiah McElheny. Students will look at art from an array of mediums not just photography.


Enduring Ideas: Throughout time and across cultures artist have explored perspectives via various mediums of art. In doing so artist impact viewers understandings of literature, history, culture, religion, art, the world around us, and lastly our place in the world. Investigations of Essential Questions: 1. What can any particular perspective do to a piece of art? 2. Why do people have different perspectives? 3. How is “perspective” used in art, literature, science, etc? 4. How does a person’s perspective influence their reading of text? 5. Why is it important to try to see ideas from another person’s perspective? 6. How can art expand our perspectives? 7. What is your understanding of the term perspective? 8. What techniques do artists use to create depth in a scene? 9. How can using the research process help and develop our own perspective? 10. How can individuals with distinct areas of expertise come to understand and perhaps begin to take another’s perspective? 11. What challenges do groups and individuals run into in trying to see others perspective? Key Instructional Concepts: The new knowledge that I hope students take away from this unit is the importance in being able to take an alternative perspective. While becoming better adept in understanding, interpreting and communicating the thoughts, feelings, likes and dislikes of others and self. Getting my students engaged in the discourse of perspective taking is an actual skill. I want my students to understand that they are using their social and cognitive parts of their brains and their emotions as well. Students will enhance their ability to look beyond oneself, the ability to recognize that one’s behaviors affects others and the ability to take the role of others and understand how the impact of ones actions can affect others. Furthermore in the technical aspect of photography students will develop their “eye” for seeing the world around them. They will learn about how perspective in their images can communicate to audiences and how perspectives can change the visual impact of an image. Students will become comfortable with experimenting, taking lots of meaningful, and thoughtful shots,. Students will also learn about their camera’s settings, composition and technique, framing, focus and perspectives and lighting. Constraints: There is a possibility of numerous constraints that could arise in our studio space. For example the lack of funding affecting the opportunities available for my students, the number distraction; such as community violence, building insufficiencies, teacher quality, behavior problems, parent and school involvement, socioeconomic factors, disruptive classmates, lack of supplies, time management and this list could go on; However I will do all that I can to meet the needs of my students and accomplish the unit at hand. This might require a lot of pre-planning before this


lesson such as tackling some grant writing, getting Fundraising, rendering volunteers, etc. However these two quotes sum up the idea! I think frugality drives innovation, just like other constraints do. One of the only ways to get out of a tight box is to invent your way out. - Jeff Bezos There are no constraints on the human mind, no walls around the human spirit, no barriers to our progress except those we ourselves erect. - Ronald Reagan Integrative Options/Cross Curricular Correlation’s: Art has the capability of relating to all of the other subjects, because art is a science, art is mathematical, art is a foreign language, art is language arts, art is physical education, art is social studies, and art is a technology! Yet I would specifically like to collaborate this unit with my student’s language arts teachers. In the way of having them read multiple stories written in different perspective coupled with writing their own stories, poems, or rap in different perspective such as: first person, second person, omniscient or antagonist. Relationship to the Developmental Needs of Children (Mo step standard 1.2.2): This unit will be differentiated so that it meets the needs of all of my students. Units will be allotted unit time by breaking the units down into small chucks, students will have ample supplies of exemplar works, including a teacher example, students will be taught in smaller groups, and have clear knowledge of what there expectations are. All parts of this unit will be differentiated, the content, process, and the product. Opportunities for student responses to art from historical, critical and aesthetic perspectives: Students will engage in discussion, research, written responses over the works of such artist as: Sherrie Levin, Andy Warhol, Walker Evans, Duchamp and many more. These activities will help scaffold students understanding of multiple methods of shooting the same subject matter, but in different ways and for different reasoning. Students will become aware of the aesthetics and perspectives taking place with in the artist images. Students will become aware of the history behind the usage of perspective in art. Lesson Sequence Lesson 1: Basic Perspective GLE’s STRAND III. Artistic Perceptions 2A. Analyze and evaluate art using art vocabulary Grade K: Identify the subject of artworks Grade 1: Identify the following in artworks: Lines, Shapes, Colors, Patterns Grade 2: Identify the following in artworks: Geometric shapes, Geometric forms, Foreground and background, Real textures, Contrast/ variety of colors Grade 3: Identify the following in artworks: Warm and Cool Colors, Symmetrical Balance, Invented textures, Horizontal, Diagonal, and vertical lines, Contrast/ variety of sizes Grade 4: Describe the use of the following in artworks: Outlines, Organic shapes, Organic forms, Tints and shades, Values, Positive and negative space,


