Page 1

OCTOBER 2017

*THE STUFF THAT REFINES YOU

ENTER


Tambour Horizon Your journey, connected.


louisvuitton.com


dior.com

#intothenight


CHANEL.COM

THE NEW FRAGRANCE


BAR REFAELI by Chen Man


T

H

E

A

R

T

O

F

F

U

Big Bang One Click Italia Independent Dark Blue Velvet. Created in collaboration with the Italian lifestyle brand. Case in ceramic. Bezel set with 42 diamonds. Self-winding Movement. Dial and strap made of genuine dark blue velvet. Limited edition of 100 pieces.

S

I

O

BOUTIQUES LONDON 31 New Bond Street / Harrods Knightsbridge Tel. 020 3214 9970 • 020 7730 1234

N

hublot.com


D E S I G N P O R T R A I T.

Michel, seat system designed by Antonio Citterio. www.bebitalia.com B&B Italia Stores: London - Milano - Paris - MĂźnchen - New York - Washington DC - Los Angeles - San Francisco - Miami - Sao Paulo - Tokyo - Dubai


Milan, Paris, London, New York, Los Angeles, Miami, Shanghai, Beijing, Tokyo


workchateatreadthinkwrite

RUN BY SAM HECHT+KIM COLIN A collection of tables, benches and shelves. Made in America from responsibly sourced materials. emeco.net


GLISS MASTER WARDROBE AND MASTER DRESSING WALK-IN CLOSET— VINCENT VAN DUYSEN D.156.3 ARMCHAIR— GIO PONTI

CHAIR MHC.3 MISS— TOBIA SCARPA VICINO TABLE— FOSTER + PARTNERS RANDOM CARPET— PATRICIA URQUIOLA


MILAN PARIS LONDON BRUSSELS MADRID BUDAPEST ISTANBUL NEW YORK MIAMI CHICAGO BOSTON PASADENA TORONTO MEXICO CITY TOKYO OSAKA HONG KONG BEIJING SEOUL MANILA

moltenigroup.com #MolteniGroup


TERRY CREWS COLLECTION


craig-green.com

A / W Collec tion 2017 Set _05. Green


aeance.com


Alliance of style and performance. Technical apparel with ready-to-wear versatility. Minimal aesthetics. Quiet luxury. Eco-sustainability.


OCTOBER A birthday salute from the big guns: greatest hits and plenty of new bang

heDi slimane Dieter rams jeff koons louise bourgeois rei kawakubo Zaha haDiD karl lagerfelD PhiliPPe starck DaviD lynch robert wilson christian marclay kraftwerk lang lang ole scheeren taryn simon elmgreen & Dragset laurie simmons frank gehry jean nouvel william wegman liZ Diller 274

273

267

264

260

272

265

262

261

271

262

263

265

270

269

268

275

275

269

261

266

∑

045


OCTOBER

ARCHITECTURE

183 232 238 307 376

Next steps The Chicago Biennial’s second coming

048

Strike force Mallorcan artist Miquel Barceló takes Salamanca by storm DESIGN

Brute force Monumental living in Beverly Hills Accidental heroes A Mexican concrete master mix Scene stealer Bold views and big wins in Lake Tahoe Cape crusade Heatherwick Studio’s temple to contemporary African art ART

188

317

Man at work Takashi Murakami, his toiling team, and dog, as deadline looms at his studio

120 126 133 137

Piece corps Wallpaper* and Sotheby’s join forces to curate an upcoming design sale Stage light Set designer Es Devlin shines among our pick of the London Design Festival Made in Meda Craft, innovation and a revamped HQ for Cassina’s 90th birthday Doctor’s orders Life-saving graphic design in London the ZeitZ MuseuM of conteMporary art africa is carved out of a forMer grain silo in cape town, see page 376


The classic in a new light USM Modular Furniture Haller now features revolutionary integral lighting: cable-free, dimmable, energy efficient. A true innovation – get inspired!

www.usm.com Visit our authorized sales partners or our USM Showrooms in Berlin, Bern, DĂźsseldorf, Hamburg, London, Munich, New York, Paris, Stuttgart, Tokyo


LONG TRADITION YOUNG CREATION

www.rosenthal.de


GEODE BY CÉDR IC R AGOT


OCTOBER 323 359

Ocean drive The Aurora superyacht makes waves Wine & Design From a pioneering Japanese winery to a treat of a tasting room in South Africa FASHION

155 218 329 386 Designer Pierre Yovanovitch rolls uP his sleeves at his Paris atelier to unveil his first furniture collection, see Page 210

159 165 210 244 254 313 056

Big draw A smarter take on vaping that aims to help you quit for good Mr Big Stuf Joris Laarman 3D-prints a bridge Higher calling Fun and comfort in a furniture irst from Pierre Yovanovitch Guiding lights Lindsey Adelman is a glowing mentor Peek show Dimore Studio’s exclusive preparatory collages for its new London installation Quiet storm The team maximalising Minimalux

Deep thinker A Seiko diver’s watch is resurgent Gentle touch Delicately engineered ine jewellery Style icons MoMA makes a fashion foray Match made We’re doing denim on denim FOOD

418

Artist’s palate Bernar Venet’s oeuf caviar FRONT OF BOOK

097 116

Newspaper All-weather outerwear; fringe beneits for furnishings; Beirut’s museum mile Vinson’s View Picky Nicky’s on retail detail INTELLIGENCE

142 408

Page maker Irma Boom, and collaborators, at her new Amsterdam studio and library Soul mates The Vatican Museums’ new director invites Wallpaper* behind the scenes


High Jeweller y C ollection Chaumet est une fĂŞte


HANDCRAFTED IN ENGLAND smallbone.co.uk +44(0)20 7589 5998

A member of the Canburg Group


ICON NO 61

SURF’S UP Elegant, grey-blue shade inspired by the iconic colour of the sea. Surf’s Up pays homage to the Pacific Ocean the origin of the Hawaiian cult sport and surfer lifestyle. Caparol Icons are luxury paints for bespoke interior design. 120 iconic colours made in Germany.

WWW.CAPAROL-ICONS.DE


OCTOBER LONDON ROAD FIRE STATION the Wallpaper* composed team offers inspiration for a remarkable redevelopment project, see page 333 ‘j16’ rocking chair, from €1,950, by hans j Wegner, from fredericia. ‘3° regal’ mini shelving Unit, from €1,336, by aero architekten, for ZeitraUm. ‘vase 1’ (top left), £159; ‘vase 3’, £129 (bottom), both by milia seyppel, for karakter. ‘kora’ vase (top right), from, €160, by stUdiopepe, for atipico. ‘herringbone natUral jt900’ rUg, £45 per sq m, by crUcial trading

MANCHESTER

INTERIORS

170 326 333 398

Smallpaper* Diminutive design for mini aesthetes Bear hug A zoomorphic sofa, the comfy way to challenge climate change Civil service As a landmark to municipal muniicence is restored in Manchester, Wallpaper* Composed ofers interiors inspiration

064

416

Soap stars Nose Lyn Harris points Claus Porto in a fresh direction

Stockists What you want and where to get it TRAVEL

365 367

Full beam We’re kings of neon LIFESTYLE

355

RESOURCES

Checking in The Mies-inspired Ace Hotel in Chicago Departure info A coolly choreographed Copenhagen retreat and a mountain rest in Guilin

SINGAPORE REVEALED

339

Sixteen pages of creative energy and expertise from the city-state set on designing its way to a better future


No.1 SAVILE ROW I BATH I BIRMINGHAM CHESTER I LIVERPOOL I WINCHESTER gievesandhawkes.com


Home at last.

ADDA SECTIONAL SOFA design by Antonio Citterio FLEXFORM www.flexform.it


84 Showroom / Archive: Kantstrasse 79, 10627 Berlin Opening hours: Tuesday-Saturday 11-7pm

bocci.ca/79


84 84 Series by Omer Arbel Standard fixtures and custom installations

bocci.ca


Wallpaper.com facebook.com/wallpapermagazine @wallpapermag

World Headquarters

Subscriptions

161 Marsh Wall, London E14 9AP, United Kingdom Tel: 44.20 3148 5000 Email: contact@wallpaper.com

Tel: 0330 333 4555 (UK) Tel: 44.33 0333 0233 (overseas) Order online at Wallpaper.com

@wallpapermag

Editorial Editor-in-Chief Tony Chambers

Architecture / Design

Fashion

Wallpaper* Digital

Contributing Editors

Acting Architecture Editor Jonathan Bell

Fashion Director Isabelle Kountoure

Digital Director Anthony Thornton

Design Albert Hill

Architecture Editor Ellie Stathaki

Fashion Editor Jason Hughes

Acting Online Editor Jessica Klingelfuss

Digital Nicolas Roope, Marc Kremers

Design Editor Rosa Bertoli

Junior Fashion Editor Lune Kuipers

Online Design Editor Sujata Burman

Media Stephen Armstrong

Architecture Assistant Harriet Thorpe

Watches & Jewellery Director Caragh McKay

Senior Digital Designer Fraser Clark

Typography Paul Barnes

Editors-at-Large Leïla Latchin Emma O’Kelly Henrietta Thompson Suzanne Trocmé

Interiors / Entertaining

Online Fashion & Jewellery Editor Laura Hawkins

Junior Digital Designer Oliver James Jackson

International Editors

Interiors Director Amy Hefernan

Bookings Editor Leila Hartley

Editorial Assistant Elly Parsons

US Editor Michael Reynolds

Interiors Editor-at-Large Benjamin Kempton

Intern Holly Patrick

New York Editor Pei-Ru Keh

Art

Fashion Coordinator Rosanna Bruce

Entertaining Director Melina Keays

Watches & Jewellery Assistant Aylin Bayhan

Group Digital Production

Italy Editor-at-Large J J Martin

Interiors Stylists Maria Sobrino Matthew Morris

Interns Juliet Dyer Gabriele Rizzi

Product Manager Leonard Burns

Japan Editor Jens H Jensen

Interiors Coordinator Olly Mason

Beauty / Lifestyle

Production Manager Daniel Short

Brazil Editor-at-Large Scott Mitchem

Product Manager, Wallpaper.com Toby Grimes

Germany Editor-at-Large Sophie Lovell

Creative Director Sarah Douglas Executive Editor Bridget Downing Senior Contributing Editor Nick Compton Commissioning Editor TF Chan

Art Director Jessica Rose Senior Designer Anne-Laure Fuchs Junior Designers Alex Michael Ben Rimmer Intern Katherine Beckwith Photography Head of Photography Kate Barrett Deputy Photography Editor Alex Milnes

Interns Markos Ioannides Robin Taher Hangna Koh Soia Dotta Travel Travel Editor Lauren Ho

Intern Hannah Tointon

Beauty & Lifestyle Director Emma Moore Intern Emily Simpson

PA to Tony Chambers Ema Janáčková

Production

Editorial Business Coordinator Tim Royall

Production Editor Anne Soward

Hamburg Editor Ina Becker Australia Editor Carrie Hutchinson Mexico & Central America Editor Pablo León de la Barra Buenos Aires Editor Mariana Rapoport

Sub Editor Léa Teuscher

Middle East Editor Warren Singh-Bartlett Singapore Editor Daven Wu

Publishing & Marketing Publisher Malcolm Young Associate Brand Publisher Kelly Gray Advertising Advertising Director Dave Harvey Tel: 44.20 3148 7722 Sales Manager George Jennings Tel: 44.20 3148 7764 Advertising Business Manager Amanda Asigno Production Controller Nick Percival Publishing Assistant Sara Esteves Tel: 44.20 3148 7724 Global Partnerships Global Partnerships Director Sarah Martin Tel: 44.20 3148 7703 Global Partnerships Events Manager Ash Fitzpatrick Tel: 44.20 3148 7782

Wallpaper* Digital

Advertising Oices

Digital Advertising Director Scott Lambert Tel: 44.20 3148 7726

usa Advertising Manager (Northeast) Ilaria Anghinoni Tel: 1.646 389 5554

Digital Advertising Manager Roya Farrokhian Tel: 44.20 3148 7725 Digital Project Manager Ella Levy Tel: 44.20 3148 7751 Wallpaper* Bespoke Bespoke Director Matthew Johnston Tel: 44.20 3148 7704

Advertising Manager (West Coast) Kiliaen Murphy Tel: 1.310 467 4577 italy Advertising Manager Paolo Cesana Fashion Executive Cristiana Catizone

Bespoke Editor Simon Mills

Design Executive Marcella Bigi

Bespoke Art Director Aneel Kalsi

Commercial Executive Paolo Mongeri Tel: 39.02 844 0441 Fax: 39.02 848 10287

Bespoke Producer Minna Vauhkonen Tel: 44.20 3148 7763 Bespoke & Fashion Account Manager Lloyd Lindo Tel: 44.20 3148 7786

Circulation / Subscriptions germany, austria and switzerland Advertising Manager Peter Wolfram Tel: 49.89 9611 6800 Fax: 49.89 9611 6803 china Advertising Manager Magie Li Tel: 86.10 6952 1122 france Advertising Manager Magali Riboud Tel: 33.1 42 56 33 36 hong kong, taiwan, and korea Advertising Manager Herb Moskowitz Tel: 852.2838 8702 Fax: 852.2572 5468 India Advertising Manager Ravi Lalwani Tel: 91.22 4220 2118

Senior International Circulation Executive Elliot Treacy International Business Development Manager Sam Vigers Finance Management Accountant Aristotle Liu Corporate Group Managing Director Andrea Davies Managing Director Roger Cummings Corporate Public Relations Victoria Higham Production Manager John Botten Assistant Syndication Manager Ei Mandrides

Wallpaper*, ISSN 1364-4475, is published monthly, 12 times a year, by The Wallpaper* Group, a division of Time Inc. (UK) Ltd. © 2017 WaIIpaper* Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, 161 Marsh Wall, London E14 9AP, UK. The US annual subscription price is $135. Airfreight and mailing in the US by agent named Worldnet Shipping Inc., 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Periodicals postage paid at Jamaica NY 11431. US Postmaster: Send address changes to Wallpaper*, Worldnet Shipping Inc., 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Subscription records are maintained at WaIIpaper* Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, 161 Marsh Wall, London E14 9AP, UK. Air Business Ltd is acting as our mailing agent. Other subscriptions rates for Wallpaper* for one year (12 issues), UK £72, Europe €142, and rest of the world £148. For enquiries, contact help@magazinesdirect.com; alternatively, from the UK call: 0330 333 1113, overseas call: 44.330 333 1113 (lines open Monday- Friday GMT, 8:30am-5.30pm ex. Bank Holidays). Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. All prices and credits are accurate at time of going to press but are subject to change. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other materials submitted must be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Wallpaper* cannot be held responsible for any unsolicited material. Repro by Rhapsody. Text printed by Wyndeham Southernprint, cover printed by Wyndeham Grange.


QUATRE

FIRST JEWELLER OF THE PLACE VENDÔME In 1893, Frédéric Boucheron is the first of the great contemporary jewellers to open a Boutique on the Place Vendôme


e x p l o re t h e e n er g y o f c re at i o n Shamballa Bracelet, Reversible Lock Bracelets, Korne PavĂŠ Bracelet, Laughing Skull Phurpa Necklace, Star Of Shamballa Cufflinks, Meucci Ring G/Vs Diamonds, Solid Black Diamonds, Black Diamonds, Yellow Sapphire, Carnelians, 18K Yellow Gold, 18K Black Rhodinated Gold Find your nearest retailer at shamballajewels.com | Follow us on Instagram @shamballajewels Flagship Stores | COPENHAGEN, Ny Ă˜stergade 7 | NEW YORK CITY, 170 Mercer Street


INNER CUP OF WISDOM

| P I LO U A S B Æ K B Y C O O P E R

& GORFER


CONTRIBUTORS BERNAR VENET Artist Venet’s bold lines and minimalist forms have placed him among the greatest sculptors of our time. He contributed this month’s artist’s recipe (page 418) in the midst of a busy summer, which saw a show at Blain Southern, an installation at Frieze Sculpture Park and the expansion of his foundation in France. The dish is a gently fried eg encircled with a generous helping of caviar – rather like his seminal 1963 work, Pile of Coal, which made waves with its ostensible lack of dimensions. YOKO CHOY Writer

ALEX MAJOLI Photographer

Wallpaper* stalwart Choy divides her time between Hong Kong and Amsterdam, where she interviewed book designer Irma Boom and her constellation of collaborators (page 142). ‘Boom’s mastery of bookmaking allows her fellow creators to ind new expression in their own art, and her library [designed by Barend Koolhaas] will surely introduce a new energy to the creative scene of the city,’ says Choy, who is planning her own book, on the contemporary creative scene in China.

Magnum photographer Majoli made his name in the mid-1990s with Leros, a study of a psychiatric hospital in Greece. He has since shot on the frontlines of Kosovo, Iraq, Afghanistan and the Congo for the likes of The New York Times and National Geographic. When we secured behind-the-scenes access at the Vatican Museums, he explored its hallowed halls and archives to cast light on the dynamic regime of its irst-ever female director, Barbara Jatta (page 408). PHILIPPE LACOMBE Photographer Still life photographer Lacombe has applied his poetic style to campaigns for Hermès, Bulgari and Chanel, and takes a graphic approach to the intricacies of ine watch and jewellery design. For this issue he shot a series of one-of high jewellery designs. Highlighting the precision skills required to imbue precious stones and metals with a sense of weightlessness, he photographed the jewels against veil-light fabrics by Kinnasand and Nya Nordiska (page 218).

080

ALEX MOSHAKIS Writer

FUMINO OSADA Photographer

London-based Moshakis visited the Southwark studios of e-cigarette start-up AYR, delivering a irst look at a product with soaring ambitions ahead of its launch in early 2018 (page 159). ‘I was surprised to hear that one of the founders’ central missions was to design a vaping product that might help smokers quit nicotine altogether,’ he says. ‘That’s positive but ambitious.’ A writer of sports and general interest features, Moshakis is currently working on a book on the changing role of design in Germany.

We dispatched Tokyo-based Osada to visit artist Takashi Murakami, who was preparing for an exhibition at Moscow’s Garage Museum of Contemporary Art (page 188). She was struck by the frenetic pace of his studio, a windowless factory which operates 24/7. ‘Murakami is a very very busy person,’ she recalls. ‘There were so many staf working under tense conditions. But his dog Pom was walking around, and when they saw him, they felt more relaxed.’ Next up for Osada is a study of Sicily’s Roma people.

WRITER: TF CHAN


Italian Masterpieces GRANTORINO SOFA. DESIGNED BY J.M. MASSAUD. SALONE DONNA ELENA, PALAZZO CORSINI, FIRENZE. poltronafrau.com London 147 – 153 Fulham Road +44 (0) 20 7589 3846


AGENT UK & IRELAND: Alberto Schiatti - Tel. +39 0362 328162 - info@schiatti.it - albertoschiatti.com/porada


EDITOR’S LETTER

This month marks Wallpaper’s coming of age: our 21st anniversary. It’s also my tenth year as editor-in-chief, having switched from being creative director in April 2007. I must confess that my coming of age came a number of years earlier. Time lies. One of the earliest projects I worked on in my new role was our inaugural October Guest Editors’ Issue. Now, many media outlets have given over their editorial reins to appropriate talents in order to bring a fresh perspective and generate some PR buzz. But because of Wallpaper’s multi-faceted editorial remit, we felt our spin on the concept should be equally all-encompassing – we would invite not just one, but up to three diverse creatives each year who would relect our ofering, but also push us to try new things. So year one saw a purist industrial designer, Dieter Rams, an iconoclastic artist, Jef Koons, and a much-more-than-a-fashion-designer fashion designer, Hedi Slimane. To rebalance the unintentional male bias for 2007, the next year saw Louise Bourgeois, Zaha Hadid and Rei Kawakubo bring art, architecture, and fashion girl power to our pages. Subsequent editions have seen Karl Lagerfeld, Philippe Starck, David Lynch, Robert Wilson, Kraftwerk, Christian Marclay, Lang Lang, Ole Scheeren, Taryn Simon, Laurie Simmons, Elmgreen & Dragset, Frank Gehry, Jean Nouvel, William Wegman and Liz Diller have fun at our expense. That makes 21 in total, and therefore a convenient excuse to take a retrospective look, as well as request some updates. See pages 259 to 305 for our Guest Editors’ greatest hits and new releases.

088

Cover by Patrik Schumacher / ZHA Zaha Hadid Architects’ parametric design honours our 21st birthday with a fitting salute. Back in 2008, Hadid herself was Guest Editor, making her mark with a technically challenging cover and a ‘big hole’ in the magazine (top). See more about her Guest Editor’s cut on page 272 and ZHA’s new offering on page 277

In addition to a 20-plus page section within the magazine, each of our Guest Editors was also invited to design a cover. Many called for unusual paper technologies – Hedi used specialist printing inks to simulate glitter, whereas Karl invited readers to strip the Dior Homme suit of his muse by means of a peelable layer. Starck constructed a transparent front cover using three layers of tracing paper. And Kraftwerk’s Ralf Hütter tacked on a pair of 3D specs, to go with his 3D cover portrait and portfolio of exclusive images tied to key Kraftwerk compositions. If I had to pick one favourite project it would be Zaha’s. Her cover was a gatefold construction using multiple die-cuts, while inside she produced a 16-page die-cut sculpture, which was a take on her ‘Lotus’ room installation at that year’s Venice Biennale. ‘I want to put a big hole in the magazine’, she told us. We dutifully obliged. Zaha was proiled by art critic Matthew Collings, who visited her at her London oices and provided a pleasant distraction from discussions about cement. Collings and ‘Big Z’, as he afectionately called her, hit it of immediately. ‘Her architecture is the greatest art of the moment,’ he said. So it’s a huge pleasure for me and I think a itting tribute to Zaha (who tragically passed away 18 months ago) that this anniversary issue’s cover was created by Zaha Hadid Architects and its principal and torchbearer, Patrik Schumacher. Enjoy this special issue and raise a glass to Big Z. Tony Chambers, Editor-in-Chief

Photography: Frank Hülsbömer, Chris Brooks

A hole in one


Dornbracht Culturing Life LifeSpa

lifespa.dornbracht.com


Rolf Benz NUVOLA

International Flagships: Beijing, Cologne, Dubai, Hamburg, London, Munich, New York, Stuttgart, Taipei, Tokyo, Vienna, Warsaw


rolf-benz.com


marni.com


Wallpaper’s hot pick of the latest global goings-on London-BASed ScriBe PAuL AnTonio TeSTed The new LAMy Aion for uS wiTh A ceLeBrATory fLouriSh ‘Aion’ founTAin Pen, €49, By JASPer MorriSon, for LAMy. KyoTo inK, £20, froM QuiLL London

Pen friends we’re celebrating 21 years with all the write people Sleek, silky smooth yet superbly sturdy – the new Aion pen range from German writing instrument brand Lamy is a scribing sensation. So it will come as no surprise that the hand behind it is British designer Jasper Morrison, who, over his 35-year career, has applied his distinct brand of minimalism to everything from home accessories and furniture to transport and technology. The Aion range is one of Lamy’s simplest designs to date, but it’s the one that packs the most innovation.

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIPPE FRAGNIÈRE WRITER: ROSA BERTOLI

Lamy developed a new manufacturing process to create the seamless body and cap combo and the double matte inish that highlights the grip. The well-proportioned case, cast from a single piece of metal, is an industry irst, while the pen also features an exclusive new nib shape. Available in two metallic shades (black and olive silver), and in fountain, ballpoint and rollerball versions, the Aion is a quiet but much welcome revolution in the world of handwriting.

097


Newspaper ‘azuRean BRaID’ whITe goLD, DIaMonD anD SaPPhIRe eaRRIngS, FRoM The FLyIng CLouD CoLLeCTIon, PRICe on RequeST, By ChaneL FIne JeweLLeRy. ToP, £5,985, By ChaneL

Smooth sailing Chanel is navigating a new era of high jewellery design with its latest nautically inspired collection

Hair: Shiori Takahashi. Make-up: Virginia Bertolani. Manicure: Saffron Goddard at Coffin Inc using YSL Beauty. Model: Saara Sihvonen at The Hive

from anchors and lifebuoys to sailor tattoos, the jaunty seafaring theme steering Chanel’s flying Cloud high jewellery collection might easily have tipped into the realm of whimsy. But it takes its name from a 1920s superyacht owned by the second duke of westminster and frequented by Coco Chanel during holidays on the riviera. That led to hardier, nautical rope references, as these bold, white gold, diamond and deep-blue sapphire knot earrings attest. Seaworthy lengths – those rough, lifesaving twists of rope that would have been handled by the flying Cloud’s 40-man crew – are scattered throughout. It mirrors the way Chanel has made the softest lambskin look like seaman’s oils in its current Cruise collection. Comprising earrings, cufs, necklaces and rings formed of swirls of the diamond rope, the collection gives a fresh feel to high jewellery design, so often set on a straight course by the reverence that rare materials demand. we’re most deinitely on board.

IN THE FRAME This new house by Jakob + MacFarlane sprouts from a site in the Parisian suburb of Boulogne-Billancourt. ‘It’s in a neighbourhood with several avantgarde houses built in the 1920s and 1930s by the likes of Le Corbusier and MalletStevens,’ says Brendan MacFarlane, who started Jakob + MacFarlane with Dominique Jakob in 1997. The house relects the shimmering white walls of its iconic precursors but takes a diferent structural direction. Rising like a fractured ovoid, its edges are deined by a branching tubular steel frame set over an internal steel-panelled skin. Five terraces are scattered throughout, while inside there are not one but two aquariums incorporated into the stair tower. jakobmacfarlane.com

pHoToGrapHY: IrInGÓ deMeTer, roLand HaLBe faSHIon: Lune kuIperS wrITerS: CaraGH MCkaY, jonaTHan BeLL

099


Newspaper ‘tripolino s’ taBle, €3,050, By Cristina Celestino, for eDitions milano. ‘ninho’ Bowl, from €400, By Cristian mohaDeD, from gallery Bensimon. ‘Calliope’ penDant light, priCe on request, By marCel wanDers, for wonDerglass. ‘half moon’ mirror, $2,100, By Ben & aja BlanC. ‘olimpia’ faBriC in terraCotta, £300 per m, By ruBelli Venezia, for ruBelli. ‘the moor’ rug, priCe on request, By all the way to paris, for &traDition

Fringe beneits

Tassels are currently the mane attraction for contemporary interiors

100

tassels and trims are making a return to interiors. far from being the style we associate with 1970s suburbia, however, 21st century fringing cuts a new sort of dash, taking on diferent proportions and functions. there are loor-sweeping fringes on Cristina Celestino’s tables for editions milano, as well as her cabinets for Durame. mirrors by Ben & aja Blanc sport threads cut into graphic-shaped manes, marcel wanders has embellished his pendant lights for wonderglass with tassels, while Cristian mohaded’s ‘ninho’ bowls for gallery Bensimon wear a thick pile of threads. finally, we have licence to skirt around the subject.

photography: philippe fragniÈre interiors: olly mason writer: emma moore


T H E O T H E R C O N V E R S AT I O N

8 SOFA DESIGNED BY PIERO LISSONI. Photographed at Shore House by Mount Fuji Architects, Japan discover more at cassina.com London 238-244 Brompton Road


Newspaper

Altared states Worship at LDF’s temple of taste Amsterdam-based food designer Ido Garini, of Studio Appétit, working with Conran + Partners, is set to make his mark on this year’s LDF with a food and design extravaganza at King’s Cross restaurant German Gymnasium. Showing from 18-24 September and entitled Tribute, the Bauhaus-inspired installation, which forms part of a larger project called Food Religion, will consist of a central totem built from layers that break down into an outdoor oven, a spice chest, a cofee roaster and a bowl. There will be tastings running throughout the festival, featuring, among other things, a deconstructed black forest gâteau (shown here) on tableware designed by Studio Appétit using oak, brass and Finnish soapstone, a material used to chill drinks, eschewing the need for ice. Black forest gâteau was chosen as, by law to deserve its title, it must be doused with kirschwasser, giving it an almost holy status. Each plate will include a chocolate piece made not for eating but for sacriice – it will be placed as an ofering at a designated altar, then melted and remoulded into a sculpture that will be presented at next year’s Salone. Pictured left, set on a blueprint of the totem, is a martini cup, ice stick, highball and whisky cup, made from Finnish soapstone, by Hukka, hukka.i. Oak cheese platter with removable stone plate and copper cheese knife, and oak dessert platter, by Studio Appétit, studioappetit.com

BLACK MAGIC The debut collection of French designer Victoria Magniant, a series of sculptural black furniture entitled Daiku, launched at Paris Design Week this month. Made of black stained ash, the starting point of the design is Japanese craft techniques, which Magniant combined with digital and CNC technology to give structure to her idea. ‘Instead of designing a chair, I tried to “write a chair”, to recreate the spontaneous feeling of a brush stroke and the luidity of the ink,’ she says. ‘I looked for a seamless silhouette to create the illusion of an impossible construction.’ Daiku collection, prices from €250, by Victoria Magniant, from Galerie V, galeriev.fr

102

PhoToGRAPhy: BAKER & EVANS, ILyES GRIyEB WRITERS: EMMA MooRE, RoSA BERToLI


FLAGSHIP STORE - BÄRENGASSE 10 - 8001 ZÜRICH HIERONYMUS-CP.COM


cappellini.it

smart people love Cappellini


Newspaper

Hair: Shiori Takahashi. Make-up: Virginia Bertolani. Manicure: Saffron Goddard at Coffin Inc using Chanel. Model: Saara Sihvonen at The Hive

Coat, €1,070, by HErno. SHoES, £380, by CHurCH’S

Storm troopers Every cloud has a single lining with the latest all-weather outerwear

PHOTOGRAPHY: IRINGÓ DEMETER FASHION: LUNE KUIPERS

105


Newspaper COAT, £560, by WOOLRICH. TROuSeRS, £455, by THeORy

COAT, £3,265, by LORO PIAnA. JACkeT (undeRneATH), £545, by THeORy

COAT, €600, by POC And FORTH

W WRITeR: LAuRA HAWkInS

hether you’re pounding pavements, mooching on the moors or pedalling urban cycle paths, concerted eforts are being made to ensure that weather-prooing doesn’t compromise your style. Loro Piana’s baby camel and cashmere city coat is crafted from a double-layered fabric and treated with a newly developed Rain System technology, giving a water-repellent inish. Herno, too, is on hand for stormy weather. The Italian outerwear expert’s classic raincoat is both waterproof and windproof, and features a triple Gore-Tex layer, and a detachable inner goose-down jacket for added warmth. Its elongated sleeves and high neck provide the comfort of both a sweater and a scarf. Woolrich, America’s oldest outerwear brand, has stayed true to its roots. This water-repellent coat features an inner padded jacket and a warming neckline that reaches to the ears, its cut concealing the detachable layer underneath. Meanwhile, POC and Forth’s debut commuter-focused collection includes pieces with cyclist-friendly features. The Swedish label’s outerwear has extendable sleeves, an unfolding back pocket for your mobile phone and a capped hood designed to it safely over a helmet. loropiana.com; herno.it; woolrich.com; pocsports.com

107


Newspaper 01

02

03

04

East is feast The chefs fusing Levantine cuisine with a melting pot of global culinary staples Ever since the likes of Yotam Ottolenghi put modern Jerusalem on a plate in the early 2000s, Levantine cuisine has been on the rise. We’ve spotted a number of creative kitchens taking the next natural step: cross-pollinating the lavours of the Levant with the cuisines of other cultures, from Bangkok to the Black Forest. Here are some of our inds.

108

01 London’s Palomar (thepalomar.co.uk) has been gaining acclaim for its Israeli lavours, innovatively reworked for the small plate generation. Playful pairings include Jerusalem mess (a take on Eton mess made with labneh mousse and almond crumble) and scallop carpaccio with Thai-bouleh (pictured), a fusion of Thai and Lebanese cuisines, with toasted cashew and lime replacing the bulgur. ‘Alchimie’ plate in Gold, £110, by L’Objet. ‘Iga’ cup, £40, by Native & Co. ‘Kintore’ fabric in Cardamon, £60 per m, by Romo 02 Maiko Kyogoku set up Bessou (bessou.nyc) in NoHo as a Japanese restaurant serving comfort food, but the melting pot of her home town is evident. We love her Japanese take on shakshuka, a blend of tofu, curry powder, pomegranate and harissa, served with toasted Japanese milk bread. ‘Chrysanthemum’ plate, £32, by Native & Co. ‘Goa’ spoon, £14, by Cutipol, from Amara. ‘C5’ griddle pan, £65, by Crane Cookware. ‘Kintore’ fabric in Buf, £60 per m, by Romo

03 At Mokonuts in Paris, Lebanese chef Omar Koreitem is in charge of the savoury, while his partner, Japanese-born pastry chef Moko Hirayama, provides the sweet. Our depiction shows their labneh dish served with sesame and miso cookies and mugicha tea. ‘Alchimie’ plate in Black, £24, by L’Objet. Ceramic cup and saucer, £24; walnut saucer, £55, all by Native & Co. ‘Mercurio’ fabric in Oro, £150 per m, by Rubelli 04 Kanaan (kanaan-berlin.de) in Berlin, set up by Israeli Oz Ben David and Palestinian Jalil Dabit, aims to bring the culinary best from their respective countries to the German city. Their desserts, in particular, bring a teutonic twist to the Middle Eastern table. Black forest malabi (pictured) is a vegan version of the Israeli milk pudding, topped with local berries. ‘Aegean’ plate, £31; ‘Alchimie’ charger in Gold, £155, both by L’Objet. ‘Olio’ jug, £35 for sugar bowl set, by Barber & Osgerby, for Royal Doulton, from Twentytwentyone. ‘Delano’ fabric in Nori, £71 per m, by Romo

PHOTOGrAPHY: JOHN sHOrT FOOD sTYLING: PETA O’BrIEN WrITEr: EMMA MOOrE


newspaper

Tools paradise Heavenly cosmetic gadgets for glamour pusses skincare is now coming with a crop of innovative analogue apparatus intended to amplify the potency of their products. groundbreaking new brand orveda provides a tool with every product, be it a brush or massage tool. eye creams from Chanel and Crème de La Mer are bolstered by massage tools designed to help smooth ine lines, minimise dark circles and solve surface discoloration. Masks such as La prairie’s skin Caviar Luxe sleep Mask come with brushes to give even application, while hourglass Cosmetics’ Curator Lash instrument allows for impeccable primer and mascara application. bristle- and brushfree, the tool targets even the smallest of lash hairs from root to tip. and facial rollers from Dr Jart+ and nurse Jamie are saviours for lacklustre complexion, boosting circulation and encouraging lymphatic drainage; when paired with their respective serums they ensure you acquire that coveted post-facial glow in the comfort of your own home.

CLoCkwIse FroM top, upLIFt MassagIng beauty roLLer, $69, by nurse JaMIe. appLICatIon tooL For eye Contour botanICaL geL, £140, by orveDa, FroM harvey nIChoLs. the eye ConCentrate wIth appLICatIon tooL, £150, by CreMe De La Mer. Contour shaper FroM LIFtra 3-step Contour set, $130, by Dr Jart+, FroM sephora. skIn brush For skIn CavIar Luxe sLeep Mask, £240, by La praIrIe. Massage tooL For subLIMage La CrèMe yeux, £128, by ChaneL. Centre, Curator Lash InstruMent, $78, by hourgLass CosMetICs For stoCkIsts throughout, see page 416

walk the line

02 BEIT BEIRUT built in 1924, this neo-ottoman building, once bullet-riddled to the point of instability, is in the process of reopening as a history museum.

scus

Born again 02

03 MIM this glittering high-tech museum showcases the collection of rare minerals amassed by financial software magnate salim edde. 04 BeMA Due to begin construction soon, the beirut Museum of art, designed by hala wardé, will be home to the national collection of modern and contemporary art. 05 BEIRUT NATIONAL MUSEUM occupying a neo-pharaonic building, designed in the 1920s, this cappuccino-coloured gem is packed with showstoppers, including the world’s largest collection of anthropoid sarcophagi.

110

03

04 05

this month, british furniture brand oMk is launching oMk1965, a sub-brand celebrating the products designed by its founder rodney kinsman. some of the pieces that went out of production will be reissued and shown at Designjunction during the London Design Festival. the collection includes the ‘tokyo’ stool (pictured), created for the groucho Club in 1985. new products will eventually be added to expand the collection. omk1965.com

photography: baker & evans wrIters: sara sturges, rosa bertoLI, warren sIngh bartLett

Illustrator: Luke Fenech

01 BEIRUT CITY MUSEUM ground has finally broken on renzo piano’s museum on Martyrs’ square. It will show off the city’s archaeological treasures.

01

dam a

once a physical representation of Lebanon’s divisions, beirut’s wartime demarcation line was an overgrown wasteland of shredded buildings and shattered dreams. now the line, which runs from the city centre to the national Museum, has become a place of encounter and exchange, where a string of museums is erasing old boundaries, knitting the city together.


LONDON | NEW YORK | LOS ANGELES | TOKYO | MILAN | OSLO | COPENHAGEN | CARLHANSEN.COM

EVERY PIECE COMES WITH A STORY | OW124 |

beak CHaIR ole wansCHeR · 1951

Ole Wanscher’s 1951 Beak Chair design stands as a glowing testament to his boundless exploration of shapes and materials. Sculptural in its design, the lounge chair is defined by organic forms, expressive silhouette, and striking, beak-like armrests. Here, Wanscher’s Colonial Coffee Table completes the scene.


MINIMALIST DESIGN DEMANDS MAXIMUM PRECISION

Timeless design for timeless architecture, built by SieMatic W W W. S I E M ATI C.CO M /S H OW ROO M S


Column

THE VINSON VIEW Quality maniac and master shopper nick Vinson on the who, what, when, where and why

OTHER LEGENDARY RETAIL TASTEMAKERS Murray Moss and Franklin Getchell The duo behind Moss, the iconic New York design gallery that opened in 1994. Having shuttered the store in 2012, today they focus on consultancy through Moss Bureau. Joseph Ettedgui Founder of the Joseph empire, who passed away in 2010. He introduced countless new brands to London, such as Prada, Marni and Kenzo, and his merchandising mix was highly seductive. Tiina Laakkonen The Finnish former model and stylist brings her unique point of view to the Hamptons through Tiina the Store in Amagansett. Tomas Maier At his Miami, Palm Beach and East Hampton stores, opened almost 20 years ago, Maier sold his own cashmere sweaters and swimwear alongside a curated edit of accessories, design objects and the best selection of design books ever. Today, his eponymous collection and stores have a fuller ofer.

01

Bounty hunters Picky nicky gets excited by a well-honed edit

About eight years ago, I stumbled across the Andreas Murkudis store in Mitte, Berlin, and was left with a lasting impression of a genius who could convincingly display items such as Aspesi nylons alongside Nymphenburg porcelain, contrasting the purely functional with the highly decorative. Murkudis has since relocated to a cavernous space in Potsdamer Strasse, where he has a fashion store at 81 and a design store at 77, as well as a gallery across the road. A visit is illed with discovery. I probably know 90 per cent of the brands and makers he sells, but it’s the ten per cent that I don’t know that excites me. Lately it has been Second Skin and Cyclas from Japan, Neri from Florence, bed linens by Ege, and candleholders by Carl Auböck for Lee West Objects. When I talk to Murkudis about object hunting (a task we have in common), and about how makers reach his radar and what interests him enough to buy, it’s clear that he’s fascinated by storytelling, and the stories that he tells about his brands and makers don’t disappoint. Another inspirational tastemaker is my Marylebone neighbour, Maria Lemos of Mouki Mou. At a recent visit to Maison et Objet, my favourite inds were some sublimely simple brushes made of shuro, or Japanese windmill palm, created by

116

Takada Tawashi, a maker from Kishu in Wakayama Prefecture. After calling a friend in Tokyo, I managed to get hold of some samples so that I could write a feature about them. When I later met up with Lemos, I was keen to share them with her, but she had them already – ‘That was my favourite item from the fair,’ we both said in unison. Lemos opened Mouki Mou in London’s Chiltern Street in 2013, and she hunts out makers and products that move her and stir a desire to possess. Her stock includes Nendo’s ‘Patchwork’ vases for Lasvit, oneof Pressed Flower Artworks by MR Studio, jewellery by Ted Muehling, blankets by Denis Colomb, glassware by Lobmeyr, and leather goods by Isaac Reina. Lemos goes to great pains to avoid the ubiquitous. Like Murkudis, she has an inherent curiosity, as well as well-honed principles, which make her edit unique. Her store layout, with its slither of a façade and warren of rooms that spreads out below, serves to accentuate the journey of discovery for the client. For me, the joy of acquiring something new and precious is in understanding its unique characteristics, in knowing who created or designed it, when and where it was made, what it is made from, and what sets it apart from the rest. A tastemaker who is well-versed in the art of storytelling will stand out from the crowd.

02 Animal magic i love a decorative napkin, such as these ones adorned with embroidered bugs, raccoons, foxes or whales, by Brooklyn irm Coral & tusk and stocked at mouki mou. moukimou.com

03 Light relief second skin, stocked at andreas murkudis, produces near-weightless clothing made of advanced natural materials, like air-knit cotton. Just the thing for aeroplane cabins. andreasmurkudis.com

illustrator: harriet lee merrion


Over 60 of the world’s finest interiors stores www.grosvenorlondon.com

(Left to right) Czech & Speake, Promemoria, Portuondo


Inspiration at every glance

www.thepimlicoroad.com


Design SOTHEBY’S 20TH CENTURY DESIGN SPECIALISTS CÉCILE VERDIER, SENIOR DIRECTOR, AND LAETITIA CONTAT-DESFONTAINES, DEPUTY DIRECTOR AND HEAD OF SALE, WITH WALLPAPER* EDITORIN-CHIEF TONY CHAMBERS, AT SOTHEBY’S WAREHOUSE IN WEST LONDON 01 ‘FLORIS’ CHAIR IN MOULDED FIBREGLASSREINFORCED POLYESTER, 1967, BY GÜNTER BELTZIG

05 ‘SQN5-T’ TABLE IN STAINLESS STEEL, 2012, BY ZHANG ZHOUJIE 06 ‘BONE’ ROCKER IN CAST BLACK MARBLE RESIN, 2009, BY JORIS LAARMAN 07 ‘FLORA‘ BUREAU, MODEL NO. 2131, IN MAHOGANYVENEERED WOOD, MAHOGANY, BRASS AND PRINTED PAPER, DESIGNED C1950-51, BY JOSEF FRANK, FOR SVENSKT TENN

04

02 ‘WING-NUT’ CHAIR IN HARDBOARD, PIANO HINGES AND WING-NUT CONNECTORS, 1985, BY JASPER MORRISON 03 ‘ALL NIGHT LONG’ TABLE IN COATED CARBON FIBRE AND NOMEX HONEYCOMB PAPER, 2002, BY RON ARAD 04 ‘FRAGMENTS’ WALL LAMP IN RECLAIMED VENINI GLASS AND STEEL, 2010, BY FERNANDO & HUMBERTO CAMPANA, FOR VENINI

01

02

05

03


PIECE CORPS Wallpaper* and Sotheby’s join forces to reveal what great design is made of PHOTOGRAPHY: LEON CHEW WRITER: HUGO MACDONALD

07

06

‘Living in a Material World.’ It’s a brave title for an auction, perhaps. Yet for Sotheby’s design auction on 17 October, curated by our own editor-in-chief Tony Chambers, the title has a very literal intent: the 150-odd pieces included have been selected for their material expression. ‘It’s interesting how our perception of the word “material” has changed in the three decades since Madonna’s anthem,’ Chambers says. ‘It was a crass and fairly derogatory term not so long ago that spoke of greed, but today we think of the word as having more noble, ine and pure connotations.’ To be clear: this is an auction exploring materiality, not materialism. Standing in Sotheby’s storage facility in the outer reaches of West London is a surreal experience. After wending one’s way through warehouses illed with canned drinks and mass-market furniture (a stark reminder that we do still live in Madonna’s material world), you ind yourself surrounded by goods of a much higher order. Out of context, away from the workshop, gallery, hotel lobby or home, it’s curiously humbling to see these spectacular works of design for what they are. They were not intended to be lots or price tags, but ideas brought to life through craft and technology as functional objects. Jasper Morrison’s ‘Wing-Nut’ chair is in one corner, its expressive utility itting right into the warehouse. A ‘Cake’ stool by the Campana brothers is being carried in a grey industrial laundry bag, while their ‘Broken Dreams’ chandelier for Venini sails past on a trolley. Everything feels of duty and all the more fascinating and spectacular for it. Cécile Verdier, senior director and coworldwide head of 20th century design at Sotheby’s, is leaning against Marc Newson’s ‘Extruded Table 3’, a seemingly impossible piece of furniture laser-cut from a single block of Striato Olimpico marble. You can’t help but touch it. It requires no small amount of willpower not to lick it. ‘A consignment »

121


Design THE AUCTION WILL FEATURE AROUND 150 PIECES OF FURNITURE, INCLUDING:

‘It’s like an antidote to our obsession with social media. We crave the materiality of design’

01 ‘PAPEL’ SOFA IN CORRUGATED CARDBOARD AND CHROMIUM-PLATED STAINLESS STEEL, DESIGNED 1993, EXECUTED 2001, BY FERNANDO & HUMBERTO CAMPANA

01

02 ‘SQN5-T’ TABLE, 2012 , BY ZHANG ZHOUJIE, AS BEFORE 03 ‘VERTICAL’ BENCH IN WOOD AND PAINTED STEEL, 2016, BY PABLO REINOSO 04 ‘WING-NUT’ CHAIR, 1985, BY JASPER MORRISON, AS BEFORE 05 ‘WRECKING BALL’ IN CAST PATINATED BRONZE, CAST AND POLISHED BRASS, AND GLASS, 2010, BY STUDIO JOB 06 ‘FLORIS’ CHAIR, 1967, BY GÜNTER BELTZIG, AS BEFORE 02

arrived last year with a group of six pieces from a European private collector,’ Verdier explains. ‘They were an interesting mixture of contemporary pieces – Hadid, Newson, Arad – and we were struck by the collective narrative of material expression. Wallpaper* was the obvious partner to help us tell this story. Tony and his team have helped cross the boundaries of diferent industries, introducing us to the pioneering and the common elements in design that shape modern life.’ This was the seed from which the auction has grown. It is a collection that traces the evolution of how designers master and manipulate materials, from the politeness of post-war furniture to the use of the most advanced technologies to achieve something more akin to alchemy. As such, there’s an anthropological thread to the hoard. The collection tells the story of modern design through the lens of materials, encompassing the evolution not just of technology, but of skill, taste, trend and wider social values, too. Materiality is more than just a handy hook for bringing the collection together. It’s also a response to where we ind ourselves today, relecting our growing appreciation of materials. As daily life is increasingly spent in virtual worlds or on digital desktops, we yearn for analogue, physical experiences to act as a counterbalance. Materials summon up primal urges – hence the desire to lick the marble. ‘Across contemporary life we are witnessing profound appreciation for experiences and sensations that ground us,’ Chambers explains. ‘We respond to things that engage our senses and make us feel human.’ Bearing testament to this, in the warehouse there’s a lot of stroking going on. Laetitia Contat-Desfontaines, Sotheby’s 20th century design head of sale, elaborates, keeping one hand on Ron Arad’s ‘All Night Long’ table: ‘It’s almost like an antidote to our obsession with social media. We crave the

122

03

04

06 05

materiality and texture that design ofers. Craftsmanship is a tangible link to reality. It speaks of skill, tradition, quality and time – when we feel these qualities we build a relationship with the pieces.’ ‘People buy design at auction because they love the piece,’ adds Verdier. ‘They don’t buy to sell, in the same way as they do with art. Generally, they live with the designs they buy, and use them, and so they have an intimate relationship with them – it’s a commitment.’ Surveying the diverse lots that will be up for auction in October, it’s a powerful concept. Taking materials as a starting point encourages a new appreciation of older, familiar pieces and a fuller interrogation of more contemporary designs. Joris Laarman’s extraordinary ‘Bone’ rocker, 3D-printed using powdered Belge Noir marble and resin, sits beside a mahogany bureau by Josef Frank for Svenskt Tenn, bedecked in botanicals. Both are exquisite examples of their period’s craftsmanship and material expression, six decades apart. Elsewhere, Pierre Jeanneret’s armchairs sit beside the Campana brothers’ ‘Cake’ stool; the elegant utility of wood and leather designed for civic duties in Chandigarh is juxtaposed with the synthetic lufy toys found on São Paulo street stalls – kitsch commerce elevated into something valuable. The breadth and depth of this collection makes clear how design has evolved over time in the minds and hands of diferent people. It is a positive story of progress. ‘Each piece is a story brought to life through materials,’ Chambers summarises. ‘Any new technology presents an opportunity for reinventing or developing a material into a new form. The story of design is efectively the combination of human ideas, material expression and technological development.’ ‘Living in a Material World’, pre-sale exhibition: Friday 13 – Monday 16 October; auction: Tuesday 17 October, Sotheby’s, 34–35 New Bond Street, London W1, sothebys.com


ALASKA

SINCE 1830 woolrich.eu


BEN SOLEIMANI DESIGNER LONDON & LOS ANGELES THE METALLIC ZIA & TEX TURED MARCA RUG COLLECTIONS


THERE ARE PIECES THAT FURNISH A HOME AND THOSE THAT DEFINE IT.®


Design

Stage light Supercharged set designer Es Devlin heads our pick of the London Design Festival PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBIN FRIEND WRITER: ALI MORRIS

To step inside the world of Es Devlin, the world’s most sought-after set designer, is to take a trip down the proverbial rabbit hole and into Wonderland. Her perennially curious mind questions everything, leading her to create unique concepts. ‘Machiko, can you look up the etymology of “indulgent”?’ she calls out to one of her design team during our visit to her south London studio space. ‘Sometimes the origins of words don’t get you very far, but more often they do.’ This instinctive curiosity, along with her seemingly boundless energy and imagination, has ired Devlin’s supercharged career. She illed the stadium at London’s 2012 Olympic closing ceremony with Damien Hirst’s 5,600 sq m Union Jack spin painting; sent Miley Cyrus down a tongue-shaped slide; mounted Jay Z and Kanye West onto two video cubes; and conjured a rotating cinema for Beyoncé. What she practises, she says, is the ‘suspension of disbelief ’, and she is most comfortable when operating ‘on the edge of impossible’. In her Peckham HQ, concept models ill every surface, while miniature props spill out of drawers and cabinets. On shelves, bulging folders with labels such as ‘Adele’ or ‘U2’ hint at Devlin’s jaw-dropping client list. ‘I’ve got to talk to you about the word “client”,’ she says apologetically. ‘I don’t really like it. It’s derived from the Latin clinare, meaning “to incline or bend”. Theatre is a collaboration, a set of ideas being constructed by people in space. So there are no clients, as such.’ Nearby, Devlin’s small team of ive or so young designers busily click around screens » ES DEVLIN IN HER PECKHAM HQ, SURROUNDED BY PROPS AND MOCK-UPS, INCLUDING A MODEL OF THE MIRROR MAZE SHE CREATED FOR CHANEL (ON TABLE, RIGHT)


∑

127


Design

building complex digital models for various projects – the next Louis Vuitton show, a mirror maze for New York and a top-secret hotel installation are all underway. The daughter of a journalist and a teacher, Devlin grew up in the East Sussex town of Rye, a place that continues to inspire her. ‘When I was younger I made stuf for people,’ she says, pondering the origins of her creativity. ‘I’d start making a Christmas present for somebody in November and get it ready by Easter. There was often someone else involved when I was making stuf.’ Unsure of where to channel her talents, Devlin embarked on an art foundation course

at Central Saint Martins, where a tutor sugested she complete the Motley Theatre Design Course. ‘At the beginning, I didn’t understand what a set designer did, to be honest,’ she relects. ‘I walked into the room, which was not so diferent to this one,’ she says, glancing around her studio, ‘except it had mice and smelt of Pot Noodles. I thought: “OK, I like this room, this is a bit like where I’ve been all my life so far, playing with bits of cardboard. And if this doesn’t work out, I’ll just be happy to be here making stuf.”’ Luckily for Devlin it did work out. Upon her graduation in 1995 she won the Linbury Prize for Stage Design and with it, her »

CloCkwise from top left, a torso for ELEGY FOR YOUNG LOVERS, 2017, theater an der wien; a model of the Chanel MIRROR MAZE, 2016; a plane model for a kanye west tour; on the window sill, two phrenology heads, used for ELEGY FOR YOUNG LOVERS, sit next to a façade for OTELLO, 2015, at the met opera, new york, and a geometriC sCulpture for kanye west’s tour; CloCkwork, for DER FREISCHÜTZ, 2015, royal danish theatre; a model set for UGLY LIES THE BONE, 2017, national theatre

129


Design

LDF highLights, 16–24 september At the festival’s South Kensington hub, the V&A, see not just Es Devlin’s work, but an immersive light installation by Flynn Talbot and a 3D tapestry by Ross Lovegrove with Alcantara. Plus, catch our pick of events across London

130

1 – AmAre gio ponti, by moLteni & C

4 – DesignJunCtion

7 – Design Frontiers

The Italian furniture company celebrates Gio Ponti’s legacy with an exhibition featuring pieces by the Milanese architect, as well as screenings of Francesca Molteni’s documentary. 245-249 Brompton Road, SW3

The design fair returns to King’s Cross. New projects inside include Wallace Sewell’s inaugural rug collection (below) and the relaunch of OMK’s best designs (see page 110). Granary Square, N1C

This year’s show at Somerset House will focus on innovation and will include an exhibition by Kvadrat featuring conceptual fabric installations by the likes of BCXSY (below) and GamFratesi. Strand, WC2R

2 – JiJibAbA

5 – shoreDitCh Design triAngLe

8 – the romAn singuLArity

Jaime Hayon and Jasper Morrison joined forces to launch Jijibaba, a fashion brand of functional and timeless menswear. The first collection will launch at Dover Street Market. 18-22 Haymarket, SW1Y

The East London design hub will include a packed programme of design initiatives, such as SCP and Tala’s day-long immersive exhibition (below) in the old Shoreditch Station arches. Shoreditch, EC2A

This exhibition at Sir John Soane’s Museum includes models of Roman architecture by designer Adam Nathaniel Furman, and his 3D-printed glazed ceramic piece, titled Pasteeshio. 13 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, WC2A

3 – other stories

6 – LonDon Design FAir

9 – set in stone

Taking over three townhouses in South Kensington, exhibits include collective Okolo’s photographic show of modernist architecture (below) and Peter Pilotto’s fashion and furniture fusion. Cromwell Place, SW7

Returning to Old Truman Brewery, the fair will present British craft and Swedish design, the ceramics of Italian designer Matteo Cibic (below), and a display of pieces from guest country USA. 26 Hanbury Street, E1

The Design Museum invited eight creatives to explore the potential of stone, and the resulting exhibition includes works by Eduardo Souto de Moura (left) and Jasper Morrison. 224-238 Kensington High St, W8

irst professional commission: Edward II at the Octagon Theatre in Bolton. Over the past 20 years, Devlin has gone from small theatres to gigantic stadiums, but it’s only in the past 12 months that she has found herself creating standalone works. In 2016, her scent-infused Mirror Maze installation with Chanel delighted crowds in Peckham, while her PoemPortraits series with Google at the Serpentine Gallery saw a crowdsourced poem projected across visitors’ faces. ‘After 20 years of working in performance spaces, where there are certain invisible parameters, doing this allows me to escape those restrictions,’ she relects. This independent new direction coincides with another professional triumph for Devlin, the Panerai London Design Medal. Part of the British Land Celebration of Design Awards, the medal is distributed each year during the London Design Festival and previous recipients have included Zaha Hadid and Ron Arad. ‘I have been following the

London Design Festival and the medal for the past decade,’ says Devlin, who also holds an OBE and honorary doctorate from Central Saint Martins. ‘It’s a festival that is infused with a spirit of inclusivity. It epitomises everything that London represents to so many, and that has shaped my character and my practice. “Design” stems from the Latin designare – “to plan, mark out or designate”. I design in London; but it was London that designed me. ‘My work is transitory and exists only as this skeletal trace through the memories of those who were there at each performance. Sometimes the work feels invisible once it’s passed. Sometimes I feel that it exists as a complete body of work only in my memory, so to have it recognised and made visible in the design community is overwhelming.’ As part of the celebrations, a 1:10 recreation of Devlin’s spectacular lakeside stage set for the Bregenz Festival’s production of Carmen will be on show within London’s

V&A Museum, as will a showcase of all four British Land Celebration of Design Award winners, with exhibition design by Devlin. ‘I need to encapsulate 20 years of work in one piece,’ she says, looking again around her studio. ‘I haven’t quite nailed it yet.’ Having found herself in a moment of relection, Devlin tells us that she has also been pondering a book and possibly a retrospective exhibition. ‘I need to create some kind of thesis of my 20 years of work,’ she reveals, eyes twinkling with excitement as her imagination sets alight. ‘I’d love to create an installation where you could travel through my stage sets. You could walk in through Kanye’s mountain, and then out through Wagner’s Parsifal tunnel and then slide down Miley’s tongue. Wouldn’t it be fun?’ We’re waiting on the edge of our seats. British Land Celebration of Design Medal, 16 – 24 September, Hide Tide for Carmen, 16 September – 5 November, both at the V&A, vam.ac.uk; esdevlin.com


Design

Made in Meda Photography: © Armin Linke and Giulia Bruno, 2017, courtesy of Galleria Vistamare, Pescara

Italian furniture maker Cassina marks 90 years with a revamped HQ, a crafty photography commission and a fresh look at its classics A squat 1940s workshop, set behind a single train track in blue-collar Meda, Lombardy, produced the irst industrialised models for the Italian furniture maker Cassina. For a while, the Cassina family lived here too, running a small shop on the premises. While Milan, 20km away, became the pretty face of modern Italian design, here in Meda is where the Cassinas got their ingernails dirty. This year Cassina turns 90, and to mark the occasion, the pioneer of 20th-century Italian design got a manicure, facelift and more besides. In Meda the Spanish designer Patricia Urquiola – Cassina’s art director for nearly three years – has transformed the old production facility into a postindustrial nirvana. Urquiola has sheathed the front courtyard in theatrical perforated-aluminium ‘curtains’, smoothed the rough stone surfaces, built an oice ‘tower’ in perforated Cassina-red metal and reached into the back catalogue of Cassina maestri to furnish

WRITER: ELLEN HIMELFARB

As part of this year’s anniversary celebrations, Cassina commissioned photographers Armin Linke and Giulia Bruno to follow the work of its artisans. Here, a master carpenter assembles a ‘699 Superleggera’ chair, an iconic model designed by Gio Ponti for Cassina. Made of a natural ashwood frame and India cane seat, the ‘super lightweight’ chair has been in production without interruption since its creation in 1957

the cavernous spaces: ‘194 9’ side tables by Piero Lissoni as well as low ‘Refolo’ tables by Charlotte Perriand and ‘LC2’ sofas by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Perriand in updated sorbet-green and blue. To create an intimate breakout space she’s installed a replica of the Refuge Tonneau in the ‘refreshment room’. The futuristic mobile shelter was designed by Perriand and Jeanneret in 1938 and produced for the irst time by Cassina in 2012. It all encapsulates beautifully Cassina’s philosophy, something managing director Gianluca Armento calls ‘looking back to move forward’. ‘It’s counterintuitive, but I believe the truer you are to where you’ve come from, the more innovative you’ll be,’ he says, after unveiling the space to employees last summer. Inaugurating this new, bolder look for Cassina HQ is the culmination of two years of dusting-of and deconstructing old classics – from Gerrit Rietveld’s »

133


Design

1935 ‘Utrecht’ armchair, upholstered with Bertjan Pot’s triangle-pattern jacquard, to the relaunch of the ‘Pampas’ chair by Le Corbusier, Jeanneret and Perriand. Similarly, Urquiola’s streamlining and ‘challenging’ of the original architecture at Meda ‘shows the real spirit of Cassina in a more modern way’, says Armento. ‘The soul of Cassina is making advancements on how we create things. What do we want to leave behind? Not just midcentury modern pieces, but an evolution. Keeping it authentic while modifying the angle and story is a science of how to maintain a glorious heritage. And anniversaries are part of that.’ A rather literal expression of that sentiment can be found in the HQ’s new gallery, metres from where co-founder Cesare Cassina irst tested the soundness of Gio Ponti’s ‘699 Superlegera’ chair in the 1950s. The inaugural exhibition, by photographers Armin Linke and Giulia Bruno, follows Cassina artisans as they piece together furnishings such as the ‘Cicognino’ table by Franco Albini and the new ‘646 Legera’, an updated version of the classic ‘Superlegera’. Linke’s photographs zoom in on the tools of the trade: Bacci CNC routers for fashioning roundedged ash legs and computers equipped with sophisticated 3D programmes. Ultimately, though, the same hands-on method from the 1950s takes over. The process of capturing it, Linke says, was downright anthropological. ‘The ‘Legera’ chair is shaped by artisans who have been working this way for centuries, but also by the classical industrial

134

Clockwise from top left, a replica of Charlotte Perriand and Pierre Jeanneret’s 1938 Refuge Tonneau takes centre stage in the communal area of Cassina’s Meda HQ; the renovated central courtyard now features an ‘office tower’ in Cassina-red perforated metal, designed by the brand’s art director Patricia Urquiola; models from the Cassina archive, including ‘Superleggera’ and ‘Leggera’ chairs, photographed by Linke and Bruno for the inaugural exhibition of the HQ’s new gallery space; Cassina’s 90th-anniversary monograph This Will Be the Place (Rizzoli, €80)

process and inally the era of robotics. So you have one piece of furniture from three diferent eras.’ And so continues the dialogue between modernism and the present day, the intertwining of handcraft – ‘which is now often forgotten, but fascinating’, says Linke – with the outer limits of digital technology. ‘Every component has a story, and inding that language to it them together has an elegance, like writing software code or choreography.’ To expound further on the theme, this month Cassina releases its 90th-anniversary monograph – no mere cofee-table retrospective, but rather a treatise on the industry moving forward. Edited by Pin-Up magazine founder Felix Burrichter, This Will Be the Place taps contemporary experts including designer Konstantin Grcic, architectural historian Beatriz Colomina and architect Zhao Yang, and asks them to arrive at a vision of the future home based on their appreciation of the past. The signiicance of history ‘as a point of reference of excellence’ is something Barbara Lehmann, director of Cassina’s archives, sets up in her introduction. ‘There can be no future without a knowledge of the past,’ she writes. Armento insists the brand has always looked forward a generation for creative input. ‘Some of the furniture we produce was designed over 100 years ago, but remember, the designers were in their twenties, thirties and forties, creating change, creating progress,’ he says. ‘That is still our responsibility, and that is what I want to pay tribute to.’ cassina.com

Photography: Stefano De Monte; © Armin Linke and Giulia Bruno, 2017, courtesy of Galleria Vistamare, Pescara

‘Creating change and progress is still our responsibility’


Р ЮLU Ц ИTЯI O В NДA ИRY ЗА ЙCНEЕRКAЕM РА И.E  RSA K EPH R A IM K EРАС ШIИKР IЯSЕ Т AЕRВEОЛ VO I CМ И MКAT I APLH I RSA RIK RAM A ВHОЗ I GМ H ОЖ -T EНCОHС Т И П ОДС МN И OVAT Ч Е С К ИI V ХEИ D ЗД ЕЛ Й .. ТОЧ Е SФ О РМ ЫI, SТО И Е L L E D FO R M S MРО ATИEЗRВI A L DТRВIАV IКNЕGРАI N ES I GИN W I TН HЫI T PR EC E , НTЧHАIЙNШ -WA С Л TЕ ГE КО ЮЧF ИEТN Е ЛBЬRНI А Т ЕGПUAG Е Р Ь EВ ОЗ ОЖ H НЫ . O M S. A ТNЕDН К TИ I G, H DС GТEЬRИA И DС I I К, Л L AU NЯG П S РAОЧNНEОWС ТLЬA N TOМBAT RO В Ы С О КОТ Е Х Н ОЛ О Г И Ч Н Ы Й М АТ Е Р И А Л В О С Н О В Е Н О В О ГО Д И ЗА Й Н А . CO L L E CT I O N VA L , D ES I G N BY KO N S TA N T I N G R C I C. КОЛ Л Е К Ц И Я IVA N O, L, Д ДИ ИЗА З АЙ ЙН Н ОТ ОТ TOA KO NNSTA N GNUTYI N E NG. RC I C.


Simply modern.

LAMY aion Design: Jasper Morrison Made in Germany. #notjustapen

lamy.com/aion


Design

Doctor’s orders From provocative poster campaigns to pill boxes, graphic design is good for you, relects a new London show

01

07

02

05

06 04

08

03

T

here isn’t a catch-all response to the question posed by the Wellcome Collection’s new exhibition, ‘Can Graphic Design Save Your Life?’ The answer, as curator Lucienne Roberts has discovered after several years of sifting through the archives, is contradictory to say the least. As co-founder, with Rebecca Wright, of GraphicDesign&, a publishing house that explores graphic design’s social role, Roberts has long been interested in ‘demonstrating the value’ of the discipline. ‘There are very few subjects that are as essential as health,’ she says. ‘We knew the pharmaceutical industry was a really rich area to explore. It lends itself to quite a minimal, abstract approach.’ Drawing on Wellcome’s own massive collection, as well as loans from companies and individuals, Roberts worked with Jason Holley and Satoshi Isono

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOEL STANISZEWSKI WRITER: JONATHAN BELL

01. Packaging for Geigy’s New Persantin, by Fred Troller, c.1963 02. Bayer stamped its logo on each Aspirin pill 03. Poster for Geigy’s Butazolidin, by Josef Müller-Brockmann, 1958 04. Bayer’s cross logo, debuted in 1904 05. The Geigy post-war identity used bold colour and sans-serif type 06. Geigy’s Eurax poster, by Igildo Biesele, 1955 07. Teva’s solid identity is unchanged over decades 08. Raymond Loewy’s 1939 design for Lucky Strike, alongside 1990sera Death cigarettes

of Universal Design Studio to shape the exhibition. ‘We looked at it as a graphic space,’ says Holley, ‘using composition, architecture, colour and iconography.’ From the (freshly fashionable) hospital pastel colour scheme to a sprinkling of supergraphics and a clutch of totemic forms (cigarette, cross, warning triangle and question mark), the stage is set for hundreds of items that chart our relationship with the desires, demands and dictates of buying, selling and applying healthcare. The exhibition begins with the cross, crescent and crystal, the three symbols of the International Red Cross movement. ‘These are powerful emblems,’ says Roberts, ‘so it’s a good way of introducing graphic design to a non-graphic audience.’ The juxtaposition with Raymond Loewy’s Lucky Strike cigarette packaging is stark; the show’s ‘Persuasion’ section  »

137


Design

01

02 06

05 03

04

Designing for healthcare ticks all the boxes for the socially conscious designer lays bare the creative battles that still rage between pro- and anti-smoking lobbies. The undeniable bursts of creativity and visual allure of the former (think Saatchi & Saatchi’s Silk Cut) have given health campaigners an unenviable uphill task. Ironically, in recent years designers have also explored the simplicity and discipline of ‘unbranded’ cigarette packaging. Drug packaging has long provided artistic inspiration. Bayer, the German chemical multinational, pioneered stamping its logo on the pills themselves at the turn of the century, giving Aspirin, its new miracle drug, a distinct, inimitable style. From the 1920s and 1930s onwards, the psychology of health and healing and the vast amount of new drugs on the market transformed packaging design. The show’s ‘Medication’ section revels in these crisply medicinal corporate identities, annual reports, packets and posters from companies including Bayer, Geigy, Teva and more. Other key pieces include a classic French pharmacy sign, with its lashing green patterns reprogrammed to display the name of the exhibition, and the ‘Battenberg’ markings from the side of a British ambulance, which

138

Universal Design Studio’s model for the exhibition, with graphic symbols as sets for themed sections 01. Education: modernism deployed to inform consumers and promote health 02. Hospitalisation: the art and design of treatment and recuperation 03. Medication: the role of design in building brands and selling drugs 04. Contagion: a warning triangle to explore safety and security 05. Provocation: design with a conscience, aiming to reshape attitudes 06. Persuasion: a cigaretteshaped display infers the power of design

form a ghostly imprint of the vehicle on the gallery wall. The signage throughout is set in New Rail Alphabet, the Margaret Calvert-designed typeface that was the default option for the NHS for many years. Designing for healthcare ticks all the boxes for the socially conscious designer – it seeks to arrest, inform and ultimately change behaviour. Roberts cites Ken Garland’s 1964 ‘First Things First’ manifesto, an inluential attempt to create a moral framework for graphic design’s ample powers of persuasion. The show’s ‘Contagion’ and ‘Provocation’ displays demonstrate how vital visual communication is and how impactful health propaganda can be (the 1980s Aids ‘gravestone’ advert, included in the exhibition, is a totemic and ominous item for those who recall it). The exhibition name is repeated, plastered across the gallery walls. ‘It is a provocative title and we wanted to maximise it,’ Roberts says. As with all the best medical messaging, it lingers in the mind long after the last pill has been popped.  ‘Can Graphic Design Save Your Life?’, Wellcome Collection, until 14 January 2018, wellcomecollection.org


UN CERTO MONDO CAMMINA ROSSETTI.


Indoor – Outdoor: Mystone Ardesia Cenere www.marazzi.it

Human Design For more than eighty years we have used technology and innovation to design ceramic tiles that people want. Real design always arises from the ones who experience it Marazzi Showroom – 90-92 St John Street, Clerkenwell, London


PAGE MAKER Over the last three decades the Dutch designer Irma Boom has revolutionised how books look and work. She is also a irst-choice collaborator for a generous clutch of A-list creatives who call Amsterdam home, from Rem Koolhaas through Viktor & Rolf and Rineke Dijkstra to Viviane Sassen. We invited all of the above and a few more of the designer’s friends, the world’s smartest book club, to her new Barend Koolhaas-designed studio and library and talked Boom’s groundbreaking take on perfectly bound printed matter phOtOgRAphy: jAAp ScheeRAn WRIteR: yOKO chOy

142


Intelligence THIS PAGE, BOOK DESIGNER IRMA BOOM WITH HER FRIEND AND COLLABORATOR, ARCHITECT REM KOOLHAAS, IN BOOM’S NEW STUDIO SPACE IN AMSTERDAM, DESIGNED BY REM’S NEPHEW, BAREND KOOLHAAS OPPOSITE, BOOM’S PARTNER JULIUS VERMEULEN, ON THE BALCONY OF THE NEW EXTENSION, ALSO HOME TO HIS EENWERK ART GALLERY


I

rma Boom has a signature look: a dress or skirt in black or deep blue (always by Alexander van Slobbe) and a cardigan in the same shade. ‘I always dress the same, so I don’t have to think about it,’ she says. ‘There are so many other things to think about.’ Her wardrobe management stands in stark contrast to her work: each Irma Boom book is diferent, and unique. The Dutch book designer, now 56, aspired to be a painter and attended the AKI Academy of Art & Design in the Netherlands, where she quickly realised art had been just ‘a romantic idea’. ‘There was not the urgency or the drive to make art,’ she says. She tried architecture and photography, then one day she walked into the class of Abe Kuipers, a visual artist and typographer. ‘He came with suitcases of books, and he’d read them and explain them. I had never realised the impact of a book, but from then I was obsessed.’ In 2014, Boom was honoured with the Johannes Vermeer Award, the Dutch state prize for the arts, which came with €100,000 to put towards a ‘special project’. Naturally, Boom opted to spend the money on a library. Located above her studio on Amsterdam’s Koninginneweg, near Vondelpark, the library will house a collection that spans from the 1600s, when books were irst produced on an industrial scale, to the avant-garde tomes of the 1960s and 1970s. In her award acceptance speech, Boom said she wanted to create a place ‘where diferent disciplines meet, where an exchange can take place to discuss the book phenomenon; to talk and fantasise’. The space is scheduled to open this autumn. Among the 330 (and counting) books created by Boom in the past three decades, only her top ten, which she considers both timeless and experimental, will be put on the library’s shelves. Her favourite – and the one that established her name – is Nederlandse Postzegels 87+88, a two-volume catalogue of stamps she designed during her irst job at the Dutch Government Printing and Publishing Oice (SDU). It was Ootje Oxenaar, designer of the famous Dutch banknotes from the 1960s to 1980s, who spotted her talent and commissioned her to follow in the footsteps of Wim Crouwel and Karel Martens, who had designed the previous editions. ‘It was total freedom,’ says Boom. ‘I was an angry young girl. I was naive, fearless.’ »

144

Irma Boom

Taco Dibbits

Rineke Dijkstra

Jacqueline Hassink


Intelligence BOOM AND HER FRIENDS ON THE BALCONIES IN THE COURTYARD OF THE STUDIO, WHICH IS SPREAD ACROSS A 1905 RED-BRICK BUILDING AND BAREND KOOLHAAS’ GLASS AND STEEL EXTENSION

Barend Koolhaas Julius Vermeulen

Viktor Horsting

Viviane Sassen

Scarlett Hooft Graaland

Rolf Snoeren


Intelligence


BOOM’S NEW LIBRARY ON THE FIRST FLOOR, HOME TO TOMES RANGING FROM KORENBLOEMEN (1672) AND ELLSWORTH KELLY (1970), TO HER BOOK MANIFEST (2015). ON THE TABLE ARE ARCHITECTURAL MODELS OF THE PROJECT

‘A book captures time and it’s a result of that moment’ – Irma Boom

The result was bold and challenging: the pages were held in Japanese-style binding, and featured rich layers of images and text running across pages that were sometimes folded and sometimes translucent. The book was highly controversial, but it brought Boom’s name into the public arena and earned her her irst Best Dutch Book Design award. Boom began to see the possibilities of the role of book designer – the director of texts and images whose treatment of content is essential to a volume’s success. In 1991, Boom left the SDU and set up her own studio in Amsterdam. Then came another turning point in her career. Together with art historian Johan Pijnappel, she spent ive years creating a book to commemorate the centenary of Dutch industrial giant SHV Holdings. Think Book has 2,136 pages and weighs over 3.5kg. Only 4,500 copies were printed for shareholders, but it turned Boom into a brand, and one of the world’s most in-demand bookmakers. Back then, Boom was devastated to discover that another ‘fat book’ had appeared just months before her own – Rem Koolhaas’ seminal work S,M,L,XL. ‘It’s terrible, somebody has come before us,’ she told the late Paul Fentener van Vlissingen, then chief executive of SHV. His reply? ‘Well, we are in such good company, Irma. It’s totally ine.’ As it turned out, the books brought Boom and Koolhaas together and they have since become close friends and collaborators. Koolhaas wrote a tribute to his friend in Irma Boom: The Architecture of the Book (2013). ‘Irma ofers books that have bodies, albeit sometimes very small ones. Books that smell, have weight, take of, are sawed, pummelled, have sharp edges or eroded borders to the point of bleeding; they’re brutal, beautifully delicate but never slick.’ The monograph, now in its second edition, measures just 1.5 x 2in but runs to 800 pages. ‘The book grows 3 per cent every year, so when I am 80 I will have a regular-sized book,’ Boom says. Like an architect, Boom makes models to test out ideas and materials – to examine the balance of text and images, and to look in an abstract way at the rhythm of the piece. The solution is often hidden in the content, and the design will reveal itself if one pays enough attention. ‘A book is a container of thoughts and content,’ says Boom. ‘It captures time and it’s a result of that moment. It’s frozen and unchangeable. For me, a book is an edited version of a thought, of an idea. The notion of freezing time and thoughts – I think that’s essential. That’s why I make books.’ » irmaboom.nl

147


L É M A N G R A N D B L E U Inspired by the romantic beauty of Lake Geneva, the new Leman Grand Bleu will surprise as much as it dazzles. Finely engraved waves, magniied by a translucent blue varnish, call to mind all the splendour of the crystalline waters. Available as a fountain pen, rollerball, ballpoint and mechanical pencil. Caran d’ Ache. Swiss Made excellence since 1915. BASELWORLD : HALL 2.1 STAND B51

carandache.com


Intelligence This picTure, boom and her Team aT work; They usually have abouT 15 projecTs on The go below, a model of The new exTension

IRMA BOOM’S BOOK CLUB Barend Koolhaas Architect The building designed for Boom and her partner, Julius Vermeulen, epitomises Barend Koolhaas’ professional outlook. ‘Architecture is about creating possibilities and spaces for the imagination,’ says the architect, who replaced the garage of Boom’s newly acquired 1905 house with a multi-loor structure. The ground level connects to studio space in the main building; another loor houses a new art space, EenWerk; and a greenhouse sits at the top. Angled glass windows and dark basalt-covered walls communicate a sense of lightness, so the building seems almost to loat. Viewed from the inside, the structure is a functional blur, in a good way, its diferent elements fusing into one continuous space, albeit with a range of atmospheres. It ofers unexpected moments that will challenge the artists and designers who are invited to collaborate and exhibit there. Koolhaas studied in Delft and New York, then worked at Ideo in Silicon Valley before joining OMA in Rotterdam and Hong Kong. He returned to the Netherlands in 2011, where he designed a series of shops for shoemaker Jan Jansen; four years later he created his irst house in Almen. ‘I am really excited about these tailor-made commissions for people who really love architecture and are willing

to be creative with it,’ Koolhaas says. His next project, a jazz cafe, is a collaboration with fellow architect Reinier Suurenbroek. barendkoolhaas.com

Julius Vermeulen Art and design consultant and gallerist In January this year, after 28 years of service, Vermeulen stepped down as art and design consultant at PostNL, the Dutch postal service, having commissioned stamp designs from leading Dutch talents such as Jan Bons, Walter Nikkels, and his partner, Boom.

‘A good stamp acts as a modern, distinctive Dutch business card,’ he says. ‘It’s a very democratic form of art – everyone can buy it.’ Vermeulen became interested in design as a teenager, through his father, pioneering typographer Jan Vermeulen. He is currently immersed in his next project, the EenWerk (One Work) gallery. Just a single work by one artist, created specially for EenWerk, will be shown at any one time. The inaugural show in October will present a piece by fellow Amsterdam resident, limmaker and artist Steve McQueen, to be followed by Icelandic conceptual artist Hreinn Fridinnsson.

Scarlett Hooft Graaland Visual artist From the salt lats of Bolivia to isolated farm sheds in Iceland, Hooft Graaland journeys to remote human habitats to tell stories of man and nature. But her work is carefully stage-managed surrealism, more Magritte than National Geographic. Her photograph of an Inuit man leaning against an orange igloo made of lemonade, from the You Winter, Let’s Get Divorced series, was chosen by Boom for the cover of the artist’s book, Shores Like You (2016). ‘The scenery is always staged, but the setting relects the local culture and reminds us of the smallness of humans amid nature,’ says Hooft Graaland, whose next project is to write the stories of her expeditions. » scarletthooftgraaland.nl

149


Intelligence this picture, in Boom’s liBrary are a ‘smoke’ chair By maarten Baas and Jacqueline hassink’s photograph of a tranquil moss garden from her VIEW, KYOTO (2011) series Below, petra Blaisse with her grandchild in Boom’s studio, with a group zero artwork in the Background

Petra Blaisse Landscape and interior architect In 2003, Blaisse invited Boom to join forces for a competition, asking her: ‘Do you want to leave paper and come into nature?’ Boom helped her envisage a botanical garden, the Library of Trees, for a ten-hectare park in Milan. Their winning design is due to open next spring. Blaisse set up her multidisciplinary practice, Inside Outside, in 1991. For her irst solo show, at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York in 2000, Boom created Movements 25%: Introduction to a Working Process. Its pages have interior projects on one side, landscape designs on the reverse, while holes cut in the pages connect the two. Blaisse is working on her irst house, in Berlin, an insulated glass structure that stands inside the uninsulated attic of a former hospital. insideoutside.nl

Rem Koolhaas Architect Koolhaas and Boom have just reworked for Taschen the 2,600-page Elements of Architecture, which featured in Koolhaas’ acclaimed exhibition at the 2014 Venice »

‘I recognise in Irma an enthusiasm for creating’ – Viviane Sassen 150


+44 (0)20 7493 4444 Wigmore Street W1 · Harrods SW1 · Chelsea Harbour SW10 From £7,500 to £125,000 HARLECH 12

A BEAUTIFUL NIGHT’S SLEEP The world’s most comfortable bed, hand made in London

savoirbeds.com

London

New York

Paris

Düsseldorf

St Petersburg

Beijing

Shanghai

Hong Kong

Seoul

Taipei


Intelligence

‘Irma is the best person to make a diference’ – Viktor & Rolf Architecture Biennale. ‘We’re looking at the moment when digital techniques began to have a deep inluence on architecture,’ says Koolhaas, who co-founded OMA in 1975. ‘Most of the buildings today have to be it for human beings, but maybe in the near future, they will be robotised and practically uninhabited. I think we need to prepare for post-human architecture.’ oma.eu

Taco Dibbits Museum director When Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum reopened in 2013 after a ten-year, €375 million overhaul, it did so with a new minimal logo, a fresh typeface and a Dutch Masters-inspired colour palette, all created by Boom to replace the 32-year-old design by Studio Dumbar. ‘Our art is old, but the Rijksmuseum has always been a contemporary platform,’ says Dibbits, the museum’s general director since 2016. ‘And the eiciency of Irma’s design is crucial to the museum’s success.’ rijksmuseum.nl

Rineke Dijkstra Portraitist A Japanese 4×5in view camera with standard lens on a tripod, and a lash on another tripod behind it: Dijkstra has been working with this

152

simple set-up for 25 years. ‘It demands a lot of concentration, both from me and from the sitter,’ says the artist, whose work focuses on the power and fragility of youth. Dijkstra won the 2017 Hasselblad Award for photography, and Boom is marking the occasion with a book to accompany an exhibition in Gothenburg in October. mariangoodman.com

Viviane Sassen Fashion and ine art photographer Sassen’s work has always been a mirror of her personal experiences. The 2014 Umbra series was an attempt to deal with the death of her father, who passed away when Sassen was in her twenties; it was also her irst collaboration with Boom, and it became an award-winning title for them both. ‘Irma’s work ethos is incredible,’ says Sassen. ‘I recognise in her a kind of enthusiasm for creating. She has that enormous drive to create beautiful things.’ Her next project is about womanhood (‘It probably has to do with the fact that I’m a mother now,’ she says), with a show at G/P Gallery in Tokyo in October. vivianesassen.com ON THE WALLS OF BOOM’S STUDIO, WORK IN PROGRESS ON HER LATEST BOOK PROJECTS IS DISPLAYED PAGE BY PAGE, SO SHE CAN VIEW THE BALANCE OF TEXT AND IMAGE

Viktor Horsting & Rolf Snoeren Fashion artists The duo began their professional life in Paris after graduating in 1992, and lived therwe for four years before heading home: ‘Amsterdam is like a global village, everything here is just so close to you.’ Next year marks their label Viktor & Rolf ’s 25th anniversary and they asked Boom, their graphic design teacher at Arnhem Academy of Art and Design back in 1989, to create a monograph. ‘We don’t want a clichéd fashion book; it needs to be something else. Irma is the best person to make a diference,’ they say. viktor-rolf.com

Jacqueline Hassink Conceptual photographer ‘I was blown away by Irma’s Vitra magazine [Workspirit, 1998] and all my books have been designed by her since, says Hassink, who made her name with The Table of Power (1996), images of the empty boardrooms of multinationals. She revisited the project, with Boom, after the 2008 inancial collapse, publishing Table of Power 2 in 2011. Her latest project, Unwired, focuses on internet ‘white spots’, with a book and a show, at Nederlands Fotomuseum Rotterdam in January, both designed by Boom. jacquelinehassink.com


Design + Performance™ and Legendary Performance Fabrics™ are trademarks and Sunbrella® is a registered trademark of Glen Raven, Inc.