Radial balance, Center of interest/focal Point, Contrast/ variety of values, Complex patterns, Facial proportions Grade 5: Describe the use of the following in artworks: Contour lines, Symbolic shapes, Illusion of form, Implied/simulated textures, Intermediate and Neutral colors, Asymmetrical Balance, Contrast /variety of textures, Perspective: change in size, Point of view. Lesson 1: Basic Perspective Goal: To get students exchanging information in small and large groups on personal experience and personal knowledge. While establishing a relationship between the students and myself. Student’s will engaged in a dialogue pertaining to perspectives to scaffold students into critical thinking and problem solving skills. Big Idea: Understanding that the creation of different perspectives can allow an artist the opportunity to enhance their images visual communication. And that artist have been using perspective to influence the way humans visual perceive things throughout history. Essential Questions: How do artist create perspective? What can perspective be used for? How can we lean from comparing artist perspectives? Why is it important to understand the impact perspective has? Key Concept: That the usage of perspective is important no matter what subject or medium that you choose to work in. And know that not being afraid to investigate and change perspectives is an essential skill. The usage of perspective can add depth and greater realism to a picture that can then aid the effect in which it can have. Objectives: Students will learn the basic concepts and techniques that work together to create a sense of depth in an image. From here students will examine the horizon line, vanishing point, foreshortening and learn why objects look different when we look at and photograph them from different angles. Lessons Timeline: 1- 2 hours and 30 Minute Class Period Day 1: Prior Knowledge Gage I will introduce students to the unit in which we will be entering informing them that at the end of the introduction we will have a 20-minute group discussion over what exactly is perspective. Next students will be giving a few minutes to themselves to consider their answer. Then students will partake in a discussion over what they consider perspective to be. To start I will pose exploratory questions such as: could someone please define perspective for me? Probing for facts and basic knowledge of the topic. The usage of exploratory questions will help me informally assess any prior knowledge my students might have on the topic before transitioning into the next unit component. Students will be giving a 10-minute and 5 minute warning approaching the closure of group discussion. Afterward student will be given 5 minutes to collect their thoughts and the chance to move seats in preparation for the slide show presentation. Students will then be shown pairs of photographs in a PowerPoint slide show that will expose and refresh them to the basic of perspective. Students will compare and contrast the pictures, describing what they think the artist is doing? What are the differences between the photographs? Does one catch your eye more than the other? Why? Why do you think the photographer chose to take the picture at this angle? How did the angle change the subject? Once we get through the PowerPoint slide show student will