L E G E N DA R Y P E R F O R M A N C E FA B R I C S ™ S U N B R E L L A .C O M

FA D E P R O O F / E A S Y C A R E / B L E AC H C L E A N A B L E


Watches rigHt, iko tokunaga, pHotograpHed at tHe seiko museum, sumida, august 2017, wearing, from left to rigHt, a grand seiko spring drive cHronograpH and His own customised seiko professional diver’s design, made of several versions of so-called ‘tuna’ models from tHe decades since 1975

CASE STUDIES Horological heroes of the hour

Deep thinker seiko engineer ikuo tokunaga’s subaqueous solutions

portrait: yasuyuki takagi writer: caragH mckay

Whether it’s the ‘Orange Monster’, ‘Tuna Can’ or ‘Sumo’, the release of a new Seiko diver’s watch sparks frenzied debate (and nickname invention) on online watch forums. This year, there is plenty to talk about as the Japanese watchmaker launches a replica edition of its irst-ever mechanical diver’s design, along with two new superior-tech versions, due in stores this month. Seiko entered the performance watch arena in 1965. Buoyed by its association with the Olympic Games, as oicial timekeeper for Tokyo 1964, it had begun  »

155


Watches

‘Titanium is an ideal material because of its corrosion resistance and lightness’

to consider the new era of gadget-hungry consumers. Its irst diver’s efort was well received, the clean, wide hands and dial markings presenting a contemporary Japanese take on an established Western template. Water-resistant to 150m, its high legibility and tough construction also led to the watch being adopted as a key tool for the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition in 1966. But it was an altogether more personal challenge – and the doged determination of an independent engineer, Ikuo Tokunaga – that led to the launch of its Prospex Professional Diver’s series in 1975. The watch featured a number of technical irsts and established Seiko as a serious player in professional instruments. ‘Just before I started working with Seiko in the late 1960s, a letter from a professional diver had arrived at the company’s head oice,’ recalls the now-retired Tokunaga, who worked with Seiko for 35 years and is a revered igure in the business today. ‘He explained

156

top Left, a contemporary reinterpretation echoing the originaL design, the prospex automatic diver’s watch 42.6mm (caLibre 6r15), features the originaL accordion strap design and bang up-to-date diver’s technoLogy, £799 above, seiko prospex diver Limited edition 39.9mm (caLibre 8L35), repLica with increased technoLogy and pyramid strap, originaLLy made in a fabric weave, now in siLicone, £3,750 both avaiLabLe at seiko’s new London fLagship boutique, brompton road, knightsbridge, seiko.com

that no diver’s watches, including imported ones, were of use to him in his ield as he worked in the oil and gas industry using a saturation diving technique, featuring a mix of helium and oxygen. We visited his team and asked them about the problems they were having.’ Working at 350m depths in pitch-black, freezing conditions was among them. But the most signiicant problem was not the water resistance under high pressure that other diver’s watches were designed to combat, but the lack of resistance to helium gas, particles so small they penetrated the gasket. Tokunaga was not a watchmaker. Rather, his focus was the behaviour of material structures. He started to experiment with titanium. ‘Compared to stainless steel, titanium is an ideal material for diver’s watches because of its corrosion resistance, intensity and lightness,’ he says. ‘However, as this was the 1970s, we had to develop new technology. Pressure-testing equipment was not hard, but the device to test the helium gas penetration was very challenging.’ His solution was a single-construction lightweight case and an L-proile gasket that enabled an air- (and helium-) tight it of the glass to the dial. In 1975, Seiko launched a completely new type of diver’s watch, afording unprecedented gas-tightness, for professional use. The team had notched up 23 horological irsts in the process, including the unique accordion polyurethane strap, designed to move with the expansion and contraction of a diver’s wrist as he reached new depths. Now a classic Seiko diver’s watch motif, it was devised by another of the brand’s lauded design associates, Taro Tanaka, who was inspired by the folding camera he used. Tanaka also created the Professional Diver’s outer case construction, aka the Tuna Can. Seiko has a healthy tradition of partnering with independent designers. In the late 1890s, its founder Kintaro Hattori met 28-year-old engineer Tsuruhiko Yoshikawa and they started producing their own clock, the ‘Bonbon’, as an alternative to popular Western imports. By 1924 it had paved the way for Hattori to capitalise on the Japanese predilection for precision (seiko) and establish the world’s irst Japanese clock and watch manufacturing business.

photography: máté moro


Kerakoll Design House_Studio Via Solferino 16, Milan

Kerakoll Design House is a new interior design project for the contemporary home: cements, resins, handcrafted wood, micro-coatings, paints and glazes, all coordinated in the colours of the Warm Collection palette.

A.D. GraphX / Ph. Tommaso Sartori

kerakolldesignhouse.com


Design the ayr e-cigarette, due to launch early next year, at £149 for a starter kit

BIG DRAW

‘alba’ whisky carafe, £214; small glass, £77 for two; tall glass, £86 for two, all by Joe doucet, for nude. dice, £80 for two pairs, by l’obJet, from amara. ‘earth Jar’ in brass, £100, by dinosaur designs. ‘trafalgar’ ashtray, £350, by linley. ‘manolo’ coffee table, £1,460, by stephan Veit, for draenert, from chaplins

A new British brand is hoping smarter vaping will stub out smoking for good

for stockists, see page 416

ate in 2013, Ian Murison and Kaveh Memari sat down to discuss a shared frustration with the state of e-cigarettes. Murison, an industrial designer with experience in perfume packaging, had been tracking the market for close to a decade, and none of its products had impressed him. For starters, they were all big and bulky, and often looked nothing like the objects they were designed to replace. They came in complicated parts that could be iddly to put together, especially in the dark. And, invariably, they leaked. The pair knew that e-cigarettes or ‘vapes’ were less detrimental to a user’s health than traditional

photography: philippe fragniÈre interiors: olly mason writer: alex moshakis

cigarettes, but poor design was deterring uptake. They also recognised a huge opportunity in the market. In 2015, the global tobacco industry was worth close to $800bn, but e-cigarette sales, which included not just vapes but medical nicotine replacement therapies, claimed less than three per cent of that igure. In research sessions, Murison and Memari had discovered that many smokers were on the look-out for an alternative to cigarettes – a product that might eventually help them quit smoking altogether – but few had embraced those cumbersome vapes already available to buy. Memari saw ‘a »

159


Design

ian murison and kaveh memari photographed at their hQ in southwark, london, with some of their vape designs. on the wall, a deconstructed view of the three-part ayr shows the complicated technology involved

160

tremendous opportunity to disrupt a very old market’ – the pair just had to produce the right product. Murison and Memari began to develop an e-cigarette concept of their own. Understanding the importance of what Murison describes as a smoker’s ‘ritual’, they started creating a product that would provide users with a familiar, ‘cigarette-like experience’. That meant designing something that actually resembled a cigarette and its pack. It also meant facilitating an experience that mimicked the act of having one cigarette at a time. Early on in the design process, Murison and Memari identiied a problem other manufacturers had overlooked: e-cigarette users often had no idea exactly how much they had smoked. Traditional cigarettes ofered smokers a inite experience – when it burnt out, a cigarette was inished – but e-cigarette users could carry on and on. During a research session, one man admitted that he’d once used an e-cigarette non-stop throughout a concert. In an hour and a half, Murison said, ‘he’d most probably inhaled the equivalent of six packs of fags’. Four years later, Murison and Memari’s new model e-cigarette is ready to hit the market. Called AYR

(pronounced ‘air’), it comes in three parts: a case, a luxurious take on traditional cigarette packaging; a vaporiser, which slots hassle-free into the case and resembles a traditional cigarette; and a capsule, bought separately, that contains a liquid formulation (or e-liquid) to be vaporised and which also slips seamlessly into the case. The whole package is light and easy to use. It’s also heavy on clever technology, although users might not notice it. ‘I like to call this a non-technology technology product,’ Murison said, holding a recent prototype in the air. ‘We didn’t put a big LCD screen on the side and give it lots of bells and whistles. We tried to break it right down to the basic core elements.’ AYR’s cleverness is in its practicality. Memari, an entrepreneur and oicially the company’s founder, describes it as ‘the irst vaporiser that reills and recharges itself automatically’ – when the vaporiser is placed into its case, it does both, within ten seconds. It might also be the irst vaporiser that connects with an app, which allows users to check on remaining battery power and capsule liquid and, when a user opts in, can record usage data. Most importantly, AYR will mimic the act of having one cigarette at a time. »

photography: tobias harvey


FORM FOLLOWS PERFECTION

Perfection in detail – that is what AXOR stands for. The AXOR shower products underline this demand. They are the ultimate for the shower. A perfect example: AXOR ShowerHeaven 1200⁄300 4jet with gently enveloping, innovative PowderRain. Water taking centre stage. Unique. In every dimension. axor-design.com


Design based in a former gallery in the bankside lofts development in southwark, ayr is currently fine-tuning its new e-cigarette

‘I like to call this a non-technology technology product. We didn’t give it lots of bells and whistles’ Lights that run the length of the vaporiser will turn of, one by one, as a user inhales. When all of the lights have turned of, a session is inished, and the user will need to slot the vaporiser back into its case for an automatic recharge, reducing the potential for overuse. One capsule provides 100 sessions – and requires none of that tricky reilling. Memari hopes AYR’s innovations might actually encourage customers to quit smoking altogether. His father had been a heavy smoker – so, too, had Murison’s – and he sees in AYR an opportunity to help smokers gradually reduce their addiction to nicotine. The company will ofer various lavours of e-liquid, from Apple Strudel to Vanilla Sky. (Other lavours in development include Rhubarb Custard and Pistachio Biscotti, and all are made in the UK.) Each lavour will be available in one of four strengths: from Bold, where each capsule contains 18mg of nicotine, all the way down to Nude, which contains no nicotine whatsoever. Over time, a user can reduce the amount

162

of nicotine they inhale while maintaining the ‘ritual’ of smoking, until they are inhaling none at all. AYR is based in a former gallery in Southwark, London, where a team of 40 work on design, branding and marketing. Murison and his design team have created original pieces of technology for which they now own hundreds of individual patents. That technology, Memari said, will not be limited to use in their luxury vape, but might also be used in a medical context. AYR is already linking with the Royal College of Physicians to share smoking data. Soon it might be used by hospital staf to treat patients sufering with respiratory illness. ‘We’re not just thinking of challenging and possibly disrupting the traditional tobacco industry,’ says Memari, ‘but about our mission of wellness using connected devices in relation to breathing.’ Smiling, he referred to the potential as AYR 2.0, when the company will deliver ‘nicotine, medicines and even better air to customers and patients alike’. vapeayr.com

photography: tobias harvey


The true innovator questions those things that others take for granted. piquadro.com/mystartup

Bagmotic Tech: Connecting trolleys/ bags/accessories. Tracking, lock, weight, charger, light. iOS and Android compatible


Design dutch designer Joris laarman at his mX3d workshop, sitting on a section of the 3d-printed bridge he is building for the city of amsterdam

MR BIG STUFF Designer Joris Laarman takes 3D printing large

In 2003, Joris Laarman – who had only just graduated from Design Academy Eindhoven – redeined one of the most mundane and overlooked household objects: the radiator. His curvaceous design considered how heat is transmitted, but came with plenty of rococo-inspired spin. When Wallpaper* magazine celebrated its irst ten years in 2006, the ‘Heatwave’ radiator was included in our selection of the decade’s most inluential designs. Eleven years on, the piece that skyrocketed Laarman to design

PHOTOGRAPHY: MARLEEN SLEEUWITS WRITER: ROSA BERTOLI

stardom remains one of the most memorable concepts in the ield. ‘It was a complete rethink of the radiator, from appearance to eiciency,’ says Caroline Baumann, director of New York’s Cooper Hewitt design museum, which acquired a model in its permanent collection in 2008. ‘It showed that ornament can be inherently functional, and challenged the dogma of functionalism with Baroque exuberance.’ This month, an exhibition chronicling Laarman’s work to date will open at the »

165


Design

Cooper Hewitt, before moving on to the High Museum in Atlanta and Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts. The works on show ofer a glimpse of Laarman’s reach as a designer and a maker, but also as a thinker and an explorer of imagined futures. ‘I have a broad interest in the world,’ he says. ‘I am very much the author of a certain story about progress.’ His interests include futurism and modernism, economics, technological progress, predictions from science iction movies of the past, as well as changes in global temperatures and stock markets, which give him an idea of the pace of the world’s development. ‘I kind of surf the waves of innovation and try to give them a face or form. The things I make are frozen moments in this timeline.’ This process makes for a body of work with a wide range of visual codes, usually originating from manufacturing experiments. Laarman launched his studio in 2004 with his partner, ilmmaker Anita Star, dubbing it a ‘lab’: ‘It’s a lab in the sense that we are not an industrial design brand, we experiment like scientists to make stuf,’ he explains. ‘The Lab is a hive of R&D activity that brings together engineers, craftspeople, designers and programmers to develop new skills, materials and digital technologies,’ adds Baumann. ‘It’s transforming our understanding of materiality, pushing the boundaries of form, and even surpassing the limitations of industrial production.’

Above, A section of the mx3d bridge. once completed, the 3d-printed metAl pArts will be welded together on site by robot Arms left, A rendering of the bridge, A scAle model of which will be on displAy At the cooper hewitt below, A rendering showing A top view of the curved, Asymmetric design

Some of the lab’s creations, such as the ‘Bone’ chair, have become design icons. Launched in 2005, it marked the beginning of Laarman’s love afair with digital fabrication. The aluminium chair (and its accompanying series, including a rocker – see our Sotheby’s auction story, page 120) was produced using technology that mimics the growth of a tree, or of bones in the human body. It is designed through an algorithm to use minimal material, with a shape very much guided by the technology, leaving an element of surprise to the design process. Another project that exempliies the breadth of Laarman’s experimentation, and that will be included in the travelling show, is the Maker series of furniture. A symbiosis between craftsmanship and technology, the »

167


Design Laarman’s designs combine technology with ornamentation

‘Heatwave’ radiator, 2003

‘Maker Chair (Polygon)’, 2014 ‘Branch’ bookshelf, 2010

range started with a chair, composed of digitally fabricated wooden modular parts. The project is based on the idea that anyone could produce the furniture using a domestic 3D-printing machine, or small consumer CNC-milling tools (the code for the chair was published under a Creative Commons licence so that it could be downloaded by anybody). ‘Joris’ work has never ceased to develop,’ relects his New York gallerist Marc Benda, who has worked closely with Laarman since 2005. ‘He has helped substantially in bringing the practice of contemporary design, especially studio work, into the 21st century.’ One key development, Benda notes, has been in the way Laarman has harnessed the latest technology, graduating from revolutionary domestic design projects to collaborating with material and building specialists on a massive scale. In 2014, Laarman and Star set up a new company, MX3D (standing for Multi Axes 3D printing), with the intention of taking digital fabrication to an industrial scale. ‘Right after our irst experiment with robots and 3D printing,’ says Laarman, referring to the sculptural ‘Dragon’ bench created that year using a metal 3D printer and a combined robot/welding machine, ‘we were thinking about how we could scale this up. The technology was too good to be true, and too good to just keep as a tool to make the designs that I came up with. So we partnered with people who create the software, who provide

168

ABOVE, A WORK IN PROGRESS MODEL OF LAARMAN’S ‘GRADIENT’ SCREEN, WHICH WILL ALSO BE SHOWN IN NEW YORK, CREATED USING THE SAME ALGORITHM AS THE BRIDGE

‘Dragon’ bench, 2014

the materials, the welding machines and the robots to establish MX3D.’ Laarman is working on his largest MX3D project yet, the irst (and probably last, he jokes) piece of infrastructure he has created. With his team, he is printing a bridge for the city of Amsterdam, to be completed in summer 2018. ‘We needed a poster project for the company, so we thought of doing something for Amsterdam, and what could be better than a bridge, since we are in a city full of bridges and water?’ In a ‘smart’ approach to building, the construction hinges on just one machine, which prints in a cost-efective manner, while the design, engineering and manufacturing processes are interwoven. When complete, the structure may be itted with sensors able to collect data ‘about the bridge or about the traic’, adds Laarman. The upcoming US exhibitions will showcase a 3D-printed scale model of the bridge, and

a new piece, the ‘Gradient’ screen, created using the same algorithm. The shows will be accompanied by a new edition of the book, Joris Laarman Lab (August Editions), edited by Star, who has also created video content for the exhibitions, ofering a behind-the-scenes peek into life at the lab. The exhibited works only ofer a glimpse of Laarman’s potential, ‘a sliver of the universe that he is in the process of building’, says Benda. ‘The future of any creative practice rests on what comes next, and in Laarman’s case, there is a noticeable lack of time in his life: there is simply not enough time in a lifetime to do all the things he is setting out to do. That is a hallmark of a great mind and a great practice.’ ‘Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age’, 27 September 2017 – 15 January 2018, Cooper Hewitt, New York; cooperhewitt.org; jorislaarman.com


PHOTOGRAPHY: PEER LINDGREEN


PLAY HOUSE Modern make-believe for mini aesthetes PHOTOGRAPHY: BENJAMIN SWANSON INTERIORS: AMY HEFFERNAN

170

∑


Smallpaper* From left, ‘Luxembourg Kid’ bench, £133; chair, £95, both by Fermob, from Barbed. Play kitchen, £165, by Sebra, from The Modern Nursery. Pots and pans set, £25, by Melissa & Doug, from Harrods. ‘Linus’ table, £40; pears set, £13, both by Kid’s Concept. ‘FAB5RCR’ minibar cooler, £549, by Smeg. ‘Nexus 90’ stove, £2,234, by Rangemaster. ‘Mami’ pot with lid, £160, by Stefano Giovannoni, for Alessi. ‘All Plastic’ chairs, £185 each, by Jasper Morrison, for Vitra. ‘Tica’ mini table, £125, by The Rocking Company, from

The Conran Shop. Play toaster and toasts, part of Breakfast Set, €84 by Howa, from Hans Natur. ‘CH337’ table, £2,396, by Hans J Wegner, from Carl Hansen & Søn. ‘Super Bauhaus 90 S’ pendant light, €479, by Fernando Prado, for Lumini. ‘Forte’ bowl, £200, by XL Boom, from SCP. ‘FAB28QP1’ fridge-freezer, £979, by Smeg. Estate emulsion in Slipper Satin and Blue Black, £44 for 2.5 litres each, by Farrow & Ball. ‘Norr’ tiles in Vit RR1, €24 per sq m, by Mirage. Douglas flooring, £60 per sq m, by Dinesen


The new PVD surfaces. www.siedle.com

Meiré und Meiré

Wafer-thin and tough.


Smallpaper* From left, ‘Domino’ pouf, £750, by Nicola Gallizia, for Molteni & C. ‘Caravan’ divan, €1,298, by Kalon Studios. ‘Popcorn’ cushion, £49, by Ferm Living. ‘Reykjavik’ blanket, €40; ‘Scheherazade’ cushion, €40, both by Nobodinoz. ‘Cal’ rug, £411, by Nanimarquina. Baby gym, €138, by Mum & Dad

Factory. Sheep 3, 2015, price on request, by Julian Opie, from Alan Cristea Gallery. ‘Estampe’ sideboard, £3,215, by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance, for Ligne Roset, from Heal’s. ‘Lion’ money bank, £1,950, by Asprey. ‘Traditional House’ storage box, £60, by Norm Architects, for Menu. Still Life with Lilies,

Petunias and Fruit, 1988, price on request, by Tom Wesselmann, from Alan Cristea Gallery. ‘Continuous’ sofa, from £3,108, by Faudet-Harrison, from SCP. Estate emulsion in Oval Room Blue, £44 for 2.5 litres, by Farrow & Ball. ‘Terrazzo’ wallpaper in Rose, £65, by Ferm Living. Flooring, as before

173


Smallpaper* From left, ‘Darkly’ mirror, £370, by Nick Ross, for Menu. ‘Little Architect’ bench, £139; table, £219; chair, £99, all by Ferm Living. Word cubes, €49, by Pia Weinberg, for Maison Deux. Find Me: A Hide and Seek Book, £13, by Anders Arhoj (Abrams & Chronicle). ‘Ginger’ portable light, £265, by Joan Gaspar, for Marset. ‘Playon’ crayons, £12 for 12, by Studio Skinky,

from The Conran Shop. by Microsoft. ‘Colour Hecks Finch #1, 2016, Block’ memo pad, £12, price on request, by by Nomess Copenhagen, Luke Stephenson, from from Future & Found. The Photographers’ ‘S-Tidy’, £26, by Michel Gallery. ‘Kazimir’ table, Charlot, for Vitra. ‘Acme’ price on request, by chair, €215, by Geckeler Philipp Mainzer, for E15. Michels, for Fredericia. ‘Ginger’ table lamp, £567, Rug, £2,550, by Jaime by Joan Gaspar, for Hayon, for Nanimarquina. Marset. ‘Beoplay P2’ Estate emulsion in Bluetooth speaker, £149, Calamine, £44 for 2.5 by Cecilie Manz, for Bang litres, by Farrow & Ball. & Olufsen, from John Lewis. ‘Terrazzo’ wallpaper; ‘Surface’ laptop, from £979, flooring, both as before

175


Smallpaper* From left, Donkey, 2009, price on request, by Daniel Naudé, from The Photographers’ Gallery. ‘The WoolNest’ carrycot with stand, £130, by MoKee. ‘Peekaboo’ chest of drawers, €1,205, by Kutikai. ‘Reva’ changing basket, £55, by Olli Ella. ‘Dotty’ hand towel, £19, by Oyoy, from Future & Found. Child’s hairbrush, £285, by Asprey. ‘Anna’ teething necklace, £18, by Lara & Ollie. ‘Terrazzo’ rug, £1,161, by The Rug Company. ‘Century’ toilet paper holder, €176, by Maiken Walther, for Décor Walther. Green toilet paper, €7, by Renova. ‘Florakid’ WC and seat, price on request, by Andreas Dimitriadis,

176

for Laufen. ‘Sigma 50’ dual flush plate, from £254, by Gerberit, from CP Hart. ‘Debba’ sinks, £78 each; ’Totem’ extended bottle traps, £122; ‘Atlas’ basin mixers, £153, all by Roca. ‘Issa’ children’s toothbrush, £79, by Foreo. ‘Minty cool’ toothpaste, £4, from Green People. ‘Biobu Bambino’ cup, €5, by Ekobo. Mirrors, from £95 each, by Moebe, from SCP. ‘Issa’ adult toothbrush, £149, by Foreo. ‘Biobu’ soap dish, €7, by Ekobo. ‘Cavallino’ valet stand, from £79, by IVDesign, for Valsecchi 1918. ‘Dotty’ hand towel, as before. Estate emulsion in Oval Room Blue; ‘Terrazzo’ wallpaper; flooring, both as before


Smallpaper* From left, toy chest on wheels, £94, by Ooh Noo, from Molly Meg. ‘Bild 5 OLED’ TV, £2,990, by Bodo Sperlein, for Loewe. ‘Tobi Ishi’ coffee table, £3,760, by Barber & Osgerby, for B&B Italia, from Chaplins. Balancing blocks, £55, by Fort Standard, for Areaware, from SCP. ‘Dibbetts Tonneau’ rug, £10,673, by Rodolfo Dordoni, for Minotti. ‘H-Horse’ rocking

178

horse, £202, by Nendo, for Kartell. ‘Seymour’ sofa, £13,500, by Rodolfo Dordoni, for Minotti. ‘IC F2’ floor lamp, price on request, by Michael Anastassiades, for Flos. Chair, €95, by Mum & Dad Factory. White Cheeked Bulbul #1, 2016, price on request, by Luke Stephenson, from The Photographers’ Gallery. ‘Bob’ marble table, price on request, by Jean-Marie

Massaud, for Poltrona Frau. ‘Bear’ tumbler, £6, by Buddy + Bear. ‘Bambino’ cork tray, €20, by Ekobo. Graphic print cushion, £69, by Alexander Girard, for Vitra. Train, £40, by Kid’s Concept. Estate emulsion in Calamine; flooring, both as before For stockists, see page 416 Interiors assistant: Robin Taher Set build: Cloud + Horse


Do you know the feeling of what it is like being surrounded by beautiful fabrics? If not, have a look at www.jab.de or order free of charge our new TEXTILE LOVE STORIES book on www.love.jab.de


Flair sofa, Thea armchair, Flair central table, Kay console, Milwuakee floor lamp.

MILANO - NEW YORK - MIAMI - LOS ANGELES - MOSCOW - BEIJING - DOHA - BEIRUT - BAKU


gianfrancoferrehome.it


Architecture SHARON JOHNSTON AND MARK LEE, THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE BIENNIAL’S ARTISTIC DIRECTORS, AT THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART CHICAGO, WHICH THEY HAVE JUST REDESIGNED

NEXT STEPS Chicago’s second Architecture Biennial is set to please with mini skyscrapers, air-iltering enclosures, newly-hued Miesian marvels and more Though a relatively recent creation, the Chicago Architecture Biennial is one of the largest exhibitions of its kind – the inaugural edition, in 2015, drew more than 530,000 visitors during its three-month run (twice the number of last year’s Venice Architecture Biennale). So expectations are high for the sophomore edition, opening on 16 September. Anchored at the Chicago Cultural Center and extending to institutions across the city, it will comprise exhibits, installations, talks and performances by over 140 participants from around the world. The aim, says executive director Todd Palmer, is to ofer the general public ‘an inside look at what architects are thinking’. Palmer is one third of the leadership team appointed last September, which also

PHOTOGRAPHY: JESSE CHEHAK WRITER: JAY PRIDMORE

includes artistic directors Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee, of Los Angeles architecture practice Johnston Marklee. ‘We’re aiming at a wide audience,’ adds Lee. ‘We want to connect with people who are genuinely interested in architecture.’ Chicago, of course, has impeccable architectural credentials. Birthplace of the skyscraper and littered with buildings by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Bertrand Goldberg and more, the city remains an epicentre of world architecture and a mecca for working architects. But it is also a tourist destination, and many, if not most, visitors to Chicago are eager to witness early skyscrapers and present-day masterpieces alike. The Biennial’s curatorial team are using Chicago’s architectural record as a stepping

stone into the future, adopting the theme ‘Make New History’. The team sent out a challenge to all participants to look back, but also to look forward. ‘History is not a straitjacket,’ says Lee, who with Johnston has direct oversight of the programme at the Cultural Center, where they will address the idea that ‘architecture is an evolutionary project’. The choice of the Chicago Cultural Center as the Biennial’s hub makes clear the fair’s crowd-pleasing intent. Situated on the bustling Michigan Avenue, it attracts the kind of visitor that might not realise the Biennial was up and running. It’s also surrounded by treasures. ‘When you walk out of the Cultural Center you are in the middle of a city that is so architecturally rich,’ says »

183


Architecture Architect Studio Anne Holtrop Project A Tower A gypsum cast model of Holtrop’s tower, which will be assembled from hand-formed copper sheets and will stand in the Cultural Center amid Atelier Bow-Wow’s older installation (left). Its ground form comes from an inkblot drawing

Architect Atelier Bow-Wow

Photography: Steve Hall

Project Piranesi Circus

In a Cultural Center courtyard, ramps, bridges and swings commissioned for the 2015 Biennial and revisited this year

Lee. Out one door, you see Renzo Piano’s Modern Wing of the Art Institute of Chicago. Out of another, there’s Frank Gehry’s Pritzker Music Pavilion. Within a few blocks are Marina City, Willis Tower and Studio Gang’s Aqua. The beaux-arts interiors of the Cultural Center provide an irresistible setting for the Biennial’s emphasis on debts owed by one generation to another. Exhibits range from dioramas taking in the work of many practices to singular visions of individual architects. One participant, Stan Allen of New York, shows how simple balloon frames can be assembled into something distinctly modern. Swiss duo Karamuk*Kuo deconstruct the dual notions of intimacy and ininity in Adolf Loos’ American Bar. And young Italian practice PioveneFabi is showing how materials developed decades ago for the Milan subway (such as Pirelli rubber looring) can be used in work of high design. Johnston and Lee have become familiar with Chicago in the past few years, working on the redesign of the interiors of the Museum of Contemporary Art, on the Near North Side. The 1996 building, by the German architect Josef Paul Kleihues, once stirred controversy with a design that some found too imposing and monumental. But for Johnston Marklee and many others, the building has aged well and there is a stateliness to the symmetrical façade. Relecting on the original design, Johnston

Architect Karamuk*Kuo Project Ininitely Intimate

Inspired by Adolf Loos’ American Bar in Vienna, which was designed after a visit to Chicago. The mirrored surfaces extend the space ad ininitum while highlighting its intimacy

Marklee’s project seeks to bring some of that quiet order inside the museum as well. Time enriches, which is one message of Vertical City, a large group installation Johnston and Lee have commissioned for one of the Cultural Center’s great halls. It comprises 18 three-metre-high skyscraper models, ranging ‘from practical to visionary’, explains Johnston. Models of two unbuilt entries in the 1922 Chicago Tribune Tower Competition ofer a direct salute to the past. One of these is Adolf Loos’ whimsical form of a Greek column writ large; the other by Ludwig Hilberseimer is of the most straightforward International Style. Beyond those, 16 contemporary models include one by the New York irm MOS, made largely of cast-glass elements, and formed as if from the negative space in the luting of Loos’ column. Another, by Go Hasegawa of Japan, is an experiment that blurs the distinction between frame and cladding, and turns out to be reminiscent of Mies van der Rohe’s unbuilt 1921 Friedrichstrasse skyscraper for Berlin. In this and other exhibits, Johnston and Lee are intent on ‘creating environments, not just two-dimensional images’. ‘We want people to feel space and inhabit space.’ Thus a ‘labyrinth’ of spaces in galleries that look directly out on Michigan Avenue. Beyond the exhibition halls and circulation areas, there will also be an information desk by Polishborn Chicagoan Ania Jaworska, who promises a structure of arches, columns and other »

185


Architecture Designers Ana Prvački and SO–IL Project L’air pour l’air Part mask, part shelter, Prvački and SO–IL’s wearable enclosures at Garield Park Conservatory will be populated by wind instrument players and singers

Photographer James Welling Project Chicago Images of Mies van der Rohe’s Illinois Institute of Technology and Lake Shore Drive apartments, manipulated to mimic exposure techniques invented half a century ago

Architect Stan Allen Project The Balloon Frame Revisited

186

A hypothetical project exploring new uses for the balloon framing, a technique developed in Chicago in 1833 to allow relatively unskilled workers to build rapidly and cheaply

traditional elements wrought in a minimalist and contemporary fashion. Mexico City architect Frida Escobedo’s multilevelled gathering place will ill part of a cofered and columned space that was a reading room of the old library. Rope bridges by Atelier Bow-Wow, remnants from the inaugural Biennial, strung precariously in one of the light courts, will be accompanied by a new sculptural tower by Studio Anne Holtrop. Beyond the Cultural Center, a number of of-site installations organised by Biennial partners will encourage visitors to experience the Chicago Water Tower (with James Welling’s fantastically hued photographs of Miesian masterpieces), the new Chinatown Branch Library (featuring images from the Obama Presidential Library competition), and the West Side’s Garield Park Conservatory. The latter will play host to a collaboration between New York architects SO-IL and artist Ana Prvački, titled ‘L’air pour l’air’. Using air-iltering

meshes, SO-IL have created an ensemble of wearable enclosures, designed to be worn by musicians playing a specially commissioned work of music by composer Veronica Kraussas. Prvački explains that she was struck by how air pollution has made it diicult for musicians to practice outdoors. ‘I think of this project as an urgent alchemy, transforming pollution through architecture and music into clean air,’ she declares. Naturally, some of the installations will ‘read’ easily, and some of them less so. Which is how it should be. ‘We want architects to use this as an opportunity to test out ideas and experiment in various ways,’ explains Palmer. Like any ambitious work of architecture, this Biennial will certainly push the limits of innovation. The hope and expectation is that, like a great building, it will also have a cohesiveness and power that makes it memorable. Chicago Architecture Biennial, 16 September 2017 – 7 January 2018, chicagoarchitecturebiennial.org


collection REVERA

LONDON Showroom Second Floor, Design Centre East, Chelsea Harbour info.uk@arte-international.com 0800 500 3335 www.arte-international.com


Art TAKASHI MURAKAMI WITH HIS DOG, POM, AT HIS VAST STUDIO IN AN INDUSTRIAL AREA OUTSIDE TOKYO. THE ARTIST OFTEN SLEEPS AT THE STUDIO, IN A LARGE CARDBOARD BOX


Man at work Rigour, neurochemicals and 24/7 assistants at Takashi Murakami’s studio as he prepares for his show at Moscow’s Garage Museum PHOTOGRAPHY: FUMINO OSADA WRITER: JENS H JENSEN

So far, 2017 has been a busy year for Takashi Murakami. His irst solo show in Scandinavia, ‘Murakami by Murakami’, ran from February to May at Oslo’s Astrup Fearnley Museet, and was closely followed by ‘The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg’, an exhibition of his paintings at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, on show until 24 September. Just ive days later, the artist’s irst major survey in Russia opens at Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow. Murakami likes it this way. ‘I am very grateful that my exhibitions are held simultaneously around the world,’ he says. ‘In the midst of this boom of a sort, I feel my head is spinning, though I feel anxious when I think about a quiet future without such lurries of activity.’ Murakami really lives for his art. He literally camps down in his factory-sized studio in Miyoshi, a rather bleak, predominantly industrial area about an hour outside Tokyo. He sleeps there, in a large cardboard box in a corner of one of the rooms. He eats there, often preparing his own simple meals. And, of course, he works there. The studio is in operation 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In the early evening, the night shift takes over from the day shift, and the hectic working schedule runs on. The studio is remarkably clean and highly organised. Large sheets of cardboard give information about who is on duty, production schedules and deadlines, and changes to artworks. When a dot of black paint has been added to a painting, the painting is photographed. This photograph is then printed  »

189


Art

out, time-stamped and added to the production board for the artwork so Murakami can go back to previous versions if he chooses. He is constantly making changes and doesn’t like deadlines for wrapping up his art. ‘The deadline of an exhibition used to be my deadline,’ he says. ‘Today, if I am really unhappy about a particular work, I will ask for it to be returned to the studio after the exhibition so I can complete it. If I keep at it for more than two years, however, the galleries and the clients start to become seriously upset, so when their anger reaches tipping point, I deliver the work.’ In lieu of windows, the studio is illuminated by hundreds of luorescent tubes, making it impossible to tell the time of day. There is also hardly any sound. Staf work assiduously at computers or crouched over paintings. Murakami sits at his table, sketching or making corrections on transparent sheets of vinyl superimposed over printouts of works in progress. From time to time he walks around, with his dog Pom in tow, to check on what’s happening and give orders to assistants. ‘I live like a monk, which is a way to induce the release of neurochemicals in my brain to heighten the senses and achieve a state of alertness,’ Murakami says of his rigid working style. When Wallpaper* visited, his focus was on the exhibition at Garage. The opening was barely two months away and several of the commissioned works for the show were still uninished. Garage Museum of Contemporary Art was founded in 2008 by oligarch Roman Abramovich, an avid art

‘I live like a monk, which is a way to induce the release of neurochemicals in my brain’

above, murakami’s many assistants work in near silence at the studio, which is operated 24/7, in shifts. on the wall hangs work in progress of a piece commissioned for the garage exhibition

collector, and his then wife Dasha Zhukova. The museum takes its name from the bus garage, designed by constructivist architect Konstantin Melnikov, that was its irst home. After a brief period in a temporary space designed by Shigeru Ban, the museum moved in 2015 to a permanent location, a prefabricated concrete pavilion that previously housed a restaurant. The space had been out of use for more than two decades and was in ruins when Zhukova commissioned an overhaul by OMA, which wrapped the existing concrete structure in a double polycarbonate skin. The wide, open spaces were renovated but kept as close to their original form as possible. A beautiful mosaic mural depicting autumn, which now greets visitors entering the museum, was also salvaged from the restaurant. For the past two years, Garage’s senior curator Katya Inozemtseva has been hard at work on the exhibition. To explain Murakami to a Russian audience, she has organised more than 70 artworks into ive sections, each exploring a Japanese cultural phenomenon that is examined in Murakami’s art. In the ‘Kawaii’ section, a new 3m-long painting serves as a backdrop. Featuring Murakami’s trademark smiling lowers, the partly  »

191


Art LEFT, MURAKAMI SKETCHES AND MAKES CORRECTIONS ON TRANSPARENT VINYL SHEETS LAID OVER PRINTOUTS OF HIS WORKS IN PROGRESS BELOW, THE STUDIO’S IMPRESSIVE CACTUS GARDEN INSPIRES SOME OF THE FORMS IN MURAKAMI’S ARTWORKS BOTTOM, A WORK IN PROGRESS MODEL OF THE GARAGE EXHIBITION. SPECIALLY DESIGNED MESH MOUNTS WILL ALLOW SOME WORKS TO BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES

gilded piece introduces visitors to the artist’s treatment of the Japanese concept of ‘cuteness’, via an all-star cast of Doraemon, Pokémon and Hello Kitty characters. The ‘Geijutsu’ section promises to appeal to visitors interested in Murakami’s background in traditional nihonga painting. Situating his art in a historical context, it also features older works by Katsushika Hokusai, Kawanabe Kyosai and Utagawa Kuniyoshi, on loan from the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, to help viewers better understand the references to Japanese art history often found in Murakami’s work. ‘Because the Russian public only has an approximate notion of Japanese history and history of art in particular, we don’t recognise the inluences and references he continuously makes,’ says Inozemtseva. ‘Murakami basically continues what has been called the “lineage of eccentrics” that began in the Edo period [1615-1868] with artists like Iwasa Matabei, Kano Sansetsu, Ito Jakuchu and Soga Shohaku. There has never been a show that explores these kinds of connections to history, which is why I wanted to take this approach.’  »

192


THE ESSENCE OF LIVING. Tama Living is the ideal setting for that special moment, a soothing and pleasant experience. Its lavish, elegant cushions set the rhythm for the sofa to unravel like a piece of classical music. With side tables and trays crafted from exquisite materials, it embodies the spirit of refined living. Design: EOOS. www.walterknoll.de


Art

Another section, ‘The Little Boy and the Fat Man’, explores how the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings in 1945 transformed Japanese visual aesthetics. In a European irst, Murakami’s Sea Breeze installation from 1992 is on display. The piece is a large, open box on wheels, with a set of mercury lamps in the middle. The lamps turn on and of in powerful glares reminiscent of the lashes after the atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. According to Inozemtseva, ‘this is the crucial and very early piece that reveals and outlines the shape of Murakami’s intense interest for the whole post-bombing/post-war thematic’. One of the artist’s trademarks also features prominently: a skull appearing out of a large mushroom cloud, which he calls ‘Time Bokan’ after a famous Japanese anime TV series. These motifs engage in a visual conversation with the large neon Time Bokans that decorate the façade of the museum. Rather than simply hanging the artworks on its walls, Garage is mounting many of them throughout the space on a specially made metal mesh. Inozemtseva wanted to make the back of Murakami’s paintings visible. ‘The back sides are perfect, no less elaborate than the front,’ she says. ‘Plus, you can see the names of all the contributors who participated in the creation of each painting. Sometimes Murakami works on one painting for years, so the list can be almost endless. I believe it reveals his attitude to his team. They are not just anonymous assistants, like in a medieval studio or contemporary art factory. They are highly devoted and appreciated collaborators.’ To ofer an insight into the workings of the artist’s studio, Garage is recreating its mood and structure

194

ABOVE, ON SHEETS OF CARDBOARD, A RECORD OF THE MANY CHANGES EACH ARTWORK GOES THROUGH BELOW, MURAKAMI’S VANS DRY OFF OUTSIDE THE STUDIO

in the ‘Sutajio’ section (a phonetic rendering of the Japanese for ‘studio’). This is another irst for a Murakami exhibition: assistants are staying on after the installation to give classes on his art and techniques. The inal section, ‘Asobi & Kazari’ (fun and decoration), spreads playful pieces throughout the museum, extending Murakami’s universe to the gift shop, the façade and the world beyond.  ‘Takashi Murakami: Under the Radiation Falls’, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, 29 September 2017 – 4 February 2018, garagemca.org


OVERSEAS A N I N V I TAT I O N T O T R AV E L

OVERSEAS SMALL MODEL


We all have different lifestyles and our own ideas about what makes a home. For each of us, the home is a place of welcoming warmth and affection; it mirrors the personal story of our growth. Mindful of the important role the home plays in everyone’s life, year after year, Minotti developed “The Home Anthology” collection, coordinated like those preceding it - entirely by Rodolfo Dordoni. Drawing upon the expertise gained over the years, Minotti expands its creativity in new directions, in a spellbinding layering of influences and styles, perfectly balanced between the classic and the contemporary. To innovate while staying true to the Minotti style and traditions, is an objective deeply embedded in the company’s corporate values. Enchanting interiors that evoke an atmosphere of timeless elegance, yet are filled with the unexpected. An extensive and eclectic style that also emerges in the new Lawrence seating system, the Colette armchair, Jacques collection and many accessories. Each one with its own, unmistakable personality, but capable of weaving a thought-provoking conversation in an intricate interplay of shapes, materials and fresh influences.


2017 / HOME ANTHOLOGY A C OL L E C T ION C O OR DI NAT E D B Y RODOLFO DORDONI


Lawrence is a seating system with a classic-modern spirit, built upon a clustering of generous yet sleek shapes that describe distinctly horizontal lines. Its bold, self-assured personality and array of pieces make it extremely versatile and allow for the creation of multi-functional compositions that bring understated elegance to settings that reflect different tastes. The Lawrence “Clan” elements feature modern, graphic stitching designs that lend a more dynamic rhythm to compositions and invite the creation of living room decor with a fresher, more contemporary vibe. This refined tailoring detail epitomizes the company’s skill in drawing upon tradition to bring new vitality to an ancient technique like embroidery, through an unhesitatingly contemporary interpretation of style. The Song side table, thanks to its original “L” shape, embraces and perfectly defines the corner composition, while providing a practical table-top-surface.

T H E A M A Z I N G V E R S AT I L I T Y O F T H I S S E AT I N G SYS T E M R E V E A L S I T S E L F I N T H E O P T I O N O F C R E AT I N G H I G H LY DY NA M I C C OM P O S I T I O N S .


MASTERFUL CRAFTSMANSHIP A N D F L AW L E S S TA I L O R I N G UNDERSCORE THE HIGH LEVEL OF EXPERTISE A C H I E V E D B Y T H E C O M PA N Y OVER THE YEARS.

The Jacques collection includes sofas, armchairs and ottomans available in several sizes, originated from a common design seed that transforms a somewhat retro style into a symbol of absolute contemporary style. A sophisticated aesthetic language that is expressed in soft shapes, compact proportions and details with striking visual impact, for example the metal base with Light Bronze finish. Elegant stitching emphasises the curved silhouette of the Jacques armchairs and sofas and accentuating the curvature creates a surprising contrast with the more formal, geometric outline of the Lawrence sofa. All seating elements share the enveloping lines that offer a pleasant sensation of welcoming warmth, thanks to the soft cushioning in the seats and backrests. The Caulfield coffee table in polished light gold finish lends a touch of contemporary glamour to the environment.


The “Grand Jacques” sofa is perfectly balanced between traditional and contemporary styling. Distinguished by an enveloping structure that continues along the contour of the armrest, it is constructed with a single seat cushion. The depth of the sofa was designed to host numerous cushions, lending the sofa a luxurious appearance and a contemporary decorative allure. The metal base with Light Bronze finish lightens its generous proportions, lifting the sofa off the floor so it seems to float. The restrained height and curved lines of the “Grand Jacques” sofa also make it a natural for positioning in the center of a room. Thanks to their soft seat cushions and backrest padding, the Jacques armchair and bergère with swivel base are extremely comfortable and lend themselves to the creation of spaces where relaxation is key, in association with highly refined accessories such as the Lou, Ellis, Song and Caulfiel accent tables.

T H E S O P H I S T I C AT E D E L E G A N C E INHERENT IN ALL THE JACQUES S E AT I N G E L E M E N T S A L L O W T H E M T O T H R I V E HA R M O N I O U S LY I N ANY SETTING, FROM HOME DECOR T O H O S P I T A L I T Y.


A C O SY A N D I N T I M AT E S L E E P I N G R O O M D I S P L AY I N G A N E L E G A N T UPHOLSTERED BED COMPLEMENTED B Y H I G H LY S O P H I S T I C AT E D ACCESSORIES.

The Lawrence Bed puts a contemporary spin on the classic upholstered bed, bringing back balanced proportions and adding a constructive detail which speaks volumes about the company’s ability to deliver design and masterful craftsmanship. The padded headboard is divided into two separate elements that come in two different heights and widths. This opens a door to creative freedom in designing symmetrical and asymmetrical configurations and making bold choices in upholstery combinations. The Lawrence Bed headboard upholstery is completely removable and features elegant stitching in modern, graphic pattern of squares. The base of the bed is a box spring, and thanks to the vast number of pocketed springs, it ensures optimal sleep quality.


A N O U T D O O R C O L L E C T I O N T HAT B R I L L IA N T LY B L E N D S F R E S H S HA P E S , M AT E R IA L S A N D C O L O U R S , JUST RIGHT FOR INFORMAL SETTINGS T HAT C O N V E Y A S E N S E O F E N E R G Y A N D E N C O U R A G E S O C I A B I L I T Y.

The new Minotti outdoor collection is formed by an attitude of sociability: outdoor furnishings with a tasteful, contemporary vibe, perfect for creating comfortable settings where everyone can kick back and relax. The Florida seating system, with its curved shapes, the Halley “Outdoor” family, the Colette “Outdoor” armchair with its enveloping lines, the many complementary pieces all do their part to help create versatile outdoor rooms in which to enjoy friends and family year-round.


FLAGSHIP STORES NET WORK Minotti’s sales network covers 63 countries around the world and currently includes 33 monobrand stores. The driving force behind this rapid expansion lies in the uniqueness of the Minotti brand, with its perfect balance between innovation and tradition, luxury and under-statement, style and comfort. The monobrand showrooms are showcases that comprehensively and clearly convey the language of the brand, communicating the variety and opulence of the collection in architecturally refined settings where everything works together to create a truly authentic brand experience.

CHICAGO NEW YORK

LOS ANGELES MIAMI MEXICO CITY

SÃO PAULO

LATIN AMERICA

NORTH AMERICA MINOTTI CHICAGO BY ORANGE SKIN 223 WEST ERIE, SUITE 1NW CHICAGO IL, 60654 PH.: +1 312 573-2788 EMAIL: INFO@MINOTTICHICAGO.COM MINOTTI LOS ANGELES BY ECRÙ 8936 BEVERLY BLVD LOS ANGELES CA, 90048 PH.: +1 310 278-6851 EMAIL: INFO@MINOTTI-LA.COM

MINOTTI MEXICO CITY BY HAJJ DESIGNLESS PARK PLAZA AVENIDA JAVIER BARROS SIERRA 540 COL. SANTA FE - LOCAL N3-L22 01210 - MEXICO CITY PH.: +52 55 52 81 87 28/29 EMAIL: HAJJ@HAJJDESIGNLESS.COM.MX MINOTTI SÃO PAULO BY ATRIUM. ALAMEDA GABRIEL M. DA SILVA, 650 JD. AMÉRICA 01442-000 SÃO PAULO PH.: +55 11 3060 3555 EMAIL: ATRIUM@ATRIUMNET.COM.BR EUROPE

MINOTTI MIAMI BY DDC 3801 NE 2ND AVENUE MIAMI FL, 33137 PH.: +1 305 306-9300 EMAIL: INFO@MINOTTIFL.COM

MINOTTI BARI BY COSAL INTERIORS VIA FILIPPO CORRIDONI, 21 70122 BARI PH.: +39 080 5542 916 EMAIL: COMMERCIALE@MINOTTIBARI.IT

MINOTTI NEW YORK BY DDC 134 MADISON AVE @ 31 ST. NEW YORK CITY, NY 10016 PH.: +1 212 685-0800 EMAIL: INFO@DDCNYC.COM

MINOTTI BERLIN BY HERRENDORF LIETZENBURGER STR. 99 10707 BERLIN PH.: +49 30 755 4204 56 EMAIL: MAIL@MINOTTI-BERLIN.DE

MINOTTI LONDON BY EDC 77 MARGARET STREET W1W 8SY LONDON PH.: +44 020 7323 3233 EMAIL: INFO@MINOTTI.CO.UK MINOTTI LYON BY MAISON HOME DESIGN RUE AUGUSTE COMTE, 48 69002 LYON PH.: +33 478053193 EMAIL: MINOTTI@MAISONHOMEDESIGN.FR MINOTTI MADRID BY CONCEPTO DR C/PRINCIPE DE VERGARA, 33 28001 MADRID PH.: +34 91 4361 004 EMAIL: DERRE@CONCEPTODR.COM MINOTTI MÜNCHEN BY EGETEMEIER WOHNKULTUR OSKAR VON MILLER RING, 1 80333 MÜNCHEN PH.: +49 89552732510 EMAIL: MINOTTI@EGETEMEIER.DE MINOTTI WIEN BY SPÄTAUF MÖBEL, DESIGN & HANDWERK GMBH PARKRING 20 1010 WIEN PH.: +43 1 513 4260 EMAIL: INFO@MINOTTI-WIEN.AT

SOUTH AFRICA MINOTTI CAPE TOWN BY LIMELINE WATERWAY HOUSE NORTH 3 DOCK ROAD V&A WATERFRONT CAPE TOWN 8001 PH: +27 (0) 87 4700 454 EMAIL: INFO@LIMELINE.CO.ZA MIDDLE EAST MINOTTI BEIRUT BY M-GROUP SAL ACHRAFIEH, AKKAWI STREET IVORY BUILDING, BEIRUT PH.: +961 1 333767 EMAIL: INFO@MGROUPME.COM ASIA MINOTTI AHMEDABAD BY DESIGN ITALIANO OPP. SINDHUBHAVAN, SINDHUBHAVAN ROAD, BODAKDEV 380015, GUJARAT AHMEDABAD PH.: +91 98 79026328 EMAIL: INFO@DESIGNITALIANO.IN


LONDON MUNICH BERLIN WIEN LYON BARI MADRID

CHENGDU BEIJING

SEOUL

SHANGHAI

BEIRUT

TOKYO TAIPEI HONG KONG TAICHUNG

AHMEDABAD

MANILA BANGKOK KUALA LUMPUR SINGAPORE JAKARTA

CAPE TOWN SYDNEY MELBOURNE

MINOTTI SEOUL BY THE OMNI 95-16 CHEONGDAM-DONG, GANGNAM-GU, 06015 SEOUL PH.: +82 2 3442 4672 EMAIL: INFO@THEOMNI.KR MINOTTI BANGKOK BY CHANINTR LIVING NOBLE SOLO THONGLOR SUKHUMVIT 55, 10330 BANGKOK PH.: +662 714 9040 EMAIL: MINOTTI@CHANINTR.COM MINOTTI JAKARTA BY MOIE JL. KEMANG RAYA NO. 79 12730 JAKARTA PH.: +62 21 719 6359 EMAIL: INFO@MOIE.COM MINOTTI KUALA LUMPUR BY XTRA FURNITURE SDN BHD THE GARDENS MALL, MID VALLEY CITY LOT S-236 & 237, SECOND FLOOR LINGKARAN SYED PUTRA 59200 KUALA LUMPUR PH.: +603 2282 9088 EMAIL: LIVING@XTRAFURNITURE.COM MINOTTI MANILA BY LIVING INNOVATIONS GF UNITS 106 AND 107 FORT VICTORIA 5TH AV., CORNER 23RD STREET, FORT BONIFACIO, GLOBAL CITY, TAGUIG. METRO MANILA PH.: +632 830 2230 EMAIL: INFO@LIVINGINNOVATIONS.PH

MINOTTI SINGAPORE BY MARQUIS INTERIORS 30 HILL STREET UNIT 01-02 179360 SINGAPORE PH.: +65 6338 2822 EMAIL: MINOTTI@MARQUIS.COM.SG MINOTTI TAICHUNG BY WATERSIDE NO. 135, SHIZHENG N. 3RD RD., XITUN DISTRICT 407 TAICHUNG CITY PH.: +886 4 2255 5018 EMAIL: MINOTTITAICHUNG@MINOTTITAIWAN.COM

MINOTTI SHANGHAI BY DOMUS TIANDI NO. 151 JIANGUO XI ROAD HUANGPU DISTRICT SHANGHAI PH.: +86 21 6466 8736 EMAIL: INFO@DOMUSTIANDI.COM MINOTTI HONG KONG BY ANDANTE SHOP D, G/F THE DESIGN SHOWCASE RUTTONJEE CENTRE 11 DUDDELL STREET CENTRAL, HONG KONG PH.: +852 2537 9688 EMAIL: INFO@ANDANTE.COM.HK

MINOTTI TAIPEI BY WATERSIDE NO. 7 LANE 36, JING-YE 1ST RD 10466 TAIPEI CITY PH.: +886 2 2532 5055 EMAIL: MINOTTITAIPEI@MINOTTITAIWAN.COM

MINOTTI CHENGDU BY LHC SHOU ZUO MAX NO.999 NORTH OF TIANFU AVENUE, GAOXIN DISTRICT, CHENGDU, SICHUAN CHINA, 610000 PH.: +86 28 8597 2067 EMAIL: IMPORTER@LANHUACAO.COM

CHINA

JAPAN

MINOTTI BEIJING BY DOMUS TIANDI 3RD FLOOR JINBAO PLACE, NO. 88 JINBAO STREET DONGCHENG DISTRICT, 100006 BEIJING PH.: +86 10 8511 6228 EMAIL: INFO@DOMUSTIANDI.COM

MINOTTI TOKYO / AOYAMA BY SUKENO 4-21-26, MINAMI-AOYAMA, MINATO-KU, 107-0062 TOKYO PH: +81 3 6434 0142 EMAIL: INFO@MINOTTI.JP

MINOTTI.COM

MINOTTI TOKYO / COURT BY SUKENO B1F, 5-4-19, MINAMI-AOYAMA, MINATO-KU, 107-0062 TOKYO PH.: +81 3 5778 0232 EMAIL: INFO@MINOTTI.JP MINOTTI TOKYO / TRI-ANGLE BY SUKENO 6-10-18, MINAMI-AOYAMA, MINATO-KU, 107-0062 TOKYO PH.: +81 3 5778 0230 EMAIL: INFO@MINOTTI.JP OCEANIA MINOTTI MELBOURNE BY DEDECE 2 DALE STREET CREMORNE, VIC, 3121 PH.: +61 3 9650 9600 EMAIL: INFO@DEDECE.COM MINOTTI SYDNEY BY DEDECE 263 LIVERPOOL STREET DARLINGHURST, NSW, 2010 PH.: +61 2 9360 2722 EMAIL: INFO@DEDECE.COM


Higher calling Pierre Yovanovitch’s playful debut furniture collection has been 20 years in the making, but is well worth the wait PHOTOGRAPHY: THOMAS CHÉNÉ WRITER: AMY VERNER

210


Design THIS PAGE, PIERRE YOVANOVITCH AT A TABLE OF HIS OWN DESIGN IN HIS PARIS ATELIER, WHICH OCCUPIES AN 18TH-CENTURY HÔTEL PARTICULIER. HIS ‘LAURA’ WALL LAMP HANGS OVERHEAD, WHILE THE PAINTING BEHIND HIM IS BY JAPANESE ARTIST TADASHI KAWAMATA OPPOSITE, ‘MONSIEUR OOPS’ CHAIR (TOP) AND ‘MADAME OOPS’ CHAIR


A new perspective on tiles

Rombini Collection design by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec


Design THIS IMAGE, ‘PAPA BEAR’, ‘MAMA BEAR’ AND ‘BABY BEAR’ ARMCHAIRS. ‘PEBBLE’ TABLE, BY ARMELLE BENOIT, FOR PIERRE YOVANOVITCH LEFT, ‘LAURA’ WALL LAMP, ‘RATATOUILLE’ SIDEBOARD, AND ‘ET’ TABLE LAMPS

W

hen French interior architect Pierre Yovanovitch unveiled his furniture at R & Company gallery in New York recently, he did so under the title ‘Oops’. This might sugest that his show materialised by happy accident, or that it is somehow slight or slapdash. However, his presentation of 24 unique pieces – alongside his selection of art and objects from R & Company and elsewhere, including works by Wendell Castle, Joaquim Tenreiro and the Haas Brothers, plus two custom paintings by Claire Tabouret – is testament to a tremendous amount of efort. ‘I started one year ago, but I really started 20 years ago,’ says Yovanovitch. The designer has spent his career seeking out and working with French artisans, customising the traditional techniques that underpin a timeless collection of subtly playful pieces. We are sitting in a small reception room in his Paris atelier, which occupies a ive-storey, 18th-century hôtel particulier in the second arrondissement. Before his expanding team of 30 moved in last year, the beautifully wrought iron and wood staircase was fully restored and punctuated with a branched suspension light that descends for 18m – designed by Yovanovitch, unsurprisingly. His slim frame has settled into one of his sofas, upholstered in duck-eg blue fabric handwoven by US

expert Sam Kasten. Between us is a version of an irregularly-shaped glazed ceramic table that is included in the show. And behind me is a silver Erwin Wurm cabinet in the form of a headless, besuited igure, which stands like a surrealist sentinel. Every detail here has been judiciously considered, but the result is warm and welcoming rather than intimidating. Yovanovitch wants his irst-ever solo show and furniture debut to encourage people to appreciate the more free-spirited, humanist aspects of his approach. Hence a pair of curvaceous chairs christened ‘Monsieur and Madame Oops’. He refers to a couple of standing lamps as ‘James’ and ‘Marsha’, a nod to the ictional US president and irst lady played by Jack Nicholson and Glenn Close in campy ilm Mars Attacks!, while another lighting piece has been named ‘ET’. With its bulbous, blown-glass head and shroud-like base, the similarity to the endearing alien is irrefutable. ‘I wanted to desacralise the objects, so I came up with these fun names. In this métier, it is important to not think so seriously,’ he says. ‘It’s serious because, of course, you have inancial challenges and so forth. But at the same time, why not have fun? It’s a lifestyle; it’s about being happy.’ Yovanovitch has been operating his eponymous practice since 2001, steadily building a reputation for a pure style where

natural materials assume distinctive, modern forms. In his streamlined yet animated interiors, he layers contemporary art and commissioned designs, typically by the likes of Daniel Buren, Tadashi Kawamata, Not Vital, Georg Baselitz, Mathieu Lehanneur and Imi Knoebel. The sugestion is of a more elemental sensibility – as in, distinct expressions of colour and form over subject matter. Yovanovitch sources midcentury treasures by Paavo Tynell, Axel Einar Hjorth and TH Robsjohn-Gibbings that aren’t as easily identiiable as pieces by Jean Prouvé and Charlotte Perriand. And, although he has been conceiving custom furniture all along (his angled or curvilinear sofas are a recurring motif ), this exhibition speaks to a vision that is broader and more holistic. In the past ive years, Yovanovitch has designed the high-end Hôtel Marignan in Paris; Christian Louboutin’s beauty boutique in the Galerie Véro-Dodat; the interior spaces of art dealer Kamel Mennour’s Paris and London galleries; the north pavilion of Kering’s Paris oices; La Patinoire Royale, a private contemporary art museum in Brussels; and residences from the Hamptons to Tel Aviv. Common to all these projects is a certain collector’s spirit. He has a gift for recognising long-term value among talents who are well-known but not overexposed. »

213


‘It’s not about making a statement. I want furniture that you’re happy to live with, that’s comfortable’ That description is just as apt for Yovanovitch himself. Zesty Meyers, co-founder of R & Company with Evan Snyderman, speaks of their collaboration with Yovanovitch with boundless enthusiasm. ‘[Pierre] is becoming the superstar of 21st-century France. I think he has captured the French spirit and has brought it into the future.’ What Meyers inds most impressive is how the designer has constantly evolved, discreetly and seemingly independently of any external inluences. ‘He cares, and that is why he’s not a one-hit wonder,’ Meyers says. ‘I don’t think many people have seen most of his work. There’s no one else doing this. I have rarely come across something like this that will be this impactful. He’s tipped the scale and the world is about to ind out.’ Yovanovitch says he hopes people discover something meaningful in his work – perhaps the physicality of a solid walnut frame with its astonishingly seamless woodwork, or the playfulness of his teddy-bear-shaped armchairs, this time rendered in sheepskin. ‘I like doing things that are very poetic. With the bears, it’s like a [cute] animal drawn by hand. You see that, and then you see the craftsmanship. You feel nature and man.’ The craftsmanship aspect is key. For Yovanovitch’s show, all the artisans are credited – ceramicists Armelle Benoit and Salomé Gendron, cabinetmaker Hugo

214

TOP LEFT, ‘MAD’ ARMCHAIR. ‘MARSHA’ FLOOR LAMP, AND ‘STELLA’ TABLE, BOTH BY ARMELLE BENOIT, FOR PIERRE YOVANOVITCH TOP RIGHT, ‘WOODY’ ARMCHAIR. ‘PEBBLE’ TABLE, AS BEFORE ABOVE, ‘JOHNNY GUITAR’ BENCH, BY ARMELLE BENOIT, FOR PIERRE YOVANOVITCH

Delavelle and glassblower Matteo Gonet, to name a few – reinforcing how tradition and craft remain crucial to contemporary design. ‘It’s like haute couture,’ the designer says. Fashion, incidentally, is not an unfamiliar environment for him. After graduating from business school, Yovanovitch spent eight years working for Pierre Cardin in Brussels and Paris, irst focusing on licensing but eventually moving into menswear and accessories design. Yet he had a passion for interiors, and he gradually transferred his understanding of textures and materiality from one realm to the other. He says each project has helped him to arrive at this point. ‘My taste is the same, but more and more I want things to be as simple as possible. We don’t need ornaments – I think design should be very warm. It’s not about [making] a statement. I want furniture that you’re happy to live with, that’s comfortable.’ But Yovanovitch is underselling his own ambition, as evidenced in his enlisting Claire Tabouret to paint a fresco in the chapel at Château de Fabrègues in Provence, which he bought in 2009 and spent years restoring. The artist’s portraits of 85 lifesize, costumed children were unveiled in July this year after a four-week residency. ‘I’m proud to do something like this, because I like the idea the artist’s work will remain after me,’ Yovanovitch says.  All prices on request, pierreyovanovitch.com


ACCESS THE BIGGEST NAMES IN INTERNATIONAL DESIGN 120 SHOWROOMS OVER 600 INTERNATIONAL BRANDS ONE ADDRESS


design centre LONDON

www.dcch.co.uk Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour, London SW10 0XE +44 (0)20 7225 9166


Gentl

e touc h

Pre ci bet sion e n wee n h gineer aut e jo ing cre aille a rie tes a d and e ligh licate WA b t-as TC H ES PHO -air alance &J EW T E L L O G RA fab ERY PHY rics D : S ET I R E CT P H I L I PPE OR D ES : IGN

LA C : MA ARAG COM B HM TTH CK E EW MO AY RRI S


High Jewellery

∑

219


High Jewellery

∑

221


High Jewellery

222

∑


TA L A MO

design damian williamson | quickship


High Jewellery

224

∑


ph. Davide Lovatti

I CATINI collection PLUTO mirror design Andrea Parisio and Giuseppe Pezzano Spazio Cielo Via Pontaccio 6, Milano

www.ceramicacielo.it ceramicacielo.it


High Jewellery

∑

227


High Jewellery

∑

229


design Paola Navone - ph. Andrea Ferrari

EMOTIONS SHOULDN’T BE DESCRIBED, THEY SHOULD BE EXPERIENCED.

UK/Eire: Nigel Rowlands_ +44 07702 153336_ interiors@intplus.co.uk | www.baxter.it


High Jewellery

∑

231


Architecture THE OVAL COURTYARD AND PARKING SPACE OF THE IDGROUP-DESIGNED HOUSE. FEATURING A SERIES OF CRENELLATED FORMATIONS IN BÉTON BRUT, THE STONEHENGE-INSPIRED ENCLOSURE INCLUDES THE FAÇADE OF THE HOUSE, WITH AN IMPOSING MAIN ENTRANCE AT ITS CENTRE

BRUTE FORCE Part henge, part Batcave, the Beverly Hills lair of serial entrepreneur James Jannard is a restorative citadel in exposed concrete PHOTOGRAPHY: JOE FLETCHER WRITER: IAN VOLNER


ames Jannard – Jim to his friends – owns a lot of things. He owns several properties in Malibu and in Newport Beach, California. He owns two islands in Fiji, a third in the Paciic Northwest. He also owns a substantial collection of vintage 1980s sunglasses and biking gear. These last two are evidence of something he used to own – the Oakley eyewear brand, which he launched in the 1970s as a maker of motocross equipment, and the sale of which, for $2.1bn in 2007, allowed him to buy many of the other things he owns today. This is a man who knows what he likes, and tends to get it. Jannard has now added another home to his residential options, perched atop a clif in the chichi

Trousdale section of Beverly Hills. The neighbourhood has a standing ordinance forbidding any construction above the irst storey, ensuring that the two-acre site has an unobstructed view of nearly the whole Los Angeles basin, from Downtown to the sea. This perch is scarcely less spectacular than the building Jannard has now plonked down on it, an 18,000 sq ft citadel in exposed concrete and aluminium. The house has no oicial nickname gracing its giant mechanical entry gate; yet the one that sugests itself is cited by both the owner and his architects, iDGroup, as an essential touchstone (so to speak) in developing their brash and brawny scheme: ‘Stonehenge’. »

233


Architecture

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE, THE HALLWAY LEADING TO THE MASTER BEDROOM, WITH A 1880S GATLING GUN ON DISPLAY; THE LIVING AREA, WHERE A RAISED ENTRY DAIS ACTS AS A DISPLAY AREA FOR SOME OF JANNARD’S PRIZED POSSESSIONS, SUCH AS A CUSTOM MOTORBIKE FROM CONFEDERATE MOTORS; THE INFINITY POOL, WITH VIEWS OF LOS ANGELES REFLECTED IN THE RETRACTABLE GLASS WALL

A quasi-Druidical enchantment settles over the house just before noon, as the raking southern light pierces the cavernous interior. Sitting on one of the bespoke stools (all, or nearly all, of the house’s furniture is custom-made) just beside a bristling all-chrome kitchen (not the real kitchen, mind you, just the show kitchen), iDGroup principal Jef Vance explains how the design process worked. ‘This was a client who just let us dream,’ he says. ‘You need to meet expectations, but we only had six or seven design meetings.’ Surprisingly easy-going, trusting his architects to take the lead, Jannard sat back and gave Vance and his team room to run – ‘not the normal thing’, says Vance, whose irm specialises in high-end residential work, and who has had to deal with far more demanding customers. Though it took ive years to complete the house, the outline of the project was sketched out in just a few bold strokes: it would have a high-tech feel, bringing in some of Jannard’s product designers for the all-metal

ixtures; it would take advantage of its singular locale, with multiple vantage points looking out to the sprawling urban vista; and, of course, it would be monumental, recalling a certain prehistoric rock formation in southern England. The plan itself is almost as simple as its illustrious forebear. A giant oval courtyard fronts the rectangular block of the house; inside, the rooms are laid out symmetrically, with an open living space lanked by service areas to one side and the guest suite and master bedroom to the other. In a typical interior this might look rather old-fashioned, but iDGroup has stripped out most of the walls, leaving only a forest of 96 oversized columns. However barebones, ‘it doesn’t feel like you’re in a concrete culvert’, notes Vance, in part thanks to specially designed acoustic panels that cut out echoes and make the place feel surprisingly homey. And then, of course, there’s that view. Entering from the elliptic car park by a faintly sinister metal door, the visitor instantly inds themselves looking »


‘He’s not a showy guy,’ says Jef Vance of his client. Still, the house feels like an improbable collision of Hollywood sci-i and 1960s brutalist architecture

235


Architecture

past the central lounge area, over the ininity pool beyond, and out to the entire metropolitan region, running clear to the hazy horizon. There is a glass partition that rises out of the loor, but it’s left down on fairer days, which is most of the time in Southern California. The reveal is impressive to say the least. An atmosphere of the ‘mad scientist’ – another watchword for both architect and client – sufuses the house. The gas hearth to one side of the living room is topped by a massive mechanical hood – it looks like Frankenstein’s ireplace. The master bathroom features a giant metal tub, inscribed with a phrase in Tolkienian Elvish. (Jannard’s other company, Red, created the digital cameras used to shoot The Hobbit franchise.) The ceiling pendants, part of a collaboration between iDGroup and the client’s own design team, bristle with cables and inials. As with almost all the seating and hardware, the lighting is fashioned out of tumbled aluminium, practically the only other material treatment in the whole house except for the bare concrete walls and loors: there are no rugs, no clutter, almost no personal belongings whatsoever. ‘He’s not a showy guy,’ says Vance of his client. Still, the house deinitely feels like a showpiece, an improbable collision of Hollywood sci-i and late-1960s brutalist architecture. So how does this unshowy showman, this maximalist-minimalist, actually live in his monumental pile on the hill? ‘It could have ended up feeling like a prison,’ says Jannard. ‘But, in fact, it’s very warm, very comfy.’ The businessman and his wife have been using the house as an urban pied-à-terre, and as a convenient spot for hosting meetings when they’re in the city; it also doubles as a useful storage space, with its basement packed full of ephemera from Jannard’s

236

ABOVE, THE DINING ROOM FURNITURE IS FASHIONED FROM TUMBLED AIRCRAFTGRADE ALUMINIUM RIGHT, ON THE BATHTUB IS A PHRASE IN TOLKIENIAN ELVISH: ‘PEOPLE WANT WHAT THEY CAN’T HAVE’

various ventures. In a way, the house is simply another item in Jannard’s outsized inventory, a personal temple to his entrepreneurial vision. Yet the owner insists that its heady combination of theatricality and simplicity is about more than just the wow-efect. ‘You can envision there’s all these inventive activities going on inside,’ says Jannard: in a life so full of stuf, the house afords an environment of creative repose. Not just another acquisition in its owner’s extensive collection, it is a place to recharge, and to dream up other things. idgrouplive.com


Architecture

ACCIDENTAL HEROES


Located in Oaxaca, Mexico, Casa Zicatela is the first building designed from scratch by Ludwig Godefroy and Emmanuel Picault. The concrete beach house has a bunker-like exterior and a central element flanked by symmetrical stepped walls

A chance meeting in a jazz bar has led to one of Mexico’s most spirited architectural collaborations PHOTOGRAPHY: RORY GARDINER WRITER: BENOÎT LOISEAU

239


Opposite, Casa Zicatela has no glass: instead, sliding wooden shutters function as windows and doors, creating what the designers describe as ‘adjustable’ spaces

motional architecture,’ muses Emmanuel Picault, enveloped in a cloud of cigarette smoke at his lat in the trendy Roma district of Mexico City, ‘is one we cannot plan.’ He is referring to the term coined by the German-born Mexican artist Mathias Goéritz in 1953, which describes an architecture elevated to art for the purpose of inspiring emotion. Known primarily for their work on nightclubs and bars, French architectural duo Picault and Ludwig Godefroy, who are based in Mexico, have developed an intuitive and spiritually charged style that mixes modernist and pre-Hispanic inluences. Picault is a well-known igure in the Mexican capital. With no formal training, he made a name for himself in the 2000s running Chic by Accident, a visionary antique gallery often credited with reviving interest in 20th-century Mexican design. He also worked on some acclaimed interiors projects, including the Revés bar in the upscale district of Polanco in 2007, which shot him to the forefront of the design scene. Godefroy moved to Mexico in 2007 to work as an architect at Tatiana Bilbao’s studio, after a stint at OMA in Rotterdam. ‘Ludwig brought a strong architecture background to the table, which I didn’t have,’ says Picault, who likes to describe himself as an ensemblier (literally one who ‘brings things together’). Although they originate from neighbouring towns in Normandy, the pair met at a jazz bar in Mexico City. Excited by the potential of their combined skills, they decided to team up in 2010. Soon they were approached to design a nightclub, set in a rundown house once inhabited by the Indian radical thinker Manabendra Nath Roy, founder of the Mexican Communist Party. For the now iconic MN Roy club, in Roma, Picault and Godefroy took inspiration from the bas-relief of the Uxmal ruins on the Yucatán Peninsula. A dramatic pyramid-like structure made of copper and timber encircles the DJ booth at the heart of the invitation-only venue, giving it a near-religious feel. ‘What I like about working in Mexico is to be able to revisit such varied references without the weight of history,’ says Godefroy. ‘I can combine pre-Hispanic inluences with brutalism in an unvexed way.’ Other

projects soon followed, including the Jules Basement cocktail bar in Polanco and the Nüba nightclub and restaurant in Paris, for which they shipped ive tonnes of volcanic stone from Veracruz to Le Havre. Not wanting to be deined by their nightspots, the duo turned their attention to domestic projects. In 2014 they started work on Casa Zicatela, a beach house in Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, the irst building they designed from scratch. The house is modelled on a Mesoamerican ballcourt, with its central element lanked by large, symmetrical stepped walls. ‘In a way, the design was borne out of constraints,’ says Godefroy in reference to the budget and the 280 sq m plot of land. ‘The more constraints you have, the more radical your choices will be.’ Made entirely of concrete (apart from the tropicalinspired wooden doors and shutters), the glassless three-bedroom house very much resembles a bunker from the outside. But, inside, its strong, geometrical features create a powerful play of light and shadow, bringing life to the open living space, garden and swimming pool. ‘The light in Oaxaca is glorious,’ says Godefroy, who cites Carlo Scarpa and Louis Kahn as major inluences. ‘You’re not restricted to living in one room, it’s all adjustable.’ He points to the large shutters, which, once closed, create a physical divide between the otherwise unenclosed spaces. And just when they thought they were done with nightclubs, Picault and Godefroy received a request, late in 2015, to design Foro Normandie in downtown Mexico City. ‘En Français!’ exclaims Picault, delighted by the reference to his native region. ‘We said yes immediately.’ When the phone call came, they were in India, visiting the city of Chandigarh, masterplanned by Le Corbusier in the mid-20th century. There they came across Nek Chand’s Rock Garden – a sculpture garden started by a government oicial who secretly assembled material collected from demolition sites – and were struck by the creative use of cement cast in jute bags, giving surfaces an almost organic feel. ‘We wanted to reproduce something similar,’ says Godefroy. They came up with an innovative technique, which became the signature element of the club’s aesthetic: ‘We stacked sandbags, like military fortiications, and  »

‘The design was born out of constraints. The more constraints you have, the more radical your choices’ 240


Architecture


Architecture

poured the concrete over them.’ For Picault and Godefroy, adding more concrete to an existing basement seemed natural. Their method was used across the 600 sq m space, creating porous, jaged surfaces – the ‘negative’ of the sandbags structure – illuminated with LED lights. Some of the walls’ salient edges reach head height. ‘That’s also the freedom of Mexico,’ says Godefroy of the experimental and arguably hazardous design. ‘It’s not as restrictive in terms of regulations and safety measures.’ After seven years, the pair have decided to go their separate ways once their current projects are inished. ‘We never really thought of ourselves as associates,’ says Picault, who is working on various architectural and interiors projects alongside his never-ending search for unusual antique items. ‘We were always two individuals who happened to collaborate.’ Godefroy is maintaining his enthusiasm for geometry and concrete as he embarks on a number of residential projects, some with French-Mexican architect Domingo Delaroiere, who contributed to Casa Zicatela. For their work together, they may be remembered as one of Mexico’s most impactful architectural collaborations – one that could not be planned.  chicbyaccident.com; ludwiggodefroy.com

242

Above and right, the Foro Normandie nightclub in Mexico City features concrete walls cast from sandbags stacked ‘like military fortifications’


Design

Guiding lights A very switched-on friendship spurs two of New York’s brightest design stars to shine PHOTOGRAPHY: MARKO MACPHERSON PRODUCER: MICHAEL REYNOLDS WRITER: PEI-RU KEH


MARY WALLIS

LINDSEY ADELMAN

CHANDELIER (CENTRE) ‘EDIE’, ED.08.06, FOR LINDSEY ADELMAN

TABLE LIGHTS (LEFT) ‘CATCH ROCK’, FOR NILUFAR

MATERIALS MACHINED BRASS AND BEVELLED GLASS

MATERIALS MALACHITE, POLISHED BRONZE AND HAND-BLOWN GLASS TABLE LIGHT (RIGHT) ‘CATCH ROCK’, FOR NILUFAR MATERIALS TIGER IRON AND HAND-BLOWN GLASS

245


New expressions for interior decoration wallanddeco.com

Essential Wallpaper

Contemporary Wallpaper

Style Colors

left wall

back wall

ceiling


Design

MARY WALLIS PENDANT (TOP) ‘EDIE’, ED.08.01, FOR LINDSEY ADELMAN MATERIALS MACHINED BRASS AND BEVELLED GLASS

LINDSEY ADELMAN TABLE LIGHT (BOTTOM) ‘CATCH BOX’, FOR NILUFAR MATERIALS POLISHED BRASS AND HAND-BLOWN GLASS

A

lthough there is no shortage of mentorship programmes within the creative industries, the relationship between rising lighting designer Mary Wallis and industry stalwart Lindsey Adelman seems particularly organic and profound. Under Adelman’s tutelage, Wallis has risen from intern to senior designer, and Adelman’s company began producing Wallis’ own designs in 2014 – an undisputed coup for any young talent. Having worked together for nine years, the two New Yorkers are not only still in sync but also spur each other on

to new heights, going above and beyond the typical mentor-mentee relationship. When Adelman irst interviewed the Australia-born Wallis in 2007, a year into running her own irm, she quickly saw Wallis’ potential. ‘There’s something that separates people who actually pursue art and design: it’s desire. You can’t tell somebody to have that,’ Adelman says. Wallis had been completing her design education at Parsons School of Design and the Pratt Institute in New York, having already earned a PhD in genetics  »

247


Design


LINDSEY ADELMAN CHANDELIER ‘CHERRY BOMB FRINGE’, FOR NILUFAR MATERIALS MACHINED BRASS, BRASS CHAIN AND HAND-BLOWN GLASS WITH GOLD FOIL

249


Design

‘I like people who make peace with their talent and don’t need to prove it to you every day’

from Cambridge University in the UK. A single trip to a life coach back in Melbourne was enough to convince her to move to the US and pursue her dream of lighting design. ‘One conversation changed my life,’ Wallis says. ‘I was on a plane two weeks later. It was like a ball in a groove – everything fell into place.’ Adelman’s own path was not dissimilar. After majoring in English at Kenyon College, Ohio, she became an editorial assistant at The Smithsonian Institution, discovering industrial design while witnessing how exhibitions were produced. ‘The same thing happened to me. There was this iery desperation of, “How do I get there?” It all happened in the same week – I found out what industrial design was, someone sugested I go to Rhode Island School of Design, I illed out the application and portfolio – in secret, basically – and sent it in the day before it was due.’ After bonding over their experiences of second acts and a shared view of the world (both are inspired by the overlap between arts and sciences), Adelman hired Wallis to join her ledgling company. ‘Lindsey gave me such conidence just by believing in me before I did. I had no experience in design. I just turned up on her doorstep one day,’ Wallis says. ‘We were just working on mock-ups at that point and everything was by hand, so it was an easy point of entry.’