be presented with the unit’s key assignment shooting assignment: “30 Ways in 30 Days” project. Then students will have the chance for a question and answer period. Finally students will be given journals that they will be using for the rest of this unit and will begin using them to formulate ideas for angles and or the piece that they might find interesting to photograph. Furthermore with in their journals are daily exercises of the “The ABC”s of perspective that they will be complete each day of class. Incorporated in their journals is an overview of the PowerPoint given in class, quick perspective reference tools and a glossary of terms. Lesson 2: I Wanna Take Me a Picture GLE’s STRAND I: Product/ Performance 1. Select and apply two dimensional media, technique, and processes to communicate ideas and solve challenging visual art problems HS Level 2- Create or modify an image using art software- Art software refers to a program such as Adobe Photoshop HS Level 3- Create expressive/symbolic art using art software- Art software refers to a program such as Adobe Photoshop STRAND I: Product/ Performance 3A. Communicate ideas about subject matter and themes in artworks created for various purposes Grade K- Portrait: Create an original picture of self or other person Landscape: Create a picture showing outside Non-Objective: Create a design using lines Grade 1: Portrait: Create an original artwork showing family members Grade 3: Figure: Create an original artwork of a figure in an action pose Landscape: Create an original cityscape Non-Objective: Create an original artwork using line, shape and color Grade 4: Portrait: Create facial features in correct proportion Exaggerate, distort, or simplify features to create an abstract portrait Still Life: Exaggerate, distort, or simplify observed objects to create an abstract still life Landscape: Create an original seascape Grade 5: Portrait: Create a portrait from observation Still Life: Create a still life from observation that shows the illusion of form Landscape: Create an original outdoor scene to show the illusion of space Grade 6: Create original artwork using the following subjects: realistic portrait, abstract portrait Grade 7: Create original artwork using the following subjects: human figure, still life from observation Grade 8: Create original artwork using the following subject: realistic landscape, abstract landscape HS Level 1: Create original artworks using the following as subject matter: Portrait, still life, landscape, non-objective, architecture HS Level 2: Communicate ideas through the creation of a: Portrait, still life, landscape, nonobjective, architecture HS Level 3: Combine subject matter in original artworks to communicate ideas (e.g., figure


and/or architecture in a landscape) HS Level 4: Select subject matter to communicate personal ideas through a series of original, related works STRAND I: Product/ Performance 3C. Communicate ideas about subject matter and themes in artworks created for various purposes Grade 7: Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about the following themes: Group Identity, Nature Grade 8: Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about the following themes: Environment, Time (e.g., past, present, future) HS Level 1: Create original artwork that communicates ideas through themes (e.g., identity, power, time, nature, illusion) Hs Level 2: Create an original artwork that communicates ideas through the following themes (e.g., cultural identity, social commentary, ceremony/ritual, myth/legend, reflection/ Transparency) HS Level 3: Create original artwork that communicates ideas through themes (e.g., national identity, spirituality, vision, progress, human condition, narrative) Hs Level 4: Develop a theme through a series of original artworks that communicates personal ideas Addresses complex visual and/or conceptual ideas, Shows imaginative, inventive approach, experimentation, risk taking, sensitivity and/or subtlety STRAND II. 1D. Select and use elements of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork Grade 1: Identify and use texture Grade 2: Identify and use actual texture Grade 6: Identify and use real/ actual texture HS LEVEL 4: Use textures expressively to communicate ideas STRAND II. Elements and Principles 1E. Select and use elements of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork Grade K: Identify and use color Grade 1: identify and use primary colors Grade 2: identify and use secondary colors Grade 4: Identify and use tints and shades HS Level 1: Identify and use color theory including color value, and color schemes HS Level 2: Identify and use color theory including color intensity and split-complementary color scheme, Identify and use local color HS Level 3: Identify and use arbitrary color and symbolic color HS Level 4: Use color expressively to communicate ideas STRAND II: Elements and Principles 1G. Select and use elements of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork HS Level 1: Identify and use positive and negative space in two-dimensional work Identify and use perspective techniques to create the illusion of space (one-point linear perspective, overlapping, and change of size, detail, placement, value contrast)