250

MARY WALLIS PENDANT (CENTRE) ‘EMPIRE’, EM.08.02, FOR LINDSEY ADELMAN MATERIALS MACHINED BRASS AND BEVELLED GLASS

LINDSEY ADELMAN CHANDELIER (LEFT AND RIGHT) ‘CHERRY BOMB’, FOR NILUFAR MATERIALS MACHINED BRASS AND HAND-BLOWN GLASS

While working for Adelman, Wallis experimented with her own designs on the side. She launched her own studio in 2012 and presented the irst versions of her ‘Empire’ and ‘Edie’ chandeliers, made independently at a shared studio in Brooklyn, at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair later that year. Two years later, as the orders steadily increased, Adelman took over the manufacturing. ‘It seems so monumental, but we really didn’t overthink it,’ Wallis says. ‘I think back now and it was such a signiicant step, but at the time it was more like, “Oh yeah, we could make it here – that would be easier.” ’ Wallis is not the only young design star to have emerged from Adelman’s studio. When Wallis joined, Bec Brittain, now a bright light on the New York design scene, was also on the small team. And Karl Zahn, Adelman’s design director, is establishing a reputation with his lights and wooden sculptures. ‘I think it’s the same way you pick your friends,’ Adelman says. ‘[I like] people who are really lit up – no pun intended. There are a lot of diferent personalities [in the studio] and we co-exist because everybody wants to make the best work. There’s another big theme, which is people who are comfortable with their talent. They make peace with the fact that they’re talented and don’t need to prove it to you every day. It’s such good energy to be around. The people who have come through my studio would have made it either way. I loved that we overlapped, it was mutually beneicial, and I hope that continues to happen.’ Adelman adds: ‘I think scheduling time for experimentation is such an important part of the [design] process. The designers that I hire pay attention to all the failures that happen in prototype. It’s inconvenient and you usually don’t have the time or money, but it makes the work what it’s supposed to be.’ Despite their aesthetic diferences (Wallis exhibits an edgy, Gothic style, while Adelman leans towards the naturalistic and ethereal), there is a shared methodology. ‘This idea of “just keep trying” as part of product development is something I think people have picked up on, as well as the idea that perfection doesn’t exist,’ Adelman says, citing the continual evolution of her designs. ‘You can’t shut things down to wait for things to become perfect.’ At the heart of the connection between Wallis and Adelman is their friendship. ‘Because I follow the same creative methodology, I never felt like I had to break away,’ Wallis says. ‘It’s just fun to have a partner in crime and someone to talk to about what’s happening.’ ‘I think something that drives us as women in design is that you just want to know that there’s someone else going out on a limb for you,’ Adelman adds. ‘It’s much more fun and enjoyable when you have a girlfriend out there.’  All prices on request, lindseyadelman.com; marywallis.com; nilufar.com


Design Centre | Chelsea Harbour | samuel-heath.co.uk | Made in England


string shelving system. made in sweden.

string.se

new. string® system metal shelves. designed by anna von schewen and björn dahlström.


Peek show Dimore Studio gives us an exclusive look behind the scenes at its London show debut COLLAGES: DIMORE STUDIO WRITER: EMMA O’KELLY

254


Design AMONG OUR EXCLUSIVE PREPARATIVE COLLAGES BY DIMORE STUDIO, THIS SHOWS THE STUDY, FEATURING A CHAISE LONGUE, BY MARCEL BREUER; PENDANTS, BY GINO SARFATTI AND ARCHIMEDE SEGUSO, FOR ARTELUCE; ‘CITYSCAPE’ LOW TABLE, BY PAUL EVANS, FOR DIRECTIONAL; ‘FUNGO’ LAMPS, BY GABRIELLA CRESPI; ‘CONFIDENTIAL’ SOFA, BY ALBERTO ROSSELLI, FOR SAPORITI; FLOOR LAMP, BY GOFFREDO REGGIANI; AND ‘102’ SOFA, FROM THE PROGETTO NON FINITO COLLECTION, BY DIMORE STUDIO. ARTWORKS ARE MERNOEK, 1989, BY VICTOR VASARELY; CONCETTO SPAZIALE, ATTESE, 1962, BY LUCIO FONTANA; GIALLO, 1969, BY AGOSTINO BONALUMI; AND CONCETTO SPAZIALE, 1968, BY LUCIO FONTANA


Design

A

nyone wanting a quick peek at Dimore Studio’s contribution to this year’s London Design Festival should head to Mayfair’s Mazzoleni Gallery. The Milan-based design all-rounders have transformed the space into a ive-room apartment, where modern art sits alongside vintage and contemporary furniture. But a peek is all you’ll get. Visible only through a porthole, each room is no more than a mise en scène – you can look but you can’t touch. The show, conceived by Dimore Studio (which has shared its preparatory collages exclusively with Wallpaper*), is the irst in a series of collaborations

above, in the living room, 1950s wall lights, by stilnovo; bar cabinet, by osvaldo borsani; ‘locus solus’ armchairs, by gae aulenti, for Poltronova; table, by ignazio gardella; ‘ 109’ Pendant, from the Progetto non finito collection, by dimore studio. artworks are NERO, 1964; GRIGIO, 1988, both by agostino bonalumi; and DUE OVALI METALLIZZATI, 2006, by turi simeti left, in the bedroom, ‘cityscaPe’ screens, by Paul evans, for directional; ‘model 1842’ floor lamPs, by Josef frank, for svenskt tenn; 1940s wall-mounted consoles; 1950s salottino armchairs; ‘trilobo’ wall lights, by venini; 1950s cherry wood beds; and ‘Palm’ carPet, from the Progetto Palmador collection, by dimore studio. artworks are RILIEVO O ELEMENTI CURVI, 1967-1972, by getulio alviani; and BIANCO E NERO, 1968, by agostino bonalumi

entitled ‘Mazzoleni Invites’. ‘We want to work with people from fashion, design, architecture – those who are outside ine art but inluenced by it,’ explains Mazzoleni’s managing director Mira Dimitrova, who is set on bringing ‘a diferent viewpoint and audience to the gallery’. Dimore was the obvious irst partner. Mazzoleni has collaborated with its founders, Britt Moran and Emiliano Salci, on several occasions. It loaned the duo art for an exhibition at this year’s Salone del Mobile, and in 2016 collaborated on a private apartment in Rome for Fendi (see W*204). Mazzoleni provided Fendi with art, while Dimore took care of the interior. ‘Mazzoleni let us pick and choose from its archive,’ recalls Moran. ‘That was a fun shopping trip!’ For the London show, Dimore has again had the chance to rile through Mazzoleni’s treasures. ‘We were given carte blanche,’ says Moran. ‘Initially we wanted to create something borderline kitsch. Instead it has turned out to be rather elegant,’ he explains. ‘We try to venture of, but the colours and materials always end up feeling Italian in everything we do.’ Dimore’s style, of which Mazzoleni shows a leeting glimpse, is taking permanent hold elsewhere in Mayfair. October sees the unveiling of its new jazz club in the The Arts Club’s basement, and a irst showing at PAD. Next year, a showroom for a watchmaking client opens in the Royal Arcade. Its time in London has come. ‘Mazzoleni Invites: Dimore Gallery/(Un)Comfort Zone’ is on until 24 September, mazzoleniart.com; dimorestudio.eu. For more Dimore Studio collages, see Wallpaper.com

π

256


Lars Gitz Architects

HeartOak. The essence of nature. Unique wooden floors since 1898.

dinesen.com


Photography by Andrea Ferrari

F A BR I C S

WAL L P AP ERS

T RI M M I N G S


21 Years 21 Guest Editors

Ten years ago, in the spirit of creative collaboration, we ofered space and time to a trio of guest editors. It was the start of something very special, a series of editorial experiments, pushing us to try new things and to the edges of the possible. In this issue, we celebrate our 21 Guest Editors to date, each one generous and demanding in all the right ways, and ofer a little more space and time for them to play with.

∑

259


MIGHTY MONTAGE

01

07

02

08

2008

Rei Kawakubo has been confounding expectations and ploughing her own very individual path since she arrived on the global fashion scene in 1981, with the launch of her legendary label, Comme des Garçons. Her radical notions of dressing, initially met with raised eyebrows, have since become widely esteemed and emulated; while her consistent aversion to publicity has only made her star burn brighter. Our irst female Guest Editor, along with Zaha Hadid and Louise Bourgeois in October 2008, Kawakubo took a typically left-ield approach to her brief, assembling 20 pages that combined art, animation, photography, graphics and illustration to summon up the maverick spirit of her brand. As she said then, ‘It is diicult to say everything I want to say with 20 pages of people wearing clothes. By choosing the work of various artists according to the spirit of the label, a new departure is arrived at and all the 20 pages become one mode of expression.’ Though now in her seventies, Kawakubo continues to oversee an ever-expanding empire, and is involved in every aspect of the business, from its highly regarded ‘anti-perfumes’ to graphics and store design, as well as the Dover Street Market fashion emporiums, which recently expanded to Singapore. This year she also became the second living designer to be honoured with an exhibition at the Met’s Costume Institute. But perhaps she is considering slowing down: according to her husband and business partner Adrian Jofe, the Met show may be the last of its kind. Whether that proves to be the case, Marc Jacobs was surely right when he said, ‘It is impossible to overstate her inluence on modern fashion.’ Christopher Stocks

260

03

04

09

05

10

06

11

Above, Kawakubo’s complex Guest Editor offering included: anarchic paintings by Argentine art collective Mondongo, reworked by Comme des Garçons (01; 07; 10; 11), as well as untouched works by the collective (04); an artwork created by Risa Fukui using a Japanese paper-cutting

technique (02); a portrait of the Russian-born American sculptor Louise Nevelson, which featured on the cover of Comme des Garçons’ Six magazine in 1991 (03); a Comme des Garçons direct mailer from A/W 1990/91, by American artist John L Murphy (05); a photograph by Yoshiko Seino, who has

12 worked with Comme des Garçons since 1998 (06); a Dalí-esque drawing by Japanese animator Tabaimo (08); and a series of Comme des Garçons promotional postcards (09; 12) Top left, portrait by Hiroshi Tanabi

Photography: Comme des Garçons X Mondongo; © Mondongo; © Risa Fukui/ Phil Co ltd; Novarro; John L Murphy; Yoshiko Seino; © Tabaimo

Rei Kawakubo Fashion avant-gardiste


21 Guest Editors | Greatest Hits

2010 David Lynch Maverick ilm director Last year a BBC poll of 177 ilm critics from 36 countries decided Lynch’s Mulholland Drive was the best ilm of the 21st century – not bad for a ilm that even its many fans found hard to follow. But then following has never been Lynch’s thing. Known for his dark imagination, Lynch studied painting before launching the nightmarish Eraserhead on an unsuspecting world in 1977. The Elephant Man, Blue Velvet, Lost Highway and, of course, the landmark TV series Twin Peaks followed. We more than welcomed Lynch as Guest Editor in 2010. And he used his space to celebrate a somewhat surprising passion: transcendental meditation, which he has been practising twice a day, every day, since 1973. Despite not releasing a movie since that issue, Lynch has kept himself busy. He has released two ‘electro-pop’ albums; launched his own LA music festival; made guest appearances on The Cleveland Show as Gus the Bartender; and developed a cult following for his daily LA weather forecasts. And this year saw the release of the documentary, David Lynch: The Art Life and the much-anticipated return of Twin Peaks, as extraordinary and befuddling as the irst time round. Nick Compton See new contribution, page 280

As Guest Editor, Lynch, photographed by Taryn Simon, turned to transcendental meditation, putting pen to paper to illustrate ‘that state of infinite consciousness’, unity, for his cover. Inside, he offered a 16-page gatefold of his own illustrations of symbols of unity from various religions and cultures, including a baffling mathematical equation

Art direction: Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Photography: Matthew Monteith

2015 Liz Diller First Lady of architecture Diller, founding partner of the New York studio Diller Scoidio + Renfro, is rethinking the American urban landscape with projects such as the High Line. As a Guest Editor, she gave us an exclusive photographic tour of the new Broad museum in Los Angeles. The cinematic chase (left) followed two characters in hot pursuit beneath the galleries’ latticed ceilings. They emerged with the same energy Diller brings to her work: ‘We jump of a clif without a parachute and we hope that we make a soft landing.’ Landing lawlessly with cultural projects such as the ICA Boston and the Museum of Image and Sound in Rio, Diller is now working on a major overhaul of MoMA and the opening of New York arts complex The Shed. Harriet Thorpe See new contribution, page 300


21 Guest Editors | Greatest Hits

2009 Philippe Starck Design’s deep thinker Frenchman Philippe Starck has spent the last four decades coming up with much-talked-about designs, from arachnid lemon squeezers to larger-than-life hotel interiors. So it came as a surprise when, as Wallpaper* Guest Editor in 2009, he steered clear of design entirely. ‘It is my mission to make intelligence sexy,’ he told us, as he called on scientists, as well as an artist and a musician, to think about time, space, matter and the never-ending quest for the meaning of life. ‘Where are we going? And are we going to like it when we get there?’ he asked. Seven sharp minds rose to the challenge, including musician Peter Gabriel and theoretical physicist Thibault Damour. In the years since, Starck has been as proliic as ever. Among other projects, he founded Starck Paris, a line of fragrances inspired by memories of his mother’s perfume shop, and was recently announced as the designer for the interiors of Cidade Matarazzo, a new São Paulo complex by Jean Nouvel. Starck also supported his home town, Paris, in its successful bid for the 2024 Olympics: the medals he designed are ‘made for sharing’ and can be taken apart. Rosa Bertoli See new contribution, page 302

Starck topped off his existential offering with a tracing paper cover, its layers representing stages of evolution. Portrait by Sofia Sanchez & Mauro Mongiello

2011 Christian Marclay Multimedia visionary Christian Marclay is that unlikely beast, an inluential visual artist who is also taken seriously in the world of experimental music. The Swiss-American established himself on the New York scene in the mid-1980s, when he literally mashed up vinyl discs then played them in all their distorted glory on his self-made ‘phonoguitar’, a record player slung around his neck. As Guest Editor, Marclay reimagined his Manga Scroll to dramatic efect. He has since expanded his work, with a 2015 show at White Cube Bermondsey, and the 2016 Six New Animations, based on photographs of detritus taken on his daily walks around London, where he now lives. A magician of sonic and visual collage, Marclay’s sense of humour makes his best work both challenging and – a rare thing in contemporary art – rib-tickingly funny. CS See new contribution, page 284

262


Manga Scroll images, courtesy Graphicstudio, University of South Florida, Tampa

‘I program my home computer/ beam myself into the future’

2011 Kraftwerk Electronic music pioneers

German synth-art-pop outit Kraftwerk just might be the most inluential band of all time. It was these four men and their Minimoogs, rather than punk, which proved the pivot point for pop in the late 1970s. Founders Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider were talking AI and data back when pocket calculators were cutting-edge, and it wasn’t just the music that pointed the way ahead. Their minimal album covers (at a time when people thought Paula Scher’s guitarshaped spaceship for Boston was cool) inluenced a generation of designers. As Guest Editors, Kraftwerk previewed a

portfolio of 3D-imagery (we thoughtfully provided 3D glasses on the cover), much of which would reappear two years later, in animated form, during a remarkable run of performances at Tate Modern. The issue also pulled in the likes of Peter Saville, Neville Brody, Thomas Demand, and Andreas Gursky, to talk about the band’s broader impact on art and design. Kraftwerk continue to tour, and this year sent 3D sound and vision spinning around the Royal Albert Hall in London, and played at the Grand Depart of the Tour de France in Düsseldorf. NC See new contribution, page 282

ONOMATOPOEIC EPIC Reimagined for his Guest Editor section, Marclay’s Manga Scroll screamed from the page like a Lichtenstein. A visualised soundtrack of Japanese manga comic action, it featured a cacophony of onomatopes as well as portraits of the piece’s six vocal interpreters Opposite, portrait by Tim Gutt

263


Bourgeois, photographed (left) by Scott Douglas in 2008, selected one of her own works for her cover, Untitled, 2007, in fabric and fabric collage Bottom, the artist’s pages included a curation of the work of three collaborators

TRIPLE WHAMMY 01

2008 02

Louise Bourgeois Art world grande dame

264

01 Peter Zumthor on the coast in Vardø, Norway. ‘Zumthor and l have used earth, water, fire and air to create views of silence,’ said Bourgeois of their Steilneset Memorial 02 Helmut Lang on the beach near his house in The Hamptons. ‘Helmut went to the ocean to gather his thoughts,’ explained Bourgeois. ‘Inspiration comes from retreat’ 03 Roni Horn with her Vatnasafn/Library of Water installation in Iceland. ‘Horn chooses solitude. She chooses the experience of nature,’ said Bourgeois

03

Photography: Christopher Burke; Joël Tettamanti, Elfie Semotan, Jeff Williams

The French-American artist Louise Bourgeois may have been 96 years old when she joined Rei Kawakubo and Zaha Hadid as our joint Guest Editor in October 2008, but she took on the role with the energy of someone half her age. Bourgeois worked with three long-time friends and collaborators – fashion designer turned artist Helmut Lang, architect Peter Zumthor and artist Roni Horn – to curate a unique edit of their work. Paris-born Bourgeois moved to New York in 1938 and achieved international recognition for the disturbing sculptures and installations that she began producing in the 1960s. She was exploring familiar territory when she told us, ‘I say things that I shouldn’t say and I do things that I shouldn’t do. There is violence. I break things and then there is guilt and regret. The duality is in the work.’ Her inal major work, a collaboration with Zumthor, was the Steilneset Memorial at Vardø in Norway. Previewed in our 2008 issue, it opened in 2011, a year after she died, and the intense psychodrama of its interior – dedicated to the many women burnt as witches hereabouts in the early 17th century – doubles as a itting memorial to Bourgeois herself. CS See new contribution from her studio, page 278


21 Guest Editors | Greatest Hits

2009 Karl Lagerfeld All-round phenomenon

‘When I do photography, I look with another eye than when I do something for myself ’

It’s hard to know how to start describing Karl Lagerfeld, one of our 2009 Guest Editors. ‘Renaissance man’ hardly does justice to this preternaturally prodigious polymath, who has been Chanel’s chief designer since 1983, not to mention performing a similar role at Fendi and running his own label on the side. Then there’s his book-publishing, his photography, his illustrations, his mammoth accumulation of books and furniture and houses. ‘I like to collect,’ Lagerfeld explains, ‘not to own.’ For Wallpaper* he photographed Alvar Aalto’s Maison Louis Carré and the artist Claude Lévêque, as well as his muse of the moment, the French model Baptiste Giabiconi, wearing a Boucheron necklace designed by Marc Newson;

in the Queen’s Theatre at Versailles; sprawling disrobed on a ‘Pebble’ seat by the Bouroullec brothers; and full-frontal in a Roman catacomb and on the cover. Since then Lagerfeld has become, if possible, even more famous and productive, while his catwalk shows for Chanel have become more extravagant year-on-year. Recent highlights include large-scale mock-ups of supermarkets, moon rockets and the Eifel Tower. ‘I am a vampire – open to everything and attached to nothing,’ Lagerfeld told us. And one does wonder where his extraordinary energy comes from. Now in his eighties, Karl has become a bit like the Eifel Tower himself: part of the cultural landscape, and worth celebrating with a lot of lashing lights. CS

THE BIG REVEAL

2012 Lang Lang Virtuoso pianist The world’s most famous classical musician, Lang Lang (photographed by Steven Brahms at New York’s Lincoln Center) presented ten of the venues he’s performed in, from Chicago’s Ravinia Pavilion, where he played Tchaikovsky at age 17, to the Beijing Olympic stadium and the White House, where he played for presidents Bush and Obama. CS

Top, self-portrait. Middle, the superbly six-packed model Baptiste Giabiconi featured on Lagerfeld’s special peel-to-reveal cover: fully clothed pre-peel, and in birthday suit (model’s own), post-peel. Above, some of Lagerfeld’s shots of Giabiconi in the fashion designer’s favourite Roman haunts


21 Guest Editors | Greatest Hits

2015 William Wegman King of canine conceptualism William Wegman started out in the 1970s as part of the West Coast art gang, working alongside Bruce Nauman, John Baldessari and Ed Ruscha, but the American artist and photographer is best known today for his beautifully set up photographs – often funny, sometimes surreal – of his Weimaraner dogs. For Wallpaper* he created a lushly coloured 21-page photo story that featured his Weimaraners Topper and Flo posing with iconic works of American design. ‘I’m like a stand-up comic who takes suggestions from the audience,’ Wegman explained. ‘If somebody comes in with a bulldog and some other prop, I’ll ind something to do with it.’ Wegman also photographed the Pennsylvania studio of the late furniture

designer George Nakashima, Flo and Topper in tow. ‘What struck me about working with my dogs and the Nakashima furniture is how alike they are,’ he said. ‘Dog and furniture blend together and at times become one and the same.’ The images culminated in the book William Wegman: Dogs on Furniture, published by Piasa Editions in collaboration with Wallpaper*. Wegman’s renown has only grown since, with touring retrospectives in Korea, Spain and Japan. Almost certainly the only major contemporary artist who has appeared on both Saturday Night Live and Sesame Street, Wegman demonstrates that high art can also be instantly accessible. CS See new contribution, page 304

BEST IN SHOW Above, self-portrait with Flo Top, Wegman’s photo story, featuring US designs, such as, clockwise from top, Long Afternoon, 2015, by Wendell Castle; ‘Hairy J Blige’ bench, 2014, by The Haas Brothers; ‘Color Wheel’ ottoman, 1967, by Alexander Girard; ‘111 Navy’ chairs, by Emeco; ‘Library’ chair, ‘Plank’ table, both by Poesis Design, and ‘Mini Farrago 02’ light, by Jason Miller Right, cover, with ‘Astral Agnes’ light, by Lindsey Adelman; ‘Formation’ table, by Holly Hunt


2007 Jef Koons Artist provocateur As one of the world’s most successful – not to mention controversial – artists, Jef Koons was a perfect choice to be our irst-ever Guest Editor in 2007, along with Dieter Rams and Hedi Slimane. Throwing himself into the project with characteristic enthusiasm, Koons produced an eye-popping homage to childhood heroes Led Zeppelin. ‘As a teenager, I was interested in art, but I didn’t know what art was,’ he told us. ‘I did know that the closest I got to this sense of transcendence that art can bring into your life was Zeppelin’s music.’ Sadly, nothing came of Koons’ plans to design the cover art for a Jimmy Page solo album, but the artist has hardly been short of ofers since 2007. In 2010 he unveiled a multicoloured M3 GT2 for BMW, followed in 2013 by a dazzle-painted yacht for industrialist Dakis Joannou. That same year his Balloon Dog (Orange) sold for $58.4m, still the highest price ever paid for a living artist’s work. Koons shows no sign of retreating from the limelight. His recent handbags for Louis Vuitton sport images from Rubens, Titian and Fragonard, and though they are not exactly taking art to the masses, they have arguably raised his proile higher than ever. CS See new contribution, page 296

‘My understanding of transcendence and how art functions comes from Zeppelin’

Photography: Dick Barnatt/Redferns, Jay Dickman/Corbis

ROCKING ON

Koons, photographed by Mario Sorrenti (top), offered up a 16-page artwork (left) inspired by his passion for Led Zeppelin, which mixed archival photography of the heavy metal outfit with reworked images from his Hulk series; and a cover (above) with an original work of art inspired by Led Zeppelin’s ‘Babe I’m Gonna Leave You’

267


2013

Elmgreen & Dragset Double visionaries Scandinavian duo Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset made for grand Guest Editors in 2013. Architecture and design bufs, champions of elevating public spaces and never afraid of a sight gag, the pair make smart (but never alienating) art for smart people. They made their name in 2005 with End Station, a recreation of a 1980s New York subway stop, and Prada Marfa, a fake luxury goods store that opened in the Texas desert the same year. Their work has taken on celebrity culture, consumerism, the failings of social housing and the way domestic interiors can speak of complex interior lives. As Guest Editors they took us on a tour of their favourite ictional homes, from the punchy pop-art pads of Richard Hamilton and David Hockney and the ilm sets of Alfred Hitchcock, to the angsty interiors of Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi. We also previewed ‘Tomorrow’, the imaginary home of a ictional architect they conjured at the V&A that year using its archive and their own works. Since then, the pair have had shows in Tel Aviv, Beijing and Seoul; installed pop-up public art in New York, including A Greater Perspective, an oversized, useless bronze telescope on the High Line, and Van Gogh's Ear, an upright ear-shaped swimming pool at the Rockefeller Center. They’ve also curated 2017’s Istanbul Biennial, opening 16 September. NC See new contribution, page 291

Top, Elmgreen & Dragset, photographed by Jonathan de Villiers, with their ‘Omnes Una Manet Nox’ (The Same Night Awaits Us All) bed for Louis Vuitton, shown at their 2013 exhibition ‘Tomorrow’ at the V&A Museum. Above and right, the imaginary study and living room of the fictional architect Norman Swann, created for the show

268

Photography: Jonathan de Villiers

They take on the way domestic interiors can speak of complex interior lives...


21 Guest Editors | Greatest Hits

2014 Jean Nouvel Monument man

Nouvel, photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari at home in Paris, put his Fondation Cartier, designed in 1994, on the cover. The image, showing a maintenance check, was taken back in 1995, but as Nouvel points out, the building looks exactly the same today – time has been kind to his transparent treasure chest

Wallpaper's October 2014 edition came to fruition far quicker than another Nouvel-Gehry double act, the Saadiyat Island complex in Abu Dhabi, where Gehry’s Guggenheim is running a distant second to Nouvel’s new Louvre, itself a ten year project but inally nearing completion. Over the course of a 50-year career the Frenchman has channelled the spirit of Gallic modernism into new forms, courting controversy whenever his single-minded vision is compromised. Nouvel used his Guest Editor pages to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Fondation Cartier, his landmark Parisian building, as crisp and reined as the day it opened. The gallery has proved to be a potent force in contemporary art, as well as an inspired exhibition space, hosting groundbreaking shows by the likes of Marc Newson, Matthew Barney, Sarah Sze and more. The architect also shared his thoughts on hotel culture – an Atelier Jean Nouvel speciality – and works then under construction, including the Louvre Abu Dhabi and the National Museum of Qatar (opening in Doha December 2018). Since 2014, Nouvel has more than demonstrated the necessary stamina for such major cultural projects, including the controversial Philharmonie de Paris and ongoing works at the National Art Museum of China, among others. His studio has also garnered a fair amount of commercial work, with the 53W53 Tower promising a prominent addition to the New York skyline. Jonathan Bell

Photography: Courtesy of Fondation Cartier © Georges Fessy

2012 Taryn Simon Cataloguer of truth The American artist-photographer Taryn Simon has built her career assembling hundreds of photographs into weirdly precise categories, such as ‘descendants of Hitler’s lawyer’ or ‘items coniscated from passengers at John F Kennedy International Airport’, thus revealing the hidden patterns behind seemingly random images. As Guest Editor, she focused on two projects: the online Image Atlas, which compares by country the image results delivered by internet search engines; and The Picture Collection, based on the New York Public Library’s image archive. ‘It is a beautiful and precious thing,’ says Simon. ‘Every single image has been curated, and I just shot what was in each folder.’ For her latest work, An Occupation of Loss, she invited 30 professional mourners from around the world to perform in New York in 2016, and getting them there became part of the show. CS See new contribution, page 287

Simon’s cover featured The Picture Collection, a selection of the prints, posters, postcards and clippings found in the files of the world’s largest circulating picture library in New York. Portrait by Rineke Dijkstra


21 Guest Editors | Greatest Hits URBAN RENEWAL

01

02

2012 Ole Scheeren Accelerated architect It felt like Ole Scheeren’s year. By 2012, barely into his forties, he’d co-authored one of the world's most recognisable new structures – Beijing’s CCTV Building – and hived of the OMA mothership with Rem Koolhaas’ blessing, completing the project as a solo operator. His Archipelago Cinema, designed for a Thai island, was rebuilt that summer in Venice as a loating venue for his cinematic debut, Against All Rules – the Architect Ole Scheeren, by the documentary maker Horst Brandenburg, while other mega-projects were well underway. It seemed a itting moment for us to connect. Scheeren’s Wallpaper* ofering was a typically headlong rush around the fast-changing Asian landscape in the company of a clutch of artists, writers and photographers drawn from the

03

region. As he noted, with two weeks to complete 20 pages, ‘the only way to look at this was to simply declare it yet another exercise in making things happen at China speed’. The point was context and culture, driven home by author Douglas Coupland, who concluded with eight ictional darts dispatched with trademark pop-cultural precision. It was a prescient issue; Büro-OS’s MahaNakhon Tower in Bangkok and Singapore’s Interlace subsequently leapt from visualisations into spectacular reality. Scheeren’s star continues to shine in the Far East, with new projects on the go in Malaysia, China and Singapore, including the Guardian Art Center in Beijing, Singapore’s Duo Tower and the Angkasa Raya in Kuala Lumpur. JB See new contribution, page 289

04 01. Photographer Wang Qingsong portrayed Scheeren’s new practice Büro-OS as a chaotic architectural sweatshop; 02. The Depth Development: RMB City & Büro Ole Scheeren, Series 01, by Cao Fei; 03. International Building Collages Part I (Singapore) – The Interlace, by Valerie Stahl von Stromberg; 04. Dancefloor (If You Make a Revolution, Make it for Fun) by Surasi Kusolwong Top left, Scheeren photographed by Mei Yuan Gui with a model of the Angkasa Raya for Kuala Lumpur


Wilson’s cover was a moving update of his video portrait of Isabella Rossellini. Dentsu London took images from Wilson’s video portraits, and applied the Ombro Cinema technique to them, while we provided a sheet of acetate film to make Rossellini move and pucker up Even Wilson himself, photographed (top) by Jason Schmidt, became animated under the acetate

2010 Robert Wilson Stage magician Having cut his creative teeth on New York’s art scene in the 1960s and 70s, stage director Robert Wilson has since created some of the most memorable pieces in contemporary theatre, featuring minimal sets and groundbreaking sound and light. As Guest Editor, he decided to ‘make the magazine more dimensional’. Since 2006, he had been making video portraits of celebrities and animals, featuring the key elements of his work – sound, light, costume and set design. He created a 16-page portfolio of portraits (plus a front cover featuring Isabella Rossellini) and then, with creative communications agency Dentsu London, employed a pre-cinema technique called Ombro

Cinema: by sliding a striped acetate sheet across the page, readers could make subjects such as Brad Pitt and a sumo world champion move. QR codes gave access to videos and soundtracks. ‘We are creating something that’s more interactive, allowing the reader to be a participant in the composition,’ Wilson said. While his work in theatre and opera continues apace, Wilson has also branched out. He designed a public park in Helsinki in 2012, and last year created a chandelier for lighting company Slamp, inspired by his set for La Traviata. ‘Light is the element that creates space,’ he told us. ‘Without light, there is no space.’ RB See new contribution, page 298

‘We are creating something interactive, allowing the reader to be a participant’

Readers could make Wilson’s Brad Pitt (left) pull his pistol, a sumo world champion bounce, and a snowy owl twist its head. QR codes allowed Wilson’s videos and soundtracks to be played on a smartphone

271


21 Guest Editors | Greatest Hits

2008 Zaha Hadid Architect of her age Dame Zaha Hadid was known globally for her dynamic public buildings. She was the irst female architect to receive the Pritzker prize, in 2004, and the RIBA Royal Gold Medal, in 2016. Her singular career was abruptly cut short when she passed away suddenly on 31 March 2016 in Miami, aged just 65. In 2008, when Hadid guest-edited Wallpaper*, we hailed her as the greatest architect of the age, and no one called to argue. She brought her futuristic touch into the magazine, testing the ‘powers and patience of the print production department’ (wrote editor-in-chief Tony Chambers) with greyscale cut-outs across 16 pages. ‘It needs a big hole in the magazine,’ Hadid told art critic Matthew Collings, who proiled her for the issue. The concept was drawn from an installation she designed with Patrik Schumacher for the Venice Architecture Biennale that year. The lotus lower was her starting point for a seductively compressing and expanding form that evolved from abstraction zinto a piece of design. The structure unfolded from the magazine – slanting like the MAXXI in Rome (2009) and curving like Beijing’s Galaxy SOHO (2012), communicating her organic way of manipulating material and space. Sampling the same idea, the cut-out cover also brought her threedimensional vision into the hands of our readers. Ever challenging the limits of design and shattering glass ceilings, Hadid received a damehood for her services to architecture in 2012. Now a 400-strong studio, Zaha Hadid Architects carries on her legacy, completing groundbreaking designs such as the Maritime Terminal Salerno (2016), Port House in Antwerp (2016) and the Napoli Afragola High Speed Train Station (2017). HT See new contribution from ZHA, page 276

‘IT NEEDS A BIG HOLE IN THE MAGAZINE’

Hadid designed a front cover (above left) and 16 pages of greyscale cut-outs (above and right)

The results brought a whole new dimension to our pages. Portrait (top) by David Hughes

Photography: Frank Hülsbömer

So said Hadid when addressing ideas of carving, layering, the void and space for her Guest Editor design, based on her ‘Lotus’ room project with Patrik Schumacher for the 2008 Venice Biennale


2007

Photography: Philippe Fragniere

hedi silmane Creative polymath The rise of Hedi Slimane seemed to signal the arrival of a new kind of cultural force, the multimedia arbiter of cool. He was connected, interested in everything, analogue and digital all at the same time. No wonder we enlisted him as an inaugural Guest Editor in 2007. It was shortly after his departure from Dior Homme, where he had reinvented the male wardrobe. He had also turned his hand to furniture design and graphics, but photography, a passion since he was 11, was the most personal part of his polymathic mix. 'I always thought I could use diferent mediums to express the same idea,’ he told us. ‘Right now my main concern is photography. But if you look at my photographs over the last decade, and then look at my style and fashion designs, it is quite obvious I'm following the same ideas and principles.’ Slimane’s contribution to the issue was a set of 20 60 x 40cm posters using his own photography and typography. He also sat down with the German artist Thomas Demand to talk about the split with Dior, redeining masculinity and the Bavarian concept of beauty in imperfection (really!). Slimane continued to take pictures, and became an in-demand curator. In 2011 he curated a group show of LA artists, including Ed Ruscha and John Baldessari, while in the same year, his photographs of their city were exhibited at MOCA. In 2012 he was appointed creative director of Yves Saint Laurent, and left the post last year. NC

‘I don’t really like the idea of committing to one ield’

Slimane, seen in a self-portrait (top), called his 20 pull-out posters ‘fragments and signs, indirect narrative textures’. Subjects ranged from a Berlin club ceiling to the hair fittings of his last show for Dior

273


Rams, photographed by Matthew Donaldson at his home in Kronberg. His cover featured his Tonarmwaage, a handheld device used to ensure the balance of a stylus on a record player. Inside the magazine, his pick of his own designs included, below, from top, Wallmounted Audio 2/3; ET66 Calculator and World Traveller ET88 Calculator, both with Dietrich Lubs; L2 and L01 Speakers

2007 Dieter Rams The great simpliier

DIETER RAMS’ TEN COMMANDMENTS

274

1. Good design is innovative 2. Good design makes a product useful 3. Good design is aesthetic 4. Good design helps a product to be understood 5. Good design is unobtrusive 6. Good design is honest 7. Good design is durable 8. Good design is consistent to the last detail 9. Good design is concerned with the environment 10. Good design is as little design as possible

Photography: Matthew Donaldson

Though he worked with only two companies (Braun, where he was chief design oicer from 1961 to 1995, and Vitsœ, the sole producer of his furniture since 1959), Dieter Rams’ elegant minimalism revolutionised product design and has inluenced wave after wave of designers since. His contribution as one of our inaugural Guest Editors in 2007 featured a conversation with Naoto Fukasawa, in which the pair discussed the design inluence of companies such as Olivetti and Apple, and their mutual passion for Bonsai. An additional 16-page portfolio explored Rams’ Ten Commandments of Design. ‘Now, more than ever, when industrial design as a discipline seems to have lost touch with a clarity of purpose and focus, it is time to perhaps get back to a core of principles and strip away the superluous once again,’ he told us. Though he is long since retired, Rams’ work generates as much interest as ever: in 2013, he was awarded the London Design Festival’s Lifetime Achievement Medal, while a documentary, by ilmmaker Gary Hustwit, and a touring show of some 250 works are in the pipeline. RB


21 Guest Editors | Greatest Hits

2014 Frank Gehry Fuliller of fantasies At the age of 88, Frank Owen Gehry’s position at the apex of the modern architectural scene is uncontested. The man who redeined public architecture, reinvented shape-making and rewired architectural technology so that his artistic visions could be realised, Gehry is both a true original and a bona ide establishment player. Our October 2014 issue featured a double header with Jean Nouvel, making it a remarkable document of the time two of architecture’s biggest names shared a stage. For Wallpaper*, Gehry deconstructed our logo with a lourish of torn paper and the judicious placement of light (we fantasised of a future Wallpaper* HQ – pipe dreams, as it transpired). Inside, the focus was on the imminent arrival of the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, with a full photographic portfolio and design critic Alice Rawsthorn waxing lyrical on the project’s gestation. ‘I’d never had a client like Bernard Arnault before,’ Gehry told her of the LVMH CEO. ‘He gave me a lot of freedom to design the building, but expressed his opinions as we did it.’ Elsewhere, Yale’s Kurt W Foster cut a swathe through the chaos and complexity of the Gehry Archive, from where form evolves out of a primordial swamp of twisted cardboard and tangled sketches. In the three years, Gehry’s works have included Facebook’s California HQ and the ongoing half-billion dollar extension to Philadelphia’s Museum of Art. In the UK, his apartment complex at the Battersea Power Station development is also well under way. JB See new contribution, page 294

STRIPE TEASE Gehry’s cover design tore a strip or two off Wallpaper*. Meanwhile, he was photographed by Azim Haidaryan at his new Fondation Louis Vuitton in July 2014 (below) where he had worked his trademark architectural magic, as revealed in a full photographic portfolio of the building

‘Fondation Louis Vuitton is a once in a lifetime project, a fantasy in a children’s park’

2013 Laurie Simmons Conceptual playmaker American artist and ilmmaker Laurie Simmons grew up in suburban New York, immersed in daytime TV. ‘You name it,’ she told us, ‘I watched it. I have a TV brain.’ She is also the girl who never stopped playing with dolls; from the mid-1970s, she began photographing them in various situations, moving to increasingly ambitious settings. In 2009 she commissioned a specially adapted life-sized sex doll from Japan, taking her work to a spooky new level of realism. For us, she created a 16-page extravaganza of jellybean-scattered images from her own work and by artists she admires, among them her husband Carroll Dunham, Sarah Charlesworth and Jimmy DeSana, inspired by Bill Evans’ 1963 jazz album, Conversations With Myself. Simmons’ most recent work, My Art, is her debut feature ilm, a comic tale in which she plays a frustrated artist called Ellie Shine, who displays the same fearless spirit as Simmons herself. CS See new contribution, page 293 Alongside works by selected artists, Simmons’ pages included her own photographs featuring the Love Doll she bought in Tokyo in 2009, such as Wes Gordon Reversible Clutch Coat, Fall 2013, on Love Doll with Brie Ruais Sculpture, 2013, seen here on the cover Top, self-portrait in Simmons’ studio


21 Guest Editors | New Releases


To celebrate Wallpaper’s 21st birthday, Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) created this design inspired by Thallus, an experimental structure the firm unveiled at this year’s Salone. Thallus distilled the work of ZHA’s computational design (CoDe) research group into a 3D installation, showing how advanced computational methods can open up new possibilities in architecture and engineering Design: Patrik Schumacher ZHA CoDe: Shajay Bhooshan, Henry David Louth, Marko Margeta

2017

Zaha Hadid Architects Pushes the computational design envelope

277


21 Guest Editors | New Releases


2017

Louise Bourgeois Studio Opens up domestic spaces

Interior shots of Louise Bourgeois’ home in Chelsea, New York. It is now part of The Easton Foundation, which promotes scholarship and awareness of Bourgeois’ life and art Photographed in 2016 by Jean-François Jaussaud © The Easton Foundation/ VAGA, NY

279


21 Guest Editors | New Releases

2017

David Lynch Calls on old friend Mr Jim

ARTWORK T


David Lynch, ‘Mr. Jim’ drawing no. 2, (1970s) pencil on paper, 4in x 6in Mr Jim is a character Lynch has been drawing for decades. Keen viewers look out for allusions to him in Lynch’s film work, including the recent TV series, Twin Peaks: The Return

TO COME

281


This picture, the limited edition Canyon x Kraftwerk ‘Ultimate CF SLX Kraftwerk’ bicycle, featuring a geometric design that echoes Kraftwerk’s signature bodysuits, developed by founding member Ralf Hütter Above, Hütter in robot mode Above right, Kraftwerk performing at London’s Tate Modern in 2013, photographed by Peter Boettcher With thanks to Monika Sprüth, © Kraftwerk 2017, courtesy of Sprüth Magers


TOUR DE FRANCE / 1983 L‘ENFER DU NORD PARIS-ROUBAIX LA COTE D‘AZUR ET SAINT-TROPEZ LES ALPES ET LES PYRÉNÉES DERNIÈRE ÉTAPE CHAMPS-ÉLYSÉES GALIBIER ET TOURMALET EN DANSEUSE JUSQU‘AU SOMMET PÉDALER EN GRAND BRAQUET SPRINT FINAL À L‘ARRIVÉE

2017

Kraftwerk Takes us for a new spin

TOUR DE FRANCE / 2003 RADIO TOUR INFORMATION TRANSMISSION TÉLÉVISION REPORTAGE SUR MOTO CAMÉRA VIDÉO ET FOTO LES ÉQUIPES PRÉSENTÉES LE DÉPART EST DONNÉ LES ÉTAPES SONT BRÛLÉES ET LA COURSE EST LANCÉE LES COUREURS CHRONOMÉTRÉS POUR L‘ÉPREUVE DE VÉRITÉ LA MONTAGNE LES VALLÉES LES GRANDS COLS LES DÉFILÉS LA FLAMME ROUGE DÉPASSÉE MAILLOT JAUNE À L‘ARRIVÉE RADIO TOUR INFORMATION TRANSMISSION TÉLÉVISION

AERO DYNAMIK / 2003 PERFECTION MEKANIK AERO DYNAMIK MATERIEL ET TECHNIK AERO DYNAMIK CONDITION ET PHYSIK AERO DYNAMIK POSITION ET TAKTIK AERO DYNAMIK

TEXT TOUR DE FRANCE / AERO DYNAMIK RALF HÜTTER / MAXIME SCHMITT

000 283


Christian Marclay, Look, 2017 Marclay regularly makes photographs and videos on his daily walks through London, honing in on detritus such as beer bottles, cigarette butts, bottle caps, chewing gum and drinking straws. He transforms chance encounters with what he finds beneath his feet into visual poetry, encouraging us to look twice and discover new possibilities in an ostensibly banal cityscape

284

∑


21 Guest Editors | New Releases

2017

Christian Marclay Makes the everyday worth a second look


21 Guest Editors | New Releases

2017

Taryn Simon Creates a composite man of power

Taryn Simon, An Avatar, 2008 Simon revisited this artwork, showing a composite political figure created from original photographs of world leaders she took between 2003 and 2008. The artist travelled within Syria, Cuba, the US, Lebanon, Israel, France and Palestine to collect the component parts. As resonant now as it was a decade ago, An Avatar raises questions about power, authority, veracity and semblance


∑

000 287


21 Guest Editors | New Releases Ole Scheeren’s 77-storey MahaNakhon skyscraper in Bangkok’s central business district, photographed by Iwan Baan. Says Scheeren, ‘The pixelated geometry of MahaNakhon takes the scale of the surrounding city and perpetuates the human scale into the large dimension of the tower. What looks incomplete from afar reveals itself to be a three-dimensional space of living’


2017

Ole Scheeren Provides a pixelated tower in Bangkok

∑

289


21 Guest Editors | New Releases

Elmgreen & Dragset The Village One single booth, isolated at the Grand Palais, one month prior to the art fair opening at the same location last autumn.