HS Level 2: Identify and use positive and negative space in three-dimensional work Identify and use perspective techniques to create the illusion of space (two-point linear perspective, overlapping, and change of size, detail, placement, value, contrast, color) HS Level 3: Design negative and positive space from all viewpoints in three-dimensional work from observation, identify and use appropriate perspective techniques to create the illusion of space HS Level 4: Use space expressively to communicate ideas STRAND II. Elements and Principles 2A. Select and use principles of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork Grade 1: Identify and demonstrate the concept of middle or center Grade 3: Identify and use symmetrical balance Grade 5: identity and use asymmetrical balance Grade 6: Identify and use symmetrical balance Grade 7: Identify and use radial balance Grade 8: Identify and use asymmetrical balance HS Level 1: Differentiate among and use symmetrical (formal), asymmetrical (informal), and radial balance HS Level 2: Use elements to create compositional balance HS Level 3: Use balance to support the communication of an idea HS Level 4: Use balance expressively STRAND II. Elements and Principles 2B. Select and use principles of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork HS Level 1: Identify and create emphasis (focal point) through contrast and convergence HS Level 2: Identify and use emphasis (focal point) through isolation and location HS Level 3: Use emphasis to support the communication of an idea HS Level 4: Use emphasis expressively Lesson 2: I Wanna Take Me a Picture Goal: Review and enhance student’s comprehension of perspective and how to use it in their artwork and everyday lives. Big Idea: Understanding how the exploration and discovery of perspective can open one up for better insight to the world around them and knowing how to utilize perspective in their own work gives them another tool to add to their tool belt. Essential Questions: How does the artist selection to show certain things affect the viewer? How can we achieve different perspectives? What is a horizon line? What is a vanishing point? What does it mean to foreshorten something? Why are multiple perspectives important? How could a perspective change? Does the person using the perspective matter? Why or why not? Key Concept: Understanding how artist can use perspective to trick the eye to see an illusion of three-dimensional space on a flat piece of paper. Students will be able to explain how prior knowledge affect outcomes of perspectives. Objectives: Discuss various perspectives. Explain assembly of subject perspective. Will be able to point out perspective taken. Lessons Timeline: 2 hours and 30 Minute Class Period


Day 2: Students will arrive to program; we will have a review of the day before. The students will be given a visual perspective warm up to get them prepared for discussion. Next students will be engaged in a teacher lead discussion pertaining to perspectives and then will introduce to our guest photo equipment trainers for the day. Next students will view a visual perception video upon completion of the video students will write a reflection about what that thought about the video. Afterwards students will then be administered there shooting equipment. Students will have 20 minutes to get acquainted with their equipment and formulate any question that they arrive at. Students will then be broken into smaller groups for equipment training and exercise shooting. Equipment training will take up a most of the class period. Once students are finish with shooting exercise and training the class will regroup. In our regrouping students will be recapped over what the assignment at hand “30 days and 30 ways” and what that means. Then the floor is open for question and answer session with me and guest trainers. (Who will be in the classroom at schedule times to help support students with usage of their camera.) For the remainder of the class period students will complete 1 of 30 of their ABC’s of perspectives drawings. For the end of the day students will be reminded of the shooting for that day and the reminder to bring in there reflection about their first shot to class the following day. Day 3-28: Students will arrive to program; we will have a review of the day before. The students will be given a visual perspective warm up to get them prepared for discussion. Afterward students will be asked to upload the image that shot the night before. I will then display images via our classroom smart board and students will divulge into conversations about how is shooting going, what angles are they using, etc. Then students will be engaged in a student/teacher lead discussion pertaining to perspectives. Next students will view a visual perception video upon completion of the video students will write a reflection about what that thought about the video. Students will then breakout into mini basic edit training sessions. After edit sessions are done one group will perform a perspective skit. Once students are finish with skits the class will regroup. In our regrouping students will be recapped over what the assignment at hand “30 days and 30 ways” and what that means. Then the floor is open for question and answer session to tackle any hiccups students might be having in shooting. For the remainder of the class period students will complete 1 of their 30 ABC’s of perspectives drawings. For the end of the day students will be reminded of the shooting for that day and the reminder to bring in there reflection about their first shot to class the following day. On days 1015 students will create post cards to send as invitations and put up posters around local art schools, universities, trendy areas, cafes, clubs, or even supermarket bulletin boards to acknownce there gallery exhibition. I will get in touch with local newspapers and tell them about the upcoming exhibition. On day 28 student will write their artist statements “that will be ready to hang in the exhibition. Lesson 3: Preparation and Culminating Activity “30 Ways In 30 Days” Gallery Show ! Goal: For students to become aware that the world is seen from many different eyes. Furthermore how to trained their eyes to understand different perspectives. Students will contemplate and discuss motive, or why an artist might choose to present a particular perspectives. Big Idea: After a short review of our classroom journey with perspective students will walk away knowing People do not have the exact same thoughts and feelings about everything. They have different ideas and opinions based on their experiences in life. Taking another’s


perspective means trying to see things from his/her point of view. When we are willing and able to see things from another’s perspective, we can learn things we didn’t know before.” Essential Questions: How is “perspective” used in art, literature, science, etc.? How can art expand our perspectives? Key Concept: For students to acknowledge that perspective is simply that position we are seeing things from an that for someone else they might see things in a total different perspective than self. Objectives: Understand that perspective is really about establishing “an eye” and that via the arts artist are able to be influential pars of how others see. Students will explain how background knowledge of a story can affect how we perceive something. Students will be able to identify choices made by the artist, which indicate the point of view they wish to portray. Lessons Timeline: 3 hours and 30 Minute Class Period Day 30:Visit an art exhibition to see how art is organized and exhibited. Review major periods and themes in art history. Review the basic elements of visual art. Review factors to consider in curating an exhibition (audience, space, theme, order). We will then return to our classroom and finish framing all artworks that require framing and include matting if necessary. Students will also create label cards to be included alongside the artworks. These include name, size, medium, and price. *teacher and volunteers will install the show students do all preparation work themselves. Day31: Gallery Show opening The opening will begin with a live music performance from the At Risk Inner City Youth Latchkey Program music department and then I will introduce the project and what students have been doing in and out of the classroom to prepare for their show. Next I will have a local artist that had been assisting in the classroom introduce student artists and other significant figures to the audience. Refreshments will be served and let the visitors begin to observe the artwork. Student artists will s be near their installations so they can answer any of the visitor’s questions. Students will then come together to thank the visitors for viewing their work and close the show with a sharing of their favorite aspect of the class thus far.

Assessment Strategies and Evaluation Criteria: For the benefit of students and to better my teaching to students will be pre-assessed of their knowledge on perspectives. Assessments will consist of a discussion, list and surveys. Afterwards student journals, performance, embedded assessments, artist statements, critiques, interviews, self-evaluations and the culminating activity gallery exhibition will assess the unit efficiency and effectiveness. Unit Evaluations and Assessment: I will know if the lesson is successful through the engagement and involvement of my students, the following of standards, outcomes being reached, flexibility for students to engage lesson with other aspects of life, students ability to collaborate and consult, and usage of technology.


Unit student art exemplar: My exemplar piece that I would photograph for 30 ways in 30 days had to be carefully thought out and chosen. The object I choose would have to be of meaning because I wanted it to be something that was first common amongst myself, and my students. The piece also had to be something that would show them that that they could trust me in this journey while having a lasting impact on them that would heighten the message and lesson of perspective that I want to get across to them. The piece that I chose to photograph came from my family life. I thought about this selection in relation to what my students would have access for photographing and I contemplate on whether or not should the piece being photography would be constricted to an actual object or should the piece be open to various subjects. The answer was to be open to various subjects, because I wanted to allow students the freedom in open subject range of the assignment, while also consciously opening the lesson up for more vulnerable, meaningful, and challenging problem solving matters. The shooting of my family life was of easy since I know the subjects at hand being photograph and the fact that I have a connection and photograph and are around them constantly gave me an edge. In particular from my family I chose to focus on my baby sister who is dear to my heart! I decided to photograph her and her habitual smoking sessions. In which there is this beauty with in this deadly process of smoking that seems to have this spirit within. In reflection upon the series I am doing on my sister for this unit coupled with the series I was already shooting on my family I came to the comprehension of why I longed to photography my family. In essence I was using my camera to find my identity within my family. I was using my art as art therapy to help me come to grips of my perspective of my family and that of how strangers percept them. Through this identifying I was able to perceive my family for whom that are and accept that. This is how this unit came about and why I feel that the teaching of perspective can have lasting impacts in life.

Unit Lesson Plan 2012  

develop a unit plan on a big idea that you have been investigating all semester through your journal, big idea book and curriculum document.

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