2017

Elmgreen & Dragset Contemplate the fun, or otherwise, of the art fair

All these fairs‌ art or not?

∑

291


21 Guest Editors | New Releases A still from My Art, a feature film by Laurie Simmons that premiered at the 2016 Venice Film Festival and was also shown at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival. Starring Simmons as Ellie, ‘an artist who shows an unwavering commitment to her work at a critical juncture in her life’, My Art was borne out of Simmons’ preoccupation with the depiction of female artists. ‘Almost invariably, they are mythologised, romanticised and made to seem tragic and crazy, which has no bearing on my own experience as an artist,’ she says. ‘Fearless about focusing her artistic voice and embracing a new medium, Ellie uses everything and everyone around her to push ahead.’ My Art is released at Quad Cinema, New York, from 12 January and at the Laemmle Theater, Los Angeles, from 19 January


2017

Laurie Simmons Lays bare an artist’s life for the lens

∑

293


2017

Frank Gehry Looks back to Bilbao in 1996, a big year for both of us

294

∑


21 Guest Editors | New Releases Entering its third decade, Gehry’s Guggenheim Bilbao remains one of the world’s most admired museum spaces, and has ushered in the city’s metamorphosis from industrial hub to cultural jewel. This image is from early 1996, when its billowing architecture was taking shape. The same year would see the birth of a little publication in London that has since grown into the magazine you hold today © FMGB Guggenheim Bilbao Museo, photography: Aitor Ortiz


21 Guest Editors | New Releases

Jeff Koons, Seated Ballerina, 2017 Unveiled in May, Koons’ third installation at New York’s Rockefeller Plaza (following Puppy, 2000, and Split-Rocker, 2014) was a 45ft-high inflatable ballerina, adjusting her shoe and seemingly readying herself to dance.

Through the sculpture, Koons wanted to bring awareness to National Missing Children’s Month: ‘I believe the sculpture symbolises affirmation and hope’ Photography: Tom Powel Imaging


2017

Jef Koons Blows up big in New York

∑

297


2017

Robert Wilson Faces up to reality

298

∑


21 Guest Editors | New Releases Robert Wilson, I Cry, 2017 The artist and filmmaker’s self-portraits reflect on the current political situation in the US Make-up: Manu Halligan. Photography: Lovis Ostenrik


21 Guest Editors | New Releases

2017

Liz Diller Rolls out Diller Scoidio + Renfro’s reinvention of the wheel

1

2a

2b

1. Technical drawing of The bogie 2a. The Shed neSTed 2b. The Shed deployed 3. ingoT forging 4. cuTTing 5. laThing 6. roll bearing 7. aSSembling The bogie on SiTe 8. The bogie placed on SiTe, phoTo by TimoThy Schenck 9. inSpecTion of The bogie 10. inTerior view of The Shed deployed, phoTo by TimoThy Schenck

liz diller, Reinventing the Wheel, 2017 diller gives us an insight into The fabrication of a bogie wheel for The Shed in new york. opening in 2019, The Shed is a 200,000 sq ft centre for artistic invention, designed by diller Scofidio + renfro in collaboration with rockwell group. it comprises

a fixed building and a telescoping outer shell that can be rolled out on tracks from its nested position, doubling its footprint on demand


3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

∑

301


21 Guest Editors | New Releases

2017

Philippe Starck Conjures a fog of falsehood


Philippe Starck, The Lightness of Lies, 2017 Starck chose to depict the lightest visible element – an ether or a mist. ‘A civilization based on lies is fragile and condemned,’ explains the designer Design: GBH

303


21 Guest Editors | New Releases William Wegman, Working I and Working II, 1992 These 20 x 24 Polaroids of Wegman’s Weimaraner, Batty, had been in storage since the day they were shot. They were rediscovered last year during an inventory of his work, which led to the forthcoming book, Being Human. They reminded Wegman of his shoot as Wallpaper* Guest Editor, another instance of happy dogs on furniture


2017

William Wegman Uncovers an old dog’s new tricks

305


TERESA DESIGN ROBERTO LAZZERONI

LONDON MILAN SINGAPORE


Architecture

Scene stealer This minimalist Lake Tahoe house makes a splash PHOTOGRAPHY: JOE FLETCHER WRITER: LAURA MAUK

You’d think living across the street from the largest alpine lake in North America would provide all the wonder one could ask for. But when Californian architect Greg Faulkner designed a minimalist house for a Lake Tahoe-adjacent plot in Incline Village, Nevada, he added more awe to the mix. Faulkner had a lot to play of and play with, of course: a glassy, freshwater lake surrounded by the Sierra Nevada mountains and countless towering pines. By incorporating the scene as part of his design, the architect blurred the boundary between the natural landscape and the built environment. When the residents retreat to the interior of their home – predominantly made of glass, plaster and »

THE HOUSE’S FRONT FAÇADE, A FRAMEWORK OF STEEL AND GLASS, FACES THE SHORES OF LAKE TAHOE IN NEVADA

307


BetteLux Oval Couture Steel can wear anything

Design: Tesseraux+Partner www.bette.de


Architecture

‘We can go snowboarding or take the boat out, then come back, sit in the living room and stare out at the blue sky’ board-formed concrete – and look through the transparent front façade, they see only water, trees and sky. ‘It’s kind of a single-aperture house,’ says the architect, who employed signiicantly smaller windows and practically opaque walls for the structure’s remaining three elevations. ‘The framework of glass and steel faces the light and the lake; the other sides are much more closed.’ On the exterior of the front façade, a low concrete wall that functions as a bench helps to crop the view so street traic and lakeshore activity are obscured. The clients, a couple and their two children, wanted to be able to engage with the landscape, but they also wanted privacy. ‘We can go snowboarding or rock climbing or take the boat out,’ they say. ‘But then we can come back, sit in the living room and stare out at the bright blue sky and feel like we’re outside.’ An explosion of epic landscape through a house’s front façade is a grand gesture that needs balance. Faulkner relieved the intensity of the design by carving loor-to-ceiling slits out of one of the opaque walls. The slender transparencies appear as splits in the building that cast slivers of sunlight onto the polished black

SUNLIGHT BOUNCING OFF THE LIVING AREA’S HIGHLY POLISHED BLACK CONCRETE FLOORS CREATES A SENSATION OF FLOATING ON WATER, REFLECTING THE DISTANT LANDSCAPE VIEWS OF THE GLASSY LAKE BEYOND

concrete loors. ‘The light on that relective looring creates a sensation of being on the water,’ he says. ‘It takes you right back to the lake.’ It’s reminiscent of the work of American artist Gordon Matta-Clark, who studied architecture at Cornell University before creating site-speciic installations that featured building cuts as social commentary. ‘I learned from the way he described the light as swathes and beams that maintain and hold the house’s energy and track the way it changes from morning to evening,’ Faulkner explains. The sunlight’s interaction with the concrete loors creates a loating sensation, but Faulkner wanted the house to feel anchored to its sloping site. ‘The clients collect cars and requested a large garage,’ says the architect, who created a six-car space that became the house’s ground form. The couple’s collection includes a Porsche 918 Spyder and a Volkswagen Thing. ‘We love parking the two next to each other and studying the lines that wrap around their forms,’ say the clients. The garage’s board-formed concrete exterior climbs from street level to the entrance, where it punctures glass, then continues inside to form an entry wall »

309


Architecture and a ire surround in the living room. ‘The boardformed concrete was sandblasted to raise the grain so it picks up the texture of the tree trunks on the property.’ The weathered rock on the site also informed the dark grey colour of the exterior plaster, and the heavy snow loads that fall in winter dictated the need for steel ceiling beams that contrast with a bright-hued maple soit and ceiling. Faulkner created more contrast for the exterior’s rear façade. ‘There is a wood skin on the section of the house that holds some of the sleeping areas and cantilevers over the outdoor bar and dining area,’ he says. ‘That volume wanted to go lighter than the plaster because it’s elevated. It’s nice to tweak something to activate the eye. If the entire rear mass was plaster, there would be no visual interest.’ The interior features another projection – a glass-andsteel bridge that is suspended above the kitchen area. ‘It accesses the bedrooms, but it became this amazing viewport that faces the aperture and looks to the lake,’ Faulkner says. ‘The railing is glass, but the loor of the bridge is one-inch-thick plate steel; the metal has a softness that relates to the liquid character of the loor.’ Faulkner designs with the idea of experience foremost in his mind, letting the surroundings and the site dictate what a building should be. In the case of a property nestled into a hillside overlooking Lake Tahoe, he discovered that the efect of sunlight on the surface of the water is a natural material that can be harnessed as part of a house. ‘When focused, light can be transcendent,’ the architect says. Edges, joints, alignments and glazing patterns are important. But space can also be formed with ephemeral elements or the absence of elements. The living room in this house is buttressed with acoustic plaster. That silence is a big part of the living experience.’ faulknerarchitects.com

ABOVE, A GLASS-AND-STEEL BRIDGE SUSPENDED ABOVE THE KITCHEN AREA LEADS TO THE BEDROOMS RIGHT, A LARGE GARAGE WAS REQUESTED FOR THE CLIENTS’ COLLECTION OF CARS

310


www.ton.eu

alba collection designed by Alexander Gufler IT/AT


Design MINIMALUX’S TAMARA CASPERSZ, CASPER VISSERS AND MARK HOLMES AT THE BRAND’S NEW HQ IN HACKNEY, LONDON ‘O’ MIRROR, FROM £395, BY MINIMALUX

Quiet storm The co-founder of design’s most baroque brand is supercharging Minimalux’s more discreet charms

PHOTOGRAPHY: GABBY LAURENT WRITER: ROSA BERTOLI

In March this year, Dutch design entrepreneur Casper Vissers, who co-founded Moooi with Marcel Wanders in 2001, made a substantial investment in British brand Minimalux. Having left Moooi in 2015 to pursue other design projects, Vissers was keen to help develop an existing design brand. It’s a radical departure: Moooi, after all, has always been an exercise in unapologetic maximalism, while Minimalux has built a reputation designing beautifully crafted pared-down products. ‘The desire is to ofer something of substance that transcends trends yet »

313


Design years, not because the product technically fails, but because these items are not strong enough to comply with the next trend.’ Minimalux, says Vissers, is a brand with great potential thanks to its clear focus on the intrinsic value of objects. ‘The ability to know which design can attract attention in the long term fascinates me,’ says Vissers, who has also been working with his wife Suzy on the 2018 launch of his own company – ‘a design brand with a classic touch’, as he describes it. Vissers’ investment has allowed Minimalux to dramatically increase its output, with a piece launched every few weeks throughout the year. So far, in 2017, it has presented the ‘A’ and ‘O’ candleholders, with conical and spherical silhouettes reminiscent of their namesake characters, and the ‘Rota’ light, featuring a simple cylinder illuminating a series of circular discs. The latest product to launch sets a new direction for the brand, adding a little humour while sticking to the minimalist mission. ‘We looked at the idea of developing a watch, but saw the market as a little saturated,’ explains Holmes. People now tell the time from a smartphone screen. ‘There’s a whole generation who don’t even wear a watch,’ he points out. With that in mind, they created an accessory with a similar aesthetic to a wristwatch but without the time: ‘Something beautiful and familiar to adorn the wrist, but with a diferent function.’ It features a nude leather strap and a mirror in lieu of the watch face – Holmes and Caspersz pondered the idea of a watch versus the verb ‘to watch’ one’s relection, and called it ‘Timeless’. The brand has also stepped it up a gear with a move to a new HQ in east London, and there will be a new retail space in the Heatherwick Studio-designed Coal Drops Yard development in London’s King’s Cross. Set to open in 2018, it will also house Vissers’ in-the-works brand. When asked what has been the most important moment in the Minimalux history, Holmes is quick to answer: ‘The present moment is the most important. From our very beginning we have been quietly preparing for this moment.’ minimalux.com

‘From our very beginning we have been quietly preparing for this moment’ remains relevant, progressive and desirable,’ says Mark Holmes, who co-founded the company in 2009 (see W*120) with partner Tamara Caspersz (the pair were also part of the founding team of Established & Sons). ‘Our formula is to create designs with the most basic forms from premium, lasting materials which, if nurtured over time, can be made eternal,’ she adds. The brand’s collection is now divided between objects for the home (such as candleholders and clocks) and for the person (pens, jewellery, pill boxes and pocket mirrors). ‘We’ve learnt to remain clear in our message,’ says Holmes. ‘We want to focus on doing just a few things, with 100 per cent commitment.’ And with Vissers’ input, the company’s steady progress has been supercharged. ‘I believe in the people and the concept,’ explains Vissers. ‘We are overloaded with objects, which are often only temporarily goodlooking. Most items will have disappeared within ive

314

ABOVE, ‘TIMELESS’ WRIST ACCESSORY, FROM £175; RIGHT, ‘FRAME’ LAMP, £295, BOTH BY MINIMALUX


zucchettidesign.it


Art MIQUEL BARCELÓ WITH HIS 14 ALUMETTES (14 MATCHES), SHOWN TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME IN THE COURTYARD OF THE ESCUELAS MENORES IN SALAMANCA

Strike force Mallorcan artist Miquel Barceló goes for the burn in Salamanca

Miquel Barceló hasn’t eaten octopus or squid for four years. ‘I would rather eat cat,’ he declares. The Spanish artist has developed an ainity with the marine animals, meeting them in the Balearic Sea on his frequent dives (‘I feed them a little,’ he says with a twinkle) and bringing them into his artistic output. Here’s one in an exuberant drawing, escaping from the inside of a towering ceramic pot with sides that appear to have been turned into soft, folding textile by the lailing of the cephalopod’s tentacles. Here’s another, swimming across a deep blue painting. Barceló even says he has injected himself with squid ink for a project, yet to reach fruition,

PHOTOGRAPHY: GREGORI CIVERA WRITER: CAROLINE ROUX

that investigates how these creatures communicate through their skin. Barceló grew up in Mallorca and the lora and fauna of island life sufuse his work, 80 pieces of which are currently on show in Salamanca. The city in western Spain – a dazzling jigsaw of perfect Spanish Renaissance buildings in honey-coloured sandstone, replete with exuberant decorative lourishes – is celebrating the 800th anniversary of its famous university and asked Barceló to help it do so. Though perhaps not a household name in the UK or even the US, the artist is a much admired and acquired star in continental Europe.  »

317


w w w. m o d u l n o v a . i t


Art

In Salamanca’s Hospedería Fonseca, a student hall of residence with 16th-century origins, the exhibition hall is hung with huge paintings of tomatoes and peppers loating in limpid blue grounds. In the adjoining chapel, fruits, ish, birds and mounds of wound-up wool dot the 6x4m canvas that is Barceló’s monumental interpretation of the Noah’s Ark myth (he worked on it for eight years). On an adjacent wall is a high Renaissance altarpiece by Alonso Berruguete, with igures so bloodied, ecstatic and crazed by fervour that the ark looks like a sane place to be. In the city’s 18th-century Plaza Mayor, a bronze elephant, nearly 8m tall, balances on its trunk in an act of either desperation or glee (Londoners will have seen a partner piece in this year’s Frieze Sculpture Park). ‘I like to occupy the city,’ says Barceló when we retire to the university accommodation he always occupies when in town, all dark wood and deep red textiles, for a glass of wine and a chat. ‘I like to mix my work with history.’ Twenty-six of the watercolour illustrations he made for an edition of Dante’s Divine Comedy between 2001 and 2003 form a showstopping ensemble in the Patio de Escuelas exhibition hall. ‘I’ve always wanted to illustrate Proust’s Le Temps retrouvé, but

top, EL ARCA DE NOÉ (noah’s ark), 2014, BarcelÓ’s interpretation of the BiBlical myth, on display in the hospederÍa fonseca aBove, BarcelÓ’s ceramics on display include PRÉDYNASTIQUE (predynastic), 2016, and RAM (Bouquet), 2016

with people from my own life,’ he says. ‘It would be very cruel.’ A self-portrait on parchment in ink and gold acrylic, made in India in 2013, shows Barceló Brahmalike with three heads. In real life, he looks rather more like Juergen Teller. Now 60, Barceló was already making waves in his early twenties, having arrived in Paris with a neo-expressionist style that he quickly left behind. Since then, his work has moved from the igurative and beyond back to abstract expressionism: visceral bronze sculptures, outsized ceramics, and huge crumpled canvases featuring horses. He’s not so much an autodidact as a sponge. ‘I’ve only spent a week in an art school, but my mother gave me my irst watercolours when I was eight,’ he says. ‘I started trying to copy Manet paintings from books.’ Such was his passion for paint that he tried to apply the watercolours as if they were oils, using up his full complement on day one. ‘I’ve always felt a relationship with the material itself,’ he says. ‘Now I feel it with clay.’ Barceló’s art school seems to have been the somewhat illustrious company he has kept: Cy Twombly in Naples in 1984 (his inluence is everywhere); Antoni Tàpies, whom Barceló visited every time he went to Barcelona;  »

319


Art LEFT, BARCELÓ’S CERAMIC PIECES BENEATH A 16THCENTURY ALTARPIECE BY ALONSO BERRUGUETE IN THE HOSPEDERÍA FONSECA BELOW, LE GRAND ÉCOUTEUR (THE BIG EARPHONE), 2015, IN THE PALACIO DE ANAYA

‘I’ve always wanted to illustrate Proust’s Le Temps retrouvé, but with people from my own life. It would be very cruel’ Javier Mariscal, with whom he took an African road trip (Barceló’s identity for Salamanca’s anniversary celebrations owes more than a little to the celebrated graphic designer’s style). Then there are the women of Mali: the clay pots they make led to his heavy ceramic works. Barceló moved to the West African country in 1987 to escape the toxicity of New York, where he had been living. Of 1980s Manhattan, he says: ‘It was a big party, but one at which people all around me were dying of drugs and HIV.’ He learned a lot from the fakers of Mali, too. ‘It’s easy to copy a Dogon sculpture in wood,’ he says. ‘But to make it like an 18th-century sacriicial piece, you need to add the dried blood, the bat shit, the fake accumulation of time.’ It taught him, he says, to value patina, and he looks around the time-worn room we are in and laughs. Barceló has never thought small. His irst Paris studio was in a deconsecrated church

320

near the Panthéon. His current home and studio in the Marais, acquired in 1991, is a maison particulière with its own generous garden. ‘We have birds singing, in the middle of the city.’ In Mallorca, he tells me, he has a 12th-century stone tower; it’s where he makes the big ceramic pieces. ‘I only have one assistant, who is also the local farmer, and a guy who looks after the kiln, because it’s so specialised.’ (And, one imagines, incredibly huge.) Barceló works for 12 hours a day and friends complain he’s always in the studio. ‘But that’s my privilege as a painter: to spend time alone,’ he says. ‘I need to try and to fail.’ In the delicately scaled-down courtyard of the Escuelas Menores in Salamanca is an installation called 14 Alumettes, a forest of spent matches rendered in bronze, some more than 3m high, all in various stages of curling diminishment. ‘They are the people I’ve known who burned themselves out,’ says Barceló of these near-anthropomorphic

stalagmites, which are skinny yet urgent, a bit like Alberto Giacometti’s men. He is preparing a show in Zurich of another example of extinction. Barceló has made bullighting paintings since the 1990s and designed the poster for the last-ever bullight held in Barcelona in 2011. While the 1990s paintings traced the passage of daylight across the arena, the new ones sugest religious parallels – the blood and sacriice that Berruguete revelled in on his altarpiece are here implied in arenas that glow like the sun. ‘It’s something from the old world that we don’t want any more. It’s about the end of something,’ says Barceló, an artist whose own work is far from being done.  Barcelo’s show, entitled El Arca de Noé, is on in Salamanca until 1 October. Gran Elefant Dret is at the Frieze Sculpture Park, London, until 8 October, frieze.com. El Planeta de los Toros will be showing at Tobias Mueller Modern Art, Zurich, from 13 October to 2 February, muellermodern.com


New black metallized editions

Design to Shape Light

PH 2/1 and PH 3½-2½ Glass Table lamp - Design: Poul Henningsen

www.louispoulsen.com


Design

OCEAN DRIVE Photography: Tom Van Oossanen

Achille Salvagni decks out the ‘Aurora’ superyacht for Rossinavi The world of yacht design is used to high-proile creative collaborations. Aside from the established designers who have been helming superyacht projects for decades, many major architectural studios have also turned their hand to nautical trimmings, no doubt lured by the big speciications, meticulous detailing and generous budgets typical of this demanding industry. While acclaimed practices such as Foster + Partners and Amanda Levete Architects are happy to dabble, other irms have made loating interiors and sleek craft their speciality. One such designer is Achille Salvagni, whose Rome-based studio Salvagni Architetti has garnered a clutch of awards for its work on land and of. Salvagni’s latest creation is a collaboration with the shipbuilder Rossinavi, based in Italy’s Viaregio superyacht hub. Founded as the Rossi shipyard in the 1970s, it became Rossinavi in 2007, turning out

WRITER: JONATHAN BELL

a small leet of hulls every year from 45m and upwards. Rossinavi specialises in aluminium, building highperformance boats with generous internal space and hull openings to bring in light and views. ‘Aurora’ was commissioned by a sport-loving couple who wanted classic transport design – particularly the textures and materials of vintage motor sport – in an impressively scaled package. The naval architect was Arrabito, with exterior design by Fulvio De Simoni. Inside, however, was Salvagni’s realm. His brief was to distill the clients’ tastes into a coherent whole. ‘The owners wanted the design to enhance their dynamic and active lifestyle,’ the designer says, referencing what he describes as the ‘spatial luidity’ of the living areas in the 49m yacht. Inspiration also came from classical sources, including the spaces shaped by the great baroque architect Francesco Borromini. ‘There is a sense of movement that pervades,’ Salvagni says, going on to chronicle the levels of detail that typify a yacht project of this scope and scale. ‘We decided to contrast the noblest materials in every element of its interior, such as limed sycamore walls, dark polished tineo details, brushed natural teak loors, hand-knotted silk carpets, Carrara Statuario marble, gunmetal bronze and custom lighting.’ Armies of craftsmen and women descend on Rossinavi’s shipyard, not just to build the hull but also to weave in hundreds of miles of wiring, elaborate materials and inishes, and – most important of all for a yacht – ixtures and ittings that have tolerances more akin to the auto industry than the architectural world.  »

WITH LINES INSPIRED BY CLASSIC CARS, THE 49M ‘AURORA’ HAS AN EXTENDABLE REAR ‘BEACH CLUB’ AND A SECLUDED PRIVATE DINING SPACE ON THE MAIN SUN DECK

323


Design LEFT AND BELOW, THE INTERIORS FEATURE LIMED SYCAMORE WALLS WITH TINEO DETAILS AND GUNMETAL BRONZE ACCENTS

A modern yacht is the equivalent of the grand country seat of centuries past

In many respects, a modern yacht is the equivalent of the grand country seat of centuries past, a blank slate upon which the cultural obsessions of the age can be explored through outstanding craftsmanship. ‘These clients are typically international, with multiple homes, are established collectors and have much more knowledge about design. They are sophisticated, with a taste level to match,’ Salvagni says. To make a modern yacht a coherent showcase of form and content requires exceptional curatorial skills, not just the ability to give it shape and get the most from materials. The design and construction of ‘Aurora’ was a threeyear process, and the boat’s owners are now taking in a Mediterranean summer before heading of to winter in the Caribbean. No country estate ever had such lexibility – nor would it have had a mechanically extending rear ‘beach club’, designed to sit lush with the water for easy bathing access. Despite the barrage of tech on display – including a recessed gym, a sauna, a cinema and a wine cellar – Salvagni is keen to stress the importance of having a wood-lined interior, both as a nod to traditional yacht design and to display the craftsmanship that might otherwise be hidden under modern materials. Those luid lines posed a challenge for the woodwork and the marble, but time and energy were lavished on this project until it was just right. Understandably, the shipyard itself relished such attention to detail. ‘Achille has a high proile not only for his vision but also because of his way of designing everything,’ says Federico Rossi, Rossinavi’s COO. ‘The design is still functional and everything is in harmony with our full custom-building philosophy.’ Salvagni’s hard work has taken to the waves in a remarkable demonstration of coherence and style.  salvagniarchitetti.net; rossinavi.it

324

Photograpahy: Paolo Petrignani

BOTTOM, THE ‘BEACH CLUB’, WITH ACCESS TO THE SWIMMING PLATFORM


Bear hug We’ll go to extremes for our latest squeeze PHOTOGRAPHY: JEAN-PACÔME DEDIEU WRITER: ROSA BERTOLI

We’ve discovered a new bear necessity. Called upon by Tuscan furniture company Edra to create a striking piece to celebrate its 30th anniversary, Italian designer Francesco Binfarè, a long-term collaborator of the brand, chose to address both comfort and climate change. His ‘Pack’ sofa references a polar bear lying astride an ice loe and draws attention to the environmental plight of the Arctic.

Available in white and black versions (representing day and night), the sofa features a roomy seat with a backrest that resembles a lifesized polar bear. The seat is upholstered in a specially developed fabric that mimics icy textures, while fake fur covers the bear. We can’t think of a cooler thing to snugle up to this autumn. ∂ ‘Pack’ sofa, from €18,000, by Francesco Binfarè, for Edra, edra.com


Design THE ‘PACK’ SOFA, WHICH PICKED UP A BEST PRODUCT AWARD AT THIS YEAR’S SALONE DEL MOBILE, FEATURES A FABRIC INSPIRED BY THE TEXTURE OF ICE


GARDEN LAYERS by Patricia Urquiola

www.gan-rugs.com

is a brand of


Fashion MOMA CURATOR PAOLA ANTONELLI AND DESIGNER RYOHEI KAWANISHI WITH HIS OVERSIZED TAKE ON THE GUAYABERA SHIRT, IN MID-PRODUCTION WHEN THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN

STYLE ICONS In its irst foray into fashion for 73 years, MoMA honours world-changing wardrobe PHOTOGRAPHY: DANIEL DORSA WRITER: PEI-RU KEH

In 1944, the Museum of Modern Art in New York staged its irst fashion exhibition, ‘Are Clothes Modern?’. Put together by architect and curator Bernard Rudofsky, the show explored attitudes towards clothes at a time when soon-to-be-outmoded traditions still prevailed, from superluous pockets and buttons to rigid female silhouettes. Despite its forward-thinking provocations, MoMA has not devoted another exhibition to the ield of fashion since. Until now, that is. This month, the museum presents ‘Items: Is Fashion Modern?’, a comprehensive exploration of fashion design that considers

the efects speciic garments and accessories have had on society. Curated by Paola Antonelli, MoMA’s senior curator in the department of architecture and design, and curatorial assistant Michelle Millar Fisher, the show brings together 111 iconic fashion typologies from the last century that have had a universal and lasting impact. ‘When I started at MoMA 23 years ago, I noticed that there was no fashion and I started asking around why,’ says Antonelli. ‘I got many explanations about the fact that modern design is timelessness and fashion is ephemeral, but it didn’t make too much  »

329


Fashion

‘The 1944 exhibition was not a fashion show – it really thought about garments in a critical way’ sense to me. So I began keeping a running list that I called “garments that changed the world”.’ About three years ago, MoMA director Glenn Lowry sugested Antonelli make a show out of that list. ‘Items’ brings together sartorial archetypes such as the biker jacket, the white T-shirt and the bikini. Some are represented by multiple examples to give a sense of evolution: there are little black dresses by Dior, Versace and Rick Owens, and suits by Armani, Carlo Brandelli and Thom Browne. Added to these are contemporary icons such as Adidas’ Superstar trainers, Levi’s 501 jeans and Yves Saint Laurent’s Le Smoking tuxedo, all chosen for their revolutionary impact. Antonelli’s anthropological approach considers each item’s cultural, technological, economic, political and aesthetic relevance. ‘We were inspired by the 1944 exhibition,’ Antonelli says. ‘That was not a fashion show – it really thought about garments in a critical way. What is interesting about design is the way it interacts with the world, not just the beauty of the object taken out of context.’ MoMA’s new show prompts the public to form their own views in the size, image and gender debates that now loom over fashion.

330

TOP, INSPIRATION FOR KAWANISHI’S POLITICALLY CHARGED GUAYABERA SHIRT. THE YELLOW SHIRT IS A VINTAGE EXAMPLE USED AS GUIDANCE FOR HIS DESIGN ABOVE, A DETAIL OF THE HANDWOVEN WOOL PANELS THAT ADORN KAWANISHI’S FINAL PIECE

But the design process is put back in the spotlight with 19 specially commissioned prototypes that rif on their predecessors, sugesting how each item could evolve. Central Saint Martins alumnus Ryohei Kawanishi has created one such piece. The New York-based designer’s take on the guayabera shirt – a Central American and Caribbean staple that has become a symbol of immigration in the US – is not only oversized, but also festooned with politically charged embroideries arranged in patterns inspired by Afghan war rugs, Vietnam War souvenir jackets and Cuban media. ‘The guayabera shirt is said to be Cuban, but as a stereotype image, I’ve seen it a lot in American war movies,’ says Kawanishi. ‘I tried to ind a way to approach the political scene and create a dialogue with those issues.’ The piece is an example of MoMA’s intention to spark a deeper understanding of ordinary items we see every day. ‘It’s really a design show in which objects give you a chance to not only think about aesthetics, style, politics and anthropology, but also just the way we live,’ Antonelli says.  ‘Items: Is Fashion Modern?’ is at MoMA from 1 October 2017 to 28 January 2018, moma.org


© 2017 Antolini Luigi. All Rights reserved.

HAUTE NATURE

Corteccia & Bianco Lasa I Covelano “Vena Oro” (Soft Quartzite & Marble)

Antolini believes in the power of what is real. Mother Nature’s tremendous force distilled into astonishing creations. Designed by nature, perfected in Italy. antolini.com

DESIGN ALESSANDRO LA SPADA


Photo: Max Zambelli — AD: Ludovica+Roberto Palomba

www.tubesradiatori.com

ORIGAMI RADIATOR DESIGN ALBERTO MEDA

PLUG and PLAY


W* Composed

LONDON ROAD FIRE STATION

MANCHESTER

1. FLOOR LIGHT

‘La Lampe’ floor light, by Ida Linea Hildebrand, for Friends & Founders 2. MIRROR

2

‘Ren’ wall mirror, by Neri & Hu, for Poltrona Frau 3. CUSHIONS

‘Eclectic’ cushions, by Hay 4. SOFA

‘Mayor’ sofa, by Arne Jacobsen and Flemming Lassen, for &Tradition 5. PLATE AND VASES

‘Edge Ø35’ brass plate, by Stilleben, for Skagerak; ‘Dancing Handles’ vases, by Jeanne Bonnefoy-Mercuriali, for TH Manufacture

3

4

1 8

6. COFFEE TABLE

‘Rodan’ coffee table, by Russell Pinch, for Pinch 7. SIDE TABLE

‘Pon 1280’ side table, by Jasper Morrison, for Fredericia

5

8. VASES

‘Bonbon’ mini vases, by Monica Förster, for Skultuna; ‘Vases 2’ vase, by Milia Seyppel, for Karakter

6

7

9

9. RUG

‘Herringbone Natural JT900’ rug, by Crucial Trading

Civil service As plans for the sensitive redevelopment of an Edwardian ire station in Manchester swing into action, the Wallpaper* Composed team dreams up a few dazzling concepts for this architectural icon PHOTOGRAPHY: TOBIAS HARVEY INTERIORS: AMY HEFFERNAN WRITER: SIMON MILLS

LEFT, THE BUILDING CURRENTLY UNDER DEVELOPMENT ORIGINALLY CONTAINED A FIRE STATION, A POLICE STATION, A BANK, THE CORONER’S COURT, AND WORKERS’ FLATS, ARRANGED AROUND AN INNER COURTYARD ABOVE, THE WALLPAPER* COMPOSED TEAM WERE ASKED TO BREATHE NEW LIFE INTO THE ROOMS AROUND THE FORMER CORONER’S COURT. THIS LIVING ROOM CONCEPT SHOWS THE POTENTIAL OF THE HIGH-CEILINGED SPACES

333


W* Composed LEFT, EXPLORING THE IDEA OF TURNING THE CORONER’S COURT INTO A MEMBERS’ CLUB OR EVENTS SPACE, THE TEAM INTRODUCED THIS DRINKS CABINET BY PINCH DESIGN TO THE BALCONY OVERLOOKING THE COURTROOM BELOW, THE LEFT-HAND DOORS IN THIS LOBBY LEAD TO A STAIRWELL AND THEN THE STREET, WHILE THE DOORS ON THE RIGHT OPEN ONTO THE BALCONY

3

4

2

5

6

1. DRINKS CABINET

‘Frans’ drinks cabinet, by Russell Pinch, for Pinch 2. GLASSWARE

‘Otis’ champagne flutes, cocktail glasses and tumblers, all by Monika Lubkowska-Jonas, for LSA International 3. COCKTAIL SHAKER

1

‘Plum’ cocktail shaker, by Tom Dixon 4. GIN

Raspberry-infused gin, by Manchester Gin 5. VODKA

Vodka, by Konik’s Tail 6. BOURBON

Bourbon, by Kings County Distillery

1. STEP STOOL

‘Step Mini’ step stool, by Karl Malmvall, for Design House Stockholm 2. UMBRELLA STAND

‘Hub’ umbrella stand, by Jordan Murphy, for Umbra 3. TABLE

‘Trio’ console table, by Neri & Hu, for De La Espada 4. CANDLEHOLDER

4

Earthenware candleholder, by Cecilie Manz, for Republic of Fritz Hansen 5. MAGAZINE RACK

1

2

3 5

334

‘Koppa’ magazine rack, by Tuuli Burman & Tuttu Sillanpää, for Verso Design

Back in 1899, after winning a national competition, Messrs Woodhouse, Willoughby and Langham set to work on a landmark ire station building on London Road, Manchester. The revered architects based their design for the multi-use structure on sketches drawn by the chief ire oicer, George William Parker, on his shirt cuf. It was equipped with air conditioning and electric alarms, and was capable of accommodating the motorised ire engines that were to replace the old horse-drawn units. After its completion in 1906, the red brick and Burmantofts terracotta structure became a bona ide Mancunian icon. This baroque cathedral to civic duty housed a seven-bay ire station, a police station, a bank, a coroner’s court, workers’ accommodation and a gas-meter testing station. Eighty years later, the Greater Manchester ire department and the police station were relocated, and the magniicent Grade II-listed building was left vacant. A 30-year period of dereliction, decay and uncertainty followed. Various grand schemes to convert it into a hotel, a music venue and a museum all failed. In 2001, in a state of steep decline, the London Road ire station was placed on English Heritage’s Buildings and Structures at Risk register. »


Enjoy your wellness experience Enjoy your wellness experience

Recline Personal Designed by Antonio Citterio

PERSONAL LINE heralds the day of a more personal and connected wellness experience thanks to the new tablet-like UNITY™ console. RECLINE PERSONAL, the new generation of cycling. Step into the future, visit www.technogym.com/personal or call +39 0547 650111.


W* Composed 1. LIGHTS

4. LETTER TRAY

‘Caché’ table lights, by Aurélien Barbry, for Le Klint

‘Nomad’ letter tray and pen holder, both by VE2, for Skagerak

2. TABLE

5. CHAIRS

‘Planks’ table, by Max Lamb, for Benchmark

‘Uncino’ chairs, by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, for Mattiazzi

3. POTS

‘Edge Ø18’ pot and ‘Edge Ø35’ pot, both by Stilleben, for Skagerak

1

2 3

Too important to demolish and too expensive to redevelop, its future looked bleak. Enter Mike Ingall, founder and CEO of Allied London. With the redevelopment of landmark buildings front and centre on his CV (most notably London’s brutalist Brunswick Centre, designed by Patrick Hodgkinson), Ingall set to work on his own grand plan for London Road. The reimagined building will combine 21st-century living and working arrangements with a boutique hotel, ‘all underpinned by carefully-curated event, leisure and cultural spaces that will bring a new dynamic to the city’. Protection and preservation are at the heart of Allied London’s proposal. The integrity, fabric and layout of the original design will be regarded as inspirational rather than troublesome. Fixtures and ittings such as oak doors, iremen’s poles, old light switches and Shaker-style coat pegs will be made good. Ripped-out ireplaces will be reinstalled, layers of vintage wallpaper in the living quarters will be  »

4

5

TOP RIGHT, THE WALLPAPER* COMPOSED TEAM’S CONCEPT FOR A SHARED WORKSPACE ABOVE, THE LAUNDRY ROOM’S ORIGINAL DRYING SYSTEM RIGHT, THE SEVEN-BAY FIRE STATION WAS DESIGNED FOR THE MOTORISED FIRE ENGINES THAT WERE REPLACING HORSE-DRAWN UNITS

337


W* composed

1

2 3

4

1. lighT

4. chaiRs

‘Ultralight’ floor light, by maciej Kossowski, for Ultralight

‘gray 24’ chairs, by paola Navone, for gervasoni

2. oil lamp

‘patina’ oil lamp, by Broberg & Ridderstråle, for Klong

5. siDe TaBle

‘pon 1280’ side table, by Jasper morrison, for Fredericia

3. glasses

‘Tank’ lowball glasses, by Tom Dixon

5

framed in situ as artworks. The decayed will be restored and replaced, the distressed made good and adapted. Earlier this year, Allied London’s plans were approved by Manchester City Council. After three decades, London Road is ‘action stations’ once more. It was the ire station’s courtyard that most inspired Ingall. Working with architects Levitt Bernstein, he will oversee the installation of a glass box at ground level and a major excavation that will unlock the

above left, the team complemented the drinks cabinet on the balcony with this informal set-up above right, looking down from the balcony over the courtroom. wallpaper* composed commissioned the custom-made cushions left, the view across the bar in the building’s original club room

338

potential of the building’s vast basement as a public events space. ‘We hope it will function rather like Wilton’s Music Hall in London, morphing between uses and creating a hub of activity,’ Ingall says. To help envision the possibilities for the development’s interiors, Ingall approached the Wallpaper* Composed team, led by interiors director Amy Hefernan, and London-based interior architecture practice Amos and Amos, with a brief to create a concept for contemporary live/work spaces within the rooms originally given over to the coroner’s court. Ingall has asked the Zetter Group to run the ive-storey boutique hotel, while the complex will also ofer restaurants, bars, interactive art spaces, cofee shops, lower stalls, a cinema and a spa. It sounds like a lot of work (completion is set for summer 2019), but Ingall is keen to play down the scale of the redevelopment and instead talk up the ire station’s gentle renovation. ‘It would be impossible to build something to the original standard of London Road today,’ he says. ‘And all things considered, the building is in a pretty good state. We don’t actually need to do a lot… and we don’t really want to either.’ The notion of careful intervention rather than major reconstruction is key in a project like this, Ingall explains. ‘It’s less about what you are adding, but [more about] how you are adding and how little you can take away. Anyone can develop a new building. But few can make an old building work again, make it sustainable… make it live again.’  londonroadmcr.com


SINGAPORE

IN FULL BLOOM The city-state’s blossoming creative economy

R

EVEALED


Editor Daven Wu Art Director Aneel Kalsi Producer Minna Vauhkonen Editor-in-Chief Tony Chambers Publisher Malcolm Young Global Partnerships Director Sarah Martin

EDITOR’S LETTER In 2011, Wallpaper* lew into Singapore for a longoverdue and in-depth look at the country’s burgeoning creative scene. As we documented in the subsequent Singapore Revealed (W*146) we found plenty to admire – in particular, the young cohort of designers, chefs and architects who were building on the pioneering works of the previous generation, and who were pushing into new frontiers of space, taste and silhouette. Six years on, it seemed timely to call in once more on Singapore for a fresh look at how this island-state has held up in the face of many global challenges. We discovered that no one has been resting on their

02

laurels. Singapore Art Week (January), Singapore Design Week (March) and the Singapore Biennale (October-February) are now key events on the calendar. The island’s creatives, meanwhile, are incorporating issues of ecology, eldercare, education and public housing into their work. They are even breaking new ground in construction techniques. Most intriguingly, from coast to coast, the buzzword we kept coming up against was ‘innovation’ – not for its own sake, but rather in terms of business and design. One feeds the other, but it’s impossible to unravel what drives what. Channelling our customary zeitgeist, earlier this year Wallpaper* partnered with DesignSingapore Council, the country’s national agency for design, to stage the inaugural Wallpaper* Handmade Classics

Photography: Phil Dunlop


Singapore Revealed

Cover photography: Phil Dunlop Fashion: Karen Kwa Model: Dianna L at Nu Models Make-up: Peter Khor Dress, $229, by Stolen Stolen, stolenstolen.com. Jumper, price on request; trousers, S$145, both by Rye, r-y-e.co. Shoes, S$50, by Charles & Keith, charleskeith.com. ‘Constellation’ bench, price on request, by Nathan Yong, nathanyongdesign.com

From left to right, Duo by Büro Ole Scheeren; The Gateway by IM Pei; Suntec City by Tsao & McKown

exhibition, a showcase of original, one-of pieces and design collaborations commissioned by us and created by international talents. That collection was recently refreshed with new pieces shipped in straight from this year’s Salone del Mobile in Milan. If it’s not already clear, these are interesting times. And if it often seems that we’re all just lurching from one crisis to another, it’s even more important to remember the role that good design and architecture can play in ordering chaos, in synthesising conlicting business and societal demands, in creating beauty, or even in raising the spirits. Remarkably for a country that’s barely 700 sq km, it looks as though Singapore is showing us all the way. Daven Wu, Editor

CONTENTS 04 DRIVING FORCE

10 HYPER SPACE

The Singapore designers committed to creating environments that are both liveable and commercially viable

The fearless young talents creating the home of tomorrow

08 FLAVOUR ENHANCERS Two of the city’s top ine-dining chefs elevate some simple ingredients into delectable works of art

12 CITY SLICKERS Singapore’s landscape transformers

14 TALENT SHOW We invite ingenious designers to contribute to our next Handmade show


DRIVING FORCE Tim Kobe, founder and CEO of Eight Inc, introduces the design innovators and creative thinkers empowering modern Singapore Our ability to develop and deploy design solutions is fundamental to our survival. We often admire companies such as Airbnb, Apple and Dyson, and think of such innovators as having the ability to change lives. However, design innovation to create a successful nation is a challenge on another scale. And Singapore is leading the way. Since arriving in Singapore from Silicon Valley seven years ago, I have seen how incredible creative energy and capital have been harnessed to transform the country. It may well be the greatest legacy of the country’s irst prime minister,

04

Lee Kuan Yew, who demonstrated how to approach the challenges that confront a changing world, and how to do so in a commercially efective way. He insisted that a great idea alone is not enough, that innovation happens only when people adopt a vision. For that reason, Singapore’s modern design approach is based on perpetual learning. The solutions that have produced the success of Singapore today may not be applicable tomorrow, which means evolving creativity is a premium. As Dr Beh Swan Gin, chairman of the Design Masterplan Committee (DMC), points out, ‘Design can play a signiicant role in the future economy of Singapore. It is an important driver of innovation and value creation. It can also add vibrancy and richness to our national identity.’ The vision of the DMC is to help Singapore make better use of design to drive innovation and growth. The creatives proiled here are all ine exemplars of this approach. Their work shows a commercial yet humane approach to design in harmony with Singapore’s commitment to creating environments that are both liveable and commercially viable.

Photography: Phil Dunlop, Jason Koxvold Writers: Ricky Yeo, Daven Wu


Singapore Revealed KEN DING

Samsung Electronics Far from being a satellite to its behemoth Seoul HQ, Samsung’s Singapore oice is a bona ide partner in the company’s design force. Leading the charge is Ken Ding, the afable Southeast Asia and Oceania director and head of product innovation. What’s diferent about Samsung’s design process? We design the inal experience around humans. Everyone has diferent requirements, so when you innovate, you can’t take a one-size-its-all approach. This requires us to pay special attention to consumer insights. They are at the heart of our business. What’s Samsung’s global strategy for driving business innovation through design? In everything we do, we are guided by a single design ethos: make it meaningful. samsung.com

SARANTA GATTIE

The Working Capitol The Working Capitol, a 3,066 sq m game-changing co-working space on the edge of Singapore’s Chinatown, was launched by Saranta Gattie in 2015. She has recently opened another, designed by Hassell Studio, which sprawls over 5,110 sq m and 11 loors of a CBD tower, and comes with a café, a gym, an outdoor lap pool, a sky garden, a bar and a members’ lounge. Why do co-working spaces make sense in Singapore? Co-working spaces like ours literally break down walls and make room for people to collaborate and create. This can only lead to better results. How does design inluence the co-working space? You need to take a human-centred approach. With us, the results are apparent. Multinationals are courting start-ups. Conversations are sparking. All this originates from good design. theworkingcapitol.com

MOSHE SAFDIE

Safdie Architects Israeli-born Safdie is best known in Singapore for creating the Marina Bay Sands resort, but all eyes are currently on his Jewel Changi Airport development. What’s the best design advice you’ve been given? Louis Kahn’s quip about asking the brick what it wants to be comes to mind. The metaphor focuses on how the materiality of architecture informs its language. It’s a fundamental lesson for a designer. How does Singapore live up to its designation as Unesco Creative City of Design? Singapore is probably at the forefront, worldwide, of publicly-initiated urban design and ambitious landscaping of the urban environment. This has had a tremendous efect on the lives of its people. Is it really possible to make a business out of innovative design? Yes, if by innovative design you mean a building that responds to its programme and its setting, manifested in its liveability and utility. msafdie.com


SCOTT MAGUIRE

Dyson Barely a decade ago, Dyson set up shop in Singapore to develop and make the world’s irst high-speed, digital electric motor. Since then, its 1,100-strong oice, overseen by global engineering director Scott Maguire, has become a key outpost for the company’s conceptto-production R&D, manufacture of digital motors, supply chain operations and commercial activities. The results, used in all its products, underpin core Dyson hardware and software. What is the remit of Dyson’s Singapore operations? Singapore has a critical role in the development, design and manufacturing of technologies across all our product categories, including our core technology, the Dyson digital motor. Also, more than 300 engineers are now focused on artiicial intelligence, machine learning, robotics, vision systems and luid dynamics to bring hardware, electronics and software together. How does Dyson reconcile the need to innovate with the business of design? Form should always follow function. You can have the most beautiful looking machine, but if it can’t fundamentally perform, it is a gimmick. What makes Dyson’s creative process unique? Our approach is always to solve a problem. We start with how technology can do that. We then build and test prototypes until we have a step-change solution. The form of the machine follows. dyson.com.sg

THAM KHAI MENG

Ogilvy & Mather The Singapore-born, New York-based Tham is co-chairman and worldwide chief creative oicer of advertising giant Ogilvy & Mather. He has long championed ‘pervasive creativity’, in which every Ogilvy stafer, regardless of rank, has a responsibility to be creative. Despite early scepticism, the idea has paid dividends, with the irm regularly sweeping global advertising awards. What’s your take on the business of design? We all know how easily ideas are strangled at birth. The more original the idea, the stranger it appears and the more hostility there will be to greet it. It needs defending ferociously. Great design cannot exist without anyone ighting for it. Singapore was designated Unesco Creative City of Design in 2015. How should Singapore’s creative industry live up to that designation? It needs to take on biger and bolder challenges, use design as a tool to solve business problems, and transform Singapore into a sustainable tropical city. How do you scale urban farming, use more alternative energy, rely less on fossil fuel, cut down on cars and use more bicycles? Singapore has the funds, the ambition and the appetite to answer these questions. What’s the best design you’ve seen in Singapore? For me, it’s the classic shophouse with a shop on the ground loor and residences above. It is an amalgamation of clever, eicient design, and it makes terriic business sense. ogilvy.com

06


Singapore Revealed

PATRICIA URQUIOLA

Studio Urquiola For the Spanish-born, Milan-based designer, fresh perspectives are par for the course, an outlook seen to best efect in her interiors work on the WOHAdesigned Oasia Hotel Downtown in Singapore’s Tanjong Pagar quarter, which she says was inspired by the building’s voids. ‘We transformed them into sky-terraces so the occupants can have a direct experience with the city.’ What is the best advice you have received about developing your design and business skills? Achille Castiglioni taught me to identify ‘the fundamental element’ around which every project revolves. Sometimes you compromise and you lose

the initial sense of what you thought a design was about. The fundamental element keeps you on track. How do you reconcile the need to innovate with the business of design? There are constant functions, but they are evolving continuously. Sometimes the boundaries blend. The way we use a sofa now is not the same as in the past. What surprises you most about the design and architecture of Singapore? It’s in continuous development. I ind this very stimulating. The architecture is imposing, but what impresses me most is the vast greenery in a country where land is so limited. patriciaurquiola.com


An interpretation of Tan’s favourite vegetable: oignon doux des Cévennes

Carabinero prawns with seasonal tomatoes, vintage sherry and Kristal caviar

Table, $900, by Gabriel Tan, gabriel-tan.com. ‘Dough & Piatti’ plates, prototypes, by Studio Juju, studio-juju.com. Chopsticks, S$22, by Marusan Shikki; plate, S$90 for set of three, by Kihara; ‘Mamezara’ sauce dish, S$12, by Lee Xinli, all from Supermama, supermamastore.com

Botanica, a selection of botanicals in a variety of preparations

JASON TAN

08

Diners go to Tan’s Corner House as much for the setting, a colonial manse in the Singapore Botanic Gardens, as for his pan-Singaporean gastrobotanica menu, with Tan sending out plates of Carabinero prawns, Australian Wagyu beef and New Zealand blue cod strewn with extravagantly hued tubers, vines, fungi and lowers. cornerhouse.com.sg


MALCOLM LEE Lee marries modern culinary techniques with vivid Peranakan lavours and heritage recipes learnt at his mother’s knee. His Candlenut outpost in Dempsey is a temple to nostalgic comfort food, dressed up for a cashed-up generation of millennials who appreciate both the experience and the experiments. comodempsey.sg

Rangers Valley Wagyu beef rib rendang, with serunding and turmeric leaf

Buah keluak of braised local chicken with Peranakan signature black nut sambal

Homemade kueh pie tee shell with salmon tartare, pickled shallot, and laksa leaf pesto

Blue swimmer crab curry with turmeric, galangal and kaffir lime leaf

Singapore Revealed

‘Monolith’ table, S$675, by Melvin Ong, for Desinere, desinere. com.sg. Plates, from S$50, by Supermama, supermamastore.com. Chopsticks; ‘Dough & Piatti’ tray, both as before. ‘Knead’ dish, S$1,380 for set of three, by Chin Guo Hong, for d.lab, dlab.com.sg

FLAVOUR ENHANCERS Classic Singaporean fare reinterpreted by two of the city-state’s brightest chefs Photography: Phil Dunlop Interiors: Maria Sobrino Writer: Daven Wu


Celebrating the city-state’s burgeoning creative economy, DesignSingapore Council’s Innovation by Design conference, held earlier this year, attracted a diverse line-up of designers, makers, thinkers and business mavericks from all over the world. ‘You only need to look at the skyline to see that Singapore has the capacity to support design in a substantial way, allowing some extraordinary creativity to become reality,’ says designer Beatrix Ong, consultant on the Atlas Bar in Parkview Square. Ong describes Singapore as ‘a unique melting pot of Southeast Asian cultures with a global aesthetic’. It’s the juxtaposition of tradition and technology, an inlux of fearless young talent and ‘a hyper-intersection of culture’, as Ernesto Quinteros, chief design oicer of Johnson & Johnson, terms it, that makes contemporary Singapore so vibrant. Adds Mauro Porcini,

10

chief design oicer at PepsiCo, ‘It’s like entering a parallel dimension, totally projected into the future, conceived and produced by the imagination, the spirit of innovation and the creativity of its people. In the streets of Singapore, nature dances with architecture, creating jazz for your eyes, food for your mind, and inspiration for your soul.’ ‘As with the Netherlands, Singapore is built on artiicial land,’ says the Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde, founder of social design lab Studio Roosegaarde. ‘Creativity and technology is what made us survive and evolve. The future of Singapore’s design will not be another chair but a hybrid of nature and technology to create our home of tomorrow.’ ‘Singapore,’ concludes Quinteros, ‘is uniquely positioned to become the hybrid-vigour epicentre of this century.’

Our group of designers were photographed at the National Gallery Singapore, designed by Studio Milou

BEATRIX ONG

LOW CHEAW HWEI

PATRICK CHIA

ERNESTO QUINTEROS

Luxury fashion accessories designer

Head of design, Philips ASEAN Paciic

Director, Design Incubation Centre

Chief design oicer, Johnson & Johnson


Singapore Revealed

HYPER SPACE Singapore’s burgeoning design scene, and the creatives drawn to its lame Photography: Jovian Lim Writer: Simon Mills

MAURO PORCINI

CHELSIA LAU

ANDRÉ FU

DAAN ROOSEGAARDE

Chief design oicer, PepsiCo

Chief designer, Ford Motor Co

Architect, founder of AFSO

Artist, founder of Studio Roosegaarde


CITY SLICKERS The astute architects and sharp minds rethinking Singapore as a capital place to live Illustrator: Adam Simpson Writers: Daven Wu, Ricky Yeo, Whang Yee Ling

A casual scan of Singapore’s skyline reveals an intriguing mix of old and new. Old in the form of the shophouses of Chinatown and the East Coast, and the midcentury black and white bungalows that dot the outskirts of Orchard and Alexandra Roads. New in the form of an astonishing haul of modern classics by the likes of Zaha Hadid, Norman Foster, IM Pei, Richard Meier and Thomas Heatherwick. Still more interesting, however, are the projects that are not just adding to a new skyline, but which are also addressing the questions and dilemmas of

millennial urban planning. How, for instance, can architecture be efectively retooled to address an ageing population or the educational needs of the very young? How can nature be integrated into the urban landscape in a realistic way that doesn’t become a sci-i parody? How does one create a building that truly meets the needs of its occupants? Singapore doesn’t pretend to have all the answers, but as you’ll see from the disparate projects featured here, this little island state is leading the way with both ingenuity and chutzpah.

LORONG 24A SHOPHOUSE SERIES Seven architects gutted and redeined eight terraced houses built in the 1920s in Geylang. In the hands of less optimistic architects, the buildings might have gone the way of the lurid KTV pubs and banal oices that bedevil architecture of this kind across Singapore. Instead, the architects, among them HYLA and Zarch Collaboratives, nudged conservation directives to the limit, dramatising the interiors with unexpected spatial experiences. thelor24ashophouseseries.com

SKYTERRACE@DAWSON In response to a government call-out for a housing prototype that also incorporated the needs of an ageing population, architects SCDA created interlocking modules that allow generations of the same family to live together while creating structural boundaries for privacy. SkyTerrace is just one component of a larger community goal of promoting cross-generational interactions, such as positioning childcare facilities close to eldercare centres. scdaarchitects.com

12


Singapore Revealed OUR TAMPINES HUB Our Tampines Hub is proof that community engagement can be more than mere rhetoric. Even before the irst line was drawn, DP Architects held roadshows and block parties, and harnessed social media to gauge the views of Tampines’ residents. The result is an airy structure, designed by residents for residents, with sports, cultural and lifestyle facilities, rooftop garden terraces, a solar roof and food waste recycling technologies. dpa.com.sg

MANDAI NATURE PRECINCT Mandai, in northern Singapore, is currently being transformed into a nature and wildlife destination, and this project looks set to be a new urban model for greening a metropolis while carefully considering environmental and conservation issues. For project architects RSP Architects Planners & Engineers, the challenge has been ‘to minimise environmental impact within the development site while creating meaningful and memorable experiences for visitors.’ mandai.com

CROWNE PLAZA CHANGI EXTENSION The extension of the Crowne Plaza Hotel at Changi Airport, designed by architects WOHA, is, in terms of construction technology, a bona ide gamechanger. The 243 new rooms, including walls, loors, door handles, bathroom tiles, carpets, sinks and bathtubs, were assembled of-site in a Shanghai factory, shipped to Singapore, then slotted into place on-site. If the savings in time and cost aren’t suiciently impressive (50 per cent reduction in manpower and 67 per cent in construction time), then the implications for the construction industry at large certainly are. woha.net

LIEN FOUNDATION Founded in 1980, the Lien Foundation works with architects and designers to reimagine education facilities and eldercare homes. For example, the foundation bankrolled Lekker Architects’ Caterpillar’s Cove, a learning lab that eschews classrooms so as to literally free its students from structural constraints. Children have also been invited to contribute ideas for their dream playground, which will be built at a kindergarten later this year. lienfoundation.org


TALENT SHOW Have you got what it takes to participate in next year’s Wallpaper* Handmade exhibition? Photography: James John Jetel, Phil Dunlop Writer: Simon Mills

Back in March, DesignSingapore Council announced a joint partnership to host the Brainstorm Design conference in Singapore in 2018 and 2019. Supported by Singapore’s Economic Development Board, the new, annual event will comprise a two-day conference bringing together global thought leaders in design and business to share strategies for design innovation. The launch also marked the Singapore debut of the Wallpaper* Handmade exhibition at the Gillman Barracks. Showcasing original pieces and unique design collaborations, commissioned by Wallpaper* and created by internationally renowned talents, it was a landmark event for the city-state’s design scene, and it led to a second show, Wallpaper* Handmade On Tour 2017 in Singapore, held in partnership with DesignSingapore Council, which runs until 31 October. Handmade Singapore has also entered a third stage;

14

Wallpaper* Handmade has invited Singapore designers to contribute to its 2018 exhibition. The theme is Wellness and Wonder, and we are looking for designers to create pieces that take you on the journey towards a better you: objects that exercise the cerebellum and replenish the body, jet-wash the life force and restore the innate harmony of the individual. All qualiied Singapore citizens and permanent residents – design, architecture and fashion creatives who have graduated in the last ive years – are invited to submit a proposal. ‘This is an exceptional opportunity for Singapore talents to demonstrate their creativity and innovation, says Agnes Kwek, DesignSingapore Council’s executive director. ‘The exposure will be far-reaching for Singapore designers, as well as for the Singapore brand.’ The closing date for entries is 30 September 2017. For details, see wallpaper.com/w-bespoke/singapore-callout


Singapore Revealed

Wallpaper’s Handmade On Tour exhibition featured original pieces, including ’The Portal’, by Snøhetta, Erik Jørgensen Møbelfabrik and Everything Elevated, and ’Solteira’ bench by Pedro Paulø-Venzon and Driade (this page), both from Handmade 2017, as well as ’Shoe Tree’, by Beatrix Ong and Joined + Jointed, from Handmade 2016, and

’Ricecube’, by Michael Elmgreen and Solve 3D, from Handmade 2012 (opposite, top row), and ’Infinity’ table, by Karen Chekerdjian and Grandinetti, Modular column, by Tijmen Smeulders and Olivier van Herpt, and Monolithic font, by Tino Seubert and Pibamarmi (opposite, bottom row), which are all from Handmade 2017


Lifestyle

SOAP STARS Photography: Bruno Barbosa

A keen nose points Portuguese label Claus Porto in a fresh direction Last year Lyn Harris didn’t have time to take a holiday. London’s most internationally recognised ine perfumer, Harris trained in Grasse 30 years ago and established her irst line, Miller Harris, 17 years ago. She founded her rather brilliant fragrance brand, Perfumer H, in 2015 and is again hot property, with numerous brands knocking at her door for the talents of her nose. The workload may have seen of 2016’s summer holiday, but Harris did make a road trip around Portugal at the behest of Claus Porto. Founded 130 years ago

WRITER: EMMA MOORE

in Porto by Germans Ferdinand Claus and Georges Schweder, Claus Porto is the brand that soap savants have sought out as much for the striking packaging as the fragrant toiletries inside. The arresting graphics of the soap wrappers trace the illustrative fashions of the 20th century, with some of the deco designs particularly sought after. Taken in hand by the de Brito family at the end of the PERFUMER LYN HARRIS (LEFT) AND ANNE-MARGREET HONING, CLAUS PORTO’S ART DIRECTOR, IN THE PORTO STORE

First World War, it remained in the family until two years ago when Ricardo Cunha-Vaz of Menlo Capital acquired a majority stake. Anne-Margreet Honing, a Dutch art director who built her career in Paris working with clients such as Comme des Garçons, was enlisted to steer the brand into its next phase. She sought out a roster of local creatives to bring the brand back to life in the most sensitive and relevant way. The talents she has brought in range from the worldrenowned Portuguese architect João Mendes Ribeiro, who has designed the interiors of »

355


Lifestyle LEFT, THE PORTO FLAGSHIP BOUTIQUE’S TOP FLOOR HOUSES A SMALL FRAGRANCE WORKSHOP FEATURING A DISPLAY OF THE BOTANICAL FINDS THAT INSPIRED THE NEW SCENT BELOW, THE COLOGNE’S HANDMADE GLASS FLACON IS IN THE SHAPE OF AN INK BOTTLE ‘TO REPRESENT 130 YEARS OF STORYTELLING’, EXPLAINS HONING

the new Lisbon store and the recently opened Porto lagship, to lesser-known talents, such as set designer Pedro Rodrigues, who works on windows; Eduardo Aires, of White Studio, who redesigned the men’s Musgo Real line; and Francelino Gomes, a young graphic designer who became Honing’s right-hand man in the redesign of everything from the logo to the Porto store’s original tiled loors. But to ensure one of the most important elements of the brand’s revival was handled skilfully, Honing turned to Harris. Having already met socially, the pair were quick to bond. Not so much a sightseeing tour as a nose-nudging endeavour, the road trip was proposed by Honing as a way to immerse Harris in the brand and the country it represents, with a view to developing a signature fragrance. Accompanied by photographer and ilmmaker João Sousa, they set of in September. ‘The heat of summer was captured in the earth and was making all the smells richer,’ says Harris. The starting point was a vineyard in the Douro, the home of Aquiles de Brito. Having steered the ship before Cunha-Vaz stepped in, de Brito is the man the brand still turns to as an authority on detail and authenticity. ‘Aquiles is someone who has

356

The scent captures the fruits, the salt, pines and shrubs of Portugal in a modern cologne

held the brand through the hardest times, dedicating his life to it. His family estate is what fed him, and fed the brand, it’s the context for the story,’ says Honing. Climbing a hill to an abandoned chapel on the estate, they were bathed in the scent of cedars, a smell that hooked Harris. They also talked to de Brito about his most poignant smells, and his answer was decisively citrus accords. Passing by the botanical gardens of Porto and Lisbon, they moved down the coast and wherever they went, Harris picked up leaves, cones, stems and stones, and where possible pressed them into her notebook. They snifed the wind, and the salt of the marshes, and cedar notes carried by the humidity. Harris was struck by one particular botanical, the Barbary ig, a tropical plant with watery green notes that is native to Portugal. Back in the lab, Harris tried to synthesise the experience into a single fragrance. The Barbary ig became her starting point. She added citrus notes to the top, galbanum for greenness, and elemi for a green peppery note, and cedar. It captures the fruits, the salt, pines and shrubs of Portugal in a very modern, comforting cologne. ‘With Aquiles’ citrus element and the Barbary ig, it has become a unique combination of things,’ says Harris. Together, Honing and Harris have honed a scent that captures the essence of the proudly Portuguese brand. Harris will continue to see that the olfactory ofering remains en pointe while Honing, having jumped into Porto life with both feet, is inspired to bring far more to the brand than once imagined – think tiles and textiles, tapping into the local vernacular and crafts, and taking advantage of the brand’s weighty illustrative archives. Claus Porto Le Parfum, €160 per 95ml, available from 26 October, clausporto.com. For João Sousa’s ilm, see Wallpaper.com


Microsculpture: The Insect Portraits of Levon Biss

Moooi presents a life extraordinary! Moooi London · 23 Great Titchield Street · London, W1W 7PA Moooi New York · 36 East 31st Street · New York, NY 10016 Moooi Amsterdam · Westerstraat 187 · 1015 MA Amsterdam Moooi Tokyo · Three F 6-11-1 Minami Aoyama · Minato-ku, Tokyo www.moooi.com | www.microsculpture.net


TOPS ON TOP Cindy Crawford on Silestone Countertop

On Top

Discover more at silestone.com| Follow Us F T Opplev Feel the den new nye fløyelsaktige velvety texture teksturen

COSENTINO UK- CENTRAL OFFICES Unit 10 Bartley Point/ Osborn Way/ Hook / Hampshire RG27 9GX/ HQ: info.uk@cosentino.com


Wine & Design

wine&design* A world of oenophile wonders and spirit-raising accoutrements

DOMAINE TETTA’S CONCRETE BUILDING IS DESIGNED TO ALLOW PRODUCTION TO OPERATE AS EFFICIENTLY AS POSSIBLE. THE LOWER DOOR PROVIDES DIRECT ACCESS TO THE VINEYARDS

VINE LINES Photography: Senichiro Nogami

A new winery by Masamichi Katayama helps rural Okayama savour the lavour of Japanese wine

WRITER: JENS H JENSEN

359


Wine & Design

The set-up is remarkably simple and the architecture only helps to amplify this

he 90-minute drive from Okayama airport to the small town of Tetta in southern Japan takes in beautiful mountain scenery and old villages set on the wide Takahashi River. The last ten minutes are on a narrow road that winds uphill through dense forest and inally vineyards, which are sheltered from the area’s generous rainfall by heavy-duty plastic domes stretched over rounded metal frames. A distinctly modern concrete structure growing out of a small hill disturbs the agrarian landscape and marks the end of the journey. Coming from a construction background, Ryuta Takahashi had a knowledge of the lime-heavy soil in the region. This was what prompted him to make wine. ‘I used to play with lime as a child and never realised it was something of any value,’ he says as he shows me around Domaine Tetta. Takahashi started the winery in 2009, when he bought a number of local vineyards. Most of the grapes were of a variety best suited for eating fresh, but there were a few rows of wine grapes and Takahashi quickly planted many more. He is now growing six varieties on a modest six hectares surrounding the winery building, which was completed in September 2016. In the interval, he collaborated with nearby wineries to process his fruit, but he is now illing all Domaine Tetta’s bottles at his own facilities. Throughout Japan, more and increasingly high quality wine is being made, though mostly in the Hokkaido, Yamanashi and Nagano regions. So when Takahashi decided to help revitalise his local community, he thought wine would be a good place to start. He turned to star designer Masamichi Katayama, principal of design irm Wonderwall, to help him create a winery that would also function as a place to enjoy and talk about wine. Katayama’s prime concern was to make the space functional. ‘There are no conspicuous or unnecessary design elements in the building,’ says the designer, also originally from Okayama. ‘I put the necessary functions at the necessary locations, and made use of the sloping site by putting the main entrance at the top layer of the building and the entrance to the ields at the bottom.’

360

ABOVE, NEON SIGNS BY DOUGLAS GORDON AND JONATHAN MONK IN THE PRODUCTION HALL BELOW, TOKYO-BASED DESIGNER NAOMI HIRABAYASHI’S SIMPLE MONOCHROME LABELS BOTTOM, THE CAFE LOOKS OUT OVER THE VINEYARDS

Photography: Daichi Ano, Senichiro Nogami

T

The main entrance opens up to a spacious café area, where wine can be sampled and bought. This loor also ofers unrestricted views of the production space on the lower levels via a loor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall window, while a small terrace overlooks the adjacent vineyards. A large door on a small, mid-level platform allows for the grapes to be brought directly to the press, where they are crushed. In a process known as gravity low, the juice runs down through pipes into fermentation tanks on the lower level, half of which is occupied by a large climate-controlled wine cellar. This is where the illed bottles are stored in readiness for shipment. The whole set-up is remarkably simple and the architecture only helps to amplify this. To avoid the space being too mundane, Katayama introduced Takahashi to businessman Yasuharu Ishikawa, another Okayama local and a prominent art collector. Ishikawa arranged for the donation of a bright yellow and green door, The No, by Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone and a series of neon signs, Paris Bar, by Douglas Gordon and Jonathan Monk. The signs light up the production hall, while Rondinone’s door is on display at one end of the wine cellar. Domaine Tetta’s capacity is around 50,000 bottles a year, but production is currently running at about a third of that. The bottles are branded with witty labels designed by Tokyo’s Naomi Hirabayashi, known for her simple graphic style. The labels feature illustrations of some of the winery’s key staf members, as well as a small panda statue that was found when construction started. The panda now greets visitors as they approach the winery. Tetta’s irst vintage, released last year, features as many as 16 varieties. It’s a large number for such a small operation, but, as Takahashi points out, the winery is so new that he is still experimenting with diferent grapes, production and ageing methods to establish what works best. He is getting closer to his dream of creating a culture of high-quality, locally produced wine in this corner of Japan.  tetta.jp


1817-2017. 200 YEARS DURAVIT. YOUR FUTUR RE BATHROOM.

DuraSquare. Precise. Organic. The exact, precise edges of the basic form blend together with the soft, organically flowing inner contours. The washbasin made from DuraCeramÂŽ sits on top of a matching metal console, shown here in chrome. The glass shelf allows for more practical storage space. To find out more go to www.duravit.com.


Wine & Design NEW SPARKLE Twee Jonge Gezellen, South Africa In a irst among the many wine estates in South Africa’s Western Cape, Krone has just completed a two-year refresh of its 300-year-old Twee Jonge Gezellen farm, giving the original Cape Dutch architecture a contemporary twist. Overseen by architect Rick Stander and interior designer Tracy Lynch, the project includes a renovated tasting room, a gallery-like space with whitewashed walls set within the original skeleton of the building. The pleasingly spare result is enhanced with minimal furnishings and a rotating collection of modern art. Beyond the arched doors, the newly raised terrace, ofering golden views of the valley, is best enjoyed with a glass of one of the best vintage bubblies South Africa has to ofer. Paul Sephton Tulbagh, Western Cape, tel: 27.23 230 0680, tweejongegezellen.co.za CUBE ROUTE D’Arenberg Cube, South Australia The d’Arenberg Cube, a ive-storey visitor centre, cellar door and restaurant, rises like an outsized Rubik’s Cube from a vineyard in South Australia’s McLaren Vale, and has been a long-held dream for chief winemaker Chester Osborn. ‘I built the model for this 14 years ago,’ he says. ‘It looks exactly the same, except the model was half a metre tall, in a tiny vineyard with little soldiers…I wanted to use an iconic puzzle, because wine is such a puzzle to work out.’ Don’t expect a standard cellar door experience from the Cube, created with Nic Salvati of ADS Architects. ‘There will be a lot of interactive wine experiences, including full surround video, augmented reality and aroma containers to play around with,’ says Osborn. Carrie Hutchinson D’Arenberg, Osborn Road, McLaren Vale, tel: 61.8 8329 4822, darenberg.com.au

Beer, gin and champagne may have been around for centuries, but Ritzenhof is making sure these age-old beverages are never out of place in a contemporary setting. The German glassware company is celebrating its 25th anniversary and brand relaunch with four new glasses – one for each of the alcoholic drinks, plus another for milk. Each glass is available in a variety of designs commissioned from 29 renowned creatives, including designers Monica Förster, Naoto Fukasawa and Studiopepe, and architects Piero Lissoni, Patricia Urquiola and Studio Fuksas. Developed by Sieger Design, the project recalls Ritzenhof ’s famous initiative of the 1990s, when select designers were asked to decorate milk glasses. The result was a range of cult objects that revolutionised the industry. Decades later, it seems the brand might be making history again. Mary Cleary ritzenhof.de; sieger-design.com

362

FRENCH BLISS Labels, by Philippe Apeloig, for Château de Chausse After acquiring Château de Chausse last year, real estate developer and ilm producer Charles Cohen called on designer Philippe Apeloig to modernise the image of the winery, on the St Tropez peninsula. Apeloig (whose work includes a typographic collaboration with Wallpaper* that graced the cover of our 200th issue in 2015) decided to steer clear of traditional wine label design. He chose 1980s typeface Avenir and its later update, which he redesigned to make more luid. The French designer also refreshed the winery’s logo, a Provençal castle lanked by two cypress trees, making it more minimal and sleek. The updated emblem evokes the region’s lora and balances the modern typography, Apeloig explains, adding that the new design ‘shows a certain union between tradition and modernity’. Rosa Bertoli chateaudechausse.fr

PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID WILLEN

Photography: Elsa Young

THIRSTY WORK Glasses, by Sieger Design, for Ritzenhof


LONDON

CERSAIE BOLOGNA, ITALY 25-29 SEPTEMBER 2017

RAKCERAMICS.COM

PAV. 14 STAND B31 C32 PAV. 30 STAND D42 E41


Checking In

THIS PICTURE, THE ACE SUITE’S LIVING AREA. BELOW, ALL-DAY RESTAURANT CITY MOUSE OFFERS SEASONAL FARE

BAU WOW

Photography: Spencer Lowell

Stay in the Loop at the Mies-inspired Ace Hotel Chicago Since opening its irst property in Seattle in 1999, the Ace Hotel Group has steadily claimed strongholds in nine other major cities. The latest to join the ranks is Chicago, where the hotel stands within a newly constructed building – a irst for the group. Located in the historic Fulton Market district, a hotbed of watering holes and restaurants in the West Loop, the 159-room property was designed by local irm GREC Architects. Its glass-and-concrete aesthetics nod to the New Bauhaus, while the preserved brick façade of a former cheese factory, on the building’s southern wing, helps anchor the new build in the listed neighbourhood. Once inside, the hotel’s fusion of past and present hits a sophisticated tone with interiors designed by Commune. Inspired by the city’s most famous architect, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, his buildings at the Illinois Institute of Technology, and other key Bauhaus

WRITER: PEI-RU KEH

émigrés, the irm used simple materials such as polished steel, brass, plywood and linoleum as the grounding elements of the space. A large skylight system enables light to lood the public spaces, which are illed with bespoke and vintage furniture. Handwoven fabrics, leather and George Nakashima rugs add a craft-focused layer to the modernist interior, while upstairs, rooms come with pops of colour, lighting by Atelier de Troupe and furniture by Michael Boyd. Of course, it wouldn’t be an Ace Hotel without a range of carefully-curated creature comforts. In addition to the Midwestern fare served at its signature restaurant City Mouse, the rooftop bar, Waydown, doles out craft beer, cocktails and small plates. An outpost of Stumptown Cofee Roasters, the irst in the Midwest, serves as a inal lourish. 311 N Morgan Street, tel: 1.312 764 1919, acehotel.com. Rates: from $299

365


mic d y n a u din g r e h in c l e ot o f t h ll e c t i o n , a g e n , y n a o r nh c b a i o s in th e Cope an, New u , D a n n n * l I lo io i, Mi ap e r arce inat dest rdam, B rid, Miam yo, Wallp ting d k te es Ams n, LA, Ma e and To st inter pest o o m m d o e R d hip Lo n aris, ncover th ights an siness P , k s Yor uides u ng a bu sider’s n ti c i e on G in City ecture, e r you ar ere’s an t e h i itor. h , h t s k c i ar Whe nd brea sav v y v . s t haun a weeke designe or trip list for th k che c

Print £8.95, $11.95, ¤10.95. Available at phaidon.com App £4.99, $5.99, ¤5.99. Available at iTunes.com/phaidon


Travel

DEPARTURE INFO This month’s new openings, from a contemporary Chinese mountain retreat to a well-choreographed Danish bolthole

Mountain rest ALILA YANGSHUO, GUILIN

The highlight at the newly opened Alila Yangshuo hotel, housed in a former sugar mill in southern China, has to be its setting, with cragy limestone mountains creating a panoramic backdrop. But there’s plenty more to be inspired by. Designed by Gong Dong of Vector Architects, with interiors by Beijing- and Shenzhen-based Horizontal Space Design, the hotel lobby features stark stone walls juxtaposed with bright, modern ixtures, such as abstract bamboo sculptures and a glossy red circular banquette recessed into the loor. There is also an expansive outdoor pool. The 117 rooms, suites and villas sport a more streamlined décor, with shades of brown dominating the palette, including reined wooden headboards with clay etchings, herringbone rugs, midcentury modern chairs and bamboo accessories. It’s a colour scheme that seamlessly mimics the hotel’s natural surroundings, bringing the beauty that’s outside in. Chadner Navarro Block 11, No. 102, Donglin Street, Yangshuo Town, tel: 86.773 8883 999, alilahotels.com. Rates: from CNY1,380 ($206)

DOCK STAR Top, the original sugar cane loading dock has been transformed into an expansive swimming pool overlooking the River Li with a spectacular mountain backdrop

RED HOT Above, the hotel lobby’s airy space is dotted with midcentury furniture and features a glossy red circular banquette recessed into the loor and bamboo sculptures on the walls

367


Travel

Basque force AKELAŔE, SAN SEBASTIÁN

It’s odd that gastronomic hotspot San Sebastián has not had, until now, a bona ide ive-star boutique hotel. Happily, chef Pedro Subijana has taken matters into his own hands and opened a 22-room retreat right next door to his much-lauded restaurant Akelaŕe. Madrid practice Mecanismo has lined the public spaces with slatted timber screens and low-slung broad-backed chairs, while the spacious guest rooms come with private balconies overlooking the Cantabrian Sea. Draging yourself from the hotel’s stonelined indoor pool and spa is a strugle, but you won’t regret heading next door for Subijana’s inventive menu incorporating local ish and Iberian meats. Daven Wu Padre Orcolaga 56, Igeldo, tel: 34.943 311 208, akelarre.net. Rates: from £379

On point HOTEL SANDERS, COPENHAGEN

This 54-room property from former Danish Royal Ballet dancer Alexander Kølpin is a precisely choreographed afair, right down to the staf uniforms, designed by Older Paris, a fashion-forward company that uses a smart technical fabric made from recycled polyester and bio-cotton to create fuss-free service wear. Located in a landmark art nouveau building near Copenhagen’s Royal Danish Theatre, London-based studio Lind + Almond has created a surprisingly unScandinavian interior, opting instead for a muted colonial look with lots of rattan, leather furnishings and woven rugs. Stop by the ifth loor rooftop conservatory, which looks set to become the city’s new social hub. Lauren Ho Tordenskjoldsgade 15, tel: 45.70 20 28 18, hotelsanders.com. Rates: from DKK2,500 (€336)

Raise the steaks CAMPO MODERN GRILL, WROCŁAW

Campo Modern Grill, located on the ground loor of Gottesman-Szmelcman Architecture’s blinding-white beanshaped OVO building in Wrocław, ofers a menu of charcoal-grilled Argentine steaks, a startling contrast to a traditional cuisine that’s predisposed towards stewed meats and noodles. The restaurant’s interior, by local studio Buck, sports a long sculptural wall of polished black pebbles, framed by cherry wood shelves, oak furniture, and brass and calf leather handles. Meanwhile, from his kitchen hidden behind a 14m-long bar, head chef Tomasz Nowak lips great slabs of organic beef that he serves with little more than lashings of chimichurri and watercress mayonnaise. DW Podwale 83, tel: 48.690 040 333, campomoderngrill.pl

368


All you need to keep your interiors in the pink

€132

€493

€179

€975

€147 €160 €65

€1,400

€480


Travel CEMENT MIX Left, guest rooms at Hôtel National des Arts et Métiers are kitted out with industrial cement slatted walls, Kvadrat headboards and Tatra chairs FLOOR SHOW Below, London-based Studio Ashby designed the interiors of eatery Ikoyi, which features elm-wood tables, ochre banquettes and a black and white terrazzo loor

Natural selection HÔTEL NATIONAL DES ARTS ET MÉTIERS, PARIS

Following the success of Hotel Bachaumont, fashion retail magnate Samy Marciano has opened his second property on rue Saint-Martin, in the Montorgueil district. Designed by Raphael Navot – the man behind David Lynch’s Silencio club – the 70-room bolthole features a natural palette of black marble, untreated timber and oxidised copper. Don’t miss the Herbarium cocktail bar, where tipples are concocted using vintage perfume beakers within a wild forest setting. Rooksana Hossenally 243 rue Saint-Martin, tel: 33.1 80 97 22 80, hotelnational.paris. Rates: from €199

Out of Africa West African cuisine is having its moment in London, thanks to Ikoyi. The restaurant’s vibrant menu includes wild Nigerian tiger prawns with banga bisque and jollof rice with smoked bone marrow, while subtle new Nordic references abound, relecting head chef and co-owner Jeremy Chan’s previous stint at Noma. Studio Ashby has kitted out the space with elm wood tables, earthenware pendants and a striking terrazzo loor, while in the six-seat bar, the cocktail menu has been designed by Max and Noel Venning, of London drinking den Three Sheets. TF Chan 1 St James’s Market, tel: 44.20 3583 4660, ikoyilondon.com

370

Photography: Jérôme Galland, Thea Løvstad

IKOYI, LONDON


s ’ o t r i ange-y and o s E H BUBBLY T T A

S AM E

TIME

S U L P

it’s

SUPER

n i r a l u p o p

SO YOU

S ’ T I W O N K

Italy

GOOD

PROSECCO + APEROL + SODA FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @APEROLUSA PLEASE ENJOY RESPONSIBLY. Aperol® Liqueur. 11% alc./vol. (22 Proof). Imported by Campari America, San Francisco, CA. ©2017.


Travel

ARTFUL LODGER High-end hedonism in Fitzrovia, watery vistas in Chicago and a modernist spin in Hyde Park – our pick of the best hotel openings and reimaginings

5: Days for which each of the 30 candles in Lara Bohinc’s lobby chandelier will burn

4: Total length in metres of the jasmine and passion fruit vines in the hanging gardens around the courtyard

14: Minutes needed to fill the penthouse suite’s six-person bathtub at 42°C

American beauty RITZ-CARLTON, CHICAGO

The renovation of Chicago’s Ritz-Carlton marks something of a homecoming for the landmark. Debuting as a Four Seasonsmanaged property in 1975, atop the then newly minted Water Tower Place, the hotel only became an oicial part of the RitzCarlton group last year, for complicated ownership reasons. San Francisco design studio BAMO’s refurbishment is a soigné take on modern luxe, with lead designer Billy Quimby selecting soothing pastel hues for the remodelled bedrooms. Inspired by the building’s exterior architecture, he has installed rows of grey marble columns and American walnut ins in the 12th-loor lobby, where a sparkling Lasvit installation of hand-blown glass mimics Lake Michigan (the latter provides a bracing spectacle from the corner gym). The overall efect bears all the hallmarks of a Ritz-Carlton, but BAMO’s principle achievement has been to channel a quiet intimacy in which Chicago’s spectacular aesthetic of water, skyscrapers and Michigan Avenue dominates at every turn. Daven Wu 160 East Pearson Street, tel: 1.312 266 1000, ritzcarlton.com. Rates: from $279

Pleasure palace

372

89: Number of ‘Arborescence’ lamps, by CVL Luminaires, found throughout the 18-storey hotel

300: Square metres of white Italian Carrara marble used in the central staircase

Park life LANCASTER, LONDON

THE MANDRAKE, LONDON

In this age of ironic-minimal, hipster homeaway-from-home hotels, Rami Fustok’s Mandrake takes hostelry in the opposite direction. Dark, moody and draped in sumptuous fabrics, with art-illed walls and eclectic (even eccentric) design pieces, it practically swings from the chandeliers. The Mandrake is designed as a sensual overload, cocooning guests in fragrance and sound (the former by Azzi Glasser, the latter by Pierre-Arnaud Alunni) and feeding them treats by Frédéric Peneau, who brings his ‘democratic French gourmet’ experience, Serge et le Phoque, to town. Wrapped around a verdant atrium, with a greenhouse for medicinal plants on the irst loor, the hotel takes its botanical inspiration seriously, even serving plant-based cocktails in the bar. Bold and opulent in a wear-yourjewels-in-the-bathtub way, the 30 bedrooms, three suites and lavish penthouse make for quite the hallucinatory homage to hedonism. Warren Singh-Bartlett 20-21 Newman Street, W1, tel: 44.20 3314 7770, themandrake.com. Rates: from £300

7,416: Weight in kg of the brass screens in the lobby, which took 3,000 man-hours to create

9: Number of days it took to install Flying Wave, a piece by Lasvit comprising 616 glass components in varying hues

46: Walnut slats on the bar’s feature wall, which references the movement of waves on Lake Michigan

1976: Year the iconic Water Tower Place, home to Chicago’s Ritz-Carlton, was completed

Designed by Richard Seifert, the building that now houses the 18-storey Lancaster hotel turns 50 this year and, to celebrate, its Thai owners have lavished £80m on a top-to-toe refurbishment. London’s Studio Proof has capitalised on the hotel’s coveted location on the edge of Hyde Park, leaving the stunning views to take centre stage throughout the property. But it has also found inspiration in the building’s architectural heritage, ofering a take on the midcentury look, with sage green details and white Carrara marble featuring alongside Spinneybeck leather in each of the 411 rooms. The most dramatic changes, though, are in the public spaces. The sweeping new entrance lobby is anchored by a white marble staircase and trimmed with gold lacquer, brass and bronze, while its walls are swathed in pale grey horsehair. The in-house Nipa Thai is the setting for richly spiced curries and views of Hyde Park’s Italian Gardens, while the Island Grill scores points for its mod Brit menu. DW Lancaster Terrace, W2, tel: 44.20 7551 6000, lancasterlondon.com. Rates: from £209

ILLUSTRATOR: EOIN RYAN


Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.

UNDER THE HIGH PATRONAGE OF HIS SERENE HIGHNESS PRINCE ALBERT II OF MONACO

House of Fine Yachting

27 > 30 SEPTEMBER 2017


PLISSÉ

EMILIANA MARTINELLI 2017

ph. kalin gemignani

a.d. emiliana martinelli

www.martinelliluce.it


OCTOBER IS ALL ABOUT...

China’s irst design museum opening in Shenzhen Thomas Heatherwick’s temple to contemporary art in Cape Town – p376 Doha’s Al Riwaq gallery surveying German design since 1950 Sculptural denim at a space-age house in Highgate – p386 Superlex taking over Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall A home with an otherworldly glow – p398 OMA unveils MPavilion in Melbourne A new regime at the Vatican Museums – p408 Cai Guo-Qiang’s irework paintings at Madrid’s Prado Bernar Venet’s oeuf caviar – p418


Cape crusade Resurrecting a disused grain silo, Heatherwick Studio creates a temple to contemporary African art and a hymn to concrete Photography Iwan Baan Writer TF Chan


Architecture Photographed in July 2017, the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa rises above Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront, bottom right


L

ooming over Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront – a mixed-use development bordering the Atlantic and interwoven with colonial structures and contemporary volumes in glass and steel – is a concrete silo. Built in 1921, it was where grain would be gathered, graded and eventually disseminated. This was the tallest building in sub-Saharan Africa for half a century, and as such, a deining feature of the city’s skyline. Designed with a view that it would last forever, it nonetheless fell into disuse in 2001, eventually ravaged by loods, plunderers and bird droppings. This September, however, the silo will receive a new lease of life as it reopens as the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (MOCAA). Restored and transformed by Heatherwick Studio, with the backing of the Waterfront and German philanthropist Jochen Zeitz, this is the irst museum on the continent dedicated to contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora, a long-awaited symbol of cultural prowess, and a towering architectural accomplishment. The silo’s revival is a tale of determination and ingenuity. Designer Thomas Heatherwick irst visited the site in 2005, when he had yet to receive the commission. There was no central space then to walk into, he recalls, just a warren of basement tunnels, above which there were two cellular structures with a total of 116 upright tubes – rectilinear ones in the lift tower (populated with vertical conveyor belts and ireman poles), and cylindrical ones in the bins annex. It was another six years before the Waterfront decided to redevelop the silo. There was temptation to tear it down, but CEO David Green resisted. ‘The building has real soul and character,’ he explains, ‘I was drawn to the idea of repurposing the industrial architecture, and leaving that for future generations to enjoy.’ Heatherwick, now introduced to Green via Design Indaba founder Ravi Naidoo, had arrived at a similar conclusion: ‘A gigantic building made from tubes was a pretty strong starting point. We wanted to draw out something that only this building could give.’ They wanted it to house something of civic signiicance. Spurred on by the dearth of museums of scale in Cape Town, Green approached a number of international institutions with experience in foreign outposts, but ultimately settled on the art collection of Zeitz, a former chairman and CEO of Puma (see W*120). Working with South African curator Mark Coetzee, Zeitz was amassing 21st-century African art and scouring the continent for an appropriate brickand-mortar venue to show it – so it was natural that he and the Waterfront would pool their resources. He’d already come across Heatherwick’s UK pavilion for the 2010 Shanghai Expo, and was keen to work together. The UK pavilion would come to inform the design of Zeitz MOCAA in another way. In commissioning that structure, the British government had allotted a signiicantly smaller budget than other Western

378

Opposite, the atrium is the beating heart of the museum, an organically shaped void carved out of concrete tubes that stored grain in the building’s previous life

nations, so Heatherwick decided to make a sixth of the site (the Seed Cathedral) memorable, while minimising expense elsewhere. At Zeitz MOCAA, he was working with a budget of R500m (about £30m), generous by local standards, but paltry in comparison to those of Renzo Piano’s Whitney ($422m) and Herzog & de Meuron’s Tate Modern extension (£260m). His design, therefore, focused on one standout interior element, an atrium, which would join the two structures of the silo into one, and serve as the museum’s primary draw. The preexisting tubes were regular, says Heatherwick, ‘but cutting through them in a threedimensionally curving plane, something unexpected happens.’ He would carve out the atrium within these tubes in the same way one would take a hot wire to a block of butter. Eschewing regular geometric shapes, he took a grain of local corn, not unlike the grains that would have been stored in the silo in ages past, and scanned it digitally to obtain an organic, asymmetrical form. This form, cut into the concrete tubes, would produce a void with plenty of sharp angles. ‘It became a destruction project, not a construction project. Our job was more about careful removal than addition.’ Easier said than done. The silo is almost a century old, meaning the original concrete had set to its hardest form. The void was also diicult to visualise in situ, so builders had to rely on GPS and lasers to track progress, and the cylinders had leant against each other for stability, so a new support structure had to be installed while the void was hollowed out. Heatherwick was adamant there shouldn’t be beams and pillars (‘that would distract from the lightness we wanted’), so instead he added a new layer of concrete sleeving to reinforce the remaining parts of each cylinder. The resulting atrium, which took between two and three million man-hours to complete, is the beating heart of the museum. Its sheer size and swooping curves give the impression of a cathedral, made all the more spectacular by the light that streams in through skylights that now cap the cylinders. The cross section of the original concrete is laid bare, its rougher surface contrasting with the smoothness of the new sleeves. One partially exposed cylinder now contains a spiral staircase; another two have been itted with glass lifts, their mechanisms embedded into the new concrete sleeve to allow unobstructed views from the lift car. One has to ascend the building and see the atrium from varying heights to experience its full efect. »

‘It became a destruction project, not a construction project. Our job was more about careful removal than addition’


Architecture


380

∑


Architecture The track shed of the silo is now the museum’s arrival area, while the façade on the upper levels has been pulled back and installed with gently bulging, faceted windows that reflect views from all around


382

∑


Architecture The glass roof of the atrium lets in natural light and joins the bins annex and lift building into a single structure


Other parts of the silo have been entirely excavated to accommodate galleries. Financial constraints and institutional demands (the museum had high expectations for the amount of wall and loor space, and favoured a white cube format) meant that these are mostly nondescript, and on some occasions cramped. But Heatherwick believes that lack of architectural detailing makes the spaces ‘available to disrupt and mess with’, and hopes that, in time, more walls on the periphery of the building could be knocked down to reveal coves of concrete. Happily, original architectural features have been preserved elsewhere. The basement tunnels, which will be used for installations (the irst being Angolan artist Edson Chagas’ Luanda, Encyclopedic City, which won the Golden Lion at the 2013 Venice Biennale), retain old machinery, signage and even dirt, while the Centre for the Moving Image, on ground level, appropriates the interior surface of the cylinders as screens for video projection. The silo’s exterior, originally coated in magnolia paint, has been water-jetted to reveal the concrete in its textured glory. On the upper levels (which house the sculpture garden and the Silo Hotel, designed independently of the museum), Heatherwick cut back the façade and installed generously proportioned convex windows. As the budget couldn’t stretch to curved glass, he came up with a faceted design instead, an inspired compromise that ‘steals views from all

384

For more information, see Africa Modern, an independent publication on the building and Africa’s artistic landscape, published by the KT Wong Foundation in collaboration with Heatherwick Studio and Wallpaper*

around’. Depending on the angle of installation, each triangular panel relects either the skies, the landscapes of Table Mountain, Lion’s Head and Signal Hill, nearby buildings, or the Atlantic waters with Robben Island in the distance. ‘You get this collage of a diferent kind, which a single plane relecting from a single angle doesn’t give.’ Illuminated at night, the windows take on a lantern-like appearance, a nod to one of the silo’s original functions as a beacon for incoming ships. It’s a itting metaphor for Zeitz MOCAA, a homecoming call for African and diaspora artists, who have mainly shown abroad due to a lack of appropriate venues on the continent, and a shimmering lure for art admirers of all stripes. Whether it can stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the world’s top museums is yet to be seen, and will depend on the appeal of its artistic collections and the resolve of its administration. This being South Africa, Heatherwick admits there is inevitably ‘a slightly raged dimension, an unruliness… the big deal is making it happen at all’. But perhaps he need not be so modest, for the architecture is already making waves within the creative community. The artist Isaac Julien, whose work had turned Zeitz’s interest towards African art years ago, wrote after a preview tour that Zeitz MOCAA was ‘one of the most sensational spaces for art on the continent and in the art world’. One can hardly ask for a better start. Zeitz MOCAA opens on 22 September, zeitzmocaa.museum


Architecture This page, an aerial view of the atrium, as seen from the sculpture garden on the roof Opposite, the basement retains its original, rough-hewn concrete walls, contrasting with grainy cross sections and smooth new sleeves


MATCH MADE We’re daring to pair with some denim-on-denim action Photography Ivan Ruberto Fashion Jason Hughes

386


Fashion This page, all-in-one, £795, by Burberry. Shirt, £235, by Vivienne Westwood Anglomania Opposite, jacket, £830; dress, £475, both by Sportmax. Jacket (worn underneath), £120, by Tommy Jeans


Fashion

This page, jacket, £150; shirt, £85, both by G-Star Raw. Jeans, 320, by Salle Privée. Shoes (worn throughout), £475, by Lemaire

Opposite, dress, £1,300, by Louis Vuitton. ‘Vertical’ earring (right ear, worn throughout), £152; ‘Twin’ earring (left ear, worn throughout), £71, both by Maria Black


∑

389


390

∑


Fashion

This page, jacket, £3,405; trousers, £605, both by Bottega Veneta. Jacket (worn underneath), £290, by Levi’s. Shirt, 380, by Salle Privée Opposite, roll-neck, £355, by Pringle of Scotland. Skirt, £60, by Lee. Trousers, £275, by Diesel Black Gold


Fashion This page, dress, £305; jeans, £225, both by AG. Shoes, £535, by Rosetta Getty Opposite, jacket; shirt, prices on request, both by Dondup. Top, £355, by Lemaire


Fashion


This page, jacket, £430; shirt, £145, both by Paul Smith. Jeans, £230, by E Tautz

Opposite, jacket, £1,500; trousers, £920, both by Dior. Roll-neck, £355, by Pringle of Scotland

395


Fashion


Hair: Antonio De Luca Make-up: Maria Comparetto Manicure: Saffron Goddard at Coffin Inc using YSL Beauty Models: Matilde Buoso at Storm Management, Rory Cooper at Elite London Photography assistants: Jim Johnson, Daniel Simm Fashion assistant: Gabriele Rizzi Shot at 6 Wood Lane, Highgate. The house was designed by architects Birds Portchmouth Russum, with the living space constructed off site using boatbuilding technology, then lifted into place by crane. For more on the architecture, see Wallpaper.com

π

This page, jacket, £335; jeans, £215, both by Margaret Howell. Shirt, £110, by Oliver Spencer Opposite, jacket, £345; jeans, £245, both by Richard James For stockists, see page 416

397


Full beam Eternal sunshine for spotless minds Photography Stephen Lenthall Interiors Matthew Morris

398

∑


Space From left, ‘Linea’ neon lights, £60 each, by Selab + Alessandro Zambelli, for Seletti. ‘Stars’ coffee table, £3,670, by Bartoli Design, for Laurameroni, from Chaplins. ‘Off the Moon’ tray, from €869, by Dariel Studio, for Cappellini. ‘Don Giovanni’ sofa, £16,945, by Giuseppe Casarosa, for Ceccotti Collezioni. ‘Boxy 3’ illuminated storage box, £2,245, by Johanna Grawunder, for Glas Italia, from Chaplins. ‘Fishnet’ chair, £1,520, by Sadi & Neptun Ozis, for Walter Knoll. ‘Utrecht’ armchairs,

£2,946 each, by Gerrit Thomas Rietveld, for Cassina. ‘Common Comrades Seamstress’ side table, £310, by Neri & Hu, for Moooi, from Chaplins. ‘Xi Deluxe’ cabinet, SEK28,500 (€2,965), by Pia Wallén, for Asplund. ‘Mingx’ armchair, from €620, by Konstantin Grcic, for Driade. ‘Numi’ tiles in Black Slope B, throughout, £191 per sq m, by Konstantin Grcic, for Mutina, from Domus. Estate Emulsion in Strong White, throughout, £44 for 2 litres, by Farrow & Ball


From left, ‘Golden Cage’ bookcase, €15,386, by Vincenzo De Cotiis, for Ceccotti Collezioni. ‘Cubo’ sideboard, £1,695, by Theo Williams, for Another Brand. ‘Grasil’ candleholders, £117 each, by AYTM, from Aram. ‘Noor’ side table, £2,640, by Christophe Delcourt, for Minotti. ‘Vitta’ tray, £79, by AYTM, from Aram. ‘Linea’ neon lights, as before.

400

‘Curva’ magazine holder, £138, by AYTM, from Aram. ‘Xavier’ desk, £7,780, by Birgit Israel. ‘Charles’ tray, £95, by Grint, for Serax. ‘Ink’ containers, large, £125; small, £80, by Emma Olbers, for Skultuna, from SCP. ‘Row’ pendant light, €1,400, by Atelier Areti. ‘Sign Filo’ chair, £1,769, by Piergiorgio Cazzaniga, for MDF Italia, from Aram


Space


Space This page, ‘Tuareg’ floor lights, £2,703 each, by Ferruccio Laviani, for Foscarini. ‘Run’ benches, £1,706 each, by Sam Hecht and Kim Colin, for Emeco, from Coexistence Opposite, from top, ‘Concentric M’ wall light, £1,367, by Rob Zinn, for Marset. Stellar II, £3,600, by Lena Bergström, from Vessel. ‘Shimmer’ table, £1,295, by Patricia Urquiola, for Glas Italia, from SCP


∑

403


404

∑


Space

From left, ‘PK22’ lounge chairs, from £3,504 each, by Poul Kjærholm, for Republic of Fritz Hansen. ‘Double’ cofee table, £5,150, by Antonio Citterio, for Flexform. ‘Charles’ trays, from £95 each, by Grint, for Serax. ‘Superloon’ floor light, from £2,444, by Jasper Morrison, for Flos, from Viaduct.

‘Paper Planes’ armchair, £3,720, by Doshi Levien, for Moroso. Day bed, £4,074, by Eileen Gray, from Aram. ‘Palette’ side table, £829, by Jaime Hayon, for &Tradition, from Viaduct. ‘Sigillata Signature’ plate, £26, by Chris Mestdagh, for Serax. ‘2 tubes’ floor light, €1,430, by Atelier Areti


Space

From left, neon ring, £3,400, by Steve Earle, for Kemp London. ‘Papyrus’ dining chairs, £218 each, by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, for Kartell. ‘LA-DI’ dining table, £6,300, by Jean Nouvel, for Roche Bobois. Stellar X, £3,600, by Lena Bergström, from Vessel. ‘Eos’ armchairs, from £4,000 each, by Fendi Casa, from Luxury Living. ‘Linea’ neon lights, as

before. ‘Pli’ side table, £1,112, by Victoria Wilmotte, for ClassiCon, from Aram. ‘Cafu’ vase, £115, by HolmbäckNordentoft, for Georg Jensen, from SCP For stockists, see page 416 Photography assistant: Hannah Tointon Interiors assistants: Markos Ioannides, Sofia Dotta


∑

000 407


Intelligence

The striking, light-filled modernist wing of the Gregoriano Profano Museum, designed in 1970 by Roman firm Studio Passarelli, displays some of the Vatican’s vast collection of Greek and Roman sculptures


SOUL MATES An art-loving pope and the Vatican’s irst-ever female director of museums are upscaling the city-state’s cultural archive Photography Alex Majoli Writer Emma O’Kelly

000 409


Intelligence

esto is one of the 25,000 tourists who visit the Vatican City every day. For him, like many others, the trip to the heartland of the Holy See is a once-in-a-lifetime pilgrimage. However, he also had the opportunity last June to visit an exact replica of its greatest attraction, the Sistine Chapel, in his home town of Mexico City. The $2.4m copy of Catholicism’s bestloved church was the brainchild of Mexican entrepreneur Antonio Berumen and funded privately. A team of Mexican photographers took more than two million photos of the original chapel’s every detail. These were then printed and mounted on canvas, and installed in a fullsize wooden replica of the chapel in Mexico City’s Plaza de la República. It was the irst time the Vatican had authorised such a project, but it won’t be the last. There are also plans to reproduce other sacred sites, among them the Raphael Rooms, a series of four papal apartments painted by the Renaissance artist in 1508. ‘The Sistine art project has been incredibly popular,’ says Barbara Jatta, the new director of the Vatican Museums. ‘But it’s costly and we can’t keep duplicating the same thing. However, we do want to reproduce those important moments in Christian history that you witness when you visit the Vatican.’ Taking the Vatican to the people instead of bringing the people to the Vatican is not only canny papal PR but it’s a practical win, too. Every day, crowds large enough to ill the San Siro football stadium stream along the tiny city-state’s walkways, taking selies and

N

craning to glimpse frescoes through a sea of bodies. But tourism on this scale annihilates the thrill of seeing Michelangelo’s genius in the lesh and dampens the spiritual aura that those of faith anticipate. By replicating its treasures beyond its walls, the Vatican can reach those without the funds to make the journey, while managing the low of visitors. When she was appointed as the irst female director of the Vatican Museums earlier this year, Jatta became the highestranking woman within the Holy See. Above her are bishops, cardinals and the pontif himself, a self-confessed art lover. She heads a team of around 600 and is responsible for the museums’ 54 galleries, among them the Ethnological Museum, which is illed with more than 80,000 ‘gifts’, ofered to popes over centuries. They range from rare aboriginal death totems and carved panels from Borobudur, one of the world’s largest Buddhist temples, to Hindu deities and Islamic scrolls. ‘When you think of the Vatican, you think of Michelangelo or Raphael, but more than half of our collection is non-European artefacts,’ says the museum’s curator Padre Nicola Mapelli. ‘Missionaries gave us most of these things. The Vatican didn’t really document papal gifts back then, so I’m rewinding a few hundred years and uncovering the stories behind the objects.’ ‘The Ethnological Museum is a pet project of Pope Francis [he’s the irst non-European pope in over 1,000 years] and we want people to see the scale of what we have,’ says Jatta. Next year, a further 8,000 sq m of »


This page, frescoes under restoration in the Room of Constantine, one of the four Raphael Rooms in the Apostolic Palace Opposite, Barbara Jatta, the new director of the Vatican Museums

∑

411


Intelligence

In the Gregoriano Profano Museum, a 4th-century mosaic depicting athletes, originally from Rome’s Baths of Caracalla


∑

413


Artwork in storage awaits restoration

414

∑


Intelligence

‘In some ways it’s easier to get things done in here than in the outside world’

exhibition space will open, allowing many gifts in storage to be displayed for the irst time. So what does the pontif give as a gift? ‘Ancient books, rosaries,’ says Mapelli. (Barack Obama received the latter in 2014.) Also reopening in the near future are the Etruscan Museum, founded in 1837 by Pope Gregory XVI, and the Gregoriano Profano Museum. Here, archaeological inds, mosaics and sculptures are displayed in a striking modernist addition created in 1970 by Roman architects Studio Passarelli. ‘One of the reasons these museums have been closed is due to a shortage of guards,’ says Jatta. In 2013, pickpockets operating within the Sistine Chapel became so numerous that even the tour guides threatened a strike. The Vatican is now recruiting more guards. ‘We need professionals, especially now terrorism is a huge threat.’ Armoured trucks, armed soldiers, carabinieri and airport-style security checks are the new reality at Rome’s major sites. Vatican employees must also be tightlipped, willing to operate under the veil of secrecy the Holy See demands. ‘These are the museums of the Pope,’ says Jatta carefully. ‘They are diferent to national institutions.’ Next year, a new entrance will help reduce queues, and a second route to the Sistine Chapel around the Apostolic Palace (which Pope Francis chose not to occupy in favour of a suite in the Vatican guesthouse) is opening. Other plans include featuring artworks that are not on display in the Vatican on the revamped Museums website, making souvenirs and books available to buy online 24/7, and extending opening times. While Pope Francis is a master of digital divinity – he has more than 12 million followers on Twitter, while four million on Instagram admire his aphorisms and ilms of his travels – Vatican City has no social media presence. A seemingly oicial Facebook page is operated by an enthusiast whom no one knows and whom they choose to ignore, but the lack of online engagement does nothing to help the Holy See’s image. ‘Little by little, we’ll adopt Twitter and Facebook,’ says Jatta. Before becoming museum director, Jatta spent 20 years working in the Vatican Library. ‘In some ways it’s easier to get things done in here than in the outside world,’ she claims. Here, in her private oice, real life feels very far away. Her huge windows ofer views across private manicured gardens to the dome of St Peter’s. ‘I don’t have to deal with so many points of reference. I go straight to my boss, the cardinal president, to get things agreed.’ A portrait of Pope Francis hangs on the wall. Is he involved in every decision? ‘No. Art is important, but it’s not his main focus.’ However, he does call her every now and then. ‘Just the other day he phoned out of the blue to ind out how the renovation of Castel Gandolfo [the papal summer retreat] was progressing,’ she pauses, and chuckles at the notion of her hotline to the pope. museivaticani.va


Stockists &Tradition Tel: 45.3920 0233 (Denmark) andtradition.com

A Abrams & Chronicle Tel: 44.1903 828501 (UK) abramsandchronicle.co.uk AG agjeans.com Alan Cristea Gallery Tel: 44.20 7439 1866 (UK) alancristea.com Alessi Tel: 44.20 7518 9090 (UK) alessi.com Amara Tel: 44.800 587 7645 (UK) amara.com Anna Hu Tel: 1.212 826 1116 (US) anna-hu.com

Bulgari Tel: 44.20 7838 8805 (UK) bulgari.com Burberry Tel: 44.20 7806 8904 (UK) burberry.com

C Cappellini Tel: 44.20 3039 3034 (UK) cappellini.it Carl Hansen & Søn Tel: 44.20 7632 7587 (UK) carlhansen.com Cartier Tel: 44.20 3147 4850 (UK) cartier.com Cassina Tel: 44.20 7584 0000 (UK) cassina.com Ceccotti Collezioni Tel: 44.20 7351 0263 (UK) ceccotticollezioni.com

D

F

De Beers Tel: 44.20 7758 9700 (UK) debeers.com

Farrow & Ball Tel: 44.1202 876141 (UK) farrow-ball.com

Hourglass Cosmetics hourglasscosmetics.com

Décor Walther Tel: 49.69 2722790 (Germany) decor-walther.com

Ferm Living fermliving.com

J

De Grisogono Tel: 44.20 7499 2225 (UK) degrisogono.com Diesel Black Gold Tel: 44.20 7495 4280 (UK) diesel.com Dinesen Tel: 44.20 3630 0196 (UK) dinesen.com Dinosaur Designs Tel: 44.20 7287 2254 (UK) dinosaurdesigns.co.uk Dior Tel: 44.20 7355 5930 (UK) dior.com

Another Brand Tel: 44.20 7738 2424 (UK) anotherbrand.co.uk

Cerruti 1881 cerruti.com

Dior Haute Joaillerie Tel: 44.20 7172 0172 (UK) dior.com

APC Tel: 33.1 53 63 43 79 (France) apc.fr

Chanel Tel: 44.20 7493 5040 (UK) chanel.com

Domus Tel: 44.20 7819 2300 (UK) domusgroup.com

Aram Tel: 44.20 7557 7557 (UK) aram.co.uk

Chanel Fine Jewellery Tel: 44.20 7499 0005 (UK) chanel.com

Dondup dondup.com

Asplund Tel: 46.8 662 5284 (Sweden) asplund.org

Chaplins Tel: 44.20 8421 1779 (UK) chaplins.co.uk

Asprey Tel: 44.20 7493 6767 (UK) asprey.com

Chaumet Tel: 44.20 7495 6303 (UK) chaumet.com

Atelier Areti Tel: 44.20 3535 1855 (UK) atelierareti.com

Church’s church-footwear.com

B Barbed Tel: 44.20 8878 1994 (UK) barbed.co.uk

Coexistence Tel: 44.20 7354 8817 (UK) coexistence.co.uk Crane Cookware cranecookware.com Crème de la Mer Tel: 44.800 054 2661 (UK) cremedelamer.com

Ben & Aja Blanc Tel: 1.323 510 7121 (US) benandajablanc.com Birgit Israel Tel: 44.20 7376 7255 (UK) birgitisrael.com Boghossian Tel: 44.20 7225 6880 (UK) boghossianjewels.com Bottega Veneta Tel: 44.20 7838 9394 (UK) bottegaveneta.com Boucheron Tel: 44.20 7514 9170 (UK) boucheron.com Buddy + Bear Tel: 44.7740 356710 (UK) buddyandbear.com

Driade Tel: 39.05 2381 8650 (Italy) driade.com Dries Van Noten driesvannoten.be

E E15 e15.com

Flexform lexform.it Foscarini Tel: 39.04 1595 3811 (Italy) foscarini.com Fredericia fredericia.com Future & Found Tel: 44.20 7267 4772 (UK) futureandfound.com

G Gallery Bensimon gallerybensimon.com Georg Jensen Tel: 44.20 3824 8430 (UK) georgjensen.com

Herno Tel: 39.03 2277 091 (Italy) herno.it

John Lewis Tel: 44.870 218 7711 (UK) johnlewis.com

K Kalon Studios kalonstudios.de Kartell Tel: 44.20 7584 3923 (UK) kartell.com Kemp London Tel: 44.20 7254 0214 (UK) kemplondon.com Kid’s Concept kidsconcept.se

Giampiero Bodino giampierobodino.com

Kinnasand Tel: 44.20 7324 5555 (UK) kinnasand.com

Graf Tel: 44.20 7584 8571 (UK) grafdiamonds.com

Kutikai Tel: 48.784 105 499 (Poland) kutikai.pl

G-Star Raw Tel: 44.20 7493 6503 (UK) g-star.com

H Hans Natur hans-natur.de

Editions Milano editionsmilano.com

Harry Winston Tel: 44.20 7907 8899 (UK) harrywinston.com

Ekobo Tel: 33.9 70 44 05 50 (France) by-ekobo.com

Harvey Nichols Tel: 44.20 7201 8088 (UK) harveynichols.com

E Tautz Tel: 44.20 7629 8809 (UK) etautz.com

Heal’s Tel: 44.20 7636 1666 (UK) heals.com

L

Lamy lamy.com La Prairie Tel: 44.20 7968 6888 (UK) laprairie.com Lara and Ollie laraandollie.co.uk Laufen Tel: 44.1530 510007 (UK) laufen.com Lee Tel: 44.20 7836 8300 (UK) lee.com Lemaire lemaire.fr

NExt mONth

Levi’s levi.com

New horizons

Linley Tel: 44.20 7730 7300 (UK) davidlinley.com

Best Urban Hotels 2017 shortlist and our jet-setting judges; Berlin’s burgeoning restaurant scene; a retail magnate’s São Paulo pad; from New York to Yorkshire with Chilean artist Alfredo Jaar; hip hoteliers and their dream designers; and the coolest of the Cruise collections Oicepaper* Interiors that help you work, rest and play, leading lights, fantasy fabrics and a dash of dictator décor ON SALE 12 OctObEr

L’Objet l-objet.com Loewe loewe.tv Loro Piana Tel: 44.20 7499 9300 (UK) loropiana.com Louis Vuitton Tel: 44.20 3214 9200 (UK) louisvuitton.com


Jacket, £500, by Cerruti 1881. Shirt, £155, by APC. Jeans, £195, by Dries Van Noten. Shoes, £475, by Lemaire. See page 386

Piaget Tel: 44.800 279 5110 (UK) piaget.com

Sportmax Tel: 44.20 7499 7902 (UK) sportmax.com

POC and Forth pocsports.com

Suzanne Syz Tel: 41.22 310 2084 (Switzerland) suzannesyz.ch

Pringle of Scotland Tel: 44.1450 360200 (UK) pringleofscotland.com

Q Quill London Tel: 44.20 7833 8562 (UK) quilllondon.com

R Rangemaster Tel: 44.800 804 6261 (UK) rangemaster.co.uk Republic of Fritz Hansen Tel: 45.48 172300 (Denmark) fritzhansen.com Reza Tel: 33.1 42 61 51 21 (France) alexandrereza.com Richard James Tel: 44.20 7434 0605 (UK) richardjames.co.uk Roche Bobois Tel: 44.20 7317 8829 (UK) roche-bobois.com Romo Tel: 44.1623 756699 (UK) romo.com Rosetta Getty rosettagetty.com

Lumini Tel: 55.21 3325 4959 (Brazil) lumini.com.br Luxury Living luxurylivingroup.com

M

MoKee Tel: 44.20 3876 6670 (UK) mokee.eu Molly Meg Tel: 44.20 7359 5655 (UK) mollymeg.com Molteni & C Tel: 44.20 7631 2345 (UK) molteni.it

Maison Deux Tel: 31.203 709 581 (Netherlands) maisondeux.com

Moroso Tel: 44.20 3328 3560 (UK) moroso.it

Marazzi Tel: 44.20 7686 7891 (UK) marazzigroup.com

Mum and Dad Factory mumanddadfactory.com

Margaret Howell Tel: 44.20 7009 9009 (UK) margarethowell.co.uk Marset Tel: 34.932 005 726 (Spain) marset.com Menu menu.as Microsoft microsoft.com Minotti Tel: 44.20 7323 3233 (UK) minotti.com

My 1st Years Tel: 44.20 3874 2225 (UK) my1styears.com

N Nanimarquina nanimarquina.com Native & Co Tel: 44.20 7243 0418 (UK) nativeandco.com

Nobodinoz nobodinoz.com Nude nudeglass.com Nurse Jamie nursejamie.com Nya Nordiska Tel: 49.5861 8090 (Germany) nya.com

O Oliver Spencer Tel: 44.20 7269 6467 (UK) oliverspencer.co.uk Olli Ella Tel: 44.20 7713 8668 (UK) olliella.com

P Paul Smith Tel: 44.20 7493 4565 (UK) paulsmith.com

Rubelli Tel: 44.20 7349 1590 (UK) rubelli.com

S Salle Privee salle-privee.com Scandibørn scandiborn.co.uk SCP Tel: 44.20 7739 1869 (UK) scp.co.uk Seletti Tel: 39.03 758 8561 (Italy) seletti.it

T The Conran Shop Tel: 44.20 7589 7401 (UK) conranshop.co.uk The Modern Nursery Tel: 44.7725 231904 (UK) themodernnursery.com Theory Tel: 44.20 7985 1188 (UK) theory.com The Photographers’ Gallery Tel: 44.20 7087 9300 (UK) thephotographersgallery.org.uk The Rug Company Tel: 44.20 7384 0980 (UK) therugcompany.com Tommy Jeans Tel: 44.20 7287 2703 (UK) tommy.com Twentytwentyone Tel: 44.20 7288 1996 (UK) twentytwentyone.com

V Valsecchi 1918 valsecchi1918.it Van Cleef & Arpels Tel: 44.20 7108 6210 (UK) vancleefarpels.com Vessel Tel: 44.20 7727 8001 (UK) vesselgallery.com Viaduct Tel: 44.20 7278 8456 (UK) viaduct.co.uk Vitra Tel: 44.20 7608 6300 (UK) vitra.com Vivienne Westwood Anglomania Tel: 44.20 7439 1109 (UK) viviennewestwood.com

W

Sephora sephora.com

Walter Knoll Tel: 49.7032 2080 (Germany) walterknoll.de

Serax Tel: 32.3458 0582 (Belgium) serax.com

Willer Tel: 44.20 7937 3518 (UK) willer.co.uk

Smeg Tel: 44.344 557 9907 (UK) smeg.com

WonderGlass Tel: 44.20 7462 6790 (UK) wonder-glass.com Woolrich woolrich.com

417


Artist’s Palate

BERNAR VENET’S Oeuf caviar

#86

Bernar Venet’s Corten steel sculptures have created dramatic statements at Versailles, Nice, New York and, most recently, in the grounds of Cliveden in Buckinghamshire. Their elegant forms relect a lifetime of careful study. ‘They take 65 years to consider, then it’s eight minutes to build the maquette, and up to three months to make them,’ he says. His oeuf caviar is equally considered: two elementally similar yet visually opposite ingredients, arranged in perfect harmony. It’s his dish of choice at the Michelin-starred Les Gorges de Pennafort, run by his friend Philippe Da Silva and located near Venet’s art foundation in Provence. Venet is fond of the dish’s simplicity. ‘It’s quick and visually sober, like my artwork.’ Venet is at Cliveden until 15 October, clivedenhouse.co.uk; and Frieze Masters, 5–8 October, frieze.com, blainsouthern.com. For his recipe, visit Wallpaper.com

Red granite plate, £87, by Willer. ‘Terrazzo’ platter, £69, by Serax, from The Conran Shop. Dinner fork, £15, by Louise Campbell, for Georg Jensen. ‘Mystone Bluestone’ tile in Grigio, from £41 per sq m, by Marazzi For stockists, see page 416

418

PHOTOGRAPHY: FELICITY MCCABE INTERIORS: MARIA SOBRINO FOOD: MAUD EDEN WRITER: TF CHAN


OCTOBER 2017

*THE STUFF THAT REFINES YOU

ENTER

Tap to rate us

Wallpaper october 2017  
Advertisement